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Luggage Transfer Correos

What's In Your bag...hmmm

02crofton

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
April 2019
Hi Everybody,

I want to open up a nice little forum regarding 'What you pack' for your Camino walk in the Months of April & May which is Spring time...

We have done a lot of reading and research probably like everybody else that has been on the walk and even planning...
We are almost certain to what we will bring now as we have dwindled it down so we have the necessities and not the weight!!

But we are curious what other people that have already done the walk packed and what they think they could of left or brought extra...

just to add... to make the thread a little more interesting... what is the weirdest/strangest thing you have packed too...

Cant wait to hear your replies.

Thanks to everyone that contributes.
 

mspath

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
Here's my list which has worked well for 10 years.
http://mermore.blogspot.fr/p/kit-and-tips.html

As for an unexpected item
some of us carry the 'little luxury' of an electric water heating coil. See various posts here regarding using it (or not) and viable alternates as well as appropriate types of cups. As with most camino equipment the choice is large.

Happy brewing and Buen Camino!
 
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RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
I can tell you you a few items I have left at albergues on the donativo table.
Pants, shirts, fleece jacket, fleece blanket, belt, mesh laundry bag, small torch, bars of soap, paperback book (not because of weight, but because it sucked :D ), socks, cotton underwear.
 

nidarosa

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Inglés 2009+2017, Francés 2012+2018, Astorga-Santiago repeatedly
Not a concrete packing list, but an observation: This weekend I went to a pilgrim meeting where a fellow veteran peregrino presented his finely tuned packing list by simply showing and telling what was in his pack. Very interesting, and a very well thought out and functional list, but I couldn't help but observe that it was almost exactly the opposite of mine! He recommended leather boots, I wear non-waterproof Hokas. He uses a rain jacket, trousers and pack cover, I prefer a poncho. He prefers techical shirts, I take merino. He is happy with all-purpose soap, I like my shampoo bar. He swears by a hat to protect his head from the sun, I hate having anything on my head and take an umbrella for rain and sun ... we did agree that walking poles were essential, though I swear by my Pacerpoles!
Basically our approach to keeping dry, warm and comfortable was very different, but when I chatted to him afterwards, we agreed that both of us were very happy with our choices and wouldn't change a thing - in fact we have both walked hundreds of miles each with only minor tweaks depending on wear, tear and time of year.
Best tip is - walk, walk and walk in and with what you intend to take, then replace what doesn't work. Hand wash your walking gear after a walk, dry it and wear it again in the morning for another walk. It's the only way you'll know!
 

Geodoc

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (crossed Pyrenees then Sarria to SdC) 2018, Frances & Ingles Summer, 2019.
We walked the CF last May. Layering is essential. We had merino base layers (both short and long sleeve) with a fleece shirt and a long-sleeve shirt, with the final layer being a rain jacket. A fleece pullover hat with a ball-cap that fit under the rain jacket hood, and glove liners with fingerless mittens - kept me warm and dry on those mornings where the temps started at freezing and barely got above that.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
Not a concrete packing list, but an observation: This weekend I went to a pilgrim meeting where a fellow veteran peregrino presented his finely tuned packing list by simply showing and telling what was in his pack. Very interesting, and a very well thought out and functional list, but I couldn't help but observe that it was almost exactly the opposite of mine! He recommended leather boots, I wear non-waterproof Hokas. He uses a rain jacket, trousers and pack cover, I prefer a poncho. He prefers techical shirts, I take merino. He is happy with all-purpose soap, I like my shampoo bar. He swears by a hat to protect his head from the sun, I hate having anything on my head and take an umbrella for rain and sun ... we did agree that walking poles were essential, though I swear by my Pacerpoles!
My packing list is very similar to yours, merino, shampoo bar, umbrella and Pacer Poles. Probably because when I was gathering information about gear for my first Camino I read a lot of your posts! 😀
 

02crofton

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
April 2019
Here's my list which has worked well for 10 years.
http://mermore.blogspot.fr/p/kit-and-tips.html

As for an unexpected item
some of us carry the 'little luxury' of an electric water heating coil. See various posts here regarding using it (or not) and viable alternates as well as appropriate types of cups. As with most camino equipment the choice is large.

