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What to do with hair!

Camino(s) past & future
March 2018
#1
Hello!

I’m doing my first ever Camino in March and I’m sure this has been asked a thousand times but what do you all do with your hair?

Mine is very long, thick and goes frizzy. Obviously I won’t be taking a hairdryer so I was wondering how you all dried it? I’m worried I’ll catch a head cold from having a wet head all the time! Eek!

Thank you for reading!
 
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2, El Norte incompleto
#2
Hello!

I’m doing my first ever Camino in March and I’m sure this has been asked a thousand times but what do you all do with your hair?

Mine is very long, thick and goes frizzy. Obviously I won’t be taking a hairdryer so I was wondering how you all dried it? I’m worried I’ll catch a head cold from having a wet head all the time! Eek!

Thank you for reading!
I also have long, thick hair that tends to frizziness without blow drying. I walked during the summer both times, so I didn't really have much trouble with wet hair. After my shower I put my hair in my buff, while I dried off, and that took some of the moisture out. It shouldn't be that much of a problem in March though. Besides, you can't catch a cold from wet hair. :p
 
#3
Most people shower when they arrive at an albergue, so there is plenty of time for your hair to dry naturally before bed. And of course, you don't have to wash it everyday. I washed mine every 3 or 4 days. If it was sunny and warm, I made sure to wash it, then sit outside and let it dry. If it was a cold and/or wet day, I just didn't wash it - unless I stayed in a hotel, which I did about once a week - then I took an extra long hot shower, and washed and dried my hair. Occasionally I washed my hair when it was too cold to comfortably go around with wet hair until it dried, so I just wrapped it in my buff and went about the rest of my day.
 

surya8

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Portugues Central, Santarem-Santiago - 2017; Portugues Interior, Sanabres, Fisterra & Muxia - 2018
#7
My advice would be to take enough shampoo and especially good conditioner with you for the road. Don't go for easier options of just having one bar or soap for everything that some people do to get the load lighter. And a good towel or two. On my first Camino I took only one small light towel for body and hair and regretted not having another one to dry my heir properly. And conditioner ran out faster then I expected as well. Have a shower first thing you arrive to the albergue, then you have enough time to dry it.
 

SabineP

Camino = Empathy + Compassion.
Camino(s) past & future
some and then more. see my signature.
#8
My advice would be to take enough shampoo and especially good conditioner with you for the road. Don't go for easier options of just having one bar or soap for everything that some people do to get the load lighter. And a good towel or two. On my first Camino I took only one small light towel for body and hair and regretted not having another one to dry my heir properly. And conditioner ran out faster then I expected as well. Have a shower first thing you arrive to the albergue, then you have enough time to dry it.
With all respect but one soap for everything and one towel is perfectly doable.
Easier options are always better in my book.
Less is indeed more.
 
Camino(s) past & future
C. Francés (2004-), C. Portugués, C. de Madrid, 1/2 V. Plata, 1/8 Levante, hospitalera Grado 2016.
#10
My main hair problem on the Camino is that my long, fine hair tangles in the wind - very, very fast. But if I braid it tightly every morning, and only undo it for washing and sleeping, it stays OK much longer - and seems to need less washing than at home.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2020)
#11

Lirsy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo (2017), Norte (2017), Frances (2017), Portugues (2018), La Plata (2018)
#12
I think the problem will solve by itself once you are in the Camino!! :) :)

Remember rule one: Not too much weight!!! This rule prevents you of taking too many shampoos, conditioners, gels, etc...

Also is advisable to take a shower when you arrive to the albergue. First because you will need it :), second is because it is not a good idea to take showers just before you start walking. Your feet will then never be 100% dry and this is a well known cause of blisters.

Buen camino & Ultreia!!
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
#13
I just take an extra small travel towel for my hair as well as the larger one for general use. My hair is short so drying it isn't a problem but I do take 200ml of shampoo and only a small piece of soap. The shampoo doubles as shower gel. The small soap is for washing clothes, although shampoo works for that too.
 

ophelia

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Português Central - October 2017
Planning the Camino Português da Costa - May 2018!
#14
I walked the CP in late October and I also have long hair. Getting it dry was a concern for me as well, as I do not like to go to sleep with wet hair! I feel like I can't get warm enough to feel comfy. What I did was to wash it immediately as I got to the albergue, then leave it wrapped in the towel (I only took one towel with me, one of those sport type towel that dry you very fast and weight almost nothing, and having almost no volume as an object whatsoever). Then I would try to dry it even more with the towel and leave it to air dry. I did not wash it everyday, but I'm happy to say that it was always dry when I went to bed.
Style wise I would leave it as it is because most of the days I walked with my hat on and then would just brush it as normal. Nothing else. I don't style it at home anyway, so was a natural option for me.

