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COVID When would you consider going back to the camino?

I would come back...

  • when there is a vaccine

    Votes: 149 37.3%
  • for a camino in my own country

    Votes: 15 3.8%
  • the moment travel restrictions have lifted

    Votes: 173 43.3%
  • for a quiet camino staying in private accomodations

    Votes: 63 15.8%

  • Total voters
    400
Status
Not open for further replies.

Luka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pelgrimspad I, Via Monastica, Via Podiensis, Via de la Plata, Camino Francés, Camino del Norte...
I hope this won't become a polemic thread. It is a serious dilemma I have. What to do after the authorities make travelling possible again? My case is different from most of you, because I live in Spain. Most likely from May 11 on, I will be allowed again to travel within Asturias (after a lockdown of almost 2 months). The Covid19 numbers are low in this province, especially in the countryside (where I live). Theoretically I could plan a couple of days on the Norte or the Primitivo. And maybe from the end of June in other parts of Spain as well.

A pro would be that camino businesses desperately need income. A con would be that it is unnecessary travel. But what if I would stay away from the cities and the crowds? Book private accomodations? Do others here have similar dilemmas and would you for example consider a camino in your own country as an alternative? Or would you travel to Spain to walk again the moment the travel restrictions have lifted? Maybe taking all kind of measures you could think of (social distancing, washing hands, wearing masks...).

Or is a camino just not a camino if you can't share bread, albergues and stories with other pilgrims?
 

Luka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pelgrimspad I, Via Monastica, Via Podiensis, Via de la Plata, Camino Francés, Camino del Norte...
I took that as a condition for all options. So the question is: would you go the moment it is allowed? In my situation it will most likely be allowed again from next week on. But that doesn't necessarily mean that I will go. We will be entering a grey area: officially not forbidden, but advised to avoid crowds and stay home as much as possible.

Edit: I don't think the camino will be 'opened'. It will go more gradually. Probably residents first. Like I could spend a night in an Asturian hotel from next week on (if I find one that considers it worthwhile to open again).
 

Isca-camigo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Various ones.
What Robbo said + some of the others. I might walk the St James Way from Reading to Southampton in July or August, I would take my tent. Some of the Spanish Camigos I was going to walk with on the Camino Geira in April are to going to walk the Camino Do Mar from Ribadeo to Ferrol in late July if the easing of restrictions make it possible, I don't think I will be allowed into the Country but if I am I might change my plans. They would stay in accommodation other than Albergues which they think is more safe and I agree.
 
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Barbara

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte (twice)and Primitivo, Sureste, In France From home Tours and Vézelay, also Le Puy.
None of your options quite match my intentions, which are to ride my bike down the drive the day travel restrictions are lifted, join the Tours Camino variant that runs through the village (France,) and continue to thé Spanish border. At that point i will have to return due to time constraints. I'll be staying either in a tent or a hotel, assuming enough hotels are open. If the campsites are closed, I may have to rethink, as it's a very obscure route.
 

Roland49

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2019 July
As far as I have plans today, I will give a Camino Portugues as a present to my son as he fulfilled his professional training with a degree. That should be in April 2021. May his gf accompany him ;).

I will be there at the same time :cool:

Buen Camino!
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
@Luka - when you say "private accommodations" - what do you mean? Private albergues (i.e. in dormitories) or private rooms? A big difference.

@Barbara my memory of the Tours route is that it is well served with good quality chambre d'hotes. Always with our own bedroom and bathroom, often quite luxurious. I think we only stayed in a hotel once, and it was not as nice as the chambres. And more expensive.

I can't see myself getting on a long distance plane until there is either a vaccine, or an effective treatment, or the virus has mutated to become less dangerous.
 

Luka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pelgrimspad I, Via Monastica, Via Podiensis, Via de la Plata, Camino Francés, Camino del Norte...
@Luka - when you say "private accommodations" - what do you mean? Private albergues (i.e. in dormitories) or private rooms? A big difference.
Sorry, I mean private rooms. As I can imagine that sharing a dorm with 20, 30, 40 other pilgrims will be about the last thing to be possible...
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)
I took that as a condition for all options. So the question is: would you go the moment it is allowed? In my situation it will most likely be allowed again from next week on. But that doesn't necessarily mean that I will go. We will be entering a grey area: officially not forbidden, but advised to avoid crowds and stay home as much as possible.

Edit: I don't think the camino will be 'opened'. It will go more gradually. Probably residents first. Like I could spend a night in an Asturian hotel from next week on (if I find one that considers it worthwhile to open again).

OK, but none of the options fit.....

I wouldn't dash over there, No. I have a life and businesses to plan around.

I plan to next walk in 2022. If I am able to travel at that time, I'll assess what is possible. Who can tell?

I will wait for the 'all clear' in every respect. Then plan. Not before.
 

PK Smit

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
(015)Irun to Santiago
(017)Lisboa to S
2018Caminha to Santiago
(2018) Camino English Ferrol Santiago
I was supposed to be on the Camino right now, but was forced to abandon plans. At first I was thinking in a delay of six months, then changed to next year Apri/May, but according to what is happening in Africa right now, I am not sure if our borders will be open at that time allready. Maybe 2022 would be a better call.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015, 2017, 2019) and plans for 2021 (Sept, Oct)
My wife and I have walked the 800 CF three times (2015, 2017, 2019). We planned to walk again this fall to avoid the crowds in the Jubilee year. We purchased flights and make reservations for private rooms every night. For the past two caminos, my mother in law, who lives near us, stayed in our home and watched our beloved beagle, Pepper. She planned to watch Pepper again this fall. A few weeks ago, Pepper developed an abcessed tooth and the vet suggested it be extracted. Pepper did find during the simple procedure, was awake and walking around afterwards, then unexpectedly died ! We were shocked and heartbroken. We are searching for a beagle puppy and decided we're okay with delaying our next camino until 2022, since we'd not ask my 87 year old mother in law to watch a new puppy. For sure we'll not travel without a vaccine.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF- Finisterre-Muxia 03/17; Camino SK 10/17; Norte 03/18; Ingles 11/18; Augusta 03/19
As far as I have plans today, I will give a Camino Portugues as a present to my son as he fulfilled his professional training with a degree. That should be in April 2021. May his gf accompany him ;).

I will be there at the same time :cool:

Buen Camino!

A wonderful graduation gift.
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
Other:

I had planned to go again in 2023. I am reasonably optimistic that will be doable. I won't if any of the following apply at the time:
- Spain is not ready to receive people again
- My own country thinks travel is still not a good idea
- International health experts say travel is still not advised.
 

Luka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pelgrimspad I, Via Monastica, Via Podiensis, Via de la Plata, Camino Francés, Camino del Norte...
My wife and I have walked the 800 CF three times (2015, 2017, 2019). We planned to walk again this fall to avoid the crowds in the Jubilee year. We purchased flights and make reservations for private rooms every night. For the past two caminos, my mother in law, who lives near us, stayed in our home and watched our beloved beagle, Pepper. She planned to watch Pepper again this fall. A few weeks ago, Pepper developed an abcessed tooth and the vet suggested it be extracted. Pepper did find during the simple procedure, was awake and walking around afterwards, then unexpectedly died ! We were shocked and heartbroken. We are searching for a beagle puppy and decided we're okay with delaying our next camino until 2022, since we'd not ask my 87 year old mother in law to watch a new puppy. For sure we'll not travel without a vaccine.
I am sorry to hear about the sudden loss of your dog! I can imagine you miss him dearly.

