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Which Camino Guide Book Do You Recommend?

Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2018)
#1
I am looking for a guide book that gives information on all the villages that you pass through, not just the main stopping off points. Which one would you recommend?
 

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davebugg

DustOff: "When I have your wounded."
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
#2
Wise Pilgrim guide book. Brierley's book is also good. There are others that also do a good job. Each have strengths and weaknesses, and appeal to individual tastes and sense of usability.
 

C clearly

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
#3
Any of the decent guidebooks will show all the villages. They need to start a new page in the book every 20 or 30 km, but that doesn't mean you have to stop at those points. :D
 

Prentiss Riddle

Aprendiz de todo, maestro de nada
Camino(s) past & future
Poco a poco: we're nibbling away at the Francés. (2015, 2016 & 2017)
#4
Personally I’m a fan of the Dintaman & Landis guide.

https://www.villagetovillagepress.com/travel-guidebooks/hiking-the-camino-de-santiago

I’m also looking forward to trying out the Wise Pilgrim guide.

https://shop.wisepilgrim.com/products/camino-frances-a-wise-pilgrim-guide-to-the-camino-de-santiago

For more historical depth, I’m intrigued by “The Pilgrimage Road to Santiago: The Complete Cultural Handbook” by David M. Gitlitz. It’s not a compact book intended to go in a backpack, but the Kindle version might be good to take along.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/0312254164/
 

GettingThere

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Roncesvalles-SdC Apr-Jun 2015
Roncesvalles-Sarria Sep-Oct 2017
#5
I have used John Brierley's guide (available from the Forum store) on two Caminos and have found it very good for those in-between places as well as the larger towns. A lot of people seem to think they have to walk the distances on his "stages", and you absolutely don't. I certainly never have (I read your question on another thread about walking shorter distances - that's me definitely!) and in fact you will find less crowding if you stay in the places in between. He lists all the accommodation in the smaller villages (or almost all - there are always new places that pop up between editions). I also like his maps - not because you need a map to follow, but they show you how places are connected and what to expect, and are very clear (not to scale but again, you don't need maps in order to find your way, they're a representation of the route).

I have not used the Wise Pilgrim guides mentioned above but hear good things of those too.

Good luck and buen camino!
 

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kmrice

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago - Fisterra 2008
St. Jean Pied de Port - Santiago 2013
#7
I've used "Walking Guide to the Camino de Santiago" by Gerard Kelly. Excellent guide, easy to use, and available in a Kindle edition if you prefer not to carry the weight of a book.
 
Camino(s) past & future
(2018)
#8
Camino de Santiago by Dintaman and Landis is great. Village to village maps over a 35 day walk. Camino de Santiago by Brierley is also good with a 33 day walk. I purchased Brierley's book first then learned of the other. I'll likely take the Dintaman and Landis book.
 

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Glenshiro

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy - Burgos, Camino Frances (2012 - 2018)
#9
A bit out of date now, but a mine of historical information every step of the way is Alison Raju's The Way of St James, Spain available from Cicerone
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francis 2012, 2014, 2016. Many more to come in my future God willing !
#10
Brierleys is good, but I recently purchased the Cicerone Norte routes and find it really detailed. Check it out on Amazon. You can read a sampling of it to see if it fits your needs before making a purchase.
 

tpmchugh

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013)
Camino Frances (2015)
#12
I am looking for a guide book that gives information on all the villages that you pass through, not just the main stopping off points. Which one would you recommend?
Brierley without a doubt. Bought the Wise Pilgrim and to be honest, it does not do it for me. I will be leaving it at home
 

RJM

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times, but soon again I hope....
#13
I have used the original Brierley for the Camino Frances and his maps only version as well. I also used another guidebook not mentioned on here, which while accomplished the task, it just was not very good. If you want one with detailed descriptions, the original Brierley is a very good choice.
Future Camino Frances's I will again carry the maps only version, if anything because it is so small and light.
 

Slycarey

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino frances (2018)
#14
I have the brierly and the dindaman books (I just like to read and it primes me up). In addition I purchased the wise pilgrim app for my phone. I plan to leave the books at home d/t weight. Use my phone app and purchase the Michelin maps book when I get there. It is lightweight and I’m old school enough that I like to have something physical to go over in the evening
 

Yoram Cohen

New Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2010,2013,2015), Portugues (2011,2016), Muxia/Fisterra (2012), Norte (2018)
#15
I am looking for a guide book that gives information on all the villages that you pass through, not just the main stopping off points. Which one would you recommend?
Hi.
I have done the Caminos 6 times (Frances, Portugues and Fineterra). For the first time (in 2010) I checked about 6 guides and opted for Brierley. Since then I have used only Brierley. Brierley provides everything - not only the vital information about lodgings and eating of all types and in all types of locations (cities, towns, villages, casa rurales), but also a wide background about the history, customs and nature of each place.
This year I am going to do the Camino del Norte and the Primitivo. Unfortunately, there is no Brierley guide for them. I have got the "Village to Village Map Guide to the Camino del Norte" and ordered the "Northern Caminos", but they do not come even close to the thoroughness and clarity of the Brierley guides.
 

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