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Who has packed the lightest pack?

2020 Camino Guides

Sjp007

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2017 St James
2020 St James
When I walked in 2017, my pack was 17lbs (7.7kgs)...this time (July/Aug 2020) I want to carry less....just curious who here has carried less lbs and if so, what did you pack?
 
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SYates

Camino Fossil AD 1999, now living in Santiago de C
Camino(s) past & future
First: Camino Francés 1999
...
Last: Santiago - Muxia 2019

Now: http://egeria.house/
I think it would work better the other way round: Post what you plan to take and we all can give you feedback ;-)

The big two are: The backpack itself (empty weight does differ from model to model) and your sleeping bag, then clothing including rain gear and so on ...

BC SY
 

spursfan

Veteran Member
3kg including pack but then carry lots of water

I walk during May or September and stay mainly in hotels but use albergues occasionally - having fewer items is probably my main theme although I pretty much choose the lightest available - and no electronics

Gregory miwok 12L (c 600g) but well built and has moisture-wicking harness

Walking shorts, Underpants (2 pairs), Merino tshirt, tech tshirt, Merrell trail glove shoes (400g the pair), barefoot socks (4 pairs), rain jacket (100g or 250g if goretex paclite), lowe alpine "french foreign legion" hat, buff, light gloves

Silk sleeping bag liner (140g), waterproof bag for clothes, guidebook, elastoplast dressing strip, razor, vaseline, sun cream, nail clippers, ear plugs, pins, comb, spare battery for watch, toothpaste, toothbrush
 

Sjp007

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2017 St James
2020 St James
3kg including pack but then carry lots of water

I walk during May or September and stay mainly in hotels but use albergues occasionally - having fewer items is probably my main theme although I pretty much choose the lightest available - and no electronics

Gregory miwok 12L (c 600g) but well built and has moisture-wicking harness

Walking shorts, Underpants (2 pairs), Merino tshirt, tech tshirt, Merrell trail glove shoes (400g the pair), barefoot socks (4 pairs), rain jacket (100g or 250g if goretex paclite), lowe alpine "french foreign legion" hat, buff, light gloves

Silk sleeping bag liner (140g), waterproof bag for clothes, guidebook, elastoplast dressing strip, razor, vaseline, sun cream, nail clippers, ear plugs, pins, comb, spare battery for watch, toothpaste, toothbrush
Wow 6.6 lbs that’s pretty light! I planned on carrying very little toiletries and just picking up what I needed, 1 extra pair of clothes, no rain gear except a cheap poncho (as I had no rain last time during July/Aug), 1 pair shoes/sandals, phone, few small items similar to what you posted...haven’t weighed my pack yet but plan on it being well under 10lbs as well
 

Robo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF last 150 to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2022)
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Derrybiketours

A journey of 500 miles begins with one step!
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdeP-SANT-FIN (09/2018)
PORTO-SANT (11/2018)
Caminho Da Fe, BR (01/2019)
SJPdeP- SANT (09/2019)
22 litre Osprey Talon
Tiley Hat
Merrell Moab Ventilator
Toms
Jungle blanket
Anti-bedbug sheet
Silk sleeping bag liner
Travel Pillow
3 Pairs of Zip off walking trousers
2 long sleeve Merino Tops
2 short sleeve Merino Tops
2 Gaelic tops
1 Hooded fleece
Rain Poncho
2 pairs light guage Merino sock
2 pairs medium guage Merino sock
4 pairs of Runderwear
Swimmers
Buff
Turkish Towel
Toiletry bag
Black African Soap
Full-size toothbrush
Travel toothpaste
Shaving foam stick
Safety Razor
Blades
6 large safety pins
Pack of 8 silicone earplugs
Pack of 20 foam earplugs (to hand out)
Cotton buds
Voltaroil
Compeed
Gehwol foot cream
Water cleansing tablets
Performance tablets
Vaseline
Travel first aid kit
Nail clippers
Cork screw with small blade
Survival bag
Waterproof internal bag
Sunnies
2 silicone wine glasses
1 travel draught set
500 ml bottle of water
Samsung mobile (acts as camera, notebook and kindle)
Michelin Camino pocket size guide
Fabric patches
Scallop Shell
2 Caribineers

Bum bag
Cash
Cards
Passports
Head torch
Random stones and Camino trophies

The selection of pack size helps to focus attention on kit priorities.

2,400 kms walked without a blister or bug bites and no problems with back, averaging 25km per day with 70km day longest walk.