I didn't realise that before: if this camino year is lost, it might be even more crowdy in the holy year of 2021. If the virus is under control by then.
 

Linda Fantillo

RiverWalker
Camino(s) past & future
September/October 14, May 17, September 18, MAY 2020
Tomorrow - Please! No seriously, was scheduled to leave for the Primitivo and San Salvador tomorrow. Turning 70 in another month, I will be cautious regarding what is transpiring re Covid-19 - certainly in Spain, advisories re travel from Canada on an overseas flight etc. We all miss it so much, but my first thoughts are the Spanish people and the ability to hopefully live a "normal" life sooner than later.
 

Stephan the Painter

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2020)
When there is a vaccine or the disease has pretty much run its course.

I was supposed to walk my first Camino starting April 9 of this year. Luckily I was able to cancel and get about 90% refund on my reservations.

I won’t plan anything new until the situation is really pretty much back to normal. Maybe I’ll rethink my budget to see if I can afford private rooms, or maybe try to find a travel companion to make that easier. But I wouldn’t go unless the pandemic was in severe remission or gone, and Spain was really encouraging tourism again.

I’m really thinking that it’ll be 2022 or 2023 before this is settled down one way or another.
Edit: I’d also have to be able to buy travel insurance.
 
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alhartman

346 joyful days in Spain and France since 2005
Camino(s) past & future
Hope so!
Being in a high risk age group (male and 77) with some of the minor co-morbidity,--besides the administrative openings, I want a vaccine and/or curative treatment.
And, very unlikely to go in a holy year because of the crowds--shoulder season waking only for me; but may have to consider a winter camino.
So spring 2022 earliest, and my health will still need to be good. I have used Godesalco to plan a sub 20km from Pamplona to Ponferrada to allow for decline in endurance which is already well underway.
 

CWBuff

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
in Planning stage: Frances (SJPdP --> SdC) & Finisterre "2021" ... (GOD WILLING!)
Hmmm... the way i see it - does not # 4 (for a quiet camino staying in private accomodations) to an extend predicates upon the other 3 (or at least ##1 and\or 3)?

My initial plans are CF late May - July 2021. I stick with that as per my vote as explained:
I dont think it would make a lot of difference to me if vaccine is available or not
I want to do CF so it is not in my country (US)​
It matters not if I stay in private or public places - whatever will be available is OK with me (as so many members stated before.... roll with the punches so to speak)​
Hence, by the method of deduction I voted for # 3 :) 🤞
 

Barbara

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte (twice)and Primitivo, Sureste, In France From home Tours and Vézelay, also Le Puy.
@Barbara my memory of the Tours route is that it is well served with good quality chambre d'hotes. Always with our own bedroom and bathroom, often quite luxurious. I think we only stayed in a hotel once, and it was not as nice as the chambres. And more expensive.
Hi Kanga
I've already done the main route, but that was in 2001. I mostly stayed in Gites and Bed and Breakfast. The secondary route via Angouleme is what I'm planning now. Most of the pilgrim accommodation is family welcome, and I don't think that's a good idea right now. There are some pilgrim Albergues, mostly very small, in Charentes. I doubt if they will be open yet. The last part of the route I'll be branching off to Lescar. The route just vanishes after Saint Aulaye, so I've cobbled together something that looks reasonable. I've already done the Somport route from Lescar via Lourdes and Oloron Sainte Marie as far as Pamplona so next time I'm in Spain I'll take the Basque Interior route and then the Invierno.
I like camping. Main problem is going to be charging the electric assist bike. That's one big heavy solar panel.
I'm hoping campsites will be open for me, as wild camping isn't much liked in France. It's acceptable if you are walking with a donkey, because nobody can resist a donkey.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (14), Portuguese (15), Le Puy (17), Ingles (17), VDLP (18), Lana (18), Madrid (19) + more
I need two things to happen before I return:
- Spain officially welcomes back international Camino-walkers
- Canada must lift international travel restrictions so I can obtain travel insurance

I'll probably take my tent if I hike on a busy Camino route.
 

Tina van Zyl

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
none
I was supposed to be on the Camino right now, but was forced to abandon plans. At first I was thinking in a delay of six months, then changed to next year Apri/May, but according to what is happening in Africa right now, I am not sure if our borders will be open at that time allready. Maybe 2022 would be a better call.

We would have left around 17h00 today from Cape Town to Porto - very sad! We are planning for May 2021 - please I pray, but like you say, Africa is only starting now with infections. They recon we will peak around August?
 

malingerer

samarkand
Camino(s) past & future
cf (2), de la plata, cp. (2003 -2018)


Disagree as Camino is Camino with or without others. I travel alone as a matter of choice. Nevertheless, buen Camino. I would go yesterday if I could but need to win the lottery in order to stay in paradors etc. At my age, my new post virus mantra will be " to hell with poverty! " At 82 I need solitude and space :) Take care and stay safe!

The Malingerer.
 

Holly Mitchem

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2016, del Norte 2019
I think 2022 is the earliest I would consider traveling to Spain, as if things are opened up I am not super excited to walk during a Holy Year. I think there will be a huge pent-up demand. However, I live 12 miles from Mission San Buenaventura in Southern California so I am thinking of walking from this mission up to Mission Santa Barbara and maybe beyond to Mission Santa Ynez and Mission la Purisima on the central coast. There is a group called California Mission Walkers (they have an active FB page), a guidebook, a credential, and stamps at each mission. And now gps tracks as well. These would all most likely be day trips. Not of course the same fellowship found walking the Frances or the Norte, but it does sound wonderful. As of now I think over 200 people have walked between all 21 missions. Some do it as a through walk but most do it in sections.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
Canada must lift international travel restrictions so I can obtain travel insurance
I can imagine that travel insurance may be more expensive in the near future, and I wouldn't be surprised if countries required that foreigners have adequate travel health insurance before entering their countries.
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Aragones-Frances (2016); VdlP-Sanabres (2017); Madrid-Frances-Invierno (2019)Levante
I will not purchase an air ticket until I have been vaccinated. At the moment, I am hoping for sometime in 2021, walking the Levante from Valencia. I do not anticipate crowds on that route and shall try to find a cooler season to walk. I may add a lightweight bivy and my Thermarest mattress (350 g.) to my gear, depending on what I hear from others when I am planning the route.
 

martin1ws

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Somport to Finisterre Jul-Aug 2018; Munich to Lindau (Germany) Sep 2020
My non-family-holiday is in September. I will hopefully be on a Camino in Spain... depending on travel restrictions and camino restrictions (no risk group). If this is not possible, I will try a Camino in Germany. One Camino route crosses Munich only some kilometers from my house door.
Whereever it will be... i want to have light camping gear that sleeping without albergues is a fallback option. This may be helpful in Spain in 2021 (holy year) as well.
 