Happy brewing and Buen Camino!
Awesome List! Mighty thanks... 6.5 kilos- for all of that!! Wow sounded heavier— good job! Although we willl be travelling in spring so I think we are only going to bring 1 long sleeve each...
 

02crofton

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
April 2019
Just a heads up that a lot of rucksacks have a whistle built inyo one of the upper strap buckles.....👍
Still choosing between an Osprey Talon or possibly a Quecha... leaning more towards the ever so growing popular brand Osprey! If it has a whistle which I didn’t notice when I was trying on the bp’s!! But if they do happy days chooo chooo 🚂🚂
 

02crofton

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
April 2019
Not a concrete packing list, but an observation: This weekend I went to a pilgrim meeting where a fellow veteran peregrino presented his finely tuned packing list by simply showing and telling what was in his pack. Very interesting, and a very well thought out and functional list, but I couldn't help but observe that it was almost exactly the opposite of mine! He recommended leather boots, I wear non-waterproof Hokas. He uses a rain jacket, trousers and pack cover, I prefer a poncho. He prefers techical shirts, I take merino. He is happy with all-purpose soap, I like my shampoo bar. He swears by a hat to protect his head from the sun, I hate having anything on my head and take an umbrella for rain and sun ... we did agree that walking poles were essential, though I swear by my Pacerpoles!
Basically our approach to keeping dry, warm and comfortable was very different, but when I chatted to him afterwards, we agreed that both of us were very happy with our choices and wouldn't change a thing - in fact we have both walked hundreds of miles each with only minor tweaks depending on wear, tear and time of year.
Best tip is - walk, walk and walk in and with what you intend to take, then replace what doesn't work. Hand wash your walking gear after a walk, dry it and wear it again in the morning for another walk. It's the only way you'll know!
Hey Nidarosa, thanks for the contribution - each to their own everyone is different your words are true, so we take each comment either with a pinch of salt and sprinkle of pepper and spice it up with what best suits our food!( u know what I mean)this is going to be our first and hopefully not last so it’s vital we try our best to get things to the best of our knowledge and just go for it!! Rock on 🤘
 

02crofton

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
April 2019
I can tell you you a few items I have left at albergues on the donativo table.
Pants, shirts, fleece jacket, fleece blanket, belt, mesh laundry bag, small torch, bars of soap, paperback book (not because of weight, but because it sucked :D ), socks, cotton underwear.
... so basically you left like u came into this world... in your Birthday suit!! 😂 thanks for the post RJM - as your Vet, what u recommend clothes wise for spring
 
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02crofton

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
April 2019
We walked the CF last May. Layering is essential. We had merino base layers (both short and long sleeve) with a fleece shirt and a long-sleeve shirt, with the final layer being a rain jacket. A fleece pullover hat with a ball-cap that fit under the rain jacket hood, and glove liners with fingerless mittens - kept me warm and dry on those mornings where the temps started at freezing and barely got above that.
Thanks for that... we were thinking it would be quite warm on spring mornings... might debate to take another long sleeve now... hmmmm valuable info thanks member!! 👍
 

Shazenalan

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2018
Still choosing between an Osprey Talon or possibly a Quecha... leaning more towards the ever so growing popular brand Osprey! If it has a whistle which I didn’t notice when I was trying on the bp’s!! But if they do happy days chooo chooo 🚂🚂
I can recomend Osprey. My pack developed an irritating sqeak after a year of use - but I have heard ( today as it happens) that they will replace the pack for me. Ker-ching. 😊
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
... so basically you left like u came into this world... in your Birthday suit!! 😂 thanks for the post RJM - as your a bet, what u recommend clothes wise for spring
Layers. Light weight and quick drying. Fleeces, puff jacket, tech shirts, shorts etc. I like carrying two pairs convertible pants myself.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2019)
I sweat regardless of the temperature so I'm taking an extra light weight shirt so I can change shirts at lunch for a bit of midday comfort. I don't know what to expect in the Pyrenees in April so I'm bringing a pair of ratty old long johns and gloves which I won't mind trashing after the Pyrenees.
Otherwise if I avoid all the advice I'm getting from non-hikers about extras I should carry, I should be able to keep my pack light!
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
I sweat regardless of the temperature so I'm taking an extra light weight shirt so I can change shirts at lunch for a bit of midday comfort. I don't know what to expect in the Pyrenees in April so I'm bringing a pair of ratty old long johns and gloves which I won't mind trashing after the Pyrenees.
Otherwise if I avoid all the advice I'm getting from non-hikers about extras I should carry, I should be able to keep my pack light!
Check out merino wool shirts - they truly don't get as stinky as the synthetic tech fabrics.
 

