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Which part should I skip?

Jingles

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning my first camino for August 2017
#1
Hi everyone,
I am preparing to make my first pilgrimage to Santiago in a couple of weeks, and I'm still unsure about which part to miss out as, sadly, I only have 28 days to walk it. I'm in my late 50's, reasonably fit, and I've done quite a bit of training for the Camino, but I'd have to go some to complete it in such a short time. I need to be back at school for early Sept, so I guess I'll have to take some form of transport at some stage.
My son walked the whole Camino a few years ago, and reckons that I should skip the 'long, boring bit in the middle,' where there's no shade for miles (you'll know better than me where he means!) but I must admit, these conditions actually appeal to me!
I need to know more specifically where might be a good place to (regretfully) take some transport. I'm starting from SJPP and hoping to walk at least 400 miles.
Any suggestions would be very welcome. I'm really looking forward to it, not long now!
Jean
 

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Felipe

Veteran Member
#2
- There is not such a thing as a "whole Camino". Many Camino Frances guides start with the Saint Jean Pied de Port stage, but it is just a modern convention.
- You can start in SJPP and walk as far as you like; then come back another year to finish your pilgrimage. A lot of persons do that, and it does not exclude you from getting the Compostela.
- Or you can begin, for example, in Pamplona or Logroño, and walk all the way to Santiago in 28 days.
- If you absolutely want to start in SJPP and reach Santiago, I suggest you don't plan beforehand the stages you need to miss out. Decide on the spot.
It would be a pity, because there are not really "boring stages"; in this forum we, the fans of the Meseta (the middle, flat stages) are legion.
Buen camino!
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2015
#4
You may want to consider renting a bicycle between Logrono or Burgos and Leon or Astorga. That way you get to do the Camino Frances under your own power in the time you have available and still get to see the meseta. There are a number of places where you can do this. Here are some links I've collected but you could also use this site's search function to check out bicycle bike rental.
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
#5
Meseta fan here as well, and SJPP-Roncesvalles fan as well.

Question is, do you want to get to Santiago, or would experiencing a long distance walk with all that entails, with no breaks, appeal to you?

And while getting to Santiago over more than one "trip" will not mean not getting a Compostella eventuallym it certainly will mean not getting one this time if you don't walk the last 100km.

I agree, go with the flow and see when you may need a break, need to catch up with buddies, bus in and out of large cities. Or bus rainy days...
 

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Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
#6
I'm a meseta fan, and also a fan of having an uninterrupted walk, if possible, rather than trying to pick the portion to "skip." As stated, there is no "whole camino" unless you start from your front door. My suggestion for a 28-day plan would be to start in Pamplona. After two weeks, you will have a better idea if you need to gain a bit of time by taking a bus. You will also know people and be familiar with the way the camino works, so it will be easy to arrange.
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
#7
As stated, there is no "whole camino" unless you start from your front door.
I was just thinking about this, and I log in and found your post @C clearly .

Why is there not a full Frances (since that when this issue pops up, SJPP vs Roncesvalles) when there is a full Primitivo, Salvador, VDLP. We all know where these start and end, so why so much tension when SJPP is brought up as the starting point for the Frances?
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata.
#9
I was just thinking about this, and I log in and found your post @C clearly .

Why is there not a full Frances (since that when this issue pops up, SJPP vs Roncesvalles) when there is a full Primitivo, Salvador, VDLP. We all know where these start and end, so why so much tension when SJPP is brought up as the starting point for the Frances?
The Spanish have always regarded Roncesvalles as the "start" of the Camino Frances.

You can also characterise SJPDP as the "finish" of the Le Puy, the Tours and the Vezelay. But I think it is just semantics.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
#10
Why is there not a full Frances (since that when this issue pops up, SJPP vs Roncesvalles) when there is a full Primitivo, Salvador, VDLP. We all know where these start and end, so why so much tension when SJPP is brought up as the starting point for the Frances?
Oddly enough, I thought about pointing that out when I wrote my post! Yes, there can be considered a "whole Camino Frances", although it is arguable whether it would start in SJPP or Roncesvalles.