Also I was lucky because despite the season, I only got sunny days!
 

hel&scott

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2004 St Jean - Santiago, 2008 &18 Seville - Finesterre, 2010 Ferrol - Lisbon, 2012 from Cartehenga.
#15
This is not a problem Scott ever encountered... But I have long hair and have to tie it up or the heat gets to me... Pigtails, sometimes in platts for days worked well. Failing that on the route from Cartehenga were I knew we would be sleeping out most nights I shaved my head to avoid having to worry about it. Worked a treat and only took a couple of years to regrow.
 
Camino(s) past & future
March 2018
#16
thanks all for your great advice!

Oh and just so you know...I’m British so I have an acute sense of sarcasm!

The head cold from wet hair comment, was me making fun of that common myth! Haha!

I just wanted to know what everyone did. My concern was that I’d have to go to sleep with wet hair! I think I’ll defini get a sports towel to wrap it in and I’ve also got a buff. Thank you!
 
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
#19
While I do not sport long hair, I can add to the excellent ideas above:

1. Maybe trim or cut you hair before the Camino to make it easier to care for and dry
2. Maybe bring a microfiber towel or even a specially made hair wrap to dry hair apres-shower
3. If staying in a commercial lodging, anything above a public albergue, ask at check-in if they might have a "secador del pelo" (sec-ah-door dehl pay-low). That is dryer for hair in Spanish. The full phrase would be "Tienes una secador del pelo?"

You would be surprised how many women just accept each day on Camino as a 'bad hair" day. Usually, you see them with a Buff or other sort of hair scarf or stretch band tying their hair back. They just rough it.;)

Hope this helps.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Portugués, Francés, Le Puy, Rota Vicentina, De Soulac, Norte, Madrid-Salv-Primitivo
#21
The full phrase would be "Tienes una secador del pelo?"
Not to derail the thread too much, but I’ve just started learning Spanish, and would like this phrase clarified please.

I know some French, so I understand the “Tu” and “Vous” for “You”.

Isn’t “Tienes” the familiar form of “do you have”? Wouldn’t you use the polite form “Tienen” when speaking to a receptionist? Or am I confused?
Jill
 

stgcph

Camino tortuga
Camino(s) past & future
CF (Aug/Sep 2017)
CF (Aug/Sep 2018)
#22
Not to derail the thread too much, but I’ve just started learning Spanish, and would like this phrase clarified please.

I know some French, so I understand the “Tu” and “Vous” for “You”.

Isn’t “Tienes” the familiar form of “do you have”? Wouldn’t you use the polite form “Tienen” when speaking to a receptionist? Or am I confused?
Jill
The correct formal form would be '(Usted) tiene..' ;)
 
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2, El Norte incompleto
#23
Not to derail the thread too much, but I’ve just started learning Spanish, and would like this phrase clarified please.

I know some French, so I understand the “Tu” and “Vous” for “You”.

Isn’t “Tienes” the familiar form of “do you have”? Wouldn’t you use the polite form “Tienen” when speaking to a receptionist? Or am I confused?
Jill
In Spain you would use the familiar form when addressing most anyone, except someone very senior to you or the king. :) At least that is what I was taught when I took a Spanish course in Barcelona.

And actually you can just say "¿hay una secadora de pelo?" (is there a hair dryer?)
You may notice there there are often signs in bars and other places saying things like "hay tortilla" rather than "tenemos tortilla".
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
#24
Isn’t “Tienes” the familiar form of “do you have”? Wouldn’t you use the polite form “Tienen” when speaking to a receptionist? Or am I confused?
I am not a native speaker, but learned Spanish in South America where the formal "usted" is used except for children or people you know well. However, in Spain it seems that the familiar "tu" and "vosotros" is the norm. I find it easier to use the formal, though (one less conjugation to learn!) I've been told that the Spaniards are fine with either.
 

stgcph

Camino tortuga
Camino(s) past & future
CF (Aug/Sep 2017)
CF (Aug/Sep 2018)
#25
Well, I guess this should not evolve into a thread on Spanish grammar and Spanish cultural norms, but I was also under the impression, that in Spain, when in any doubt, you use the formal (usted/ustedes) form. Maybe some of the native speakers can enlighten us..?

And by the way, @t2andreo, pronouncing ‘pelo’ as ‘pay-low’ is very American :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
#26
Not to derail the thread too much, but I’ve just started learning Spanish, and would like this phrase clarified please.

I know some French, so I understand the “Tu” and “Vous” for “You”.