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Anto

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
September 2017 SJPDP to Pamplona
Hi
I voted for when there is a vaccine but I may ameliorate that if there is no prospect of a vaccine and the virus has retreated to such an extent that the likelihood of catching it is unlikely or there is an effective and widely available anti viral
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portuguese 2012
Camino Mozarabe 2018 Granada-Merida
Camino de la Lana (2020)
I think that for many of us coming from outside Europe, international travel will be dictated by the insurance companies and their willingness to cover influenza related costs. As per usual most have taken the money and then backed out when it comes to covering costs incurred due to this outbreak so trusting them to honour their policies is not something we can rely on unfortunately. Hopefully 2021 will see us on the Ruta de la Lana that we should be doing right now !
 

Dromengro

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP - Leon 1984
Frances (2021)
None of the poll options really

1- Maybe there will never be a vaccine.
2- Sorry I can't bring myself to call a walk outside Spain a Camino. I could go on a pilgrimage here in the UK if it connected religious or spiritual places or headed in the direction of Santiago with the intention to complete it later. Other than that it would be just a walk, which I do plenty of anyway.
3- The virus can't be turned off like a tap, even when travel restrictions are lifted it will still be around for some time, infrastructure will take a while to recover, and the very real possibility of a second lockdown.
4- Despite normally preferring to be alone, I was looking forward to the interaction of meeting and sharing stories with others, as on my first pilgrimage I camped and met or saw no other pilgrims as it was before it got popular and today's pilgrim infrastructure. So I wouldn't want to use private accommodation.

I'll wait and go when I feel it is safe enough and the world more back to normal, and obviously legal to travel. Probably next year.

However I think if you live in Spain, then as long as it's legal and that you are prepared for closed Albergues, take sensible precautions and be prepared for a quick exit if there's a a second lockdown then you'll be as safe on a Camino as staying at home.
 

Anamiri

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016, 2017, 2019 Camino Frances
I hope this won't become a polemic thread. It is a serious dilemma I have. What to do after the authorities make travelling possible again? My case is different from most of you, because I live in Spain. Most likely from May 11 on, I will be allowed again to travel within Asturias (after a lockdown of almost 2 months). The Covid19 numbers are low in this province, especially in the countryside (where I live). Theoretically I could plan a couple of days on the Norte or the Primitivo. And maybe from the end of June in other parts of Spain as well.

A pro would be that camino businesses desperately need income. A con would be that it is unnecessary travel. But what if I would stay away from the cities and the crowds? Book private accomodations? Do others here have similar dilemmas and would you for example consider a camino in your own country as an alternative? Or would you travel to Spain to walk again the moment the travel restrictions have lifted? Maybe taking all kind of measures you could think of (social distancing, washing hands, wearing masks...).

Or is a camino just not a camino if you can't share bread, albergues and stories with other pilgrims?
I think another option is missing - affordable air travel - its not just when restrictions have lifted - it is possible that some airlines wont make it, or travel to some destinations.
 
Camino(s) past & future
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
May do a peaceful holy year VdlP in 2021 and go home before the last 100k into Santiago in spring next year. VdlP is fantastic.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
I think that for many of us coming from outside Europe, international travel will be dictated by the insurance companies and their willingness to cover influenza related costs
I think that you mean Covid related costs, since this isn't a flu virus. I know it's nit-picky, but there is a big difference.
2- Sorry I can't bring myself to call a walk outside Spain a Camino.
If you were speaking Spanish you would. 😅
 

mvanert

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Bits and pieces - 2014, 2016, 2018 and 2020?
I took that as a condition for all options. So the question is: would you go the moment it is allowed? In my situation it will most likely be allowed again from next week on. But that doesn't necessarily mean that I will go. We will be entering a grey area: officially not forbidden, but advised to avoid crowds and stay home as much as possible.

Edit: I don't think the camino will be 'opened'. It will go more gradually. Probably residents first. Like I could spend a night in an Asturian hotel from next week on (if I find one that considers it worthwhile to open again).
I will go as soon as the authorities say it is okay.
 

Lindsay53

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances April / May 19
I too will go as soon as the restrictions are lifted. This looks like being some time next year at the moment, we can only wait and see.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
It's not the walking that would be a worry for me, because if it is deemed safe enough to walk the Camino, there will be guidelines in place.

What worries me more is the prospect of getting on a plane with hundreds of other people. Not to mention the cost, because many airlines will be going belly-up.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
Or is a camino just not a camino if you can't share bread, albergues and stories with other pilgrims?
No, or at least not for me. Three of my pilgrimage walks have been quite solitary. While I enjoyed the company of other pilgrims when we met, the lack of other pilgrims wasn't something that detracted from the experience.

My next camino is likely to be the CP, starting from Lisbon. I expect that it will be a similarly solitary experience until I reach Porto, when their might be more pilgrims sharing accommodation, etc.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)
No, or at least not for me. Three of my pilgrimage walks have been quite solitary. While I enjoyed the company of other pilgrims when we met, the lack of other pilgrims wasn't something that detracted from the experience.

My next camino is likely to be the CP, starting from Lisbon. I expect that it will be a similarly solitary experience until I reach Porto, when their might be more pilgrims sharing accommodation, etc.

We're 'Birds of a Feather' I think @dougfitz .
I like to walk alone with not a soul in sight.
Though breaking bread with just one of two others in the Evening is nice.

Probably a key reason why I use private accommodation.....
 

HeidiL

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2004-), Portugués, Madrid, 4/5 Plata, 1/8 Levante, 1/8 Lana, Augusta, hospitalera Grado.
I am fairly certain I will walk for a week in my own country this summer.

When travel restrictions are lifted, both in my own country and in Spain, I will walk in Spain again.

I usually walk with my husband (and often also our son) on caminos where there are few people walking - I miss Spain, Spaniards and Spanish villages, not other pilgrims.

The majority of my meetings with pilgrims are right here on the Forum!
 

Luka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pelgrimspad I, Via Monastica, Via Podiensis, Via de la Plata, Camino Francés, Camino del Norte...
Thanks for your replies! I am not sure what to do myself. I would like to opt for a quiet camino here in Spain. But I'll have to wait until at least the second half of June to be able to travel within the country again. The camino I had in mind (Mozárabe) will be too hot by then.
 
D

Deleted member 94911

Guest
I hope this won't become a polemic thread. It is a serious dilemma I have. What to do after the authorities make travelling possible again? My case is different from most of you, because I live in Spain. Most likely from May 11 on, I will be allowed again to travel within Asturias (after a lockdown of almost 2 months). The Covid19 numbers are low in this province, especially in the countryside (where I live). Theoretically I could plan a couple of days on the Norte or the Primitivo. And maybe from the end of June in other parts of Spain as well.

A pro would be that camino businesses desperately need income. A con would be that it is unnecessary travel. But what if I would stay away from the cities and the crowds? Book private accomodations? Do others here have similar dilemmas and would you for example consider a camino in your own country as an alternative? Or would you travel to Spain to walk again the moment the travel restrictions have lifted? Maybe taking all kind of measures you could think of (social distancing, washing hands, wearing masks...).

