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Which Camino next after "perfect" experience on the Le Puy Camino?

Sue L

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Sept/Oct 2015 Le Puy - to Conques, Tui - Santiago. May/June 2017 Conques to SJPP
Four months after completing the Le Puy route (Conques to SJPP) we're ready to think about the next one. No question there's a next one cause this is what we do. But how do you move on from a truly amazing experience? We were incredibly blessed to meet inspiring, wonderful, funny people along the way. Camino angels came in all shapes and forms. Will never forget the driver of the black mercedes who offered us a lift when blisters got the better of us. He and his wife shared the driving/walking and so he was waiting up a very big hill when we staggered over the peak. Despite our being covered in mud, he welcomed us (with boots in plastic bags) onto his cushy leather seats for a delightful 4 km to town. And when we arrived the Gite owner bathed my partner's feet, bandaged his blisters, then poured large glasses of a very nice red for everyone to share.

Nor shall we forget the gentle man who walked holding his wife's hand all the way to guide her along the trail and through her dementia fog.

Every day we walked for someone special and were going to walk for ourselves on our last day into SJPP but over dinner on our last night met an elderly French couple who told us about their grandson who'd been killed by his father. Despite language difficulties they were able to share their story with us. And so we walked for them on our last day. The end of our Camino in SJPP just made sense when we we spotted them poking their heads out of their hotel window as we walked to the train station to depart. Our last Camino memory will be this lovely couple who rushed down to the station to say farewell. It was a teary goodbye.

We loved the people, the scenery, the food, the wine and even managed to find things to say about cornfields and more cornfields and then more cornfields. Felt so chuffed to finish feeling fitter and stronger than when we started - even lost a little weight!

It had been two years since our first Camino (Le Puy to Conques then Tui to Santiago) and this year it was physically harder and took longer to get to that place where you are not focused on sore feet etc. The heatwave didn't help. So we think shorter stages and very light packs (plus serious training of course!) are the secret to completing our next Camino.

We'd wondered about doing the Portuguese Camino simply because we enjoyed our post-Santiago experience there, but am confused about whether it will be something we would enjoy having read conflicting stories on this Forum about too much road walking, poor signage - or conversely that it is fine. We're a bit hopeless with technology so appreciate a well marked route. The Frances? The Norte? In terms of interactions with others we thought Le Puy was perfect for us as it wasn't too crowded but we had enough opportunity to mix with others to make it just right. We met a Pilgrim (funnily enough he arrived at the junction of the Le Puy, Paris and Vezelay routes just as we did) from the Vezelay route but he hadn't met another Pilgrim for weeks. So not really what we are seeking.

We will keep reading and learning as much as possible about the different routes because at the end of the day only we can decide what suits us, but I was keen to learn what influenced your thinking in choosing certain routes over others? And we know that you can't and in fact don't want to assume what the Camino will give can be based on the prior experience of others. We are also undecided about whether it will be April/May or September/October (would love to do one in each but that's a little ambitious). Appreciate your thoughts.
 
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Try Vezelay. Equally scenic, but a bit more challenging for ease of accommodations. It won't have shorter stages, though. Bon chemin!
 

Sue L

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Sept/Oct 2015 Le Puy - to Conques, Tui - Santiago. May/June 2017 Conques to SJPP
If you liked the Le Puy, consider the Norte. Very beautiful. About the same level of difficulty, but easy to break into short stages. Lots of different accommodation options. Lots of road walking, but @peregrina2000 has posted many alternatives here.
Thanks Kanga - appreciate help navigating Forum posts as well as the trail.
 

Sue L

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Sept/Oct 2015 Le Puy - to Conques, Tui - Santiago. May/June 2017 Conques to SJPP
Try Vezelay. Equally scenic, but a bit more challenging for ease of accommodations. It won't have shorter stages, though. Bon chemin!
Appreciate the suggestion, would enable our French experience to continue so will have a look at it.
 