Isn’t “Tienes” the familiar form of “do you have”? Wouldn’t you use the polite form “Tienen” when speaking to a receptionist? Or am I confused?
Jill
Tienes is the familiar or informal form of saying "you have." Adding the questioning lilt to your statement turns it into a question....do you have... The formal form I believe is "usted tiene..." The informal form is "tu tiene." But "tienes" is also used, instead of "tu tiene." That said, hay is also correct.

At least this is the way I am learning it. I am still learning. I was just trying to help...

"Tienen," I believe refers to multiples. For example, "do they have a hair dryer" might be "¿tienen un secador de pelo."

That said:

1. I am not a fluent or native speaker. I too am still learning and just trying to offer help. I added what I did, because no one else had, at that point, offered a simple phrase that would help.

2. I happily accept all grammatic advice and corrections.

Hope this helps.
 
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2, El Norte incompleto
#27
" The informal form is "tu tiene." But "tienes" is also used, instead of "tu tiene."
You wouldn't use tiene with tú. Tienes means you (informal) have. Tiene means you (formal), he or she has. You can't mix tiene with tú. Just like you can't say yo tiene. You must use the properly conjugated form of tener (to have), which is tengo, when you want to say I have.

I have - Yo tengo
You (formal), he or she have - usted, él o ella tiene
You (informal) have - tú tienes
We have - nosotros(as) tenemos
They have or you(as a formal group) have - ellos, ellas or ustedes tienen
You (as an informal group) have - vosotros tenéis

Of course this is all just present tense...
 

Helen1

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
London to Santiago (2014)
Narbonne to Oloron (2015)
Camino Portugues (2016)
Sentier Cathar (2017)
#28
Hi Rachie Bee, I have long fine hair and despite all the evidence telling me it's impossible to get a cold from wet hair - I tend to end up with head colds from wet hair too.

No reason why you can't take a hairdryer... I went on a trip in November (not a camino) and a lady there took her hairdryer and was immediately everyone's best friend because when we got wet and cold it was the best thing ever - dried our shoes/clothes and warmed up our chilly damp room! A Babyliss Travel 2000 is 427g an ipad is 730g... all depends on your priorities but donate some extra money for the electricity.

If you finish walking early in the day and shower there will be time for your hair to dry naturally. Those microfibre turbans - around 60g for a light one - also do a good job and dry quickly. A lot of people take a lot of stuff on their caminos, it might not be sensible but most people seem to survive ok. You can have a back to basics experience if that's what you but you can choose to carry more.

Helen
 
Camino(s) past & future
please see signature
#30
what do you all do with your hair?
I can only speak for myself, a male of the species.

It is my understanding that hair is aways growing.

On this understanding my approach is to get a number 1 cut shortly before leaving home.

It does solve a number of issues.

Kia kaha (take care, be strong, get going)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015); Camino Norte/Primitivo (2016); Camino Frances (2017); Le Puy (June 2018)
#31
With all respect but one soap for everything and one towel is perfectly doable.
Easier options are always better in my book.
Less is indeed more.
I did just fine with just "one" bar and "one" small towel for everything. I loved the "less is more" approach as it was so much easier.
 

Chacharm

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Via Frances (2012) Vie Del Norte (2015) Via Frances (2016) Le Puy (2017)
#32
Hello!

I’m doing my first ever Camino in March and I’m sure this has been asked a thousand times but what do you all do with your hair?

Mine is very long, thick and goes frizzy. Obviously I won’t be taking a hairdryer so I was wondering how you all dried it? I’m worried I’ll catch a head cold from having a wet head all the time! Eek!

Thank you for reading!
Every year, before I go on Camino, I get a Brazillian Blowout. It is expensive! But I don't have to worry about blow drying my hair, it dries much faster and there is NO FRIZZ. Get one of those little hair towels they sell in beauty shops - they're super absorbent and very lightweight and fast drying.
And many albuergues have a blow dryer. You'll worry about it less than you think.
 

JennyH94

Pilgrim in progress
Camino(s) past & future
The Frances from Pamplona and part VF, first-aid helper and hospitalera
#33
I like my bar shampoo so much that it's all that I use now.
Hi Trecile - could you let me know what brand of bar shampoo you use please? I'd be really interested to know. Perhaps you could PM me as I'm not sure if the Mods are keen to see brand names publicly.
Thanks and cheers from Oz -
Jenny
 

Momonne

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte, Primtivo, Portuguese, VDLP
#34
Every year, before I go on Camino, I get a Brazillian Blowout. It is expensive! But I don't have to worry about blow drying my hair, it dries much faster and there is NO FRIZZ. Get one of those little hair towels they sell in beauty shops - they're super absorbent and very lightweight and fast drying.
And many albuergues have a blow dryer. You'll worry about it less than you think.
I would be much more concerned about the risks of cancer for the Brazilian keratein treatement that any curls. Those are some nasty chemicals in there.
 