Linda Fantillo

RiverWalker
Camino(s) past & future
September/October 14, May 17, September 18
Here's my list which has worked well for 10 years.
http://mermore.blogspot.fr/p/kit-and-tips.html

As for an unexpected item
some of us carry the 'little luxury' of an electric water heating coil. See various posts here regarding using it (or not) and viable alternates as well as appropriate types of cups. As with most camino equipment the choice is large.

Happy brewing and Buen Camino!
Have read your list and tips several times, but never tire of it. Common sense and experience!
 

02crofton

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
April 2019
I can recomend Osprey. My pack developed an irritating sqeak after a year of use - but I have heard ( today as it happens) that they will replace the pack for me. Ker-ching. 😊
It wasnt the mouse then.... hehe - thanks for contributing
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
Hi Everybody,

I want to open up a nice little forum regarding 'What you pack' for your Camino walk in the Months of April & May which is Spring time...

We have done a lot of reading and research probably like everybody else that has been on the walk and even planning...
We are almost certain to what we will bring now as we have dwindled it down so we have the necessities and not the weight!!

But we are curious what other people that have already done the walk packed and what they think they could of left or brought extra...

just to add... to make the thread a little more interesting... what is the weirdest/strangest thing you have packed too...

Cant wait to hear your replies.

Thanks to everyone that contributes.
52838
 
Camino(s) past & future
June 2013, June 2014, Oct 2014, May 2015
Here's my list which has worked well for 10 years.
http://mermore.blogspot.fr/p/kit-and-tips.html

As for an unexpected item
some of us carry the 'little luxury' of an electric water heating coil. See various posts here regarding using it (or not) and viable alternates as well as appropriate types of cups. As with most camino equipment the choice is large.

Happy brewing and Buen Camino!
Here's my list which has worked well for 10 years.
http://mermore.blogspot.fr/p/kit-and-tips.html

As for an unexpected item
some of us carry the 'little luxury' of an electric water heating coil. See various posts here regarding using it (or not) and viable alternates as well as appropriate types of cups. As with most camino equipment the choice is large.

Happy brewing and Buen Camino!
Really enjoyed reading your blog and list. Great words of advice.
 

Montana Bill

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2017
Hi Everybody,

I want to open up a nice little forum regarding 'What you pack' for your Camino walk in the Months of April & May which is Spring time...

We have done a lot of reading and research probably like everybody else that has been on the walk and even planning...
We are almost certain to what we will bring now as we have dwindled it down so we have the necessities and not the weight!!

But we are curious what other people that have already done the walk packed and what they think they could of left or brought extra...

just to add... to make the thread a little more interesting... what is the weirdest/strangest thing you have packed too...

Cant wait to hear your replies.

Thanks to everyone that contributes.
DUCT TAPE
Hi Everybody,

I want to open up a nice little forum regarding 'What you pack' for your Camino walk in the Months of April & May which is Spring time...

We have done a lot of reading and research probably like everybody else that has been on the walk and even planning...
We are almost certain to what we will bring now as we have dwindled it down so we have the necessities and not the weight!!

But we are curious what other people that have already done the walk packed and what they think they could of left or brought extra...

just to add... to make the thread a little more interesting... what is the weirdest/strangest thing you have packed too...

Cant wait to hear your replies.

Thanks to everyone that contributes.
 