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good_old_shoes

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Francés ('15, '19)
Via Coloniensis ('16)
Trier-Nancy + Le Puy-Fisterra ('17)
Aragonés ('18)
Don't make a rational decision, follow your heart, do what feels right...

One thing to consider, though: Would you prefer to do a new, different Camino, or to continue the last one? Starting from the same place you stopped the last time (St. Jean) will feel very different than starting somewhere else completely.

If you start from the place you last stopped, in the end it will feel like one loooong journey, like you walked all the way from Le Puy to Santiago. After a while, in your memory they will merge into one. If you start from another place, you'll most likely remember it as a completely different trip. Both can be nice, just depends on what you prefer.

Personally, I'd probably continue from St. Jean and walk the Francés – starting March (or if in April, after Easter) to avoid the crowds. Despite what you often read, the Francés does have a very special vibe/atmosphere - for me it felt less touristy than the LePuy, even though there are more people walking - it's about the feeling, not about the numbers. Then, the next time, you could continue again from Santiago to Finisterre/Muxia.

But I'm biased, so, don't listen to me ;)

Anyway, happy planning and buen camino!
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Year of past OR future Camino
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
If you have not walked the Francés - it is still my favourite camino. As @good_old_shoes says, it has a unique, inexplicable quality. It is "The Camino" - the Big Daddy of them all. Approach it with an open heart and it brings such rewards. It is hard to explain - it is certainly not the most beautiful walk in the world (although parts are lovely), but nothing anywhere else compares. I go back to it again and again and always love it. Walking into SDC at the end of the Francés, after walking a long distance, is very, very special. Yes, I love the last section too - some of the nicest walking you will do and some of the best infrastructure - and the additional people give it a lively, joyous, party feel.
 

backpack45

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Vezelay (2017, in progress); Primitivo & Norte; Geneva/LePuy; Arles; Portuguese; Francés + more
Absolutely loved LePuy, Norte, Primitivo, and Arles routes, but for something different, and shorter--why not start in Geneva and walk to LePuy! There are fewer albergues--there is program called Accueil Pelerin. This program asks volunteers to open their homes to pilgrims--might be certain times of year, or days of the week. So, you must arrange a day or so ahead. We often stayed with our hosts--as the only guests--and were treated as friends while sharing amazing food in their dining rooms. Donativo-style. As you may well image, the countryside was beautiful.
 

good_old_shoes

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Francés ('15, '19)
Via Coloniensis ('16)
Trier-Nancy + Le Puy-Fisterra ('17)
Aragonés ('18)
But don't forget that from Geneva to Le Puy there will be very few pilgrims, as from Vezelay or Cluny or, or... especially early spring (before May).

Again, depends on what you want... do you prefer hiking in beautiful landscape with not many people around, or prefer meeting pilgrims from all over the world and don't mind if the landscape is not always perfectly beautiful - can you deal better with not meeting any other pilgrim for days, or with walking along a not so beautiful hiking path for a few days, but have great company in the evenings? Do you prefer solitary hiking in nature or the cultural/social experience?

You'll know best what you prefer. I agree with Kanga, though: the Francés is THE Camino, despite all its flaws. Give it a chance if it's not too far outside your comfort zone :)
 

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
I second the Geneva route. Combined with the Robert Louis Stevenson trail from Le Puy it makes a decent walk of about 570 km.
You will meet other pilgrims and the gites communales are really good on the Geneva route. The accueil jacquaires accommodations add a really special quality.
The RLS is stunning and also has very good walkers accommodation, a bit more expensive.
I loved the Le Puy route so much I walked it twice.
Also really enjoyed the Via Regia from Goerlitz to Vacha in Germany, but you do need some German for that. It is a quirky route.
Would not recommend the Portuguese. Crowded and lots of road walking. Portuguese part from Porto starting on coast is pretty nice, but I did not enjoy the Spanish segment at all.
 