Or is a camino just not a camino if you can't share bread, albergues and stories with other pilgrims?
I think my grandchildren will be walking Camino for me in 2025
now where did I put my reading glasses and false teath
 

lindam

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, VDLP, Invierno, Portuguese, Madrid, Ingles, Fisterra, Muxia, Catalan/Aragones/Loyola Norte
I can imagine that travel insurance may be more expensive in the near future, and I wouldn't be surprised if countries required that foreigners have adequate travel health insurance before entering their countries.
This is already happening: in order to enter Thailand, one must have very expensive health travel insurance with specific coverage for Covid-19.
 

nathanael

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte, Plata,
@Luka - when you say "private accommodations" - what do you mean? Private albergues (i.e. in dormitories) or private rooms? A big difference.

@Barbara my memory of the Tours route is that it is well served with good quality chambre d'hotes. Always with our own bedroom and bathroom, often quite luxurious. I think we only stayed in a hotel once, and it was not as nice as the chambres. And more expensive.

I can't see myself getting on a long distance plane until there is either a vaccine, or an effective treatment, or the virus has mutated to become less dangerous.
that could be a long time.
 
D

Deleted member 94911

Guest
I am a walker already walked 25 caminos
i walk solo and love my own company but with social distancing I don’t see albergues opening for years
communal dinners nightmare
No Camino for me until vaccine comes and tested
 

JiminVa

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances Aug/Sept 17; Frances Aug/Sept 18
My son and I are scheduled to walk the Camino mid-Aug to late Sept this year. If we can go. We'll go. If not we'll walk in 2021 if we can.
 

Barbara

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte (twice)and Primitivo, Sureste, In France From home Tours and Vézelay, also Le Puy.
Stephan, it means that some people will take you into their home, treat you as an honoured guest, and do it for nothing more than the privilege of helping a pilgrim. They might ask for a prayer on your arrival.
 
Stephan, it means that some people will take you into their home, treat you as an honoured guest, and do it for nothing more than the privilege of helping a pilgrim. They might ask for a prayer on your arrival.
Hi Barbara
I undertook a training course,with the Association les amis de St Jacques Rhône/ Alpes in 2012 ,to be a hospitalière in France.Since 2007 I have walked many routes in France including La Voie de Tours.
I have volunteered in Le Puy.Bordeaux and Lourdes.
I am familiar with the Accueils Jacqaires where individuals or families welcome pilgrims into their homes .Accueils Jacqaires ,which I have had the pleasure to stay in,provide a bed for the night along with usually dinner and breakfast.They are not commercial establishments and the hosts have expenses which have to be met.There is no set fee but having enjoyed their hospitality a donation is merited.You ,of course ,give according to your means.
I think it is wrong to give the impression a prayer will suffice.There are also gîtes in France where they prefer not to use the term donativo but participation aux frais i.e you
give something towards the expenses.
 

Barbara

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte (twice)and Primitivo, Sureste, In France From home Tours and Vézelay, also Le Puy.
Yes, thank you Mournes. On several occasions I have had to politely insist on giving to my hosts favourite charity. I am fully aware that people must meet their expenses but I stand by what I posted. There are still, in this world, people who WILL NOT accept money.
My home is one of those places.
I have yet to encounter a genuine pilgrim who does not offer to help with my expenses. I have yet to take their money. The people who asked for a prayer have had more than one.
The Pilgrimage to St. James has many people both on the way and housing those who walk who still believe that it is A PILGRIMAGE.
If that's not why one walks, no problem. Just don't say that one is a pilgrim. Actually, if you ask to stay with me, I don't mind what your motivation is. Please don't be offended if, as my guest, I don't want your money. Pay it forward.
Oh, and I have been a Hospitalier
Just to add that one family did sneak some money into the house. It went to an animal rescue centre.
 

lindam

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, VDLP, Invierno, Portuguese, Madrid, Ingles, Fisterra, Muxia, Catalan/Aragones/Loyola Norte
I can not imagine an insurance company offering specific COVID-19 coverage with out a vaccine.
Apparently it is very difficult and hugely expensive to find such a policy. I am aware that there are some expats who were living in Thailand and left the country for a temporary period before all of this began and, sadly, can't return to their homes in Thailand as they do not possess the required insurance policy.
 

jpflavin1

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(10,11,17), Vasco(12), Salvador(13), CP(13), CN(14), Madrid (16), Mozarabe (18), VdlP(19)
I chose when travel restrictions have been lifted.

It is unlikely, imo, there will be a vaccine for this virus before travel restrictions have been lifted. I would be willing to risk walking when international travel restrictions are lifted and the Spanish government says it is allowable to walk.

My plan would include a mask and sanitizers on the plane and in crowded accommodations along the way. It is likely, imo, some of the practices we have incorporated into our daily lives will be around for a while.

Mucha salud a todos
 
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mark stevens

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
camino Francés - 2016
camino Ingles - 2018
camino Norte - 2019
I was due to go on May 22 to do the Norte again after doing the frances in 2016, ingles in 2018 and Norte in 2019.

I think this year will probably be a small Camino in the UK, maybe the SW coast path or something like that and we’ll return to Spain in 2021 when, we hope, everything will have returned to normal. Here’s the hoping.....
 
Camino(s) past & future
www.cyclingsofties.blog
Camino de Santiago, 2013
Lucky you, Luka, already living in Spain. I would have thought that you'd be welcome back with open arms once the Way is cleared for pilgrims to arrive. The only caution I would take is to ensure that you do everything to make sure you don't get into any trouble and need outside help. But I'm sure things will begin to get easier and I can well understand your desire to start working again.

We were hoping to walk much of the Camino next year, after spending a few weeks attending a cycling event in France this year. The cycling even has been put off until next year, which leaves us with a dilemma. I will be 73 and my husband 80 next year and we thought a walk would be more fitting - having cycled the Camino de Santiago already - trust me, it's not the same. We live in the UK, and I think that it is unlikely that we would be allowed to travel to Europe at our ages until there is a vaccine available so this definitely puts the rest of this year out of commission. So it's holiday in France next year then the Camino in 2022?

The trip to France has already been paid for and we are unlikely to get our money back - indeed, both the ferry company and the insurance company have agreed to vouchers as they aren't too keen in giving us our money back. We might get the cost of the holiday back, and are still waiting on this. Yes, the virus has certainly made for some very frustrating decisions to be taken. Our passports both need to be renewed in 2023 so we might just find restrictions on travelling any time during 2022! We will wait and see.
 

Pelegrin

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo June 2013
SJPP - Logroño June 2014
Ingles July2016
My plan would include a mask and sanitizers on the plane and in crowded accommodations along the way. It is likely, imo, some of the practices we have incorporated into our daily lives will be around for a while.
Mucho salud a todos
I never correct this type of misspelling because I make a lot of similar mistakes in English when I write on the forum, but in this case I take the opportunity to wish:

Mucha salud a todos y todas.
 

Luka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pelgrimspad I, Via Monastica, Via Podiensis, Via de la Plata, Camino Francés, Camino del Norte...
Lucky you, Luka, already living in Spain. I would have thought that you'd be welcome back with open arms once the Way is cleared for pilgrims to arrive. The only caution I would take is to ensure that you do everything to make sure you don't get into any trouble and need outside help. But I'm sure things will begin to get easier and I can well understand your desire to start working again.
Yes, in a way I am lucky. In another way maybe not. The Spanish lockdown has been very strict. From Monday on I hope to be abe to slowly get back into shape after almost 2 months of confinement at home.