#36
For the recommendation to get a short cut to make your hair easier to deal with - I think that if you go very short, this works, but not if you go short-ish. Short-ish hair is the hardest to deal with on the Camino, especially for us curly girls - it just seems to need the most product and the most styling to look decent, and if it's not long enough put up, you are stuck with it. If it's super short, you are good - dries fast, not enough of it to really look freaky. If it is long enough to pull back in a bun or braid, you are good - it will take longer for your hair to dry, but if you keep it back, you won't have to wash it often.
 
Camino(s) past & future
C Frances 2005, 2007
Le Puy en Velay -SdC 2009
Via de la Plata 2011
gr 653 from Oloron to Puente la Reina 2012
Gr65 from le Puy to Figeac 2013
Irun to Santander 2013
Porto to SdC 2014
Astorga to SdC 2015
#37
On my first camino in 2005 I had long hair, on my next and since then hairlength 1-2 cm!Daylylife was easier then!
 

hel&scott

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2004 St Jean - Santiago, 2008 &18 Seville - Finesterre, 2010 Ferrol - Lisbon, 2012 from Cartehenga.
#39
Um.. Is it just me or have I missed something as I thought getting a Brazilian was somethings else entirely.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francis 2012, 2014, 2016, 2018. Many more to come in my future God willing !
#40
I vote for shaving it off as well. Really works well. No combs or brushes needed !!!!!!!!!!
 

Anamya

Keeping it simple
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015)
Camino Portugues (2017)
Lebaniego (Planning)
#43
First day into my camino, I washed it for the first time and realised I did not have a comb. So, not only I spent the next 6 days drying it naturally, but also not combing! (until we stopped in an inn that had those free plastic ones with the toiletry kit).

Sincerely? After one wash with conditioner (also from the inn`s toiletry kit) it was all good and all new. And no one ever thought anything about my hair - I was a pilgrim, a hiker, so that totally did not matter.

I work well dressed and with make up every day. It was weird in the beggining. I felt like I needed at least a lipstick, or some combing. Nah, walking almost 3 weeks with only sunscreen was one of the most freeing experiences ever! :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances-(2013/14/18
Camino Salvado Perth -(2015)
West Highland Way (2016)
Lyon France 2017
#44
Jenny Heesh.....the bar shampoo/soap I use is the Dark Blue one from the Lush shops here in Australia.
 
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2, El Norte incompleto
#45
Hi Trecile - could you let me know what brand of bar shampoo you use please? I'd be really interested to know. Perhaps you could PM me as I'm not sure if the Mods are keen to see brand names publicly.
Thanks and cheers from Oz -
Jenny
I have actually bought shampoo bars from several Etsy sellers, and have been happy with all of them. I initially tried the "all natural" shampoo/soap bars, but I didn't like the way that they left my hair, and I'm too lazy to do an apple cider vinegar rinse, plus that's not too practical on the Camino. So I switched to the syndet type shampoo bars, which I believe are similar to the Lush bars, but less expensive.
Here are some that I've bought from. I'm sure that there are Etsy sellers in Australia selling similar bars.
https://www.etsy.com/shop/ScenterSquare
https://www.etsy.com/shop/GetLathered
https://www.etsy.com/shop/LakeSuperiorSoap

And I've been using a conditioner bar from this seller: https://www.etsy.com/listing/543187...query=conditioner+bar&ref=shop_items_search_2
 

Gumba

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF with my husband and two boys in March 2018
Planning a winter CF in 2019/2020
#46
Hi Trecile - could you let me know what brand of bar shampoo you use please? I'd be really interested to know. Perhaps you could PM me as I'm not sure if the Mods are keen to see brand names publicly.
Thanks and cheers from Oz -
Jenny
I second Lush. The shampoo bar is very sudsy (is that a word?) I also use their conditioning bar - no suds, doesn't feel like it is doing anything but I don't have a single knot after using it (better than my regular liquid conditioner). Apparently the soaps are very fresh so buy them a month or two in advance and keep them unwrapped to dry out before you begin using them. This way they last longer as they are harder. Have a look at their web site.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2017
Camino de Saint Jacques 2018
#47
Hi. I walked in August, summer I know. I have long, frizzy knotty hair. I washed it every day as I wore a hat so I sweated profusely. I was completely covered up from the sun as have had lots of skin cancers in the past. It was the first time since I was a child that I didn't use hair conditioner. I just used shampoo and a child's plastic de tangler brush. I never use soap anyway so just used Nivea cream after the shower. I carried all my toiletries in a small bumbag around my waist as my small backpack was full. I did take a larger microfibres towel which was great for my hair.
 