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Kitsambler

Jakobsweg Junkie
Year of past OR future Camino
Le Puy 2010-11, Prague 2012, Nuremberg 2013, Einsiedeln 2015, Geneva 2017-19
Appreciate your thoughts.
Nothing upstream of Le Puy has the same population density as everything downstream of Le Puy, so you will need to think about the scenery/comradeship trade-off.

If you like France, and Vezelay is too solitary for you, there is always the Geneva route: about 4 weeks to Le Puy from there. Switzerland, especially east of Interlaken, has the best scenery and the possibility of shorter stages, but fewer walkers.

April/May is quite early season and suffers from the three long holiday weekends in France. Sept/Oct will be drier and presents the joys of the harvest. Easter falls on April 1 in 2018. France has mid-term school holidays in mid-October, and many gites will start closing around then.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
Absolutely loved LePuy, Norte, Primitivo, and Arles routes, but for something different, and shorter--why not start in Geneva and walk to LePuy! There are fewer albergues--there is program called Accueil Pelerin. This program asks volunteers to open their homes to pilgrims--might be certain times of year, or days of the week. So, you must arrange a day or so ahead. We often stayed with our hosts--as the only guests--and were treated as friends while sharing amazing food in their dining rooms. Donativo-style. As you may well image, the countryside was beautiful.
Sounds unique and fascinating! I'm walking the LePuy to Moissac in June 2018. I will keep your suggestion on the back burner for the future...who knows?
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
Nothing upstream of Le Puy has the same population density as everything downstream of Le Puy, so you will need to think about the scenery/comradeship trade-off.

If you like France, and Vezelay is too solitary for you, there is always the Geneva route: about 4 weeks to Le Puy from there. Switzerland, especially east of Interlaken, has the best scenery and the possibility of shorter stages, but fewer walkers.

April/May is quite early season and suffers from the three long holiday weekends in France. Sept/Oct will be drier and presents the joys of the harvest. Easter falls on April 1 in 2018. France has mid-term school holidays in mid-October, and many gites will start closing around then.
Another great idea for future consideration!!
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
Nothing upstream of Le Puy has the same population density as everything downstream of Le Puy, so you will need to think about the scenery/comradeship trade-off.

If you like France, and Vezelay is too solitary for you, there is always the Geneva route: about 4 weeks to Le Puy from there. Switzerland, especially east of Interlaken, has the best scenery and the possibility of shorter stages, but fewer walkers.

April/May is quite early season and suffers from the three long holiday weekends in France. Sept/Oct will be drier and presents the joys of the harvest. Easter falls on April 1 in 2018. France has mid-term school holidays in mid-October, and many gites will start closing around then.
You always provide such good information, Kitsambler. Thank you for your expertise! I will walk LePuy with two Camino friends in June as far as Moissac and have gleaned good advise from you in that section thus far.
 

Sue L

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Sept/Oct 2015 Le Puy - to Conques, Tui - Santiago. May/June 2017 Conques to SJPP
Absolutely loved LePuy, Norte, Primitivo, and Arles routes, but for something different, and shorter--why not start in Geneva and walk to LePuy! There are fewer albergues--there is program called Accueil Pelerin. This program asks volunteers to open their homes to pilgrims--might be certain times of year, or days of the week. So, you must arrange a day or so ahead. We often stayed with our hosts--as the only guests--and were treated as friends while sharing amazing food in their dining rooms. Donativo-style. As you may well image, the countryside was beautiful.
I hadn't read about the Geneva Route so thanks so much for planting this seed. And for mentioning the Accueil Pelerin (just love this Forum!). I will investigate both.
 
