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What's wrong with my hiking pole?

#1
I walked for 32 days without ever collapsing my Z-poles, and when I went to do that to get on the plane, one of them was full of black stuff. Does anyone have any idea what is going on with the pole on the bottom?
image.jpeg
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times, but soon again I hope....
#2
Looks to me like that rubber is breaking down, turning into a powdery substance.
 
Camino(s) past & future
in fall 2017
#4
Just clean it up with a damp paper towel. Use a bit of rubbing alcohol if needed. IF it then looks the same as the others you know what is wrong. Something got spilled on it or it got in a mud puddle or . . . If it doesn't look the same take it back to the store. IT should still be on warranty.
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times, but soon again I hope....
#5
Definitely the rubber or similar material breaking down. You can see it quite plainly where I have circled it in red. Doesn't appear as though it will effect the function of the trekking pole at all. I would not use petroleum oil on it, as that may cause more breaking down. Maybe a silicone lube instead.
image.jpeg
 
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
#6
The clean up is the easy part. As mentioned above, moist paper towel or an old rag will do it. I have the identical poles in carbon fiber. Yours appear to be the aluminum alloy variety. My previous pair were aluminum. In my experience, and having read the Black Diamond instructions, there are two likely causes and one farther-fetched possibility for things that can cause this condition:

1. Your shaft tension was not as tight as it could be, and your poles made a VERY slight "clicking" noise as you walked. The "slack" in the tension could cause oxidation and deposition of the "dust" on the shaft. There is no long-term harm. If you heard this sound, or wondered if your poles might be loosening up as you walked this could be the culprit. It happened to me two years ago on my first outing with the aluminum BD LTZ poles...the same as your's I believe.

If you lock your poles into place and you can pull the lower sections part of the way out, even just a few centimeters, this is likely the problem. BD designed this mechanism to be TIGHT. Any slack in the tension causes rubbing on the shaft sections.

If you tighten the wheeled / pin adjuster inside the second section, the noise goes away as proper tension is placed on all the silicone sections. Note, the black dust deposits are not caused by deteriorating silicone. This is medical grade silicone that does not dry out or go to dust.

FYI, The tension is proper when you have to give a good tug on both top sections to "pop" the release pin, just before the foam handle, into locking position. I have to give a good, extra pull with two hands to accomplish this.

You might have to make this adjustment every couple of days. It makes pushing the pin in to release tension so the piles can be collapsed a tad harder, but that is good. I do not know if it is possible to over-tension the silicone, I doubt it. But, experiment until you get it right.

2. Leaving your poles together for so long, like a month or more, causes moisture to be retained inside the shaft sections. This, in contact with the aluminum may have caused surface corrosion. Aluminum and alu-alloy does not rust, but it does corrode. Surface "dust," sort of like brake dust on a car's brakes, is the result.

For reference, although my carbon fiber version of the same pole does not have the corrosion issue, I DO have to examine and adjust the wheeled / pin adjuster every 2 to 3 days. I am in the habit of checking every day, just to make certain. I am also sensitized to any slack that might creep into the mechanism and start a extremely tiny clicking sound...NO WHERE near the sound of bare tips on paved surfaces. This is very feint and can be immediately traced to loose tension.

Just pick up the pole and try to pull two sections apart with the tension pin "locked." If there is any "give" it is time to pause and adjust the tension wheel / pin.

3. The odd-ball possibility is that after walking in the rain and temperate climes for more than a month, your poles have sprouted mold inside the tubes. It is possible, but in my estimation not likely. I advise releasing the tension and loosening the poles every couple of days while on Camino. This gives you the ability to test the tension, clean the connections and spot issues before they become problems.

I hope this helps, and that you had a marvelous Camino.
 
Last edited:

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
#8
Or just get a simple hiking staff.

Best is an Ash sapling dried for about a year, length up into your armpit but exact inches TBD by comfort. Up into your armpit is maximum length though.

Circumference ideal for your own grip, thicker end down for better support.

Then the difficult stuff -- learn how to walk putting the support for two legs into a single arm and a one-handed staff. Balancing shoulders, posture, and gait with a staff is tougher to learn than hiking poles.
 
#9
The clean up is the easy part. As mentioned above, moist paper towel or an old rag will do it. I have the identical poles in carbon fiber. Yours appear to be the aluminum alloy variety. My previous pair were aluminum. In my experience, and having read the Black Diamond instructions, there are two likely causes and one farther-fetched possibility for things that can cause this condition:

1. Your shaft tension was not as tight as it could be, and your poles made a VERY slight "clicking" noise as you walked. The "slack" in the tension could cause oxidation and deposition of the "dust" on the shaft. There is no long-term harm. If you heard this sound, or wondered if your poles might be loosening up as you walked this could be the culprit. It happened to me two years ago on my first outing with the aluminum BD LTZ poles...the same as your's I believe.