I don't feel any tension about this phrase (as long as they don't say "the whole El Camino.":eek::eek::eek: But it is very common that people who use the phrase do not realize there are various routes with different names, and neither do they understand much about the whole range of options and variations. That is the point of responding with "there is no whole Camino." It makes them think a bit differently, but you are right that a little more explanation might be in order to get the correct terminology.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Past: Francés, Inglés, Fisterra/Muxia, Baztanés x2, Primitivo, Norte. 2018: Portugues.
#12
Hi @Jingles, I'm sure you're very excited at this point!
Assuming that you want to end up in Santiago, I second the earlier posts about starting in Pamplona/Logrono and not skipping sections. There's something very special about a continuous walk. I'm also a Meseta fan - it's definitely not a 'long boring bit in the middle' :)

However, if you find that you want or need to skip sections, these points might be helpful:

1. There are plenty of local buses between Pamplona and Burgos - it would be easy to skip a stage, or part of a stage without any prior planning.
2. You could take a train to Leon from Sahagun or El Burgo Ranero.
3. A bus in or out of Leon - again, easy to do without any prior planning.
4. A bus or train from Astorga to Ponferrada (but not recommended as you'd miss an absolutely wonderful walk!)

Happy planning and Buen Camino.
 

owms2323

Credential question
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Frances (2014) Camino Frances (2016) Camino Finisterre/Muxia (2017)
#13
Hi everyone,
I am preparing to make my first pilgrimage to Santiago in a couple of weeks, and I'm still unsure about which part to miss out as, sadly, I only have 28 days to walk it. I'm in my late 50's, reasonably fit, and I've done quite a bit of training for the Camino, but I'd have to go some to complete it in such a short time. I need to be back at school for early Sept, so I guess I'll have to take some form of transport at some stage.
My son walked the whole Camino a few years ago, and reckons that I should skip the 'long, boring bit in the middle,' where there's no shade for miles (you'll know better than me where he means!) but I must admit, these conditions actually appeal to me!
I need to know more specifically where might be a good place to (regretfully) take some transport. I'm starting from SJPP and hoping to walk at least 400 miles.
Any suggestions would be very welcome. I'm really looking forward to it, not long now!
Jean
I would definitely bus or train into and out of Leon, and maybe bus into Burgos. That should save you maybe 3-4 days.
 
#14
Hi everyone,
I am preparing to make my first pilgrimage to Santiago in a couple of weeks, and I'm still unsure about which part to miss out as, sadly, I only have 28 days to walk it. I'm in my late 50's, reasonably fit, and I've done quite a bit of training for the Camino, but I'd have to go some to complete it in such a short time. I need to be back at school for early Sept, so I guess I'll have to take some form of transport at some stage.
My son walked the whole Camino a few years ago, and reckons that I should skip the 'long, boring bit in the middle,' where there's no shade for miles (you'll know better than me where he means!) but I must admit, these conditions actually appeal to me!
I need to know more specifically where might be a good place to (regretfully) take some transport. I'm starting from SJPP and hoping to walk at least 400 miles.
Any suggestions would be very welcome. I'm really looking forward to it, not long now!
Jean
Hi, Jingles, Welcome to the forum,

You've gotten lots of good suggestions about how to save a few days by busing certain parts. All are quite do-able. But I think there are a couple of other things to consider, especially in light of what so many people have said about our use of the term "whole camino," when that is really a misnomer.

-- You may find that hopping on a bus or train right in the middle really messes with your sense of the journey. I have had to do it, in fact I did it this year to transition from the Baztán to the Norte, but it is jarring and in my case it left me with the Norte from Irún in tact.
-- You may find that you have established bonds with others, all of whom you will have to leave when you skip ahead.
-- That "long boring bit in the middle" has many wonderful aspects, as others have noted.

If it were me, and if it were my first camino, I would do one of two things, assuming you need to shorten the SJPP-Santiago stretch by 4 or 5 days. One option is to start at a point where you are pretty sure you will be able to get to Santiago (Logroño would be a sure bet, maybe a few days further back like Estella, all of these places are reach-able by public transport). BUT... taking into account the point made by @Anemone del Camino about the beauty of the first few days, you might just walk SJPP to Pamplona and then make a clean break up to a reasonable starting point five days ahead. That will give you a 3-week-plus uninterrupted Camino. For me, ripping out the insides of the Camino Francés by skipping the meseta really takes away a lot of the magic that comes from being on your own in wide open spaces with nothing but your thoughts. But in part it depends on your own reasons for going. If it's a bucket list challenge (and I mean no disrespect, there's absolutely nothing wrong with that), skipping the "boring parts" might be just what is called for. Buen camino, Laurie
 