TaraWalks

Peregrina without a skateboard
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2016 & 2018, planning for Le Puy 2019/2020ish and for some shorter Caminos stacked
#48
With all respect but one soap for everything and one towel is perfectly doable.
Easier options are always better in my book.
Less is indeed more.

Yep! I'm a fan of the Lush shampoo bars. I use them for my hair and my washing. I'm getting a shorter haircut too. I have very long straight hair that will get pretty unruly anyway.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Portuguese Camino (2016), French Camino (2015), Northern Camino (2017)
#50
Hello!

I’m doing my first ever Camino de Santiago in March and I’m sure this has been asked a thousand times but what do you all do with your hair?

Mine is very long, thick and goes frizzy. Obviously I won’t be taking a hairdryer so I was wondering how you all dried it? I’m worried I’ll catch a head cold from having a wet head all the time during the Camino de Santiago! Eek!

Thank you for reading!
I would bring a small hairdryer with me during the trip, not only for the hair, but because during the Camino it will definitely rain and you will be able to dry your clothes and shoes, and it's a quick fix for when you need to wash and dry underwear. For me it's on the must-packing list.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances from SJPP 2015, 2016, 2018
Way of St. Francis, Italy April 2017
Portuguese/Finister (2018)
#51
I’ve walked two full Caminos and only saw one person using a blow dryer in an Albergue. It was unusal enough that I remember the person and the place. It’s really not needed. I walked both April/May and Sept./Oct. I just embraced my wild side (and used bands and barrettes.) One of my favorite things about the Camino is giving up the stuff...... it’s freeing.
 

Jodean

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
22 Sept. to 21 Oct. 2015, Pamplona to Santiago
6-23.04 Porto to Santiago 2018
17.09-30.09 CF 2018
#52
Kept my fine, but thick, below shoulder hair braided all day, tucked up in my cap and washed every other day or so. Depended on if was a hot, sweaty day or not. It was usually dry by bedtime as we would walk around town or sit in the sun.
I brought shampoo and conditioner. The amount of weight is negligible.
Seems lots of people are bringing tiny blow dryers, so if you want to, see if you can find a lightweight travel one. Sometimes just a couple of minutes is enough to get your hair dried quicker.
 

Stivandrer

Perambulating & Curious. Rep stravaiging offender
Camino(s) past & future
I´ve got Camino plans until 2042,
- or till I fall flat on my face, whichever comes first !!
#57
Hello!

I’m doing my first ever Camino in March and I’m sure this has been asked a thousand times but what do you all do with your hair?

Mine is very long, thick and goes frizzy. Obviously I won’t be taking a hairdryer so I was wondering how you all dried it? I’m worried I’ll catch a head cold from having a wet head all the time! Eek!

Thank you for reading!
use an extra buff for the hair*bulk* - this will keep wet hair collected on top whilst drying.
You might be looking like an African princess, however, but that is to be risked !

Buff for neck, use wool, for head use synthetic, I always carry extras!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (2018)
#58
With all respect but one soap for everything and one towel is perfectly doable.
Easier options are always better in my book.
Less is indeed more.
I'm not sure what texture your hair is, but my thick, wavy hair turns to frizzy straw if it's not babied with two types of conditioner (deep conditioner in the shower, then leave-in conditioner) and oil. And it saturates a towel on its own to the point that I can wring out the towel and get a stream of water. Yes, it's heavy to carry all of that, but I'd rather save weight elsewhere.
 

RumAndChupacabras

"Looking Forward To 6 Weeks in 2019"
Camino(s) past & future
Jul-Aug 2019 Norte Apr. 2018: Oviedo, Santo Toribio, Covadonga, Garabandal May/Jun 2016: Portuguese
#59
Buffs, braids, ponytails, get some dry shampoo there...more Buffs!
 

Chacharm

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Via Frances (2012) Vie Del Norte (2015) Via Frances (2016) Le Puy (2017)
#60
I would be much more concerned about the risks of cancer for the Brazilian keratein treatement that any curls. Those are some nasty chemicals in there.
Brazillian isn't Keratin.
 
Camino(s) past & future
April 2016
#61
Hello!

I’m doing my first ever Camino in March and I’m sure this has been asked a thousand times but what do you all do with your hair?

Mine is very long, thick and goes frizzy. Obviously I won’t be taking a hairdryer so I was wondering how you all dried it? I’m worried I’ll catch a head cold from having a wet head all the time! Eek!

Thank you for reading!
You can cut it short, no one will know the difference. If you walk for five weeks your hair will be back to normal.
 
Camino(s) past & future
February (2018)
#62
My main hair problem on the Camino is that my long, fine hair tangles in the wind - very, very fast. But if I braid it tightly every morning, and only undo it for washing and sleeping, it stays OK much longer - and seems to need less washing than at home.
Thanks, HeidiL - that's exactly my plan for my upcoming February-start. I've very long, fine hair, and plan to keep it in tight braids for as long as I can between washes (and Buff over it when it gets too unruly in between!).
 
