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Where's the end of the Camino for you?

Where do yoes the Camino end for you? Santiago, Finisterra or Muxia?


  • Total voters
    33

TheTinkerBell

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP - SdC (2013);
OCebreiro - Fisterra (2019)
Just read a post in another thread where the poster mentioned that the end of the Camino for them is Santiago. It was something I wondered about too when planning my trip. On the assumption that every single Camino is an end to itself and that it ends (physically-speaking) in one of three locations; was it at the Cathedral in Santiago, or should I go on to Finisterra or even Muxia? Personally, I decided that my Way would end in Santiago too, at the Cathedral, even though I walked for "religious and other" reasons.

This is a simple question and a simple poll. Not interested in the why of why people choose one over the other, just wondering what your answer is.

EDIT: Sorry Ivar, I meant to post this thread in the Miscellaneous Section.
 
Last edited:

biarritzdon

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF&CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF&CP17, CdN18, CM18, CF18, LePuy19
You should add another option in your poll which is something like "none of the above" or "never" because my Camino is a never ending experience!!! I did Fisterra last year and will probably do Muxia next year. As I approach the end of my walk, I'm already planning my next Camino before I arrive in Santiago.
 

TheTinkerBell

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP - SdC (2013);
OCebreiro - Fisterra (2019)
You should add another option in your poll which is something like "none of the above" or "never" because my Camino is a never ending experience!!!...
Good shout, but I'm not sure I can add any more options now...
 

SYates

Camino Fossil AD 1999, now living in Santiago de C
Camino(s) past & future
First: Camino Francés 1999
...
Last: Santiago - Muxia 2019

Now: http://egeria.house/
As the old saying goes "The most difficult stage of the Camino is the journey home" so that would be for me - kind of - be the end of one Camino ;-) SY
 

pilgrim b

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Caminos Frances 2013-Ingles 2014-Frances 2015
St Cuthbert's Way 2017-Via Francigena 2018 & 2019
How about: Now I've started not sure when I'll finish !!!!
 

Samin

New Member
The Camino newer ended, it is still calling me in my heart.. and I will walk it over and over again...
It is and newer ending Camino <3

Buen Camino
 
D

Deleted member 3000

Guest
I may be dense, but I took the question to be the physical end of walking the camino, not some philosophical end. Like I said, I may be the dense one here.
 

wayfarer

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-Santiago-Finistera-Muxia. April/May 2012
Sarria-Santiago Sept. 2013
SJPP - Almost Orrison April 2014
From the journey I walked I hope it never ends - its' just this blasted job I have that keeps me home! Very good question as I was suprised how many pilgrims carried on after we had reached Santiago. Seems like I had missed something by not carrying on - I will for sure the next time! I agree with SYates and the feelings we had as went home and thought about our journey.

Mark
Born to Walk, Forced to Work. Know the feeling. :)
 
P

PANO

Guest
Historically the Way ends in Santiago; the continuation to Finisterre/Muxia became popular in the late sixties amongst those peregrinos who somehow understandably would not want it to end; many Americans (US/Canadians alike) would want to reach the Atlantic. As for me, the air simply was out when reaching Santiago but four of us decided to share a car-rental (45€ plus gas) and to do a round trip visiting Muxia and Finisterre. it was fantastic, void of any scheduling and a true award for accomplishing the Camino.
However, everyone decides on his/her own Camino, do it the way you feel right.
 
M

MendiWalker

Guest
I always say " The Camino de Santiago ends in Santiago de Compostela." But the Camino never ends.

People´s goal in the past was to reach the town of Santiago de Compostela in order to visit the tomb of the saint.

Some people extended their walk to Finisterra ( Fin de la Tierra ) Land´s End, the end of the known world ( Europe)

Fashion came later to continue to Muxia , perhaps because it´s a lovely town.

In any case wherever you decide to "end" it , try to enjoy all the pleasures of the Camino.:)

Buen Camino!
 