I still find it complicated. For me what the authorities decide is not leading, because they decide differently in different countries while the virus is everywhere the same. It is much more about common sense. I would prefer to avoid places where people come together, but a solitary walk seems perfectly possible.
 
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Barbara

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte (twice)and Primitivo, Sureste, In France From home Tours and Vézelay, also Le Puy.
. We live in the UK, and I think that it is unlikely that we would be allowed to travel to Europe at our ages until there is a vaccine available
I very much doubt anyone will find European travel from the UK dependent on there being a vaccine. You will just have to make your own analysis as to the risks, in view of your age. Here in France the opening of the lockdown is not age dependent. Apparently the State still considers older people capable of using their own judgement.
PS
France next year? Last time I looked we were right next to Spain, and also in Europe. Or did I misunderstand your timetable?
 
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trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
I very much doubt anyone will find European travel from the UK dependent on there being a vaccine. You will just have to make your own analysis as to the risks, in view of your age
But the risk of travel is not just to the traveler, but possibly to all that they encounter.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
But the risk of travel is not just to the traveler, but possibly to all that they encounter.
Again, thank you @trecile. It's complicated. Things can open up prematurely, because the decision to open up is not only a medical one. So while it may be legal, it may not be the wise or kind thing to do to potentially expose yourself to the virus, and thereby potentially everybody else whom you meet.
 

Stephan the Painter

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2020)
After some further thought, I’ll start planning my Camino when Spain is asking for the tourists to come back.

I doubt Spain will do this before it’s reasonably safe to do so for everybody involved, both pilgrims and the people who run the businesses that serve the pilgrims. And then everybody will be happy. One will not be imposing on anyone or taking unnecessary risks, or forcing those risks on others.
 

Barbara

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte (twice)and Primitivo, Sureste, In France From home Tours and Vézelay, also Le Puy.
But the risk of travel is not just to the traveler, but possibly to all that they encounter.
Yes, of course. No doubt this will be taken into consideration by those people who have to make the decision on opening the border. However, as land borders are not impermeable to virus, and in any event cross border traffic of goods and trans frontalier workers already exists, I doubt if people will be at greater risk when travellers arrive than they are already. As long as the virus is under control everywhere, which is already a big if, then travel should be entirely possible, taking reasonable precautions.
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
I hope this won't become a polemic thread. It is a serious dilemma I have. What to do after the authorities make travelling possible again? My case is different from most of you, because I live in Spain. Most likely from May 11 on, I will be allowed again to travel within Asturias (after a lockdown of almost 2 months). The Covid19 numbers are low in this province, especially in the countryside (where I live). Theoretically I could plan a couple of days on the Norte or the Primitivo. And maybe from the end of June in other parts of Spain as well.

A pro would be that camino businesses desperately need income. A con would be that it is unnecessary travel. But what if I would stay away from the cities and the crowds? Book private accomodations? Do others here have similar dilemmas and would you for example consider a camino in your own country as an alternative? Or would you travel to Spain to walk again the moment the travel restrictions have lifted? Maybe taking all kind of measures you could think of (social distancing, washing hands, wearing masks...).

Or is a camino just not a camino if you can't share bread, albergues and stories with other pilgrims?

Luca, I live in Palencia, and help run a donativo albergue in Grado, Asturias, your neighborhood! Lucky you, Asturias has gone to Phase 1 of the "decellaration," and you can get out and about! Trouble is, you still need to have a good reason to go anywhere along a public pathway. And the hotels and hostels -- and especially pilgrim albergues -- still have not been given legal clearance or guidance regarding opening and hosting anyone. Until then, you will not find anyplace to stay.
It will be at least June before walking a camino is legally feasible, and then only if the Covid-19 numbers are almost to zero. Once the surviving albergues open, they will likely not have open kitchens or common areas. The dorms will be stripped of much of their furnishings, capacity will be greatly reduced, and the hospi will likely be following you around with disinfectant and plastic bags.
You will have only Spanish pilgrims to talk with, or other legal residents of Spain, as the borders are expected to remain closed into Autumn.
I hope to hit the Road soon as I can, but I will take a tent!
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
No doubt this will be taken into consideration by those people who have to make the decision on opening the border
One would hope so, but sadly wisdom is hardly guaranteed.

Regardless, for those headed to Spain Rebecca's comments here seem like reasonable estimate the situation:
It will be at least June before walking a camino is legally feasible, and then only if the Covid-19 numbers are almost to zero.
[...]
You will have only Spanish pilgrims to talk with, or other legal residents of Spain, as the borders are expected to remain closed into Autumn.
 

martin1ws

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Somport to Finisterre Jul-Aug 2018; Munich to Lindau (Germany) Sep 2020
I hope to hit the Road soon as I can, but I will take a tent!
Where do you plan to place your tent?
Do you think one can have the tent "in the garden" of an albergue and use its toilets and showers (and pay the albergue as usual)?
 
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concha

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Ingles (2019)
In the UK press this morning it is reported that the government, from the end of May, is going to impose a 14 day quarantine requirement upon all arrivals into the UK (including UK citizens), with the exception of arrivals from the Republic of Ireland (can't quite understand the rationale behind this exception). Spot checks will apparently be carried out to ensure compliance. This will make any International travel for working UK residents unfeasible, especially for those who cannot work from home. I also anticipate these restrictions will be mirrored by other countries including Spain. We had booked our flights late last year to walk the Portugues from Porto in mid September but will be deferring it till Sept 2021 at the earliest or until a vaccine is available and rolled out. We shall return to the Camino when it is safe for everyone (including local communities), international travel restrictions have been lifted and Spain is welcoming tourism with open arms. The Camino will always be there. Its been there for several hundred years and isn't going anywhere. We shall return, just not this year.
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2016), Norte (2017), Portuges (2018), Mozarabe (2019), Primitivo (2019), Via de La Plata (2
I hope this won't become a polemic thread. It is a serious dilemma I have. What to do after the authorities make travelling possible again? My case is different from most of you, because I live in Spain. Most likely from May 11 on, I will be allowed again to travel within Asturias (after a lockdown of almost 2 months). The Covid19 numbers are low in this province, especially in the countryside (where I live). Theoretically I could plan a couple of days on the Norte or the Primitivo. And maybe from the end of June in other parts of Spain as well.

A pro would be that camino businesses desperately need income. A con would be that it is unnecessary travel. But what if I would stay away from the cities and the crowds? Book private accomodations? Do others here have similar dilemmas and would you for example consider a camino in your own country as an alternative? Or would you travel to Spain to walk again the moment the travel restrictions have lifted? Maybe taking all kind of measures you could think of (social distancing, washing hands, wearing masks...).

Or is a camino just not a camino if you can't share bread, albergues and stories with other pilgrims?
Hi there. I live in the Province of Huelva in Andalucia, which, like Asturias, has been allowed to enter Phase 1 of the relaxation of lockdown. This raises the possibility of walking a tranche of the Via de La Plata - maybe from Sevilla to Monasterio or Zufre. However I feel that I would rather wait until all restriction of common gatherings have been lifted.