AMoore63

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Can I manage to do it in August 2017?
#15
Hi everyone,
I am preparing to make my first pilgrimage to Santiago in a couple of weeks, and I'm still unsure about which part to miss out as, sadly, I only have 28 days to walk it. I'm in my late 50's, reasonably fit, and I've done quite a bit of training for the Camino, but I'd have to go some to complete it in such a short time. I need to be back at school for early Sept, so I guess I'll have to take some form of transport at some stage.
My son walked the whole Camino a few years ago, and reckons that I should skip the 'long, boring bit in the middle,' where there's no shade for miles (you'll know better than me where he means!) but I must admit, these conditions actually appeal to me!
I need to know more specifically where might be a good place to (regretfully) take some transport. I'm starting from SJPP and hoping to walk at least 400 miles.
Any suggestions would be very welcome. I'm really looking forward to it, not long now!
Jean
Jean, you and I are exactly the same! When do you leave? I had my heart set on starting at SJPP and walking the entire thing before I went back to work in a school but life prevented me from starting and now I have decided to just do what I can in a little less than you...21 days. So many threads I have read give so many different ideas. I got so overwhelmed I almost felt like I should just wait until another year but I am going to start and figure it out as I go. When do you leave? Just wondering if we will be starting about the same time?
 

Jingles

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning my first camino for August 2017
#16
Hello!
Thanks for your reply - it's reassuring to learn that someone else is having a similar dilemma!
I fly to Biarritz on Thurs Aug 3rd, and will start from SJPP the next day. Does this coincide with you?
I've only just found time to read all the replies, as I've still not broken up from school. There are some good suggestions, but I've bought my airline ticket now so will start from SJPP as planned. I like the idea of hiring a bike for part of it, but don't know if I'd be able to cycle with my backpack on, lol!
I think I'll be inclined to do as you say, and go with the flow. Would be great if it turned out we were starting same time!
 

Jingles

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning my first camino for August 2017
#17
Thank you to everyone who replied to my thread re which bit to miss. There are some excellent ideas, and I will reply to all in next day or so, extremely busy today!
 

AMoore63

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Can I manage to do it in August 2017?
#18
Hello!
Thanks for your reply - it's reassuring to learn that someone else is having a similar dilemma!
I fly to Biarritz on Thurs Aug 3rd, and will start from SJPP the next day. Does this coincide with you?
I've only just found time to read all the replies, as I've still not broken up from school. There are some good suggestions, but I've bought my airline ticket now so will start from SJPP as planned. I like the idea of hiring a bike for part of it, but don't know if I'd be able to cycle with my backpack on, lol!
I think I'll be inclined to do as you say, and go with the flow. Would be great if it turned out we were starting same time!
Oh darn! I will just miss you by a few days. I am flying into Paris on the 4th but thought I should see Paris for a day and will probably get to SJPP by the 6th. I would have been much comforted to have been able to start with you!
 

JulieandPeter

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (April/May 2015)
Frances (May/June 2017)
Planning Le Puy to SJPDP (August/September 2018)
#19
All great suggestions above (I am also a Mesita fan). My first suggestion is to arrive and walk and decide as you go. You may want to linger in places that others consider skipping . . . I would skip Sarria to Santiago in August. Take public transport to Santiago and go to the cathedral when it is empty and reflect on your journey (this quiet time in the cathedral was for me far more rewarding than the compestela I received after my first Camino, but that is just me). Maybe come back and walk from Sarria when it is not so crowded (or, perhaps, you would like the crowds and you do not want to wait to receive the compostela and that plan would not work for you).

Regardless of what you decide, there are plenty of options to catch a bus or train or hire a taxi although it is a little more difficult and/or expensive in some places. Two people I met on separate occasions this June ended up getting sick just after Burgos. There was a heat wave and they were dealing with dehydration - one young woman ended up in the hospital and another young man had to stop walking for three days. The young man made up the days lost by walking 30 miles per day for several days. The young woman took the bus from Fromista to a train station and then a train to Leon. I was told by the young woman that Fromista was the last place to catch a bus to the train station, after that I think you must either walk to Sahagun to catch the train to Leon (which I noticed several people did) or hire a taxi.

Three short parts I would consider skipping are Viana to Logrono, Leon to Mazarife, and taking the bus from Villafria to Burgos. I am a slow walker, so for me avoiding the long walks into Logrono and Burgos and out of Leon could potentially save three days (however, for most people that is a savings of two days at most :)).