StuartM

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012)
I did all the usual, St James Tomb, Pilgrim Mass, getting the Compostela, etc., but for me it really didn't feel like it was truly over until I left the chestnut and small pebble I'd carried all the way on one of the columns at the main entrance to the cathedral. I guess everyone finds their own end point.
 

piogaw

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino frances (05/06 2012) sjpdp-sdc; vdlp/camino sanabrea (02/03 2013) sevilla-sdc; hospitalero sdc june 2013, august-september 2013; caminho portugues (03 2014) lisboa-sdc
The camino never ends. As soon as you arrived in santiago before you set for home, you are already thinking of the next camino.

Buen camino to all.
 
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shefollowsshells

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Several alone and with children
I may be dense, but I took the question to be the physical end of walking the camino, not some philosophical end. Like I said, I may be the dense one here.
Moi aussi :)

I went from Santiago to Finesterre on foot with friends that I met on the way...I carried a scoop each of ashes from five loved pets over the years to throw into the water. I enjoyed Finesterre BUT quickly realized that it was not the place for me to throw the ashes I do not really know why...In a thunderstorm I left for Muxia by myself hoping that was the place...and it was.
Muxia was the end of my Camino. I loved every single step of my Camino, never for a nano second did I wish to be anywhere else on this Earth during the whole trip.

Muxia was a wind down for me...a peace, a personal peace that grounded me and prepared me for my transition home.
I got on that bus from Muxia back to Santiago and it was my only lost feelings of the trip, I felt like Santiago was no longer "mine" and worried about the feelings that would come over me coming back after I had my celebrations just the week before.

How fortunate I was to run into one of the dearest people of my Camino...a friend who I lost on day five...ran right into him with about two hours to go till I caught the plane.
The Camino provided...and I am glad that I walked thru Santiago in those last few hours.

Don't misunderstood I loved Finesterre it just didn't feel like the resting place for my puppies ashes. Muxia provided a rainstorm and wind when I threw them into the water and minutes later a RAINBOW!!!!!
 
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dalston999

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Walked Le Puy/Santiago/Fisterra/Murxia Sept/Oct 2012, Portugues march 2013, Arles April 2013
I walked from Le Puy to Santiago which I thought was the end. However, when I continued to Fisterra and sat on the rocks it felt like a completely different kind of ending. Santiago was celebratory, a party town, whereas Fisterra, the sea, was quiet, contemplative, and moreover a total contrast to the medieval interior of France where I had started. Suddenly, after following way marks and arrows westward for two months, there was nowhere further.

I did continue up to Muxia and spent the next few days processing the path I had travelled; the albergues I had stayed in, beds I had slept in, people I had met, and generally coming to a stop.

The other posters are right though, having arrived home, I couldn't wait to start walking again......and so it continues......

Buen camino
 

Al the optimist

Veteran Member
You beat me to it Biarritzdon, because I was off forum yesterday as I woke up with the walking lust and spent a happy day (without getting wet - it is pouring down today). Yes Falcon is right the orignal question is about ending an individual physical walk in Spain. I ended one in Finisterra and one in Muxia. Personally I much prefer the later, but that's just my choice. They were two very different experiences though. I arrived in Finisterra last September at Fiesta time when they had the effigy procession and took it out to sea. There was a huge party afterwards. Muxia this June was quiet (and very wet), but I was lucky that the local choir were singing beautifully at the mass which was preceded by a christening. For me the walk to Santiago is one of personal enlightenment that brings me closer to good friend above, and the ones to the coast are a time for enjoying the new found me.
 

tpmchugh

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013)
Camino Frances (2015)
Camino Frances (2016)
Camino Frances (2018}
The end of my Camino was my own front door. I have waymark tile on it and touching that tile was always my goal. Five minutes to midnight on the 5th October I finally touched it. and my camino ended
 

JohnMcM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Some, and with luck, some more.
Moi aussi :)

I went from Santiago to Finesterre on foot with friends that I met on the way...I carried a scoop each of ashes from five loved pets over the years to throw into the water. I enjoyed Finesterre BUT quickly realized that it was not the place for me to throw the ashes. I still throw the ashes into, I do not really know why...In a thunderstorm I left for Muxia by myself hoping that was the place...and it was.
Muxia was the end of my Camino. I loved every single step of my Camino, never for a nano second did I wish to be anywhere else on this Earth during the whole trip.