If you lock your poles into place and you can pull the lower sections part of the way out, even just a few centimeters, this is likely the problem. BD designed this mechanism to be TIGHT. Any slack in the tension causes rubbing on the shaft sections.

If you tighten the wheeled / pin adjuster inside the second section, the noise goes away as proper tension is placed on all the silicone sections. Note, the black dust deposits are not caused by deteriorating silicone. This is medical grade silicone that does not dry out or go to dust.

FYI, The tension is proper when you have to give a good tug on both top sections to "pop" the release pin, just before the foam handle, into locking position. I have to give a good, extra pull with two hands to accomplish this.

You might have to make this adjustment every couple of days. It makes pushing the pin in to release tension so the piles can be collapsed a tad harder, but that is good. I do not know if it is possible to over-tension the silicone, I doubt it. But, experiment until you get it right.

2. Leaving your poles together for so long, like a month or more, causes moisture to be retained inside the shaft sections. This, in contact with the aluminum may have caused surface corrosion. Aluminum and alu-alloy does not rust, but it does corrode. Surface "dust," sort of like brake dust on a car's brakes, is the result.

For reference, although my carbon fiber version of the same pole does not have the corrosion issue, I DO have to examine and adjust the wheeled / pin adjuster every 2 to 3 days. I am in the habit of checking every day, just to make certain. I am also sensitized to any slack that might creep into the mechanism and start a extremely tiny clicking sound...NO WHERE near the sound of bare tips on paved surfaces. This is very feint and can be immediately traced to loose tension.

Just pick up the pole and try to pull two sections apart with the tension pin "locked." If there is any "give" it is time to pause and adjust the tension wheel / pin.

3. The odd-ball possibility is that after walking in the rain and temperate climes for more than a month, your poles have sprouted mold inside the tubes. It is possible, but in my estimation not likely. I advise releasing the tension and loosening the poles every couple of days while on Camino. This gives you the ability to test the tension, clean the connections and spot issues before they become problems.

I hope this helps, and that you had a marvelous Camino.
Thanks a million, t2. You are right that there was a slight clicking sound in this pole that sort of sounded like the rubber tip was off, but then it magically stopped. I also found that when the clicking noise was happening, I could rotate the separate sections of the clicking pole, but not the other. My guess is that this all goes back to the original problem I had when some of the inner mechanism popped out of place and I was told to use superglue to reconnect it. When I did that, I must have been a millimeter or two off in my measuring, because from that point on, it was extremely difficult for me to extend the pole, in fact I needed two people pulling. That seems to be a bit better now.

I did write to customer service and will see what they tell me, so I will wait before I start experimenting with your suggestions, but I think you are spot on in your remote diagnosis. Mil gracias.

And yes, I absolutely loved the Mozárabe (I didn't make it to Santiago, just Almería to Salamanca), for three main reasons. First, the route is dotted with castles that are the leftovers from the many centuries' border war between Moors and Christians, and I just love climbing all over old castles. And second because I think it was probably the most physically challenging I have ever walked, though the Olvidado might be a close contender. And third, it is virtually asphalt-free, though there were some days walking on stony empty riverbeds when asphalt would have been a welcome substitute!
 

stgcph

Camino tortuga
Camino(s) past & future
CF (Aug/Sep 2017)
CF (Aug/Sep 2018)
#11
Just saying -- my big wooden stick doesn't need customer service.
I’m a wooden stick man too. I bought one last year in Spain (7 euro) and when I went home I left it behind with a bleeding heart thinking it would be too cumbersome and expensive to bring it back home.

Do you bring yours along and if so how does it travel? And at which price?
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
#14
I know - I feel bad about it, but it's done and I have now got me a new friend.
But did you have to check it in separately on the plane?
What plane ?

I've only ever gone back by foot, hitch-hike, or train.
 

