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Which next?

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JMA

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2012) / Portugues (2015) / Ingles (2018) / Primitivo (2019)
Hello!

I've just completed my fourth camino route, and I'm interested if anyone can make any recommendations on which route I could consider next.

My history is:
2012 - Frances from St Jean, then Finisterre/Muxia
2015 - Portugues Central from Porto, then Finisterre/Muxia
2018 - Ingles from Ferrol, then Finisterre/Muxia
2019 - Primitivo from Oviedo, then Finisterre/Muxia

Far from experiencing diminishing returns - the Primitivo was actually my favourite yet! I'm already looking to next summer - but don't know what to look at next?

The 'big names' I've yet to look at are Norte and Via De La Plata - but I won't be able to get so long off work, and I don't know how I'll feel about starting one 'midway' if that makes sense... although I suppose all routes are arguably a mid point on a longer way!

My desirable criteria are:
- It fits sensibly into a stretched 'fortnight' (the most recent trip on the Primitivo was the longest I've ever been able to take off work at 18 days - I could do the same again but not much more)
- It's a fairly 'full and finished' version of the route (I.e. it ultimately ends in Santiago, it starts at a traditional starting point rather than randomly midway)
- Enough footfall/infrastructure that I can stay in albergues rather than pensions or hotels etc

I'd be keen to hear any suggestions to research :)
 

NorthernLight

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
If you need to finish in Santiago, you only have the Invierno left.

Since you seem to enjoy this, perhaps it is time to consider starting much further away and plan to do it in segments over the coming years. French folks often do a week at a time, segment by segment to finish. I met a Dutch man who spent a month walking each year for three years, from his door in Holland.

There are other, short caminos that are connectors, like the Aragon, that don't end in Santiago.
 

SabineP

Camino = Empathy + Compassion.
Camino(s) past & future
some and then more. see my signature.
A shorter Camino but starting in Irun and ending in Santo Domingo de la Calzada or Burgos : Camino Vasco Interior or Via de Bayona. Not ending in Santiago but Irun is definitely a clear starting point.
 
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Jean Ti

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Norte, Primitivo, Frances,Via de la Plata

Trying to do one camino every year
Gijon to Santiago very nice on the ocean.

Screenshot_2019-09-21-11-48-22.png
 
Last edited:

biarritzdon

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF&CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF&CP17, CdN18, CM18, CF18, LePuy19
From Madrid you can walk to Sahagun and from Oloron-Ste. Marie you can walk to Puenta la Reina or Pamplona in about 2 weeks. Both are lovely routes and less traveled
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF2012,Le Puy/CF 2015 Portugues 2017 Norte 2018, CF 2019
If you want to finish in Santiago than I would agree with Jean Ti and start in Gijon on the Norte. If you want some more company with plenty of albergues to stay in start in Irun on the Norte and you will see some of the most magnificent scenery on any Camino. You could easily make it to Santander and maybe even a little further depending on how you walk. It is a really beautiful and mellow camino.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
It seems that you kind of like hilly Caminos and if you want to end it in Santiago then I can only think about three more (but they are not extremely hilly though):
Invierno from Ponferrada or
Sanabres from Granja de Moreruela (2 days after Zamora) or
Via de la Plata Portugues from Zamora.

All three coming to Santiago on Sanabres. I have walked first two and liked them both. And I heard (and saw photos) a lot of praise for the third one.

Otherwise if Santiago isn't main goal then you have some "shorter" Caminos that goes through Basque Country, Asturias and Cantabria like Voie de la Nive, Baztan, already mentioned Via de Bayona/Vasco del Interior, Olvidado, Ruta del Besaya, Lebaniego+Vadiniense, Salvador etc. Some with more pilgrim orientated infrastructure some with much less.
Or in Galicia Ruta del Mar and Camino dos Faros and you could visit Santiago afterwards. Or maybe walk Fisterra-Muxia (Muxia-Fisterra)-Santiago route.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2015
Gronze has 13 stages for Montserrat to the Camino Aragonese. I'm giving it a try in about a month.