As I said initially, I genuinely feel you should start your walk and decide as you go! Buen Camino.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
#20
When I walked the Camino Frances, starting in Roncesvalles, as a result of there being no beds in Portomarin, we 'did' it in 29 days. I was able to do more km by then because stamina had been building up along the way. Just start. And you can get your pack sent on if you do take a bike for a few days... hope it works out for you.
 

AMoore63

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Can I manage to do it in August 2017?
#21
Oh darn! I will just miss you by a few days. I am flying into Paris on the 4th but thought I should see Paris for a day and will probably get to SJPP by the 6th. I would have been much comforted to have been able to start with you!
Jingles, I just may see you. Based on the research and the kind feedback I have gotten, I am not thinking I will just forget seeing Paris this trip and go right from the airport to a flight to Biarritz. I will add some days to my window and take away the stress of doing "two trips". Looking at flights now.
 

Jingles

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning my first camino for August 2017
#22
Hi, Jingles, Welcome to the forum,

You've gotten lots of good suggestions about how to save a few days by busing certain parts. All are quite do-able. But I think there are a couple of other things to consider, especially in light of what so many people have said about our use of the term "whole camino," when that is really a misnomer.

-- You may find that hopping on a bus or train right in the middle really messes with your sense of the journey. I have had to do it, in fact I did it this year to transition from the Baztán to the Norte, but it is jarring and in my case it left me with the Norte from Irún in tact.
-- You may find that you have established bonds with others, all of whom you will have to leave when you skip ahead.
-- That "long boring bit in the middle" has many wonderful aspects, as others have noted.

If it were me, and if it were my first camino, I would do one of two things, assuming you need to shorten the SJPP-Santiago stretch by 4 or 5 days. One option is to start at a point where you are pretty sure you will be able to get to Santiago (Logroño would be a sure bet, maybe a few days further back like Estella, all of these places are reach-able by public transport). BUT... taking into account the point made by @Anemone del Camino about the beauty of the first few days, you might just walk SJPP to Pamplona and then make a clean break up to a reasonable starting point five days ahead. That will give you a 3-week-plus uninterrupted Camino. For me, ripping out the insides of the Camino Francés by skipping the meseta really takes away a lot of the magic that comes from being on your own in wide open spaces with nothing but your thoughts. But in part it depends on your own reasons for going. If it's a bucket list challenge (and I mean no disrespect, there's absolutely nothing wrong with that), skipping the "boring parts" might be just what is called for. Buen camino, Laurie
Hi Laurie,
Thanks for your reply, I love your suggestion to walk to Pamplona to have a 3 week uninterrupted camino. That was what was bothering me the most, that I might not experience the relentlessness, and, hopefully, the positive benefits of that.
This journey for me is very much a calling, rather than something to cross off a list. I didn't really want to miss what I now know is called the meseta, but your suggestion sounds perfect.
Thanks again
 

SYates

Camino Fossil AD 1999
Camino(s) past & future
First: Camino Francés 1999
...
Last: Camino Portugues 2018

Now: http://egeria.house/
#23
Hi everyone,
I am preparing to make my first pilgrimage to Santiago in a couple of weeks, and I'm still unsure about which part to miss out as, sadly, I only have 28 days to walk it. ...
Unless you walk from the door of your home and back again, you will never do a 'traditional Camino' - so, just relax!

... I fly to Biarritz ...
Then you have plenty of starting points to start from: Pamplona, Logroño, Burgos ...
Just multiply the km you can comfortably do each day by available days and you have your starting point ;-)

Buen Camino, SY
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
#24
Hi everyone,
I am preparing to make my first pilgrimage to Santiago in a couple of weeks, and I'm still unsure about which part to miss out as, sadly, I only have 28 days to walk it. I'm in my late 50's, reasonably fit, and I've done quite a bit of training for the Camino, but I'd have to go some to complete it in such a short time. I need to be back at school for early Sept, so I guess I'll have to take some form of transport at some stage.
My son walked the whole Camino a few years ago, and reckons that I should skip the 'long, boring bit in the middle,' where there's no shade for miles (you'll know better than me where he means!) but I must admit, these conditions actually appeal to me!
I need to know more specifically where might be a good place to (regretfully) take some transport. I'm starting from SJPP and hoping to walk at least 400 miles.
Any suggestions would be very welcome. I'm really looking forward to it, not long now!
Jean
Hi, Jean,

As to your question I would say NONE (to skip). You just walk from wherever you planned to walk and do it at your own pace, smell the roses, enjoy red Rioja wine, tapas, company and so on. The Camino will be there for you to return, believe me, I've been in similar situation on behalf of injured ankle. And when your time is up then find the best way to starting point.