SYates

Camino Fossil AD 1999
Camino(s) past & future
First: Camino Francés 1999
...
Last: Camino Inglés 2018

Now: http://egeria.house/
#16
@stgcph Typically you will need to put walking sticks into the checked luggage. How much that costs depends on the airline/your ticket/destination. Also, if the stick is non-collapsible, you will need to check it in at the "over-sized" items counter. Hope that helps, Buen Camino, SY
 

stgcph

Camino tortuga
Camino(s) past & future
CF (Aug/Sep 2017)
CF (Aug/Sep 2018)
#17
@stgcph Typically you will need to put walking sticks into the checked luggage. How much that costs depends on the airline/your ticket/destination. Also, if the stick is non-collapsible, you will need to check it in at the "over-sized" items counter. Hope that helps, Buen Camino, SY
Thank you - I will check it with the airline company (when I decide which, I still have a couple of months before I go).
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Ch. d'Arles: Oloron Ste Marie to Aragones; Frances (2016); V.d.l.P.; Sanabres (2017)
#18
I bought a wooden walking stick in San Jean pied de Port at the start of my first camino and carried it with me to Santiago, and in the baggage area on buses to Muxia and Finnesterre then back to Santiago and on to Madrid. In the Madrid airport I checked my bag then continued to security with my walking stick. I was directed to a special security line: women with babies, the handicapped, and seniors. I kept my stick and on the plane I put it in an overhead bin, where it was not too long. I suspect my age was the factor which permitted me to take the stick on the plane. It was considered to be a walking aide, which indeed it was. I have done so in other airports, with the same results. Age has it privileges. But I wouldn't count on it. Airport security is not wholly predictable.
 

Kiwi-family

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Past: (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016)
Future (God-willing): Madrid, Salvador, Primitivo (2018)
#19
Laurie, you started the electric coil club. You have left the boots club and might even make it to the sandal club. Maybe it's time to join the PacerPole Party! Who knows, you might even end up in the Macabi Club!
 
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
#20
Thanks a million, t2. You are right that there was a slight clicking sound in this pole that sort of sounded like the rubber tip was off, but then it magically stopped. I also found that when the clicking noise was happening, I could rotate the separate sections of the clicking pole, but not the other. My guess is that this all goes back to the original problem I had when some of the inner mechanism popped out of place and I was told to use superglue to reconnect it. When I did that, I must have been a millimeter or two off in my measuring, because from that point on, it was extremely difficult for me to extend the pole, in fact I needed two people pulling. That seems to be a bit better now.

I did write to customer service and will see what they tell me, so I will wait before I start experimenting with your suggestions, but I think you are spot on in your remote diagnosis. Mil gracias.

And yes, I absolutely loved the Mozárabe (I didn't make it to Santiago, just Almería to Salamanca), for three main reasons. First, the route is dotted with castles that are the leftovers from the many centuries' border war between Moors and Christians, and I just love climbing all over old castles. And second because I think it was probably the most physically challenging I have ever walked, though the Olvidado might be a close contender. And third, it is virtually asphalt-free, though there were some days walking on stony empty riverbeds when asphalt would have been a welcome substitute!
I am reasonably certain that tightening the tension adjuster nut / wheel will solve the clicking / rubbing "brake dust" thing. Wanna bet Black Diamond says the same thing, in different language?

Glad you like taking detours to explore castles. I am a point-to-point pilgrim myself. I do not do detours, scenic overlooks off-piste, and I NEVER walk back to revisit anything. o_O

Once I cover the ground, it stays covered. I like castles and old ruins, but like many of the lesser churches along the routes, once you've seen 20 or 30, they do tend to look similar... To each his or her own.

I am very glad you had a good experience. I cannot wait to return to work at Santiago in July... only about 50 days to go...:)
 
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
#22
My first set of Leki Ultralight aluminum alloy poles literally saved my life in April 2013 when I was almost forced off the trail off a steep drop just after Pamplona. In 2013, there was no safety guard line on the trail up to Alto de Perdon. Two mountain bikers speeding down the trail forced me to leap out of the way...WRONG!

Anyway, I still have these hiking sticks. I will never get rid of them or leave them behind...ever. I owe them my life. Presently, these poles are reserved for training hikes at home. For Camino use, I have since moved to a series of Black Diamond Z poles. They collapse to a 16 inch length for travel. My latest pair are carbon fiber and weigh only 11.1 ounces (314 gm) for the pair, with rubber tips.
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
#25
Too bad. You should try flying sometime. Two lads by the name of Wright came up with the concept some 100+ years ago, I think. It's great and cuts down on time.
Fitting my legs in would be far more difficult than trivial matters of sticks.

But more seriously, I think pilgrims would do better to make their return from Compostela an actual journey, not a quick flight. The Camino is a long walk from home to home via Santiago, not a hiking trail "starting" at SJPP and "finishing" at Santiago.
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata.
#26
I’m having problems with my carbon fibre Black Diamond - on one The little “push button” is refusing to push in so I cannot fold that pole. I’ve looked on YouTube and the internet but none of the fixes seem directly relevant to this particular problem. Any ideas?
 
