A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it

Advertisement

See the full Camino Forum Store here with many more camino products.

When they finish the restoration of this cathedral, it will look amazing!

amancio

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte, Primit, Salvador, Portug, Arag, Ingles, VdlP, Leban-Vadin, Fisterra, Invierno, LePuy
Looking forward to seeing it! BTW, Ivar, I cannot help noticing you have used a "click bait" strategy when writing the subject of your post ;)
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Seeing those upper galleries reminded me of the cathedral in Conques on the Le Puy route. At night, I remember that you could walk up through those upper galleries, up close and personal with some amazing capitals, while the organ played below.

I wonder if there are any plans to allow people to do something similar in Santiago, now that it is all so beautifully restored.
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
It has always been a strange Cathedral (in an excellent way), but I must admit to being very pleased indeed by this new emphasis on its core Romance simplicity and beauty.
 

Bala

Veteran member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: SJPdP-Burgos, (2015); Burgos-Sarria (2018); Sarria-Santiago (2018).
Frances (2020)
I wonder if there are any plans to allow people to do something similar in Santiago, now that it is all so beautifully restored.
I hope so! When I was there in 2018 I took a tour of the upper galleries, as the rooftop tour was sold out. The galleries were fascinating, and the views below gave a whole new perspective. Plus, we got a first-hand view of how much restoration work needed to be done in the behind the scenes areas of the cathedral. Highly recommended if they start up again.
 

Caligal

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF April 4- May 12, 2018
CF Sept 10-27 2019
CP Sept 28- Oct12 2019
C Finisterre Oct 16-Oct 20
Thank you for sharing, its beautiful! BTW I’ve really enjoyed your Monday updates!
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Aragones-Frances (2016); VdlP-Sanabres (2017); Madrid-Frances-Invierno (2019)Levante
I don't know what it will look like when the restoration is finished. I think that depends on how much of the kitsch will be put back (or in view, if it is still in there somewhere). These photos may be my only chance ever to see the true beauty of the cathedral.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
I hope so! When I was there in 2018 I took a tour of the upper galleries,
Oh, do tell more! I thought I had taken every possible cathedral tour and visited every museum, but I never knew about an upper gallery tour. Now that you mention it, though, I think that maybe the rooftop tour included a brief glimpse of the galleries, but I am not at all sure.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
I'm not sure either, but our roof top tour guide paused to give us some facts about the galleries as we made our way to the roof. In particuler I recall the colorful giant festival "puppets" in storage as we passed them by.
 

MichaelB10398

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago de Compostela, Lourdes to SdC, SJPP to SdC
I would expect to see considerable more work done as far as the "decorations". It makes me think of the renovation completed at Chartres. Granted, that cathedral had amazing stained glass windows, but the renovation also included a lot of painting to bring it back to an original state. Many did not care for it.

The current state of this cathedral is almost stark now. Look for changes before it is declared complete.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
I thought I had taken every possible cathedral tour and visited every museum, but I never knew about an upper gallery tour. Now that you mention it, though, I think that maybe the rooftop tour included a brief glimpse of the galleries, but I am not at all sure.
When I when I did the rooftop tour in 2015, we also were taken through the galleries and the guide explained quite a lot about what we were seeing. It was fantastic.

I think that depends on how much of the kitsch will be put back
Wouldn't it be grand if they didn't do that? During the tour of the Portico de Gloria, we were told that some of Maestro Mateo's work ended up as fill in one of the towers during a later renovation (I think it was when the new Baroque portico was built but I can't remember exacly). Maybe it's time for payback? Or at least a massive garage sale.
🙃 ;)
 
Last edited:

Lexicos

Jim
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances
2017
Camino Portuguese 2019
Thanks Ivar. Looks wonderful. Can't wait to see it in real life.
 
Last edited:

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
When I when I did the rooftop tour in 2015, we also were taken through the galleries and the guide explained quite a lot about what we were seeing. It was fantastic.
I didn't take many photos, but here are two. The mason's marks on those archstones made a big impression.
 