And return!!!

B.
 
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Gillyweb

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Villafranca - Santiago (2013)
SJPP - Santiago (2014)
Portugues (2017)
#25
Hi everyone,
I am preparing to make my first pilgrimage to Santiago in a couple of weeks, and I'm still unsure about which part to miss out as, sadly, I only have 28 days to walk it. I'm in my late 50's, reasonably fit, and I've done quite a bit of training for the Camino, but I'd have to go some to complete it in such a short time. I need to be back at school for early Sept, so I guess I'll have to take some form of transport at some stage.
My son walked the whole Camino a few years ago, and reckons that I should skip the 'long, boring bit in the middle,' where there's no shade for miles (you'll know better than me where he means!) but I must admit, these conditions actually appeal to me!
I need to know more specifically where might be a good place to (regretfully) take some transport. I'm starting from SJPP and hoping to walk at least 400 miles.
Any suggestions would be very welcome. I'm really looking forward to it, not long now!
Jean
Oh don't skip the Meseta!! It's the place where your soul really gets to sing and instead of watching where your feet are going you can simply 'be' and experience the wonder of the Camino. It's hot, yes, but not a problem if you rise early and hide from the midday sun. There is a moment coming out of the Rioja region where you reach the crest of a hill and the Meseta suddenly expands before your eyes ;.It's wonderful. If you really really must skip a bit then perhaps the very end of the Meseta where it gets a little industrial but it is truly the most contemplative wonderful part of the walk. Or do as others suggest and start in Pamplona. 28 days should do it from there and save the Pyrenees for another journey :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
C/Frances. SJPP - Estella May 2009.
C/frances. SJPP - Santiago April/ May 2013.
C/Finisterre. Santiag - Finisterre - Muxia May 2013.
C/Ingles. Ferrol - Santiago May 2013.
C/Frances. SJPP - Santiago May - June 2015.
C/Finisterre. Santiago - Muxia - Finisrerre - Cee. June 2015.
C/Frances. Logrono - Burgos May 2016.
#26
Hi everyone,
I am preparing to make my first pilgrimage to Santiago in a couple of weeks, and I'm still unsure about which part to miss out as, sadly, I only have 28 days to walk it. I'm in my late 50's, reasonably fit, and I've done quite a bit of training for the Camino, but I'd have to go some to complete it in such a short time. I need to be back at school for early Sept, so I guess I'll have to take some form of transport at some stage.
My son walked the whole Camino a few years ago, and reckons that I should skip the 'long, boring bit in the middle,' where there's no shade for miles (you'll know better than me where he means!) but I must admit, these conditions actually appeal to me!
I need to know more specifically where might be a good place to (regretfully) take some transport. I'm starting from SJPP and hoping to walk at least 400 miles.
Any suggestions would be very welcome. I'm really looking forward to it, not long now!
Jean
Just walk for 28days you will have walked your Camino ,you do not have to reach a large building covered in blue plastic.
 

Ange105

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2018
#27
Thank you for asking this question. I am still in the early days of my planning for May 2018 and I wasn't sure where to start. After reading this thread and talking to a friend who did the pilgrimage a few years back I am feeling more set on starting in SJPP, walking over the Pyrenees, then missing a piece and walking as much as I can to arrive in SdC within the time available.
Enjoy your pilgrimage, may it open you to all that you wish.
 

MtoM

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Arles route (in part) 2013 - planning Le Puy route
#28
Hi everyone,
I am preparing to make my first pilgrimage to Santiago in a couple of weeks, and I'm still unsure about which part to miss out as, sadly, I only have 28 days to walk it. I'm in my late 50's, reasonably fit, and I've done quite a bit of training for the Camino, but I'd have to go some to complete it in such a short time. I need to be back at school for early Sept, so I guess I'll have to take some form of transport at some stage.
My son walked the whole Camino a few years ago, and reckons that I should skip the 'long, boring bit in the middle,' where there's no shade for miles (you'll know better than me where he means!) but I must admit, these conditions actually appeal to me!
I need to know more specifically where might be a good place to (regretfully) take some transport. I'm starting from SJPP and hoping to walk at least 400 miles.
Any suggestions would be very welcome. I'm really looking forward to it, not long now!
Jean
I see you have received many replies to your post so another may be superfluous, but I was interested in your question and what others have suggested so I'd like to add my own experience.