#27
I’m having problems with my carbon fibre Black Diamond - on one The little “push button” is refusing to push in so I cannot fold that pole. I’ve looked on YouTube and the internet but none of the fixes seem directly relevant to this particular problem. Any ideas?
Have you tried having someone else pull the top part away from you while you pull towards you with one hand and push in the button with the other? Not sure if that makes sense, but at the beginning of my walk I couldn't get the poles to extend far enough so the button could come out and it seems like you have the problem in reverse.
Buen camino Sanabrés, Kanga.
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata.
#28
I’ve managed to pull them out so there is a little play, but still can’t get the button to go back in. I will flow your suggestion and try with a second person. It is only one out of the two that is having this problem and they are fine for walking, but I do need to collapse them to get them home. If it does not work I suppose I’ll have to abandon them. They have done several thousand kilometres but are otherwise perfectly fine so it seems a pity.
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
#29
Well, the reality is that most pilgrims need to take a quick flight home from the insulating bubble of walking the Camino so they can get back to jobs, school, family etc.
I tend to be quite literalist -- to say that X is "better" does mean that Y must be "good". :)
 

KJFSophie

My Way, With Joy !
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2014 & 2015 ) ,Via San Francesco, Italy (2017 )
Camino Portugese (2018 )
#30
I’m having problems with my carbon fibre Black Diamond - on one The little “push button” is refusing to push in so I cannot fold that pole. I’ve looked on YouTube and the internet but none of the fixes seem directly relevant to this particular problem. Any ideas?
I had a similar issue with my Black Diamond ZPoles. We contacted them by email when we were in Ponferrada, and remarkably they replied within a few hours with photos and details of exactly how to fix it! I was so impressed with that customer service!
 
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
#32
Sorry for the late reply. I just now saw this updated post.

If there is too much tension on the silicone connectors, lateral pressure on the spring-loaded 'nipple' prevents you from pushing the round 'nipple' thing in.

Peregrina2000's suggestion is the correct one to get them apart initially. It may take more outward tension or pulling effort than you can manage. You may need a second person. Those silicone bands are VERY strong. Remember to pull GENTLY, do not jerk or tug sharply.

Once you DO get them apart, adjust the twist adjustment inside the second tube section to loosen very SLIGHTLY the tension on the silicon band. That should solve the problem. Continue to adjust as needed. Check the other pole.

I have owned two sets of BD Z poles, and used them for three Caminos, so far. I had this problem on the first set, they were aluminium alloy. My current set are carbon fiber. So far, no problem.

Another thing to consider is that I do wash the poles by immersion in warm soapy water when I get home. After they air-dry for several days, I inspect all components, apply a slight amount of silicone lubricant to the silicone bands and the nipple thingie, and store them away until the next use. This is also when worn rubber tips or steel tips are replaced.

This is one of the nice features of the BD poles. You can easily remove and or replace the steel tips. it only requires a small plier, such as you might have on a pocket multi-tool or overly large Swiss Army knife.

Also, doing this can help you get them on an airplane. Without the steel tips in place, the hiking poles are a walking aid, NOT a stabbing weapon...just sayin...

This said, I am still going to err on the side of caution and check my expensive carbon fiber poles EVERY TIME. Y'all do what you want.

Contacting Black Diamond directly was the best idea I have seen. I did the same with Osprey when I had a rucksack adjustment problem in 2017 while in Portugal. Given the time zone difference, they responded fast, the next business day. I saw the reply when I woke up the next morning.

The only dumb question is the one you do not ask...o_O

Hope this helps.
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015); Camino Norte/Primitivo (2016); Camino Frances (2017); Le Puy (June 2018)
#33
Tom, this is an example of one of your many detailed replies to questions asked on the forum. You are full of Camino knowledge and helpful advise, so when you say "hope this helps", I'm confident that it always does!
 
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
#34
Chris:

Thank you. You are very kind. All I do it to treat others the way I would be treated and do whatever and whenever I can to help. It seems to have become my calling in retirement and as regards the Camino especially.

I realize that some folks may not appreciate my overly long and detailed information. But I also know that there are a LOT of first timers. lurkers and browsers out there who are just looking for reliable information.

I try to provide that information. I figure that whatever I write will be useful to someone.

That is why I always close with 'Hope this helps...' because I simply do...