Re-tired

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances
Check out merino wool shirts - they truly don't get as stinky as the synthetic tech fabrics.
That used to be true but not anylonger. Most of the better synthetic base layers have non-stink vodoo built in and their wicking and drying performance beats wool hands down. I can wear my Patagonia Capilene base layer around for a week without needing to wash it no problem...
 

backpack45

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Vezelay (2017, in progress); Primitivo & Norte; Geneva/LePuy; Arles; Portuguese; Francés + more
Not a concrete packing list, but an observation: This weekend I went to a pilgrim meeting where a fellow veteran peregrino presented his finely tuned packing list by simply showing and telling what was in his pack. Very interesting, and a very well thought out and functional list, but I couldn't help but observe that it was almost exactly the opposite of mine! He recommended leather boots, I wear non-waterproof Hokas. He uses a rain jacket, trousers and pack cover, I prefer a poncho. He prefers techical shirts, I take merino. He is happy with all-purpose soap, I like my shampoo bar. He swears by a hat to protect his head from the sun, I hate having anything on my head and take an umbrella for rain and sun ... we did agree that walking poles were essential, though I swear by my Pacerpoles!
Basically our approach to keeping dry, warm and comfortable was very different, but when I chatted to him afterwards, we agreed that both of us were very happy with our choices and wouldn't change a thing - in fact we have both walked hundreds of miles each with only minor tweaks depending on wear, tear and time of year.
Best tip is - walk, walk and walk in and with what you intend to take, then replace what doesn't work. Hand wash your walking gear after a walk, dry it and wear it again in the morning for another walk. It's the only way you'll know!
Good advice! I do have a packing list, but I also have observed that I always make a few changes year to year--more depending on mood than anything else--i.e. should I take my polyester top or the merino wool, should I wear the Injinji socks, my liner socks, or my Wrightsocks (double layer.). There are some things I never leave home--my 1-pound sleeping bag, my down jacket, my rain jacket, and pants, and my Smartwool long sleeved top--but others items are more interchangeable. So I agree, wear your outfits, see if they will dry by morning, and choose paperback books that you can bear to read all the way through :). Oh, and trail runners for sure--non waterproof (so they breathe) for me!
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
Great list but keep in mind that when you are walking your water bottles/bladders will be full—don’t forget to factor in that weight
I hadn't forgotten, it was simply not relevant. Allow me to explain why my gear lists are always posted the in the manner that I do, and why that is the most accurate way to post this kind of information.

There are two basic weight measurements that are done when weighing a backpack.

1. Base Weight - - Base weight, which is what I posted, measures a pack's weight without consumables. No food, fuel, or water, etc. Among the most hardcore of those among us for thru hiking the PCT or Appalachian Trail, even medications, blister goo, repellents (for wilderness backpacking) are included as a consumable. I tend to include them.

As indicated, consumables are variable. At the beginning of a multi-day / week / month backpacking trip, one's pack is the heaviest, and just before reaching a resupply point (for me that be 7-10 days) the backpack is at its lightest.

By eliminating consumables, it gives the most accurate picture of how much the main weight of the pack -- the gear (including the backpack) and clothing weighs.

2. Total Pack Weight - - As indicated above, it includes everything one carries in the pack, including consumables, but does not include clothing which is worn.

My base pack weight for a 10 day backpacking trip will be around 13 to 14 pounds. Add in the consumables, and my total pack weight goes up to around 22 to 24 pounds.Studies performed by the

On Camino, there is a lot of gear that I do not bring which I would bring when backpacking, even for a 2 day quick trip in the mountains. Tent, air mattress, stove and titanium cooking and eating mug are a few examples.

So, when adding water in my reservoir during most of the Camino Frances specifically, one may add 1.5 pounds to my base weight that is on the list I posted. Add another 5 ounces for a snack between bars and other eateries. That will be my total pack weight.

Full Skin Out (FSO) Weight. Some folks will include this as third weight measurement in order to incorporate all that is both worn and carried. I don't; I never use it. Clothing which is worn acts differently than weight that is carried as an attachment. As such, FSO is not terribly useful as a figure.

The Military and others examining how the body performs when backpacking (or on patrol or in troop movements in the Military) have demonstrated that wearing a backpack creates a different physiological dynamic than that of worn clothing, as far as wearing and moving are concerned. That does not mean there is no impact to the weight of clothing worn, but it does mean that such weight exacts far less of a toll than the weight of a backpack as it hangs from the shoulder and pelvic girdles.
 