I did a camino walk four years ago starting from Arles. Because I didn't have time to do more than about half the distance from Arles to Santiago, I decided to walk three sections of the route and take public transport in between.

On paper this seemed like a good idea, but I found the breaks much more jarring than I'd expected. For the first three weeks or so, when I was walking a continuous stretch, I felt very centred, but when I made the first hop to a new part of the camino I lost some of that peace. While I enjoyed the later parts of my camino, I always felt slightly displaced. This may just say something about me, but I did notice that (as far as I can remember) all of the other pilgrims I met were walking a continuous stretch. It makes me wonder if there is in fact a collective wisdom that supports the idea - continuity is important!

I am thinking of walking the Le Puy route in the next year or two, and if I do I will definitely start at Le Puy and just walk as far as my time allows. If arriving in Santiago on this trip is important to you, you could simply start closer to your goal than SJPP (as others have suggested).

Whatever you decide, I wish you joy on your journey.
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata.
#29
Yes, I am another that does not like to break the journey. I've enjoyed them all, but it definitely feels more like a "pilgrimage" if I Just Keep Walking.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
#30
Yes, I am another that does not like to break the journey. I've enjoyed them all, but it definitely feels more like a "pilgrimage" if I Just Keep Walking.
For a number of reasons that happened to me last summer I had to break up my Walking. I've walked Via de Bayona (took a train three stages before its' ending to Burgos and Sahagun and back from Leon to finish it), then again trained from Burgos to Leon and walked Salvador to Oviedo. Such a bad weather I've had made my decision (also because of a friend in need who was in Santiago at that time) to take a bus to SdC where I injured my little toe pretty badly hitting the curb. The time I had allowed me to walk slow Ingles (although the Primitivo was the plan) and Fisterra. But that wasn't "my" real Camino with all those hitchhiking, trains and buses. Those interruptions are just that - interruptions.

Three beautiful Caminos but they just weren't consecutive which would make my heart and soul sing if circumstances would be different. Therefore I suggest @Jingles that you walk the longest possible distance you could. Anyway both the Camino and the Tomb will be there another time.

Buen Camino!
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
#31
I would definitely suggest starting, for instance, in Logroño and then walking all the way.

Someone said that the "the whole Camino" thing is just a myth, and that's certainly true unless you start your walk from your own front door.

It is more important in my experience to have a continuous experience than to try and compromise with this "whole Camino" idea, given that whether you start at SJPP or Logroño or Lourdes or even Le Puy, then that's by definition already a compromise of not walking from home.

People do however have limited time, nearly always -- so then simply estimate how far you can walk in the time that you have (not forgetting that you'll certainly need at least one rest day, more likely at least two), and then start from a point that's at that distance from Compostela. Or to answer the question as you've framed it, "skip" the section between SJPP and, say, Logroño ...
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
#32
but I've bought my airline ticket now so will start from SJPP as planned.
Public transport between Biarritz and Pamplona/Logroño does exist, so you're still not tied down to SJPP.

I like the idea of hiring a bike for part of it, but don't know if I'd be able to cycle with my backpack on, lol!
This would be a rare instance of a case where I'd positively recommend using JacoTrans :p
 
Camino(s) past & future
All that we are is the result of what we have thought.
#33
Hi everyone,
I am preparing to make my first pilgrimage to Santiago in a couple of weeks, and I'm still unsure about which part to miss out as, sadly, I only have 28 days to walk it. I'm in my late 50's, reasonably fit, and I've done quite a bit of training for the Camino, but I'd have to go some to complete it in such a short time. I need to be back at school for early Sept, so I guess I'll have to take some form of transport at some stage.
My son walked the whole Camino a few years ago, and reckons that I should skip the 'long, boring bit in the middle,' where there's no shade for miles (you'll know better than me where he means!) but I must admit, these conditions actually appeal to me!
I need to know more specifically where might be a good place to (regretfully) take some transport. I'm starting from SJPP and hoping to walk at least 400 miles.
Any suggestions would be very welcome. I'm really looking forward to it, not long now!
Jean
Hi Jean ,
I would say don't skip anything,come back when you can on a later date and begin where you ended.
But who am I, you have to make the decission what to do.