I am hopeful that someone finds the content useful, but I realize that it is not a one size fits all situation.
 
#35
Well, easily distracted as I am, I wrote to Black Diamond, read all your replies, and then did nothing. But seeing this thread bumped up prompted me to remember, and to go get my poles to take a look. It turns out that on careful inspection, I now see that the black rubber covering at the joint has broken through. I think that is what @RJM was trying to tell me in an earlier thread, though I couldn’t see any red circle in the photo he posted.

But anyway.... if you look at the picture I originally posted, particularly at the shadow of the part of the pole where the rubber folds and enters the tube, you can see that the rubber is jagged and broken. So, now that I know what the problem is, I wonder if I should bother trying to fix it. Seems like it would be a complicated thing to do, so do you experts have an opinion on whether this is just something I should forget about and walk on.
 
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
#36
I would take photos, write to BD sending the photos as evidence of what you are trying to explain. Then rely on their reply.

If we are talking about carbon fiber poles, it is likely worth the effort time and expense to return them for repair. In any event, I would rely on what BD advises. They are a very good company that stands behind their product.

As regular Camino veterans, we are actually a very good source of field experience input for them. While I am sure they test their product, I doubt they usually plan on their poles being used as we use them on month long, or longer, Caminos on varied surfaces and in most any weather.

You never know. If I were them, I might even want to 'salt' the veteran Camino community with poles being developed or under consideration for proper field testing by 'experts." It is a distinct possibility.

Hope this helps.
 
#37
I would take photos, write to BD sending the photos as evidence of what you are trying to explain. Then rely on their reply.

If we are talking about carbon fiber poles, it is likely worth the effort time and expense to return them for repair. In any event, I would rely on what BD advises. They are a very good company that stands behind their product.

As regular Camino veterans, we are actually a very good source of field experience input for them. While I am sure they test their product, I doubt they usually plan on their poles being used as we use them on month long, or longer, Caminos on varied surfaces and in most any weather.

You never know. If I were them, I might even want to 'salt' the veteran Camino community with poles being developed or under consideration for proper field testing by 'experts." It is a distinct possibility.

Hope this helps.
Just an update. I wrote to Black Diamond again, and I sent the picture again, which showed that the rubber was disintegrating. Surprise surprise, they are sending me a new set, I cannot believe it!
 
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
#38
Believe it! Black Diamond stand behind their products. I am glad it is working out.

Besides, and as I learned long, long, long ago when dating in high school, if you don't ask, the answer is always NO. If you do ask for something, anything, you have at least a 50-50 chance of receiving a YES answer. Over time, this concept actually bears out.

So, when confronted with a product defect, it always pays to ask the manufacturer. BTW, in my direct experience, Keen Footwear and Osprey Packs also have excellent customer service policies.

Hope this helps.
 
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
#40
Only Black Diamond can repair the silicone connectors that attach the Z-pole segments. You will need to contact them by e-mail. I recommend including a photo of the break.

Good luck. Hope this helps.
 
#41
Only Black Diamond can repair the silicone connectors that attach the Z-pole segments. You will need to contact them by e-mail. I recommend including a photo of the break.

Good luck. Hope this helps.
Sorry, I wasn’t clear. They are sending me a new pair. I am just wondering what I can do to minimize the likelihood that it will happen again. Thanks, t2, l.
 
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
#42
Oops! After reading your previous post again this morning, with a cup of coffee at my hand, I read it correctly, You were clear, I was not when I first read it... My bad...

In my experience, damage to the silicone connector bands occurs from: (1) persistent overtensioning, and (2) long-term kinking / folding under tension; or (3) drying out... or some combination of the above...

My recommendations for each, in turn, are:

(1) do not store poles assembled and locked into place. This maintains constant tension on the bands and hastens both drying out and stretching beyond useful specifications. Once you stretch the bands beyond what the adjusteers can cope with, it is out of specifications. Store your your poles connected, and without the top portion clicked into place, as this is what stretches the silicone bands. Hang the poles loosely assembled... (this is what I do - they are on a hook, under a clothes hanging shelf in a closet.

(2) do not store the poles for a long time in the transport / closed / "Z" shape. Over time, this places tension on the bend points, and can hasten drying out and deterioration of the bands, and...

(3) before storing your poles, apply SILICONE lubricant VERY LIGHTLY to maintain the moisture content of the silicone material. Silicone is a VERY durable material, but it can dry out over time, and depending on environmental circumstances. DO NOT use any petroleum or non-silicone based lubricant...

Hope this helps.
 

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