Attachments

Camino(s) past & future
CF14(21?)
Aussie Camino15
WHW15
CP16
CdelN Fin/Muxia18
GGW StCuthWay HadrWall CotswoldWay19
Thanks Ivar for these photos. The Cathedral is looking magnificent. Can't wait to visit again!
Anne & Pat
 

IngridF

Intrepid Peregrina
Camino(s) past & future
2012, 2015 ,2017, 2019
Oh, do tell more! I thought I had taken every possible cathedral tour and visited every museum, but I never knew about an upper gallery tour. Now that you mention it, though, I think that maybe the rooftop tour included a brief glimpse of the galleries, but I am not at all sure.
I remember it from 2012 after my first Camino and pre renovations. It was a wonderful tour and we got caught in a downpour whilst on the roof. I was very popular, being the only one with an umbrella. I remember as we walked past the "Giants" that are trot out for festival processions and remember visiting the display of plans for the upcoming renovation of the Porto de Gloria. I am so happy I was able to experience all that, including walking into the cathedral from Plaza del Obradoiro.
 

pelerine

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte 10, Primitivo 13, Plata 14+15, Salvador 16, Torres 17, Portugues 18, Mozarabe 19
Tthe interior of the cathedral looks pristine and beautiful, but the chairs spaced far apart instead of pews is vey sad to me...it's a new day to be sure.
I just love the simplicity : the position of the chairs and the humble altar.
No pomp and circumstance at all.
How many people are allowed into the cathedral now with chairs spaced like this?Any standing allowed? Do you remember how the cathedral used to be packed with people, pilgrims and tourists milling about during pilgrims’ mass? The number of times I sat at the foot of a column or anywhere I could sit down! I suppose you will have to book ahead in order to get in. No spontaneous rush to the cathedral after arriving just in time to catch the pilgrims’ mass.....
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
To Santiago and beyond (from home; Voie de Tours; Camino Francés; Biskaya; Manche; Via Brabantica)
Oh, do tell more! I thought I had taken every possible cathedral tour and visited every museum, but I never knew about an upper gallery tour.
It seems that they introduced a proper guided tour of the gallery in the summer of 2014. Because of the renovation works, these tours were not available when I was in Santiago and I definitely want to do this one day. The only other triforium I have walked through was in Westminster Abbey where they also opened this space to visitors in recent years.

 

Sue127

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
French Camino in 2020
Thank you @ivar It’s great to see the beauty inside. I visited Santiago last year, not via à Camino, and was in awe, even with all the scaffolding. I can’t wait to visit at the end of my first Camino.
 

Elle Bieling

Elle Bieling, PilgrimageTraveler
Camino(s) past & future
A total of eight in the past 6 years!
Oh, do tell more! I thought I had taken every possible cathedral tour and visited every museum, but I never knew about an upper gallery tour. Now that you mention it, though, I think that maybe the rooftop tour included a brief glimpse of the galleries, but I am not at all sure.
Yes, Laurie, it was the rooftop tour. Click on the link for my photos of it. I took this tour five years ago, so I don't know if it has been the same more recently with all the phases of renovation. I don't have a lot of gallery photos, but the tour was fascinating and the stories about it, more so.
 

Bala

Veteran member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: SJPdP-Burgos, (2015); Burgos-Sarria (2018); Sarria-Santiago (2018).
Frances (2020)
@peregrina2000 Regarding the gallery tour. I took it in October, 2018, as the rooftop tour was filled. We walked the entire circumference of the cathedral and the views were really something. For starters, a group of several hundred pilgrims had arranged for a private mass that day, which just happened to be finishing up as we reached the top of the stairs at the front of the cathedral. So we got an eye-level view of the swinging butofumero, even if we were a bit in the distance. Later, as we came to the transcept we got a close view of the ropes, pulleys, and cross-beams that operate the butofumero from above. Quite fascinating. I tried to take photos, but my little phone camera just couldn't capture the mechanisms as a whole, although you can see one of the ropes in my photos below.

Equally impressive were the up close and personal views of the organ pipes and the statues that decorate and surround it. From floor level we have no idea of the elaborate carvings and workmanship that went into this artwork. I was reminded of an article I once read about the completion of the gothic-style National Cathedral in Washington, D.C. The reporter asked one of the workmen why bother with such detail on the back of the head of a cherub, placed high above the ground, that no one would ever see. "Well, God sees it," was his reply. 😊 My favorite photo below is of the priest in the confessional. It seemed to me to be a scene right out of the Middle Ages.