Wish you a wonderful time and a Buen Camino,Peter.
 
Camino(s) past & future
GR65(2008)Camino Frances(2011)both(2013

Hoping for Del Norte in 2018
#34
- There is not such a thing as a "whole Camino". Many Camino Frances guides start with the Saint Jean Pied de Port stage, but it is just a modern convention.
- You can start in SJPP and walk as far as you like; then come back another year to finish your pilgrimage. A lot of persons do that, and it does not exclude you from getting the Compostela.
- Or you can begin, for example, in Pamplona or Logroño, and walk all the way to Santiago in 28 days.
- If you absolutely want to start in SJPP and reach Santiago, I suggest you don't plan beforehand the stages you need to miss out. Decide on the spot.
It would be a pity, because there are not really "boring stages"; in this forum we, the fans of the Meseta (the middle, flat stages) are legion.
Buen camino!
Hi
I would not aim to miss a whole stage but skip bits which would bring little joy, such as bussing out of Burgos, and thus save some energy to walk a little bit further that day. Like the other posts I am a huge fan of the Meseta, endless space, quiet and time to be you. If you can bring your self to leap frog you can quite easily knock 3 days off your itinerary. I have walked the Meseta in blazing sun and rain and mud and just love it . Buen Camino.
 

Jingles

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning my first camino for August 2017
#35
Oh don't skip the Meseta!! It's the place where your soul really gets to sing and instead of watching where your feet are going you can simply 'be' and experience the wonder of the Camino. It's hot, yes, but not a problem if you rise early and hide from the midday sun. There is a moment coming out of the Rioja region where you reach the crest of a hill and the Meseta suddenly expands before your eyes ;.It's wonderful. If you really really must skip a bit then perhaps the very end of the Meseta where it gets a little industrial but it is truly the most contemplative wonderful part of the walk. Or do as others suggest and start in Pamplona. 28 days should do it from there and save the Pyrenees for another journey :)
Thank you for your reply. I am now certain that the meseta is for me, reading the many replies from those who have described it so well, including yourself . I will start in SJPP as my flight is to Bierritz, and I've always imagined tackling the arduous first day/ it's something I really want to do. Much food for thought re missing a bit though! X
Hi
I would not aim to miss a whole stage but skip bits which would bring little joy, such as bussing out of Burgos, and thus save some energy to walk a little bit further that day. Like the other posts I am a huge fan of the Meseta, endless space, quiet and time to be you. If you can bring your self to leap frog you can quite easily knock 3 days off your itinerary. I have walked the Meseta in blazing sun and rain and mud and just love it . Buen Camino.
 

Jingles

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning my first camino for August 2017
#36
Hi Jean ,
I would say don't skip anything,come back when you can on a later date and begin where you ended.
But who am I, you have to make the decission what to do.

Wish you a wonderful time and a Buen Camino,Peter.
Thank you Peter- school determined the date I will finish, sadly x
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
#37
Thank you Peter- school determined the date I will finish, sadly x
He means come back another year to walk from where you end this year to Santiago, when school is out again. Many people walk only a couple of weeks at a time and come back to pick uo where they left off.
 

paul.ferris

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2011 Camino Frances
2013 Camino Frances
2015 To be decided
#38
Hi everyone,
I am preparing to make my first pilgrimage to Santiago in a couple of weeks, and I'm still unsure about which part to miss out as, sadly, I only have 28 days to walk it. I'm in my late 50's, reasonably fit, and I've done quite a bit of training for the Camino, but I'd have to go some to complete it in such a short time. I need to be back at school for early Sept, so I guess I'll have to take some form of transport at some stage.
My son walked the whole Camino a few years ago, and reckons that I should skip the 'long, boring bit in the middle,' where there's no shade for miles (you'll know better than me where he means!) but I must admit, these conditions actually appeal to me!
I need to know more specifically where might be a good place to (regretfully) take some transport. I'm starting from SJPP and hoping to walk at least 400 miles.
Any suggestions would be very welcome. I'm really looking forward to it, not long now!
Jean
If you are not concerned about a Compostella you can skip the crowds, lineups and aggravation of the last 100K.
 