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Sue L

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Sept/Oct 2015 Le Puy - to Conques, Tui - Santiago. May/June 2017 Conques to SJPP
If you have not walked the Francés - it is still my favourite camino. As @good_old_shoes says, it has a unique, inexplicable quality. It is "The Camino" - the Big Daddy of them all. Approach it with an open heart and it brings such rewards. It is hard to explain - it is certainly not the most beautiful walk in the world (although parts are lovely), but nothing anywhere else compares. I go back to it again and again and always love it. Walking into SDC at the end of the Francés, after walking a long distance, is very, very special. Yes, I love the last section too - some of the nicest walking you will do and some of the best infrastructure - and the additional people give it a lively, joyous, party feel.
Thanks Kanga, your description of the Frances as "THE Camino" has resonance with me and another post that talks about it being a natural continuation from where we ended. But news to me was the mention of the Geneva Route. What lovely problems to be grabbling with!! Feeling very lucky to only have to ponder such things.
 

Sue L

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Sept/Oct 2015 Le Puy - to Conques, Tui - Santiago. May/June 2017 Conques to SJPP
I second the Geneva route. Combined with the Robert Louis Stevenson trail from Le Puy it makes a decent walk of about 570 km.
You will meet other pilgrims and the gites communales are really good on the Geneva route. The accueil jacquaires accommodations add a really special quality.
The RLS is stunning and also has very good walkers accommodation, a bit more expensive.
I loved the Le Puy route so much I walked it twice.
Also really enjoyed the Via Regia from Goerlitz to Vacha in Germany, but you do need some German for that. It is a quirky route.
Would not recommend the Portuguese. Crowded and lots of road walking. Portuguese part from Porto starting on coast is pretty nice, but I did not enjoy the Spanish segment at all.
Thanks Gittiharre - really want to avoid too much road walking. Like others we find that too scary and tough on the legs.
 

TMcA

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Pamplona to Santiago (2013)
Le Puy to Pamplona in segments (2013 - 2016)
Pamplona to León
We anticipate going back to France after walking La Meseta next year. (Due to assorted foot and knee problems we skipped this section of the CF in 2013.) WRT possibilities in France, I was supplied with many ideas by a digital "brochure" sent from La Malle Postale, the transport service that shuttles bags and passengers from Le Puy to a little past Figeac. Here's a link to the page I received...

https://www.lamallepostale.com/fr/randonnees

In French but there are maps as well as links to the Bureaus de Tourisme for each itinerary. Baggage transport is now being offered for each of these treks.

Bons chemins!

Tom
 
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A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
Since you have clearly said you do not want a lonely route, walk the Frances in April or October. May into September is too busy.

I waled the Central from Porto and did not find it has too much roadway, in fact I much prefer it to walking in tractor tracks, but in between the pretty towns at the end of the day there is really little to look at. The Frances has better landscape, views, changes in topography and crops to keep the eye entertained. Also much more in terms of architecture and history.

If you are ok walking alone during the day and catching up with others in the afternoon at the albergues, and enjoy mountain views or seascape, then the Primitivo or Norte. The Norte has fabulous cities, the sea, good food. The Primitivo is much more rural, with beautiful mountain views.
 

Sue L

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Sept/Oct 2015 Le Puy - to Conques, Tui - Santiago. May/June 2017 Conques to SJPP
We anticipate going back to France after walking La Meseta next year. (Due to assorted foot and knee problems we skipped this section of the CF in 2013.) WRT possibilities in France, I was supplied with many ideas by a digital "brochure" sent from La Malle Postale, the transport service that shuttles bags and passengers from Le Puy to a little past Figeac. Here's a link to the page I received...

https://www.lamallepostale.com/fr/randonnees

In French but there are maps as well as links to the Bureaus de Tourisme for each itinerary. Baggage transport is now being offered for each of these treks.

Bons chemins!

Tom
Many thanks, great idea.
 
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gittiharre

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
Thanks Gittiharre - really want to avoid too much road walking. Like others we find that too scary and tough on the legs.
And very little road walking on both these routes. They are quite up and down. Good workout.
 