Muxia was a wind down for me...a peace, a personal peace that grounded me and prepared me for my transition home.
I got on that bus from Muxia back to Santiago and it was my only lost feelings of the trip, I felt like Santiago was no longer "mine" and worried about the feelings that would come over me coming back after I had my celebrations just the week before.

How fortunate I was to run into one of the dearest people of my Camino...a friend who I lost on day five...ran right into him with about two hours to go till I caught the plane.
The Camino provided...and glad that I walked thru Santiago in those last few hours.

Don't misunderstood I loved Finesterre it just didn't feel like the resting place for my puppies ashes. Muxia provided a rainstorm and wind when I threw them in and minutes later a RAINBOW!!!!!
Wow! What a thought provoking post.
 

JohnMcM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Some, and with luck, some more.
Just read a post in another thread where the poster mentioned that the end of the Camino for them is Santiago. It was something I wondered about too when planning my trip. On the assumption that every single Camino is an end to itself and that it ends (physically-speaking) in one of three locations; was it at the Cathedral in Santiago, or should I go on to Finisterra or even Muxia? Personally, I decided that my Way would end in Santiago too, at the Cathedral, even though I walked for "religious and other" reasons.

This is a simple question and a simple poll. Not interested in the why of why people choose one over the other, just wondering what your answer is.

EDIT: Sorry Ivar, I meant to post this thread in the Miscellaneous Section.
I would like to reserve an option to further reply to this post more fully after I discover what my first Camino holds for me.

Hold on........... I've just re-read my post before posting to check for typos etc.............. I wonder what made me say "after my first Camino ". Where did that come from? As far as I know I'm walking a Camino. ........... .o_O.
 
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D

Deleted member 3000

Guest
Another vote for the Cathedral:

The Camino, from France to Spain

Thursday, Nov 7, 2013, 10:45 IST | Agency: DNA
Parvez Damania
Parvez Damania walks you through his 11-day journey-on-foot to Compostela de Santiago in Spain.


The Camino de Santiago, or the Way of Saint James, has for centuries been one of the most respected pilgrimages of the Western world. The camino or 'Way' starts anywhere in three countries, France, Spain and Portugal, but ends only in Compostela de Santiago, a Cathedral in Spain.

I took the Camino Frances, starting at Astorga, with two dear friends on a chilly October morning.
Although it is the most popular route, extending 790 km, we decided to walk only the 276-kilometer-stretch directly leading to the Cathedral. I thought Saint James would still approve.

It is most certainly a pilgrimage for those who complete the entire camino, but I was doing it as a salutation to a powerful and venerable tradition. It was rewarding to meet some true pilgrims en route, like the 73-year-old man who planned to walk the entire way merely a year after his triple bypass surgery, and a couple in their 70s who were doing it for the sixth time. I met kids, schoolboys and even a doughty dog trotting right along his master.

If you follow the yellow arrows, painted along the entire route–on streets, trees, markers, posts and buildings–you can't go wrong.

If you're tired, halt at albergues (rest stops) maintained for pilgrims, where you can freshen up and get a good night's sleep. They are open in the afternoon and close in the morning, once the last pilgrims set out. If you try to cheat on your way by taking a vehicle, you won't just find yourself waiting outside the albergues, but you'll also be denied the precious stamps on the special passports issued to pilgrims at different points. For a formal certificate that declares your successful completion of the camino, you need the right number of the right stamps. So walk right, walk true and walk to the finish!

I walked for 11 days, covering 38 km on my longest day and 24 km on my shortest. I had the route well mapped out in advance and the only privilege I allowed myself was having my knapsack shipped from one stop to another.

It was a pleasure walking through the countryside, its forests and towns. I stopped at just about every church on the way, attended the evening Pilgrim's Mass at a few and soaked myself in the river of energy that has been running through the camino for hundreds of years.

Watching strangers feelingly wish each other "Buen camino" as they passed by was was an extraordinary experience. When every person's heart is so full of encouragement, you wonder about the scale of errors human beings make by way of battles, losing out on brotherhood.