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Hansel

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances and Fisterre (2018,08) ,Camino Primitivo, and Fisterre,(2019,04)
Check out merino wool shirts - they truly don't get as stinky as the synthetic tech fabrics.
But can be a bit itchy, and warm , binned some today, having a clear out !
Bill
 

Chrissycs

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2019
We walked the CF last May. Layering is essential. We had merino base layers (both short and long sleeve) with a fleece shirt and a long-sleeve shirt, with the final layer being a rain jacket. A fleece pullover hat with a ball-cap that fit under the rain jacket hood, and glove liners with fingerless mittens - kept me warm and dry on those mornings where the temps started at freezing and barely got above that.
Hi, when in May was it this cold? I’m starting off May 28 will it be as cold then? We are still compiling our backpack;)
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
Not a concrete packing list, but an observation: This weekend I went to a pilgrim meeting where a fellow veteran peregrino presented his finely tuned packing list by simply showing and telling what was in his pack. Very interesting, and a very well thought out and functional list, but I couldn't help but observe that it was almost exactly the opposite of mine! He recommended leather boots, I wear non-waterproof Hokas. He uses a rain jacket, trousers and pack cover, I prefer a poncho. He prefers techical shirts, I take merino. He is happy with all-purpose soap, I like my shampoo bar. He swears by a hat to protect his head from the sun, I hate having anything on my head and take an umbrella for rain and sun ... we did agree that walking poles were essential, though I swear by my Pacerpoles!
Basically our approach to keeping dry, warm and comfortable was very different, but when I chatted to him afterwards, we agreed that both of us were very happy with our choices and wouldn't change a thing - in fact we have both walked hundreds of miles each with only minor tweaks depending on wear, tear and time of year.
Best tip is - walk, walk and walk in and with what you intend to take, then replace what doesn't work. Hand wash your walking gear after a walk, dry it and wear it again in the morning for another walk. It's the only way you'll know!
I wish we had a similar forum in my area. I bet that you had a very enjoyable time. :)

In one important way, your post is spot on; how one responds to gear and clothing and footwear is an unarguably subjective point of view. Which is why, unless there is an objective issue, like wearing an packing cotton clothing for a backpacking trip into the mountains, there is no rationale basis for debate.

However, I would bet that there is a significant difference between his and your backpack weights. And certainly a difference in weight between choices of footwear. Those issues are objective measurements which DO affect performance and the potential for increasing the risk of injury. Making choices which can reduce weight are worth discussing. :)

This isn't about what one can tolerate or put up with. I've written before about my backpacking career over the decades, when my first thru-hikes lasting a month required that I accept a total pack weight load of 65 pounds in order to go 8-10 days between supply points.

Old technology, old understandings, old methods have substantially evolved since the late '60's. My leather boots gave way to trail runners. My 5 pound down sleeping bag is now a 11 ounce backpacking sleeping quilt. My 4 pounds of stove, pot, mug, and fuel, became a 13 ounce kit consisting of my stove, fuel cartridge, and titanium mug (which everything fits into for carrying).

Nowadays, that same load only weighs 22 to 24 pounds. Guess which weight load allows me to perform better and more comfortably, and with less risk of injury.

Same with footwear. The heavier the footwear, the more energy is exerted and the more foot, ankle, and lower leg fatigue will occur that increases the risk of injuries to those areas. It also increases the chances of repetitive strain injuries like shin splints.

As with you and the veteran pilgrim, it is wonderful to acknowledge the commonalities that bind us. For those who are novices and for those who are looking for something to make life easier and more comfortable on Camino, going over the choices available can provide needed insight.
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
Hi, when in May was it this cold? I’m starting off May 28 will it be as cold then? We are still compiling our backpack;)
Using layering, you can have a clothing inventory in your backpack's 'closet' that will serve you well over a very wide temperature range. My close list below is an example:

Maybe this will give you an idea of what will work during your time on Camino. Below is a list of my "closet" that I carry in my pack. Besides it being used during the Fall on the Camino last year, it is about the same as what I used to thru hike the Pacific Crest Trail and the Colorado Trail (most of which sits above 9,000 feet / 2743 meters in elevation. And for the thousands of other backpacking miles I have done.
  1. Pants -- REI, Classic Sahara Convertible, Zip-Off Legs
  2. Baselayer Top -- Smartwool, Lightweight, Long-Sleeve x 1
  3. Baselayer Bottom - Smartwool, Lightweight
  4. Hat - wool beanie
  5. Windshell Jacket - Patagonia, Houdini
  6. Insulating Layer -- Mountain Hardwear, Ghost Whisperer Vest
  7. Socks -- Smartwool Phd, Crew, Light Padding x 2
  8. Extra insoles x 1
  9. Poncho --- Zpacks, Cuben Fiber
  10. Gloves -- North Face, polartec
The total weight is around 3.4 pounds.

The clothing that I wear usually consists of running shorts and a long sleeved synthetic and lightweight shirt. All of the clothing can be used in various layering configurations to provide a comfort range from 25F/-4C to very hot.

This is just an example of how a layering system can be flexible and cover a wide temperature range which is more than sufficient for the time of year you are going over the Pyrenees and Galicia.
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
But can be a bit itchy, and warm , binned some today, having a clear out !
Bill
I use both synthetic (Patagonia Capiline) and Merino (Smartwool). Even in high summer heat.

Breathability and Insulation. I find that Merino is at least as breathable as any of the synthetics I've used. As with synthetic garment baselayers, Merino baselayers come in three 'weights' to help with seasonal use.

The lightweight Capilene and Smartwool baselayers work well from mid spring thru mid fall. I find neither to run hotter than the other. During summer heat (in my area we're looking at an average of 90 F at mid afternoon), the Merino long sleeved shirts actually keep me cooler than other materials. Keeping infrared radiation off of the skin keeps a person cooler than having exposed bare skin - - even with sun screen products lathered on.

There is a reason desert dwellers keep their skin covered in the high heat of their climate.

Stink level. Even with the newer generation of synthetics that I have gear tested for Patagonia and others, I still find that they start smelling funkier far earlier than Merino. The manufacturers know that has been an historic gripe about their products, and are really trying to even the playing field with Merino. It's better, but Merino is still much better in this regard.

Drying. Whether from washing or perspiration, synthetics do have a bit of advantage here.

When I have washed and rinsed each garment in the same way, allowing to air dry after a light wringing, the synthetics dry quicker. This doesn't mean that synthetics do a better job of wet weather insulation, though.

When wet, I have found that my wool does a better job of maintaining heat retention (this is subjective, but many report the same effect). Synthetics still work well, but for myself, the edge goes to Merino or regular wool.

NOTE: How one washes and dries either synthetics or Merino wool will affect their longevity and itchiness (YES, synthetics will can get very itchy if washing and drying instructions are ignored. The synthetic 'threads' making up the material start breaking apart, creating micro sharp edges).

Although there are a variety of directions and methods that folks swear by using, I find that these are the best practices over the long term.

  1. Best to use cold or cooler/lukewarm water.
  2. Use as little washing soap as possible. I use a fraction of what is recommended.
  3. Gently wring out excess water before drying. I do mean 'gently'.
  4. Although it takes more time, either use the 'air' setting on the dryer or hang the garment to dry.
5. DO NOT HANG IN DIRECT SUNLIGHT!!!!!!!! It has been noted that drying in the UV of the sun interacts with the wool or synthetic material and makes it friable.
 

Geodoc

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (crossed Pyrenees then Sarria to SdC) 2018, Frances & Ingles Summer, 2019.
Hi, when in May was it this cold? I’m starting off May 28 will it be as cold then? We are still compiling our backpack;)
We started around the 11th. This picture was taken in Roncesvalle on the 13th, looking back at the pass.
 

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kdespot

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés SJPP-SdC Sept-Oct 2016
Oh yeah, mspath, the electric water heating coil was my favorite! Minimal weight, and every morning a cup of joe or tea. Wouldn't dream of going without it!
 

Hansel

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances and Fisterre (2018,08) ,Camino Primitivo, and Fisterre,(2019,04)
I use both synthetic (Patagonia Capiline) and Merino (Smartwool). Even in high summer heat.