We got out on exterior balconies twice. One was over the Mercy Door, which was under scaffolding at the time for the desperately needed cleaning and restoration. Plants and small bushes were growing out of the cornices and other outcroppings. The other was on a larger balcony overlooking the square just before you go through the tunnel where the bagpipers play. If anything, the exterior there was in even worse shape, with stonework deteriorating, fairly sizable trees growing out the sides, rot, moss, and mold everywhere. It gave me a real appreciation of the enormous extent of the restoration work being done.

I believe there was quite a bit of history and architectural explanation given on the tour, but it was in Spanish. The guide did, rather grudgingly, translate a few bits into English now and then, since 6 of the 9 of us spoke no Spanish, so I think I missed a lot, lol. But it was still worth it. After all, as the old saying goes, a tourist complains, a pilgrim is grateful. 😄 I hope I have the opportunity to take it again and see it, and all the cathedral, in its restored glory. It looks spectacular.
.20200709_134515.jpg Screenshot_20200709-134338_Photos.jpg 20200709_134609.jpg 20200709_134543.jpg
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
@peregrina2000 Regarding the gallery tour. I took it in October, 2018, as the rooftop tour was filled. We walked the entire circumference of the cathedral and the views were really something. For starters, a group of several hundred pilgrims had arranged for a private mass that day, which just happened to be finishing up as we reached the top of the stairs at the front of the cathedral. So we got an eye-level view of the swinging butofumero, even if we were a bit in the distance. Later, as we came to the transcept we got a close view of the ropes, pulleys, and cross-beams that operate the butofumero from above. Quite fascinating. I tried to take photos, but my little phone camera just couldn't capture the mechanisms as a whole, although you can see one of the ropes in my photos below.

Equally impressive were the up close and personal views of the organ pipes and the statues that decorate and surround it. From floor level we have no idea of the elaborate carvings and workmanship that went into this artwork. I was reminded of an article I once read about the completion of the gothic-style National Cathedral in Washington, D.C. The reporter asked one of the workmen why bother with such detail on the back of the head of a cherub, placed high above the ground, that no one would ever see. "Well, God sees it," was his reply. 😊 My favorite photo below is of the priest in the confessional. It seemed to me to be a scene right out of the Middle Ages.

We got out on exterior balconies twice. One was over the Mercy Door, which was under scaffolding at the time for the desperately needed cleaning and restoration. Plants and small bushes were growing out of the cornices and other outcroppings. The other was on a larger balcony overlooking the square just before you go through the tunnel where the bagpipers play. If anything, the exterior there was in even worse shape, with stonework deteriorating, fairly sizable trees growing out the sides, rot, moss, and mold everywhere. It gave me a real appreciation of the enormous extent of the restoration work being done.

I believe there was quite a bit of history and architectural explanation given on the tour, but it was in Spanish. The guide did, rather grudgingly, translate a few bits into English now and then, since 6 of the 9 of us spoke no Spanish, so I think I missed a lot, lol. But it was still worth it. After all, as the old saying goes, a tourist complains, a pilgrim is grateful. 😄 I hope I have the opportunity to take it again and see it, and all the cathedral, in its restored glory. It looks spectacular.
.View attachment 78534 View attachment 78535 View attachment 78536 View attachment 78537
You have a great memory. Thank you!
 

Bala

Veteran member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: SJPdP-Burgos, (2015); Burgos-Sarria (2018); Sarria-Santiago (2018).
Frances (2020)
You have a great memory. Thank you!
It was a fun walk down memory lane! I hadn't really thought about this tour all that much since returning so it was fun to revisit it.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
I also had the privilege of doing the cathedral tour and we visited the galleries. Our guide spoke Spanish in a slower manner so I was able to understand everything.
Being from the USA I was lucky as I had an English speaking guide for my tours...even then I do not remember everyhing I learned.
🙄
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
To Santiago and beyond (from home; Voie de Tours; Camino Francés; Biskaya; Manche; Via Brabantica)
Regarding the gallery tour. I took it in October, 2018, as the rooftop tour was filled
Thank you for this splendid description! That's how I had understood it: that the guided tour of the rooftops (cubiertas) is a different tour than the guided tour of the gallery, and that the gallery tour (tribuna) is fairly recent and covers areas that had not been accessible to the public before. It used to be:

Visita guiada a la Tribuna de la Catedral: 10 euros.
Visita guiada a las Cubiertas de la Catedral: 12 euros.
 