Sue L

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Sept/Oct 2015 Le Puy - to Conques, Tui - Santiago. May/June 2017 Conques to SJPP
And very little road walking on both these routes. They are quite up and down. Good workout.
Thanks Gittiharre, it looks stunning though clearly fairly solitary with serious ascents and descents. I feel I want to do the Frances next but having mentioned Geneva to my partner he's now fixated on that. A new dilemma has emerged! Two next year?????
 

Shades of Narnia

Sandi, Shades of Narnia
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Francis, 2014
Camino Portuguese 2015
Camino Francis, 2016 & Hospitalera in Viana Spain
(etc)
Four months after completing the Le Puy route (Conques to SJPP) we're ready to think about the next one. No question there's a next one cause this is what we do. But how do you move on from a truly amazing experience? We were incredibly blessed to meet inspiring, wonderful, funny people along the way. Camino angels came in all shapes and forms. Will never forget the driver of the black mercedes who offered us a lift when blisters got the better of us. He and his wife shared the driving/walking and so he was waiting up a very big hill when we staggered over the peak. Despite our being covered in mud, he welcomed us (with boots in plastic bags) onto his cushy leather seats for a delightful 4 km to town. And when we arrived the Gite owner bathed my partner's feet, bandaged his blisters, then poured large glasses of a very nice red for everyone to share.

Nor shall we forget the gentle man who walked holding his wife's hand all the way to guide her along the trail and through her dementia fog.

Every day we walked for someone special and were going to walk for ourselves on our last day into SJPP but over dinner on our last night met an elderly French couple who told us about their grandson who'd been killed by his father. Despite language difficulties they were able to share their story with us. And so we walked for them on our last day. The end of our Camino in SJPP just made sense when we we spotted them poking their heads out of their hotel window as we walked to the train station to depart. Our last Camino memory will be this lovely couple who rushed down to the station to say farewell. It was a teary goodbye.

We loved the people, the scenery, the food, the wine and even managed to find things to say about cornfields and more cornfields and then more cornfields. Felt so chuffed to finish feeling fitter and stronger than when we started - even lost a little weight!

It had been two years since our first Camino (Le Puy to Conques then Tui to Santiago) and this year it was physically harder and took longer to get to that place where you are not focused on sore feet etc. The heatwave didn't help. So we think shorter stages and very light packs (plus serious training of course!) are the secret to completing our next Camino.

We'd wondered about doing the Portuguese Camino simply because we enjoyed our post-Santiago experience there, but am confused about whether it will be something we would enjoy having read conflicting stories on this Forum about too much road walking, poor signage - or conversely that it is fine. We're a bit hopeless with technology so appreciate a well marked route. The Frances? The Norte? In terms of interactions with others we thought Le Puy was perfect for us as it wasn't too crowded but we had enough opportunity to mix with others to make it just right. We met a Pilgrim (funnily enough he arrived at the junction of the Le Puy, Paris and Vezelay routes just as we did) from the Vezelay route but he hadn't met another Pilgrim for weeks. So not really what we are seeking.

We will keep reading and learning as much as possible about the different routes because at the end of the day only we can decide what suits us, but I was keen to learn what influenced your thinking in choosing certain routes over others? And we know that you can't and in fact don't want to assume what the Camino will give can be based on the prior experience of others. We are also undecided about whether it will be April/May or September/October (would love to do one in each but that's a little ambitious). Appreciate your thoughts.

What a lovely letter! Thank you for the careful generous time you took to present this piece of writing.....makes me all the more keen to set off next May, on the Podiensis, starting in Le Puy ( 4th Camino)......Bon chemin, fondly sandi, west coast Vancouver Canada.
 

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
Thanks Gittiharre, it looks stunning though clearly fairly solitary with serious ascents and descents. I feel I want to do the Frances next but having mentioned Geneva to my partner he's now fixated on that. A new dilemma has emerged! Two next year?????
When I did the Geneva last year for second time we met a handful of pilgrims daily.
 