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2, El Norte incompleto
#63
You can cut it short, no one will know the difference. If you walk for five weeks your hair will be back to normal.
Says the man without long hair. ;)
I never found my long, thick wavy/frizzy hair to be a problem. Sometimes looking in a mirror was though. :D
When it was cool I left it down, and when it was hot I put it up in a clip.
 

Lucy Longpath

Lucy Longpath
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015), Puy Way (2016), North Wales Pilgrims Way (2017), Camino Vezelay(2018) &(2019)
#64
Hello!

I’m doing my first ever Camino in March and I’m sure this has been asked a thousand times but what do you all do with your hair?

Mine is very long, thick and goes frizzy. Obviously I won’t be taking a hairdryer so I was wondering how you all dried it? I’m worried I’ll catch a head cold from having a wet head all the time! Eek!

Thank you for reading!
I have long thick dark hair. I wear it in two plaits during the day time to keep it out of my way and so the wind won't blow it around too much. I washed it about once a week which is normal for me. I never use a hair dryer at home so did not really think about it being wet. I just towel dry it a bit although that is not so effective with a tiny travel towel. Sometimes we stayed in a hotel so when we did I usually chose to wash it there so I could have a proper towel to help dry it. I only took one small shampoo to start the trip and then acquired more at hotels and other places we stayed (not in the albergues).
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(x4), Fisterra/Muxía(x2), VdlP, Jerusalem, VF, Walsingham,
C inglés. 2019? Who knows! ;-)
#65
I'm not sure what texture your hair is, but my thick, wavy hair turns to frizzy straw if it's not babied with two types of conditioner (deep conditioner in the shower, then leave-in conditioner) and oil. And it saturates a towel on its own to the point that I can wring out the towel and get a stream of water. Yes, it's heavy to carry all of that, but I'd rather save weight elsewhere.
Sorry but your hair is just...hair.... I'm sure you can manage, somehow... try! :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
#67
Heck, I still HAVE hair. SO all is well.
I do not sweat the small stuff. Keeping it clean and dry is definitely small stuff...o_O
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
#69
You can cut it short, no one will know the difference. If you walk for five weeks your hair will be back to normal.
My hair is curly and fairly short. I just have it extra short for the Camino and it is back to normal by the time I return home. However our daughter has long hair and keeps hers plaited during the day and dries it that way when needed as far as I know. (Goes to Africa not the Camino)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances starting SJPdP Sept/Oct 2015, April/May 2017
#72
We all had similar sorts of questions before our first camino, or at least I did. Alas they were not about long or thick hair, but I was used to showering and washing my hair every morning. That’s what we do in Australia as a general rule. Well maybe not the hair stuff but usually the shower stuff. I’d done it for more years than I care to admit or remember. Found it almost impossible to contemplate showering in the afternoon, sleeping, and then walking the next morning. Huh? Turns out the camino teaches heaps of lessons. The least being that it’s OK to get up and go. So be reassured that it will be OK.
Buen camino, peregrina. :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
St Olav/Francés ('16)
Baztanés/Francés ('17)
Ingles ('18)
#76
This year I met a english girl and she did it and she was still pretty
It's the eyes that you really notice when the hair is out of the picture.
And no need to really go radical with a razor. An extremely short cut will do the trick, and the freedom from hassle is delicious.
 
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La Brique Jaune

Official member of la confradia del pinza del oro
Camino(s) past & future
2017: SJPDP to Finisterre
(201?): I hope and need to
#77
It's the eyes that you really notice when the hair is out of the picture.
And no need to really go radical wiht a razor. An extremely short cut will do the trick, and the freedom from hassle is delicious.

Yes Like we say the eyes are windows to the soul..when forgot all the physical we began to understand each others no matters our differences
 
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Kurt5280

Crazy Enough To Try It Again!
Camino(s) past & future
Frances: SJPDP to Finisterre & Muxia 9/15 (MTB) - Norte: Bayonne to Muxia & Finisterre 9/18 (MTB)
#78
Before my Camino I cut my hair down military style...but I did not shave or cut my hair for 4-weeks...so I returned home with long messy hair and a full beard.
 

lindacube

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte, Camino Costa, Camino Central (all 2017); Camino Primitivo + Norte (July 2018)
#79
Hi! Gonna add my little bit of expertise. I forgot my towel in Fisterra and was walking back to Porto still so needs it for about 10 more days - and so experimented quite a bit with what to dry my long hair with. Found out that a long sleeved t-shirt (which i got from a lovely elderly German pilgrim as i dint forget just my towel, but two t-shirts, socks and a dress that I loved to hike in) from Tezenis was a godsend. I walked in it frequently as well and it dried super fast after washing. Don't know how it worked but it absorbed the water from my hair much quicker than my previous microfibre towel. (btw don't try to use the one use bedsheets as a towel - bad idea). Later I bought a t-shirt and i switched between wearing, drying from washing and using it as a towel. The other days I used one of my two scarves that I use as everything from pillow, to turbans/hats, extra layers when its cold, etc.