JohnLloyd

Author of "Go Your Own Way"
Camino(s) past & future
Francés - SJPDP to SdC - Autumn 2018
Portugués - Porto to SdC - Spring 2019
Francés again - ASAP
I've been twice and I didn't know about these higher-level tours until now.

I shall have to walk a third Camino now...
 

Terry Callery

Chi Walker
Camino(s) past & future
"Portuguese Camino - In Search of the Infinite Moment" Amazon/Kindle books authored
"Slow Camino"
I had no idea about the massive renovation, so when I arrived in Santiago after walking from Lisbon (2018) on the Portuguese Route I was very disappointed to see all the blue construction tarps and staging obscuring the facade of the great cathedral.

IMG_1168.JPGIMG_1167.JPG
 

JohnLloyd

Author of "Go Your Own Way"
Camino(s) past & future
Francés - SJPDP to SdC - Autumn 2018
Portugués - Porto to SdC - Spring 2019
Francés again - ASAP
I really recognise now just how fortunate I was to finish my first Camino in late September 2018, when the Cathedral was free of scaffolding, posters or anything to detract from her glories.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
@peregrina2000 Regarding the gallery tour. I took it in October, 2018, as the rooftop tour was filled. We walked the entire circumference of the cathedral and the views were really something. For starters, a group of several hundred pilgrims had arranged for a private mass that day, which just happened to be finishing up as we reached the top of the stairs at the front of the cathedral. So we got an eye-level view of the swinging butofumero, even if we were a bit in the distance. Later, as we came to the transcept we got a close view of the ropes, pulleys, and cross-beams that operate the butofumero from above. Quite fascinating. I tried to take photos, but my little phone camera just couldn't capture the mechanisms as a whole, although you can see one of the ropes in my photos below.

Equally impressive were the up close and personal views of the organ pipes and the statues that decorate and surround it. From floor level we have no idea of the elaborate carvings and workmanship that went into this artwork. I was reminded of an article I once read about the completion of the gothic-style National Cathedral in Washington, D.C. The reporter asked one of the workmen why bother with such detail on the back of the head of a cherub, placed high above the ground, that no one would ever see. "Well, God sees it," was his reply. 😊 My favorite photo below is of the priest in the confessional. It seemed to me to be a scene right out of the Middle Ages.

We got out on exterior balconies twice. One was over the Mercy Door, which was under scaffolding at the time for the desperately needed cleaning and restoration. Plants and small bushes were growing out of the cornices and other outcroppings. The other was on a larger balcony overlooking the square just before you go through the tunnel where the bagpipers play. If anything, the exterior there was in even worse shape, with stonework deteriorating, fairly sizable trees growing out the sides, rot, moss, and mold everywhere. It gave me a real appreciation of the enormous extent of the restoration work being done.

I believe there was quite a bit of history and architectural explanation given on the tour, but it was in Spanish. The guide did, rather grudgingly, translate a few bits into English now and then, since 6 of the 9 of us spoke no Spanish, so I think I missed a lot, lol. But it was still worth it. After all, as the old saying goes, a tourist complains, a pilgrim is grateful. 😄 I hope I have the opportunity to take it again and see it, and all the cathedral, in its restored glory. It looks spectacular.
.View attachment 78534 View attachment 78535 View attachment 78536 View attachment 78537
If I were feeling more optimistic, I would put this on the top of my list for the next time I walk into Santiago. No point making a list or a plan when the event seems so unlikely and so far away!

The pictures are great, thanks so much for posting them.
 

IngridF

Intrepid Peregrina
Camino(s) past & future
2012, 2015 ,2017, 2019
Yes, Laurie, it was the rooftop tour. Click on the link for my photos of it. I took this tour five years ago, so I don't know if it has been the same more recently with all the phases of renovation. I don't have a lot of gallery photos, but the tour was fascinating and the stories about it, more so.
Great description... and pictures. Thank you for posting
 

Stephan the Painter

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2020)
Looks wonderful. Is the goal to repair or bring it back close to the original? And which original? For an old building, you might have many centuries to choose from.