Sue L

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Sept/Oct 2015 Le Puy - to Conques, Tui - Santiago. May/June 2017 Conques to SJPP
What a lovely letter! Thank you for the careful generous time you took to present this piece of writing.....makes me all the more keen to set off next May, on the Podiensis, starting in Le Puy ( 4th Camino)......Bon chemin, fondly sandi, west coast Vancouver Canada.[/QUOTE

Merci Beaucoup Sandi. The saying "the Camino always gives" was so true! Bon Chemin and sending kind regards from downunder
 
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Sue L

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Sept/Oct 2015 Le Puy - to Conques, Tui - Santiago. May/June 2017 Conques to SJPP
When I did the Geneva last year for second time we met a handful of pilgrims daily.
That sounds great. Which month did you walk? Would we need to carry a sleeping bag as well as liner in late May/June? Thinking that a lighter pack means happier knees and back on all those slopes.
 

TimH

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances April 2016
Le Puy route May 2017
Camino Norte June 2017
St Francis Way Sept 2018
Hi Sue, I am with Ian in that I reckon it would be great to add the Geneva to Le Puy 350km to what you have already done, but I am not sure about doing it in April/May. We had five days where it snowed in late April early May between Le Puy and Conques and all you need is one day of heavy snow and you can't even find the route. We did the Frances in March-April and there weren't too many people at all. Certainly more than the Le Puy route but not overwhelming as it was in June. The overall experience was very different to the Le Puy route. Not quite as pretty but still very historic and heaps more opportunities for food and places to stay. However, we couldn't cross the Pyrenees in March because of very deep snow. May e not an issue for April/May.
We have been looking at the Vezelay route on iPhiGenie and looks really interesting. I am sure that there is a guide book for it but can't seem to find it on the net?? Make you you let us know what you end up doing!!!
Tim and Sally
 

mspath

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
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gittiharre

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
That sounds great. Which month did you walk? Would we need to carry a sleeping bag as well as liner in late May/June? Thinking that a lighter pack means happier knees and back on all those slopes.
I walked in August September both times. It was very hot. If you go in April May you may well still get some snow....June would be better....
 

Sue L

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Sept/Oct 2015 Le Puy - to Conques, Tui - Santiago. May/June 2017 Conques to SJPP
I walked in August September both times. It was very hot. If you go in April May you may well still get some snow....June would be better....
That makes sense. Had better rethink the logistics as we want to be in France early May for daughter's birthday so trying to combine everything!
 
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Sue L

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Sept/Oct 2015 Le Puy - to Conques, Tui - Santiago. May/June 2017 Conques to SJPP
Hi Sue, I am with Ian in that I reckon it would be great to add the Geneva to Le Puy 350km to what you have already done, but I am not sure about doing it in April/May. We had five days where it snowed in late April early May between Le Puy and Conques and all you need is one day of heavy snow and you can't even find the route. We did the Frances in March-April and there weren't too many people at all. Certainly more than the Le Puy route but not overwhelming as it was in June. The overall experience was very different to the Le Puy route. Not quite as pretty but still very historic and heaps more opportunities for food and places to stay. However, we couldn't cross the Pyrenees in March because of very deep snow. May e not an issue for April/May.
We have been looking at the Vezelay route on iPhiGenie and looks really interesting. I am sure that there is a guide book for it but can't seem to find it on the net?? Make you you let us know what you end up doing!!!
Tim and Sally
Hi Tim & Sally - Thanks for that. Perhaps Vezelay would be the compromise (though it would be quite solitary judging by what people on this forum have said)? By shuffling things around we could probably walk late May/June rather than April/May. Will be in touch after I too check out the link below about Vezelay mentioned by another kind Pilgrim.
 

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
I walked in August September both times. It was very hot. If you go in April May you may well still get some snow....June would be better....
Sorry forgot to say a liner was all that was needed. Blankets everywhere and the lighter the pack the better.
 

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