For me I identify very much with your last sentence....a Camino is not a Camino if you can't share bread, albergues and stories with other walkers.

Saludos.
 

Razvan

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
future (2018)
I hope to start the Portuguese Camino in Porto on September 30th.
This will happen if the authorities allow it and the insurance will cover Covid-19.
I have a reservation on September 29 to Porto with a layover in Brussels.

P.S. Just today I checked and packed my backpack again :)
 

Quicci

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
C. Francés from Pamplona (Sep-Oct 2016)
C. Portugués da Costa from Porto (Sep-Oct 2018)
Multiple options in the poll would be great :)

It is currently possible to walk in my home country (Slovakia, Europe), and with new Camino routes open here, I will walk on multiple weekends in spring and summer! (our local travel restrictions are not limited, travelling abroad is discouraged by compulsory quarantine upon return).

Back in 2019 I planned to start the Camino in Spain last Wednesday (Leon > Oviedo > Santiago), and in current conditions I moved the schedule to September/Autumn.

If this does not work out, then next year, with the vaccine in place, the Way will still be there to grind down my feet :D
 

JustinB

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Future (2020)
May 2022, have to put my life back in order first. Need to visit grandkids, kids, brothers and sister first. Go to Italy and visit cousins and family ancestral home first.
 

John Hawke

Leaving O'Cebreiro
Camino(s) past & future
May 2016, completed 1/6/2016
(April 2018)
I hope this won't become a polemic thread. It is a serious dilemma I have. What to do after the authorities make travelling possible again? My case is different from most of you, because I live in Spain. Most likely from May 11 on, I will be allowed again to travel within Asturias (after a lockdown of almost 2 months). The Covid19 numbers are low in this province, especially in the countryside (where I live). Theoretically I could plan a couple of days on the Norte or the Primitivo. And maybe from the end of June in other parts of Spain as well.

A pro would be that camino businesses desperately need income. A con would be that it is unnecessary travel. But what if I would stay away from the cities and the crowds? Book private accomodations? Do others here have similar dilemmas and would you for example consider a camino in your own country as an alternative? Or would you travel to Spain to walk again the moment the travel restrictions have lifted? Maybe taking all kind of measures you could think of (social distancing, washing hands, wearing masks...).

Or is a camino just not a camino if you can't share bread, albergues and stories with other pilgrims?
I abandoned my Primitivo March 8th in Lugo. Oh how I wish I had your dilemma ! Of course I'm retired and living in the U.S.
 

tjb1013

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2017)
Portugués (2019)
For me it will be a vaccine.

With the large caveat around "based on what is believed now about COVID-19", it appears that congregating in small spaces for long periods with others is the most effective way to spread the virus. That describes every night on a Camino the way I and most others do them, with a nightly changing group of friends and strangers.

Spreading the virus to hospitaleros and hospitaleras would seem to be among the best ways I could think of to spread it as far as it can spread on the Camino.

While there is much to be learned about the fatality rate of COVID-19, as of this morning 0.24% of all New Yorkers have died of it. If as many as half of them were infected, that's a 0.48% fatality rate. Five in a thousand is perhaps not much, but there are thousands and thousands of peregrinos.

On top of that, some number of the people who survive the illness appear to be left with permanent damage to important systems.

That's too much risk for me, and importantly, for others.

My partner and I are actively planning our next Camino, the north route, and hoping for a record-breaking sprint to a vaccine.
 

4 Eyes

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF from SJPP 14, VDLP from Seville 15, DN&P from Irun 16, Portuguese from Lisbon 17, CF from SJPP 18
I can imagine that travel insurance may be more expensive in the near future, and I wouldn't be surprised if countries required that foreigners have adequate travel health insurance before entering their countries.
Just a caveat: travel insurance policies always exclude pandemics from coverage.
 

Zordmot

First timer Spring 2019
Camino(s) past & future
April-May 2019
I think 2022 is the earliest I would consider traveling to Spain, as if things are opened up I am not super excited to walk during a Holy Year. I think there will be a huge pent-up demand. However, I live 12 miles from Mission San Buenaventura in Southern California so I am thinking of walking from this mission up to Mission Santa Barbara and maybe beyond to Mission Santa Ynez and Mission la Purisima on the central coast. There is a group called California Mission Walkers (they have an active FB page), a guidebook, a credential, and stamps at each mission. And now gps tracks as well. These would all most likely be day trips. Not of course the same fellowship found walking the Frances or the Norte, but it does sound wonderful. As of now I think over 200 people have walked between all 21 missions. Some do it as a through walk but most do it in sections.
Has there been any “infrastructure” added along the California Missions Camino—such as hostels, signage, maps, walking routes and trails (anything beyond the 101), buy-in by local municipalities, a “Camino office”, endorsement by churches, bishops, businesses, etc?
 
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4 Eyes

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF from SJPP 14, VDLP from Seville 15, DN&P from Irun 16, Portuguese from Lisbon 17, CF from SJPP 18
Is that health or just cancellation of trip coverage?
The entire policy typically. So it's important to read the fine prints before buying one.
 

mickiengland

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planned to start the Camino Del Norte in June 2020...
We’re booked to come to San Sebastián in late June and had planned a couple of days on the Camino, starting in Irun, plus had tickets for a Euro 2020 game in Bilbao😢 We haven’t broken our (albeit fairly relaxed...) UK lockdown rules so far and don’t intend to start now... but once Spain opens its doors then we won’t have any hesitation in coming. Fortunately, we are fit and healthy and prepared to accept the low risk if the alternative is giving up on a year or two of active retirement! Appreciate that there is a zero% chance of our June trip going ahead, but hoping all will be well for same time next year🙏🏻
 

Isca-camigo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Various ones.
For me I identify very much with your last sentence....a Camino is not a Camino if you can't share bread, albergues and stories with other walkers.

I can see camp fires and groups of people with tents making a comeback, I would definitely end up on the Norte in a situation like that,lots of camp sites and beaches. For those with antibodies and a document of confirmation,access to Albergues will be an option. I know it's uncertain about antibodies at the moment but hopefully you get a year out of them if they are generated.
 

Gene_781

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino francés, Camino portugués (Tui), Pilgrims Welcome Office, hospitalero 8 times
I just did a search on "Sanchez" in this tread and didn't find the name of the Spanish PM. Odd because on April 29th (or the day before) he said that restrictions on the arrival of international tourists to Spain will last until October. I interpret that as meaning that non-Spanish citizens simply will not be allowed to enter the country until (at least) then. See

https://www.abc.es/economia/abci-go...s-inducido&ref=&ref=https://www.facebook.com/

(You can drop that into Google Translate if needed.)

For a collection of links and information see:

https://americanpilgrims.org/covid-19-what-you-should-know/
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
Where do you plan to place your tent?
Do you think one can have the tent "in the garden" of an albergue and use its toilets and showers (and pay the albergue as usual)?

That is very often an option. If nothing is available, I will find a quiet park or ask to use someone's back yard, barn, or pasture. Lots of people use tents along the caminos every year.
 