Lest I forget, along the way you'll encounter the Ferro Cruz and the Iron Cross, surrounded by a mound of stones, of all sizes. You usually pick a size signifying your sins and drop it at the foot of the Cross. I decided that a modestly sized pebble would do for me, spent a moment in prayer and looked in wonder at the large stones left behind.

Saint James is known to be buried in the Cathedral. One of the first followers of Jesus Christ, James is the Patron Saint of Spain. The significance of this pilgrimage has inspired millions to walk the distance (2,00,000 people have completed it in 2012 alone).

To my joy Spaniards are delighted to meet Indians and the ones who've visited India have left images of Hanuman, Shiva and Parvati, Meher Baba and have even scrawled Om on a signpost that featured the traditional icon of the camino, the scallop.

The Cathedral at Santiago is a reward in itself. The Pilgrims' Mass, held in the ornate baroque inside the Cathedral, has a cleansing effect with its ritual ceremony, music and the devotion of the priests and worshippers. Incense sticks are lit in a giant urn and swung across the church in benediction. If you want your country to be included in the roster of countries called out during Mass, then register early. I was thrilled to hear India's name, as I was carrying back blessings from a journey that was everything I had hoped for, and more.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
I know in a general sense that my pilgrimages have ended at the cathedral or church which are at the destination. Certainly, by the time I was on the train or bus to the airport, I was returning to my 'normal' life, and certainly no longer thought of myself as a pilgrim, even if I hadn't returneed home. If I tried to codify this, I would say that I have been on pilgrimages, intend to be so again, but I am not on one now.

I don't have an answer on whether that makes me a pilgrim right now. The phrase 'once a (something), always a (something)' so often used to pejoratively label someone with their past misdeeds it much too shallow to really answer that question. That is why I prefer talk about having done pilgrimages, rather than to say I am a pilgrim.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Jul-Aug 05, Frances, Jul-Aug 06, Portugues, Oct 2010
At my first pilgrim's mass in SdC, the bishop told us in his sermon that the Camino BEGINS now. I suppose that means I'm still on it 8 years later.
 

taozenqi

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: Sept/Oct (2014)
+1 with biarritzdon( fellow ex-Cincy), Pieces, and whariwharangi.
"Peace is every step." - Thich Nhat Hanh
 

Stephen Nicholls

Steve Nicholls, Suffolk, U.K.
Camino(s) past & future
Too many caminos to list in the permitted 100 characters!!
My camino ended in Santiago in 2011.
That's what I thought for about two days.
Now I'm saying my camino will end after the Camino Ingles next May, celebrating my 75th.
....... but I'm already looking at the Primitivo and thinking about 2015!!!

So maybe that answers the question? Never! Or at least until this earthly pilgrimage is complete.....but then who knows what new 'camino' we'll all be on?
 

soydechiapas

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
June (2013)
While walking the Camino I was told about the ceremonial ending in Finisterre so I adjusted my plans to finish there. I am so glad I did. Seeing the sign with 0.00 KM let me know this part of my journey was done. Sitting on the rocks and hearing singing in different languages as sunset approached gave me opportunity to reflect on my experiences, the people, the places and THE PYRENEES! The quiet that enveloped all of us as the sun sizzled into the Atlantic was unifying. We all had experienced the Camino in our own way now we were heading elsewhere to apply our lessons learned. Finisterre was the perfect and fitting ending for me.
 

jmcarp

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2013
Camino del Norte a Chimayó (USA), 2015
Camino Portugues, 2017
We could debate ad infinitum as to where the Camino "ends." As others suggested, for probably 99 percent of us, no matter where we stop walking, the Camino continues to live within us as a spiritual journey. Where one stops walking may be the last chapter in the the personal book we call "My Camino de Santiago." But what happens in and to our lives as we go forward is the epilogue to that book, an epilogue that continues until they shovel the dirt over us in the graveyard.
 
D

Deleted member 3000

Guest
We could debate ad infinitum as to where the Camino "ends."
The original post/questionnaire offered just three physical end points. The question was not really philosophical!!:)
 


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