See this Gronze webpage:

For forum threads on this camino see:
 
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Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
I slightly favour the Sanabrés over the Norte, having done both. On the Sanabrés starting at Pueblo de Sanabria makes historical sense, but if you want to keep it down to the last 100km start at Ourense (who does not love a spa town - don't forget your swimmers) from the wonderful cathedral with its beautifully coloured Portico which is similar to the restored Portico of Glory in SDC.

The entry into Santiago from the Sanabrés is also much nicer than the Norte. The Norte joins the CF at Arzua, whereas the entry from the Sanabrés avoids all the major roads and you pop out from a green lane with the cathedral immediately ahead. Magic.
 

JMA

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2012) / Portugues (2015) / Ingles (2018) / Primitivo (2019)
Thank you everyone for taking the time to make suggestions! I will now do some research - it sounds like I have quite a few exciting options! 😊
 

laineylainey

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
started in 2012, hooked ever since.
It seems that you kind of like hilly Caminos and if you want to end it in Santiago then I can only think about three more (but they are not extremely hilly though):
Invierno from Ponferrada or
Sanabres from Granja de Moreruela (2 days after Zamora) or
Via de la Plata Portugues from Zamora.

All three coming to Santiago on Sanabres. I have walked first two and liked them both. And I heard (and saw photos) a lot of praise for the third one.

Otherwise if Santiago isn't main goal then you have some "shorter" Caminos that goes through Basque Country, Asturias and Cantabria like Voie de la Nive, Baztan, already mentioned Via de Bayona/Vasco del Interior, Olvidado, Ruta del Besaya, Lebaniego+Vadiniense, Salvador etc. Some with more pilgrim orientated infrastructure some with much less.
Or in Galicia Ruta del Mar and Camino dos Faros and you could visit Santiago afterwards. Or maybe walk Fisterra-Muxia (Muxia-Fisterra)-Santiago route.
Great ideas @KinkyOne thanks! Also thinking about next year. Well I have been back nearly a week from completing VdlP. So it's about time to start planning again lol 🤗🤗🤗
 

WayWalker

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013, 2016
"The entry into Santiago from the Sanabrés is also much nicer than the Norte. The Norte joins the CF at Arzua, whereas the entry from the Sanabrés avoids all the major roads and you pop out from a green lane with the cathedral immediately ahead. Magic."
They've changed the Norte so you don't have to continue on the Frances at Arzua. It's a long slog but in hindsight I wish we had taken it.
 

Dinah Shaw

Volcano Climber
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Norte and Frances Sept 6 - Oct 11, 2016
Hello!

I've just completed my fourth camino route, and I'm interested if anyone can make any recommendations on which route I could consider next.

My history is:
2012 - Frances from St Jean, then Finisterre/Muxia
2015 - Portugues Central from Porto, then Finisterre/Muxia
2018 - Ingles from Ferrol, then Finisterre/Muxia
2019 - Primitivo from Oviedo, then Finisterre/Muxia

Far from experiencing diminishing returns - the Primitivo was actually my favourite yet! I'm already looking to next summer - but don't know what to look at next?

The 'big names' I've yet to look at are Norte and Via De La Plata - but I won't be able to get so long off work, and I don't know how I'll feel about starting one 'midway' if that makes sense... although I suppose all routes are arguably a mid point on a longer way!

My desirable criteria are:
- It fits sensibly into a stretched 'fortnight' (the most recent trip on the Primitivo was the longest I've ever been able to take off work at 18 days - I could do the same again but not much more)
- It's a fairly 'full and finished' version of the route (I.e. it ultimately ends in Santiago, it starts at a traditional starting point rather than randomly midway)
- Enough footfall/infrastructure that I can stay in albergues rather than pensions or hotels etc

I'd be keen to hear any suggestions to research :)
The Norte! It's the best!
 

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