Does anybody know of any links discussing the details of the restoration goals?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Leon - Santiago (2015); Ingles (2016); Baiona - Santiago (2018); Pamplona - Burgos (2021? 2022?)
Oh, this is magnificent. Can't wait to go back to Santiago.... We're moving to Portugal as soon as we can get our visas, so it will be an easy (and frequent!) trip.
 

4 Eyes

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF from SJPP 14, VDLP from Seville 15, DN&P from Irun 16, Portuguese from Lisbon 17, CF from SJPP 18
I wonder why they selected that particular image of the Christ on crucifix in the temporary altar. I learned from visiting one of the museums in Spain, (I forgot which one) that there is a theological significance in the depiction of the crucifix where Christ had his arms stretched to the sides versus a depiction of Christ with arms raised above, the former expressing a theological outlook of a wide open, welcoming and accepting church, while the latter expressed a more exclusive theological outlook. I take it that the people involved in the selection process must be aware of this theological distinction. So it bothers me to see that this particular form symbolizing exclusivity is selected.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
I wonder why they selected that particular image of the Christ on crucifix in the temporary altar. I learned from visiting one of the museums in Spain, (I forgot which one) that there is a theological significance in the depiction of the crucifix where Christ had his arms stretched to the sides versus a depiction of Christ with arms raised above, the former expressing a theological outlook of a wide open, welcoming and accepting church, while the latter expressed a more exclusive theological outlook. I take it that the people involved in the selection process must be aware of this theological distinction. So it bothers me to see that this particular form symbolizing exclusivity is selected.
I saw a quite different and more prosaic explanation for this when I was last in Trondheim around St Olav's Day two years ago, and visited one of the museums near the cathedral. The early depictions of Christ's body on the crucifix were symbolic, and presented the figure both as alive and crowned - in some way representing his priestly function in Christian thought. Later depictions became more realistic, emphasising the suffering of Christ on the cross as his body slumps under his outstretched arms.

@4 Eyes, I don't recall there being any suggestion of the theological interpretations you were offered.

I have seen somewhere recently that both forms are now being used in modern churches, although I admit that I haven't investigated this personally.
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
To Santiago and beyond (from home; Voie de Tours; Camino Francés; Biskaya; Manche; Via Brabantica)
The early depictions of Christ's body on the crucifix were symbolic, and presented the figure both as alive and crowned - in some way representing his priestly function in Christian thought. Later depictions became more realistic, emphasising the suffering of Christ on the cross as his body slumps under his outstretched arms.
The Cathedral published some information about the figure of Christ used for the provisional altar, see here in Spanish or Google Translated into English. This figure was part of a Gothic crucifix that was moved to other places in the cathedral when the choir was dismantled and removed from the central nave in 1946. The text says that the figure shows great expressiveness, typical of its time, showing the suffering that Christ, as a human, suffered in his martyrdom on the cross, marking his wounds and muscle tension until the body of the crucified is broken; a typology that would become very common, from the middle years of the fourteenth century onwards. I guess that is what a contemporary viewer sees, too: the suffering (followed by salvation) and not some interpretation about (or contrast to) a wide open, welcoming and accepting church - something that would have made no sense at all in any case when the figure was created.

Here is a photo from before 1946 with the crucifix in place. The whole view to the main altar must have been blocked then, I guess? This view is in the direction of the main altar which is behind the cross and the low wall while the current temporary altar would be at the back of the viewer.

I must say that I personally am pleased that they removed this stuff. It often pains me a bit when I visit a Gothic church that is stuffed with Baroque additions.

Choir.jpg
 
Last edited:

4 Eyes

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF from SJPP 14, VDLP from Seville 15, DN&P from Irun 16, Portuguese from Lisbon 17, CF from SJPP 18
Thank you Kathar1na and Dougfitz for the the information. Yes I have learned about the difference between the Byzantine cross which emphasized the glory of Christ and the S cross more common in western Europe which emphasized the suffering of Christ. The difference in the arms' positions does not involve the Byzantine cross. It is a difference within the S crosses. It is also not an interpretation. It supposedly reflects a actual historical theological dispute among the Catholic orders. The differences in the style of the cross was a reflection of that theological dispute. I tried to look up more information about it but have found none. It's probably an esoteric point known only to theologians and the curator of the museum. Anyhow I agree with you Kathar1na about the removal of Baroque pieces from a Gothic church. For that reason my favorite is the deconsecrated cathedral at the Museo del Pueblo Gallego. It still has a couple of Baroque pieces but it's mostly bare. It's very beautiful.
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
To Santiago and beyond (from home; Voie de Tours; Camino Francés; Biskaya; Manche; Via Brabantica)
The difference in the arms' positions does not involve the Byzantine cross. It is a difference within the S crosses.
I don't know what you mean by S crosses but I got curious. There's a short description of the development of crucifixes in art history here. A beautiful crucifix from Lucca in Italy, 8th century, is shown and described as outstretched arms do not bend with the weight of the body. Straight and firm as they are, the arms can suggest welcome or acclaim by a victorious leader. Then later, in Romanesque art, the arms are slightly bent but Jesus is still shown as alive while even later, in Gothic art, the imagery changes to the torments and death that Jesus suffered. Thanks for bringing this up, I wasn't particularly aware of these differences. Obviously, nowadays, the earlier such a crucifix was created, the rarer they are today.
 
Last edited:

4 Eyes

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF from SJPP 14, VDLP from Seville 15, DN&P from Irun 16, Portuguese from Lisbon 17, CF from SJPP 18
Thank you Kathar1na for the information on the history of the cross. By S cross I mean the crosses depicting Christ after death, where the knees are bent and the head hung over so that the body is shaped like an S from the side view. I am not talking about the Romanesque cross. I think we are talking about different things. Thanks for the effort. I appreciate it.
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
To Santiago and beyond (from home; Voie de Tours; Camino Francés; Biskaya; Manche; Via Brabantica)
I learned from visiting one of the museums in Spain, (I forgot which one) that there is a theological significance in the depiction of the crucifix where Christ had his arms stretched to the sides versus a depiction of Christ with arms raised above, the former expressing a theological outlook of a wide open, welcoming and accepting church, while the latter expressed a more exclusive theological outlook. I take it that the people involved in the selection process must be aware of this theological distinction. So it bothers me to see that this particular form symbolizing exclusivity is selected.
I hope you are now less bothered about the selection of this figure for the temporary altar, and please let us know when you remember to what period in history these different theological outlooks belong. If it's a long time ago then I cannot imagine that what a wide open, welcoming and accepting church meant then is similar to what it means now to most people.
 

4 Eyes

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF from SJPP 14, VDLP from Seville 15, DN&P from Irun 16, Portuguese from Lisbon 17, CF from SJPP 18
Thank you all for your input. I don't remember during what historical period this theological dispute arose. I don't remember which order took what position. I do remember the orders involved are still in existence now. I don't know if the orders involved have since changed theological doctrinal beliefs. I don't know what orders the people who selected the cross may belong to. Anyways, symbols can be important and consequential in many ways. Yes, different people attribute different meanings to them and have different sensitivities to them, depending on how they may be affected personally. as shown very clearly now in my country over the various statues and flags. I think the selection and use of symbols should be done with great care and awareness.
 

CWBuff

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
in Planning stage: Frances (SJPdP --> SdC) & Finisterre "2021" ... (GOD WILLING!)
.... We're moving to Portugal as soon as we can get our visas, so it will be an easy (and frequent!) trip.
Trying very hard to talk my wife into that move. so far she won't budge 😢
 

Get on our Mailing list for new products on the Camino Store and news from the Camino Forum








Advertisement

Booking.com

Most downloaded Resources

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store

Casa Ivar Newsletter






Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 16 1.2%
  • February

    Votes: 10 0.8%
  • March

    Votes: 54 4.2%
  • April

    Votes: 196 15.1%
  • May

    Votes: 323 24.9%
  • June

    Votes: 94 7.2%
  • July

    Votes: 24 1.9%
  • August

    Votes: 27 2.1%
  • September

    Votes: 373 28.8%
  • October

    Votes: 156 12.0%
  • November

    Votes: 17 1.3%
  • December

    Votes: 7 0.5%
Top
AdBlock Detected

We get it, advertisements are annoying!

Sure, ad-blocking software does a great job at blocking ads, but it also blocks useful features of our website. For the best site experience please disable your AdBlocker.

I've Disabled AdBlock