tpmchugh

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013)
Camino Frances (2015)
#39
Hi everyone,
I am preparing to make my first pilgrimage to Santiago in a couple of weeks, and I'm still unsure about which part to miss out as, sadly, I only have 28 days to walk it. I'm in my late 50's, reasonably fit, and I've done quite a bit of training for the Camino, but I'd have to go some to complete it in such a short time. I need to be back at school for early Sept, so I guess I'll have to take some form of transport at some stage.
My son walked the whole Camino a few years ago, and reckons that I should skip the 'long, boring bit in the middle,' where there's no shade for miles (you'll know better than me where he means!) but I must admit, these conditions actually appeal to me!
I need to know more specifically where might be a good place to (regretfully) take some transport. I'm starting from SJPP and hoping to walk at least 400 miles.
Any suggestions would be very welcome. I'm really looking forward to it, not long now!
Jean
If I have to miss a section it is León. I know a lot of people love the place but not me. Bus or train into the city, walk to the plaza just before the cathedral and get the bus to La Vergin on the outskirts. There are of course many shortcuts by bus but only you can choose but in my opinion, think about skipping León, I have only stayed there once out of three caminos and did not like it. I have walked through and did not like the walk out but then, just my personal opinion which will be different to that of others
 
Camino(s) past & future
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
#40
Hi everyone,
I am preparing to make my first pilgrimage to Santiago in a couple of weeks, and I'm still unsure about which part to miss out as, sadly, I only have 28 days to walk it. I'm in my late 50's, reasonably fit, and I've done quite a bit of training for the Camino, but I'd have to go some to complete it in such a short time. I need to be back at school for early Sept, so I guess I'll have to take some form of transport at some stage.
My son walked the whole Camino a few years ago, and reckons that I should skip the 'long, boring bit in the middle,' where there's no shade for miles (you'll know better than me where he means!) but I must admit, these conditions actually appeal to me!
I need to know more specifically where might be a good place to (regretfully) take some transport. I'm starting from SJPP and hoping to walk at least 400 miles.
Any suggestions would be very welcome. I'm really looking forward to it, not long now!
Jean
I understand your need to cut down. Life is not always kind to us. Start in Pamplona: Forget SJpdP: It is just a place, like any other. Pamplona is better: I will start there Sept. 1. (Or around that date: On the Camino, it is good to not fix dates: Anything can happen, and let there be room for it...)

Cut (by bus or train, easy and frequent) Sahagun to Astorga. The way into/out of Leon and onwards can easily be avoided IMHO. But by all means, do not skip the Meseta (Burgos-Sahagun): It is the place for personal reflections and inner learning. Here you will find the meaning of your Camino.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF: (2001, 2002, 2004, 2014). Hospitalera: 2002, Ponferrada. 2004, Rabanal del Camino.
#41
Skipping the meseta is not an option. Start in SJPP and walk. The answer to make up time will present itself. And, do get your Compostela. SJPP-Roncesvalles, meseta, and Sarria to Santiago are the best bits!
Buen camino. Sing some jingles at top of voice along the way. That is what three priests and I did a few days on camino. No ah, skipping whilst singing.
Buen camino.
 

newfydog

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pamplona-Santiago, Le Puy- Santiago, Prague- LePuy, Menton- Toulouse, Menton- Rome, Canterbury- Lausanne, Chemin Stevenson, Voie de Vezelay
#42
SJPP has no historical significance as a starting point. LePuy and Paris do, as does a person's front door.

We started our first trip in Pamplona, and it never occurred to us that we had skipped anything, we just found it was a great segment of a fantastic network of trails.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, fall of 2015
#43
We rented bikes to cross the mesetta. It's 167kms that would have taken us between 6-7 days but because we rented bikes it took us 2.5 days instead. The mesetta is the only flat bit on the entire Camino and we had a blast, although we did have sore buns instead of sore feet for a few days! We had them delivered to the wonderful albergue Fabrica in Tardajos, which is about 10kms past Burgos and we returned them in Leon. It took us 32 days but that was because we took two rest days. It saved us a lot of time for sure! For reference, we started in St Jean but you could also consider starting in Pamplona or somewhere else? I understand what people are saying about the mesetta being very introspective, but I managed to find that space during other parts of the Camino. I guess it depends on your reason for doing the Camino, so do what suits you. We would like to go back and do that part someday as well.

Whatever you decide....buen Camino!
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
2015, St. Jean Pied de Port to Burgos
2016, Burgos to Ponferrada
2017, Ponferrada to Atlantic Ocean
#45
Instead of skipping any part, I suggest that your start in SJPP and walk as time permits. Come back next year and start where you left off the previous year.

-Paul
 

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