Breathability and Insulation. I find that Merino is at least as breathable as any of the synthetics I've used. As with synthetic garment baselayers, Merino baselayers come in three 'weights' to help with seasonal use.

The lightweight Capilene and Smartwool baselayers work well from mid spring thru mid fall. I find neither to run hotter than the other. During summer heat (in my area we're looking at an average of 90 F at mid afternoon), the Merino long sleeved shirts actually keep me cooler than other materials. Keeping infrared radiation off of the skin keeps a person cooler than having exposed bare skin - - even with sun screen products lathered on.

There is a reason desert dwellers keep their skin covered in the high heat of their climate.

Stink level. Even with the newer generation of synthetics that I have gear tested for Patagonia and others, I still find that they start smelling funkier far earlier than Merino. The manufacturers know that has been an historic gripe about their products, and are really trying to even the playing field with Merino. It's better, but Merino is still much better in this regard.

Drying. Whether from washing or perspiration, synthetics do have a bit of advantage here.

When I have washed and rinsed each garment in the same way, allowing to air dry after a light wringing, the synthetics dry quicker. This doesn't mean that synthetics do a better job of wet weather insulation, though.

When wet, I have found that my wool does a better job of maintaining heat retention (this is subjective, but many report the same effect). Synthetics still work well, but for myself, the edge goes to Merino or regular wool.

NOTE: How one washes and dries either synthetics or Merino wool will affect their longevity and itchiness (YES, synthetics will can get very itchy if washing and drying instructions are ignored. The synthetic 'threads' making up the material start breaking apart, creating micro sharp edges).

Although there are a variety of directions and methods that folks swear by using, I find that these are the best practices over the long term.

  1. Best to use cold or cooler/lukewarm water.
  2. Use as little washing soap as possible. I use a fraction of what is recommended.
  3. Gently wring out excess water before drying. I do mean 'gently'.
  4. Although it takes more time, either use the 'air' setting on the dryer or hang the garment to dry.
5. DO NOT HANG IN DIRECT SUNLIGHT!!!!!!!! It has been noted that drying in the UV of the sun interacts with the wool or synthetic material and makes it friable.
Good points, there Dave, the desert dwellers tended to walk at night using the stars to guide them, and rest up during the day, ( mad dogs and English men !) go out in the mid-day sun , don't think I'll have to start walking at 5am in April on the Primitivo to avoid the heat,
Bill
 

Nekodemus

Certified insane
Camino(s) past & future
Been there, done that. Keep coming back.
Most likely addicted.
He recommended leather boots, I wear non-waterproof Hokas. He uses a rain jacket, trousers and pack cover, I prefer a poncho. He prefers techical shirts, I take merino. He is happy with all-purpose soap, I like my shampoo bar. He swears by a hat to protect his head from the sun, I hate having anything on my head and take an umbrella for rain and sun ... we did agree that walking poles were essential, though I swear by my Pacerpoles!
I'm somewhat in the middle.
  • Leather boots - my feet demand it. "Boots, or we'll quit cooperating". "Yes, dears"
  • Poncho + rain legs + umbrella - makes for a very comfortable, well ventilated me
  • I mix technical shirts with merinos - I much prefer merinos, but it's matter of funding. I'm still saving for them merinos
  • All-purpose soap - I don't have much hair anyway
  • I prefer the umbrella for walking in the sun, but I still bring a hat/cap to manage the poncho hood for those times when the wind makes the umbrella too bothersome
  • Pacerpoles! Definitely Pacerpoles!
And I'd really like to try a hiking kilt (I'll need to find one in MacLean tartan)
 

02crofton

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
April 2019
I can recomend Osprey. My pack developed an irritating sqeak after a year of use - but I have heard ( today as it happens) that they will replace the pack for me. Ker-ching. 😊
Thanks member... well I have finally gone for the Osprey Talon 44, although im thinking now whether i should of got the 33 Talon, I havent got all my gear yet so Im not sure how much space i will exactly need.
hmmmmm...
 