My hair gets tangled super fast even though it's totally straight but i still decided to try an ego the less weight way and got just a bar of shampoo soap for everything (usually can't deal without conditioner, can't even brush my hair after washing it). After a few days found out that I could wash my hair every two to four days and sometimes I actually washed it on the Way by taking a dip somewhere (usually freezing cold), even in the ocean (Portuguese Coastal way and parts of Norte) plus rivers and ponds i saw along the way and then just using a bit of water from my water bottle to wash away the salt. Did miracles for my hair, when I returned home after a month, my hair was amazingly strong and didn't tangle as much. Also PLAITS. PLAITS are a girls best friend on the Camino. Sometimes i kept the same ones on for two to three days, looked okayish (no one is a supermodel while they are a peregrine as well) and was struggle -free.

Hope this helps! I just trust the Camino to provide me with some way of keeping my hair under wraps and I try and help other peregrines in allergies. Helping others untangle their hair and brush it gently after a tangled shower gets you bonuses like head massages etc. :D
 

Ronald H

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2012
#80
Hello!

I’m doing my first ever Camino in March and I’m sure this has been asked a thousand times but what do you all do with your hair?

Mine is very long, thick and goes frizzy. Obviously I won’t be taking a hairdryer so I was wondering how you all dried it? I’m worried I’ll catch a head cold from having a wet head all the time! Eek!

Thank you for reading!
I have always said, the size of ones pack is directly related to ones vanity. Take the opportunity and cut it off! You are on the Camino! Have fun!
 
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2, El Norte incompleto
#82
I have always said, the size of ones pack is directly related to ones vanity. Take the opportunity and cut it off! You are on the Camino! Have fun!
Honestly, long hair is much easier for me to deal with on the Camino. I just put it up in a clip when it's hot, or leave it down when it's cold.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013)
#83
Cold weather doesn’t make you sick, germs do, but research suggests that cold weather can create conditions that help those germs survive and thrive....so, she has not been BS ing you after all :)
Thanks! I was just scrolling down this thread planning to weigh in on this argument and along came your post. I agree with you. Personally I look at it this way: a wet head in cold weather puts a certain amount of stress on the body, stress lowers one's resistance, making one more susceptible to the germs lurking about. (But I prefer the way you've put it.) :):):)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Ch. d'Arles: Oloron Ste Marie to Aragones; Frances (2016); V.d.l.P.; Sanabres (2017)
#84
what do you all do with your hair?
The camino has changed my life in various ways, as I become much more flexible in what I need and what I used to think I need. About my hair: long, washed with shampoo and conditioned and braided for many years. I tried the advice of one pilgrim before my first camino to just use Ivory soap for everything. It took two shampoos to get the soap out. Then I tried using my regular shampoo but washing less frequently and omitting conditioner. This saved on carrying more shampoo and any conditioner. Now I know that Ivory soap (my regular) will last for a couple of months in Spain and can be used for hand washing clothes. So I can take just one bar of Ivory soap and a small container of shampoo on camino (I soap my hair once and it is clean enough without drying out). My suggestion: experiment before you go, with an open mind and the goal of keeping your pack as light as possible. And remember that you can buy needed replacements in Spain. Buen camino.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (Sept 2016)
SDC/ Finesterre/ Muxia (2016)
#85
"As you know, colds are caused by viruses. There's no evidence that wet hair acts as a magnet for viruses"

as a Western Medical practitioner, we know this is "true", however, in Traditional Chinese Medicine
Wind Cold Damp can allow invasion of an External Pathogen in susceptible people- hence the cold virus
just another take
Nancy
 

T-Camino

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2016
#86
I have long hair. Lush shampoo bars worked for me along the way. Get a little tin for them to go in and they last and don't get your pack wet. I took 2 and they lasted me the whole way (St Jean- Muxia) :)

Like others have said, shower as you get in and your hair will dry rather quickly

They have lots of different types of the shampoo bar so you can find one that works for your hair. If you go in and ask really nicely, sometimes they let you take a sample home to try (we ended up with quite a bit)

https://uk.lush.com/products/shampoo

Buen camino
 
Camino(s) past & future
2014 St Jean - Santo Domingo: 2013 Leon - Sarria: 2011 Sarria - Santiago
2015 Planning Santo Domingo to Leon.
#87
I go to the hairdresser every few days .... it brings a little business to the hairdressers. Buen Camino.
 