Luka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pelgrimspad I, Via Monastica, Via Podiensis, Via de la Plata, Camino Francés, Camino del Norte...
I just did a search on "Sanchez" in this tread and didn't find the name of the Spanish PM. Odd because on April 29th (or the day before) he said that restrictions on the arrival of international tourists to Spain will last until October. I interpret that as meaning that non-Spanish citizens simply will not be allowed to enter the country until (at least) then. See

https://www.abc.es/economia/abci-go...s-inducido&ref=&ref=https://www.facebook.com/

(You can drop that into Google Translate if needed.)

For a collection of links and information see:

https://americanpilgrims.org/covid-19-what-you-should-know/
No decision on this has been taken yet. If I remember well the government named a timeframe until October, but it is still unclear what will happen between June and October. Could for example be a gradual opening of the borders (neighbouring countries first, then EU, then the rest of the world for example, totally depending on the number of Covid19 cases of course). They also said they hoped a decision about this could be made at EU level.
 

Luka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pelgrimspad I, Via Monastica, Via Podiensis, Via de la Plata, Camino Francés, Camino del Norte...
Luca, I live in Palencia, and help run a donativo albergue in Grado, Asturias, your neighborhood! Lucky you, Asturias has gone to Phase 1 of the "decellaration," and you can get out and about! Trouble is, you still need to have a good reason to go anywhere along a public pathway. And the hotels and hostels -- and especially pilgrim albergues -- still have not been given legal clearance or guidance regarding opening and hosting anyone. Until then, you will not find anyplace to stay.
It will be at least June before walking a camino is legally feasible, and then only if the Covid-19 numbers are almost to zero. Once the surviving albergues open, they will likely not have open kitchens or common areas. The dorms will be stripped of much of their furnishings, capacity will be greatly reduced, and the hospi will likely be following you around with disinfectant and plastic bags.
You will have only Spanish pilgrims to talk with, or other legal residents of Spain, as the borders are expected to remain closed into Autumn.
I hope to hit the Road soon as I can, but I will take a tent!
Is Palencia still in phase 0?

Yes, it is very exciting that we are moving to phase 1 from Monday on! I love my garden and the view from it, but it will be wonderful to be able to go for quiet walks again in the rest of Asturias!

As far as I understand the (very complicated) rules I would theoretically be allowed to walk Asturian parts of the Norte and the Primitivo:

- Quienes vivan en territorios que se encuentren en la fase 1 podrán circular por toda la unidad territorial afectada, es decir, por su misma provincia, isla o departamento de salud para hacer las actividades permitidas.
- La actividad hotelera está permitida en esta fase. Los establecimientos pueden abrir todas sus habitaciones, aunque no estarán operativas las zonas comunes, como los restaurantes.
- También sobre turismo, se pueden reanudar las actividades de "turismo activo y naturaleza para grupos de un máximo de diez personas por empresas registradas como empresas de turismo activo".

(Source: https://www.eldiario.es/sociedad/fase_1-hoteles-terrazas-museos-reuniones_0_1023297990.html)

They don't say it very clearly, but I can't imagine that they would allow organized groups to go on hikes and not allow solitary hikers. Apart from that, Asturias already allowed 'senderismo' in phase 0. But then with the restriction that you would have to walk from home (you were not allowed to drive somewhere to hike) and you were not allowed to leave your municipality. But I suppose these restrictions will be lifted in phase 1, because in that phase we are allowed to move around freely within the province.

All of this doesn't mean that albergues will be open of course. And it certainly doesn't mean that I will be off to walk a couple of stages next week. I'll start with some quiet walks to get back in shape anyway and will see how things develop. Apart from that, I would need a house sitter...
 
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Liz Drew

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016 Coastal Portuguese
2018 Via de la Plata
(2019) del Norte
I hope this won't become a polemic thread. It is a serious dilemma I have. What to do after the authorities make travelling possible again? My case is different from most of you, because I live in Spain. Most likely from May 11 on, I will be allowed again to travel within Asturias (after a lockdown of almost 2 months). The Covid19 numbers are low in this province, especially in the countryside (where I live). Theoretically I could plan a couple of days on the Norte or the Primitivo. And maybe from the end of June in other parts of Spain as well.

A pro would be that camino businesses desperately need income. A con would be that it is unnecessary travel. But what if I would stay away from the cities and the crowds? Book private accomodations? Do others here have similar dilemmas and would you for example consider a camino in your own country as an alternative? Or would you travel to Spain to walk again the moment the travel restrictions have lifted? Maybe taking all kind of measures you could think of (social distancing, washing hands, wearing masks...).

Or is a camino just not a camino if you can't share bread, albergues and stories with other pilgrims?
I would wait and see how the Spanish people react. I don’t believe many Spaniards are in a rush to see crowds again. Especially after all you have been through. I believe you will be very cautious.
i personally couldn’t walk wearing a mask
 

Mike Vara

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Start hiking from St Jean on August 24(2020)
I hope this won't become a polemic thread. It is a serious dilemma I have. What to do after the authorities make travelling possible again? My case is different from most of you, because I live in Spain. Most likely from May 11 on, I will be allowed again to travel within Asturias (after a lockdown of almost 2 months). The Covid19 numbers are low in this province, especially in the countryside (where I live). Theoretically I could plan a couple of days on the Norte or the Primitivo. And maybe from the end of June in other parts of Spain as well.

A pro would be that camino businesses desperately need income. A con would be that it is unnecessary travel. But what if I would stay away from the cities and the crowds? Book private accomodations? Do others here have similar dilemmas and would you for example consider a camino in your own country as an alternative? Or would you travel to Spain to walk again the moment the travel restrictions have lifted? Maybe taking all kind of measures you could think of (social distancing, washing hands, wearing masks...).

Or is a camino just not a camino if you can't share bread, albergues and stories with other pilgrims?

Have you heard when international travel will open again and if rooms will be available later in August on the Camino?
 

Luka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pelgrimspad I, Via Monastica, Via Podiensis, Via de la Plata, Camino Francés, Camino del Norte...
I would wait and see how the Spanish people react. I don’t believe many Spaniards are in a rush to see crowds again. Especially after all you have been through. I believe you will be very cautious.
i personally couldn’t walk wearing a mask
It depends. There will certainly be people scared to go out. But after being locked up in their homes for almost 2 months a lot of people are really looking forward to get back into the streets and socialise again. On the 2nd of May the Spanish were allowed to go out for walks and runs again within certain timeslots for the first time. The streets in the cities were full of people.

During the lockdown I went out for groceries once a week and I noticed that in the last couple of weeks I already saw a lot more people in the streets, chatting with each other and certainly not at a 2 metres distance. Could also be because there are hardly any Covid19 cases in the municipality where I live.

There is at least one thing that I don't have in common with most Spaniards. They love to come together in groups. They will probably go for the terraces and the family gatherings while I'll go for quiet walks in nature. And I will be avoiding the weekends.
 