Lindsay53

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances April / May 19
I am following this and other gear threads with great interest. One thing I am getting my head around is that the camino, for all its length, is essentially a series of day walks rather than the isolated wilderness I usually walk in, and I need to modify my kit to suit. My usual bushwalking kit including food and water comes in at 12.5kg. Today I had a trial run with my proposed camino stuff that came in at 8.5kg. I will continue tweaking. :)
 

02crofton

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
April 2019
I am following this and other gear threads with great interest. One thing I am getting my head around is that the camino, for all its length, is essentially a series of day walks rather than the isolated wilderness I usually walk in, and I need to modify my kit to suit. My usual bushwalking kit including food and water comes in at 12.5kg. Today I had a trial run with my proposed camino stuff that came in at 8.5kg. I will continue tweaking. :)
Nice thanks for that.... Buen Camino as the saying goes !!!
Really cant wait, I have some awesome meindls and my Talon, my training is starting tomorrow.... will take a nice easy 1 - 2 hour walk and progress as the time ticks by until we go in Mid April.
 

02crofton

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
April 2019
I use both synthetic (Patagonia Capiline) and Merino (Smartwool). Even in high summer heat.

Breathability and Insulation. I find that Merino is at least as breathable as any of the synthetics I've used. As with synthetic garment baselayers, Merino baselayers come in three 'weights' to help with seasonal use.

The lightweight Capilene and Smartwool baselayers work well from mid spring thru mid fall. I find neither to run hotter than the other. During summer heat (in my area we're looking at an average of 90 F at mid afternoon), the Merino long sleeved shirts actually keep me cooler than other materials. Keeping infrared radiation off of the skin keeps a person cooler than having exposed bare skin - - even with sun screen products lathered on.

There is a reason desert dwellers keep their skin covered in the high heat of their climate.

Stink level. Even with the newer generation of synthetics that I have gear tested for Patagonia and others, I still find that they start smelling funkier far earlier than Merino. The manufacturers know that has been an historic gripe about their products, and are really trying to even the playing field with Merino. It's better, but Merino is still much better in this regard.

Drying. Whether from washing or perspiration, synthetics do have a bit of advantage here.

When I have washed and rinsed each garment in the same way, allowing to air dry after a light wringing, the synthetics dry quicker. This doesn't mean that synthetics do a better job of wet weather insulation, though.

When wet, I have found that my wool does a better job of maintaining heat retention (this is subjective, but many report the same effect). Synthetics still work well, but for myself, the edge goes to Merino or regular wool.

NOTE: How one washes and dries either synthetics or Merino wool will affect their longevity and itchiness (YES, synthetics will can get very itchy if washing and drying instructions are ignored. The synthetic 'threads' making up the material start breaking apart, creating micro sharp edges).

Although there are a variety of directions and methods that folks swear by using, I find that these are the best practices over the long term.

  1. Best to use cold or cooler/lukewarm water.
  2. Use as little washing soap as possible. I use a fraction of what is recommended.
  3. Gently wring out excess water before drying. I do mean 'gently'.
  4. Although it takes more time, either use the 'air' setting on the dryer or hang the garment to dry.
5. DO NOT HANG IN DIRECT SUNLIGHT!!!!!!!! It has been noted that drying in the UV of the sun interacts with the wool or synthetic material and makes it friable.

Thanks for the highly valuable lessons... taken on board and will use less soapy stuff when washing my clothes.
 

Jermann75

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2018
two black garbage bags in case you get bed bugs and need to heat your backpack in the sun.
seperate your clothes in big ziploc baggies from the clothes that are clean and the clothes that are dirty so if you do get a bed bug contamination, the clothes that are clean are still safe in the big ziploc baggie.
 

Shazenalan

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2018
Thanks member... well I have finally gone for the Osprey Talon 44, although im thinking now whether i should of got the 33 Talon, I havent got all my gear yet so Im not sure how much space i will exactly need.
hmmmmm...
[/SO many flippin’ choices, I know!! I returned mine to the retailer, along with the email from Osprey, and got an instant replacement. Interestingly it was ‘on offer’ at £20 more than I paid last year. But it was a no quibble exchange which I very much appreciated and has cemented my loyalty to Osprey. Now.... will it squeek! 🥴
 

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