Camino(s) past & future
April-May 2018
#89
Every year, before I go on Camino, I get a Brazillian Blowout. It is expensive! But I don't have to worry about blow drying my hair, it dries much faster and there is NO FRIZZ. Get one of those little hair towels they sell in beauty shops - they're super absorbent and very lightweight and fast drying.
And many albuergues have a blow dryer. You'll worry about it less than you think.
I have shoulder length hair on which I do a keratin treatment a couple of times a year. Usually I use a keratin shampoo. I’d love to take a shampoo bar and use it for everything, but am curious if a particular type would be better with the keratin treatment (I know that Lush has different types).
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances
SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia, May 2016
C. Frances, Sept 2017
Via de La Plata (spring, 2019)
#91
And it isn't about looks or vanity to need conditioner for long hair. I recommend bar shampoo and conditioner.
 

JMac56

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(2015)
CF+Fis(2016)
CP:Porto-SdC-Mux-Fis(2017)
CF:Leon-SdC(2017)
CF+Mux+Fis(2018)
#92
Oh, to have that problem! Thank goodness for the buff! ;)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
#93
Today I got a haircut. My hairdresser asked "Is this going to be a regular cut, or a going-away cut?" I said it was regular, but the next one will be a going-away (shorter) one.
 

Anamiri

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances
#94
I have long fine blond hair. It doesn't grow fast, so I dont cut it often as it takes so long to grow back. It tangles like crazy but at home because Im lazy, I put it in a pony tail most of the time if its windy. So for my first Camino, I tied it in a ponytail or put it in braids. Washed it quite infrequently (clearly my standards drop on a Camino). Being out in the sun for so long so it does get quite dry which probably doesn't help the tangling.I didnt care if I walked around with wet hair when I did wash it. But I found it kept catching on my pack, not all the time, but enough to be annoying.
For the next Camino, I chopped about 3 inches off the bottom, it still hasn't grown back but I dont care. It solved the problem, I still didnt wash it all that often and still wore it tied up.
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
#95
Is that a medical opinion..? ;););)

My wife does in cold weather. :eek:
When people are in close proximity to each other for extended periods, with little fresh air ventilation and lots of sneezing and coughing. :)
 

Chacharm

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Via Frances (2012) Vie Del Norte (2015) Via Frances (2016) Le Puy (2017)
#97
I have shoulder length hair on which I do a keratin treatment a couple of times a year. Usually I use a keratin shampoo. I’d love to take a shampoo bar and use it for everything, but am curious if a particular type would be better with the keratin treatment (I know that Lush has different types).
They do - but I can't say it did my hair any favors on Camino. It smelled really good tho, hah! I think a better idea would be to only take a small thing of safe shampoo and just not actually wash your hair much - get it wet, just don't use any sort of shampoo.
 

Chacharm

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Via Frances (2012) Vie Del Norte (2015) Via Frances (2016) Le Puy (2017)
#98
I have long fine blond hair. It doesn't grow fast, so I dont cut it often as it takes so long to grow back. It tangles like crazy but at home because Im lazy, I put it in a pony tail most of the time if its windy. So for my first Camino, I tied it in a ponytail or put it in braids. Washed it quite infrequently (clearly my standards drop on a Camino). Being out in the sun for so long so it does get quite dry which probably doesn't help the tangling.I didnt care if I walked around with wet hair when I did wash it. But I found it kept catching on my pack, not all the time, but enough to be annoying.
For the next Camino, I chopped about 3 inches off the bottom, it still hasn't grown back but I dont care. It solved the problem, I still didnt wash it all that often and still wore it tied up.
I do too. I have walked with a pony tail that caught, and short hair I couldn't pull back at all - which whipped into my face all day and scratched my neck. I think the best I ever came up with was to put it in a pony tail/bun and tuck it all under a cap.
 
Camino(s) past & future
April-May 2018
#99
They do - but I can't say it did my hair any favors on Camino. It smelled really good tho, hah! I think a better idea would be to only take a small thing of safe shampoo and just not actually wash your hair much - get it wet, just don't use any sort of shampoo.
Thanks for the advice! Smelling good could be a benefit...
 

FastDB

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte
I have a portable hair straightener for long trips. My hair is wavy but I like it better when it's straightened. My hairstyle is important for me, so I always take my shampoo and other care products with me. It's really helping me out while going out somewhere. Monica helped me to choose an appropriate tool on her blog. My Ukliss USB mini flat Iron doesn`t take much space and allows to straighten my locks without spending a lot of time.
 

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