Luka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pelgrimspad I, Via Monastica, Via Podiensis, Via de la Plata, Camino Francés, Camino del Norte...
Have you heard when international travel will open again and if rooms will be available later in August on the Camino?
No news about that yet.
 

concha

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Ingles (2019)
I
This will happen if the authorities allow it and the insurance will cover Covid-19.
In the UK, insurance companies are now specifically excluding COVID19 from all travel insurance policies for travel booked after 26th March (which was the date "lockdown" came into effect). I doubt that any insurance company anywhere will include cover for Covid.
 

Liz Drew

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016 Coastal Portuguese
2018 Via de la Plata
(2019) del Norte
I don’t believe international travel will be possible before the northern spring
 

Ellann

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Portuguese Camino 2016
OK, but none of the options fit.....

I wouldn't dash over there, No. I have a life and businesses to plan around.

I plan to next walk in 2022. If I am able to travel at that time, I'll assess what is possible. Who can tell?

I will wait for the 'all clear' in every respect. Then plan. Not before.
I am of the same opinion, I planned to walk in 2021, either May or September, but it may be pushed out to 2022. I would also think that things will be a lot different by then.
 

thejoker

Member
Camino(s) past & future
many
No news about that yet.

I really appreciate your almost daily updates. It's great to get real news from someone on the ground who is going through the situation in Spain, on the Camino Primitivo. Your posts are highly informative and helpful. When I browse the forum for the latest news, it is your posts and updates I look for first of all. Thank you.
 
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Faith Walker

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016 Frances
2020 will cancel
Instead of my April 2020 Portuguese Camino, I will be waiting for both the vaccine and after the holy year.

As consolation, I am creating a faux travel journal using the guide book and Google Street view. For you novelty seekers, I recommend getting a local map and making a project of walking every street and trail of your home town. I've also picked a point on the horizon and walked to it. I can see a local mountain out my dining room window. I walked out and back several miles. The next day I advanced my car and walk another out and back. It took me nine days, 93 miles, and connecting with a local off road jeep club, but now when I see the mountain I know I've walked there and back again.

I've also walked from near Disneyland to LAX and then on to Malibu using buses to get me back to my car that I kept advancing every day.

Carpe diem.
 

Tess@rest

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances
Norte
Finstr/Mux
Primitivo
Via la Plata
Sanabres
Portugues
Levante
Lana
Ingles
Has there been any “infrastructure” added along the California Missions Camino—such as hostels, signage, maps, walking routes and trails (anything beyond the 101), buy-in by local municipalities, a “Camino office”, endorsement by churches, bishops, businesses, etc?
The guidebook is great & includes hand-drawn maps which are very helpful but there is no infrastructure & signs only to the missions when you are really close by. Some of the paths follow walking trails and bike trails but much of it is along roads. Also many of the "hike and bike" camping spots at beaches and state parks have been eliminated due to problems with the homeless. Hotels are often your only option but several times I stayed in 'surfer' hostels. The Facebook group is very supportive. They also put out an informative newsletter. I think there are actually less than 75 people who have walked to all 21 missions. I completed my journey last July and my number was in the 40's. It is very much a solitary camino but I throughly enjoyed it. At each mission the staff was always very welcoming, helpful and encouraging. I'm sure you will need to check with the individual missions to see when they will open. Some are active parishes, some are historic sites and others are state parks so there is no one authority over all of the missions that will determine when they open.
 

Luka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pelgrimspad I, Via Monastica, Via Podiensis, Via de la Plata, Camino Francés, Camino del Norte...
I really appreciate your almost daily updates. It's great to get real news from someone on the ground who is going through the situation in Spain, on the Camino Primitivo. Your posts are highly informative and helpful. When I browse the forum for the latest news, it is your posts and updates I look for first of all. Thank you.
Thank you! I am just trying to follow the news here in Spain. Because the rules are not always clear and often detailed and complicated, what is in the newspapers isn't always correct. Even the local government of Asturias has to rectify what they told before every now and then. There are also many adjustments.

Actually I don't live on the Primitivo. I live in the eastern part of Asturias, not far from Cangas de Onís.
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
Is Palencia still in phase 0?

Yes, it is very exciting that we are moving to phase 1 from Monday on! I love my garden and the view from it, but it will be wonderful to be able to go for quiet walks again in the rest of Asturias!

As far as I understand the (very complicated) rules I would theoretically be allowed to walk Asturian parts of the Norte and the Primitivo:

- Quienes vivan en territorios que se encuentren en la fase 1 podrán circular por toda la unidad territorial afectada, es decir, por su misma provincia, isla o departamento de salud para hacer las actividades permitidas.
- La actividad hotelera está permitida en esta fase. Los establecimientos pueden abrir todas sus habitaciones, aunque no estarán operativas las zonas comunes, como los restaurantes.
- También sobre turismo, se pueden reanudar las actividades de "turismo activo y naturaleza para grupos de un máximo de diez personas por empresas registradas como empresas de turismo activo".

(Source: https://www.eldiario.es/sociedad/fase_1-hoteles-terrazas-museos-reuniones_0_1023297990.html)

They don't say it very clearly, but I can't imagine that they would allow organized groups to go on hikes and not allow solitary hikers. Apart from that, Asturias already allowed 'senderismo' in phase 0. But then with the restriction that you would have to walk from home (you were not allowed to drive somewhere to hike) and you were not allowed to leave your municipality. But I suppose these restrictions will be lifted in phase 1, because in that phase we are allowed to move around freely within the province.

All of this doesn't mean that albergues will be open of course. And it certainly doesn't mean that I will be off to walk a couple of stages next week. I'll start with some quiet walks to get back in shape anyway and will see how things develop. Apart from that, I would need a house sitter...


Yes, Palencia and all of Castilla y Leon are still in zero. Frustrating, but understandable -- we still have too many new cases to take chances. That said, there are more cars on the road and people working in their gardens.. I drive into Sahagun each week for groceries, which technically is crossing into another province (Leon), and so far I've not been busted!
A freind is giving me a nice bike, and I am filling up the hours getting it (and me) prepared for a nice trip up the trail sometime soon!
 

gerip

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF, Lourdes to Burgos, Oct 2018
CF, Burgos to Santiago, May 2019
Ingles, Sep - Oct 2019
I need two things to happen before I return:
- Spain officially welcomes back international Camino-walkers
- Canada must lift international travel restrictions so I can obtain travel insurance

I'll probably take my tent if I hike on a busy Camino route.
I’m thinking about tenting it too, but wondering which routes would be more amenable.
Actually I’m much more interested in volunteering this autumn, but that situation is also in a state of flux. Camino Companions sent out an email last week, which seemed to indicate that the Spanish authorities want to open the Camino to residents of the country by July!
I’ve booked a flight with EasyJet to Santiago as it was quite cheap. I figured if things couldn’t go forward it wasn’t much money to lose. And if flying is a no go the ferry to Spain might be possible.
Anyway, we shall see what develops.
 

gerip

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF, Lourdes to Burgos, Oct 2018
CF, Burgos to Santiago, May 2019
Ingles, Sep - Oct 2019
I think another option is missing - affordable air travel - its not just when restrictions have lifted - it is possible that some airlines wont make it, or travel to some destinations.
Very true. Fewer airlines, less competition, higher costs. I can imagine flights from Oz or NZ becoming terribly expensive.Luckily I live in the UK, so I may have options.
 
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