A pack for all Caminos any-time of year and in my experience its better looking at it than looking for it 🤠

Total weight (excluding what I walk in)
8kg

A light pack for the sake of lightening load may not be fit for purpose. A well thought out pack and multiple use kit items goes a long way to providing a fuller experience 🤠
 

Attachments

Last edited:
D

Deleted member 43780

Guest
22 litre Osprey Talon
Tiley Hat
Merrell Moab Ventilator
Toms
Jungle blanket
Anti-bedbug sheet
Silk sleeping bag liner
Travel Pillow
3 Pairs of Zip off walking trousers
2 long sleeve Merino Tops
2 short sleeve Merino Tops
2 Gaelic tops
1 Hooded fleece
Rain Poncho
2 pairs light guage Merino sock
2 pairs medium guage Merino sock
4 pairs of Runderwear
Swimmers
Buff
Turkish Towel
Toiletry bag
Black African Soap
Full-size toothbrush
Travel toothpaste
Shaving foam stick
Safety Razor
Blades
Cotton buds
Voltaroil
Compeed
Gehwol foot cream
Water cleansing tablets
Performance tablets
Vaseline
Travel first aid kit
Nail clippers
Cork screw with small blade
Survival bag
Waterproof internal bag
Sunnies
2 silicone wine glasses
1 travel draught set
500 ml bottle of water
Samsung mobile (acts as camera, notebook and kindle)
Michelin Camino pocket size guide
Fabric patches
Scallop Shell
2 Caribineers

Bum bag
Cash
Cards
Passports
Random stones and Camino trophies

The selection of pack size helps to focus attention on kit priorities.

2,400 kms walked without a blister or bug bites and no problems with back, averaging 25km per day with 70km day longest walk.

A pack for all Caminos any-time of year and in my experience its better looking at it than looking for it 🤠

Total weight (excluding what I walk in)
8kg
thanks for the list.
Good list.

but, oh my so many things compared to my “basic” list.

really appreciate you giving the list.
 

Derrybiketours

A journey of 500 miles begins with one step!
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdeP-SANT-FIN (09/2018)
PORTO-SANT (11/2018)
Caminho Da Fe, BR (01/2019)
SJPdeP- SANT (09/2019)
thanks for the list.
Good list.

but, oh my so many things compared to my “basic” list.

really appreciate you giving the list.
A light pack for the sake of lightening load may not be fit for purpose. A well thought out pack and multiple use kit items goes a long way to providing a fuller experience 🤠
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Currently on a "Virtual" Camino and striding out across Navarra!
22 litre Osprey Talon
Tiley Hat
Merrell Moab Ventilator
Toms
Jungle blanket
Anti-bedbug sheet
Silk sleeping bag liner
Travel Pillow
3 Pairs of Zip off walking trousers
2 long sleeve Merino Tops
2 short sleeve Merino Tops
2 Gaelic tops
1 Hooded fleece
Rain Poncho
2 pairs light guage Merino sock
2 pairs medium guage Merino sock
4 pairs of Runderwear
Swimmers
Buff
Turkish Towel
Toiletry bag
Black African Soap
Full-size toothbrush
Travel toothpaste
Shaving foam stick
Safety Razor
Blades
Cotton buds
Voltaroil
Compeed
Gehwol foot cream
Water cleansing tablets
Performance tablets
Vaseline
Travel first aid kit
Nail clippers
Cork screw with small blade
Survival bag
Waterproof internal bag
Sunnies
2 silicone wine glasses
1 travel draught set
500 ml bottle of water
Samsung mobile (acts as camera, notebook and kindle)
Michelin Camino pocket size guide
Fabric patches
Scallop Shell
2 Caribineers

Bum bag
Cash
Cards
Passports
Head torch
Random stones and Camino trophies

The selection of pack size helps to focus attention on kit priorities.

2,400 kms walked without a blister or bug bites and no problems with back, averaging 25km per day with 70km day longest walk.

A pack for all Caminos any-time of year and in my experience its better looking at it than looking for it 🤠

Total weight (excluding what I walk in)
8kg

A light pack for the sake of lightening load may not be fit for purpose. A well thought out pack and multiple use kit items goes a long way to providing a fuller experience 🤠
All in a 22? Damn that's impressive!
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Currently on a "Virtual" Camino and striding out across Navarra!
My last Camino was the Ingles, stayed in hostales and so no towel, no bedding just two changes clothes and an Altus raincoat. Didn't shave. Pack weight was 4.75kg and the pack weighs 1.34kg.
 

Derrybiketours

A journey of 500 miles begins with one step!
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdeP-SANT-FIN (09/2018)
PORTO-SANT (11/2018)
Caminho Da Fe, BR (01/2019)
SJPdeP- SANT (09/2019)
All in a 22? Damn that's impressive!
Thankyou and still room on side pocket of bag to carry leftover of pilgrim wine from night before. The Caribineers permit hanging item's on outside which frees up internal space for munchies 🤠
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
A light pack for the sake of lightening load may not be fit for purpose. A well thought out pack and multiple use kit items goes a long way to providing a fuller experience 🤠
I agree. My motto is If you can comfortably carry it, carry what makes you comfortable,
 

Sjp007

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2017 St James
2020 St James
22 litre Osprey Talon
Tiley Hat
Merrell Moab Ventilator
Toms
Jungle blanket
Anti-bedbug sheet
Silk sleeping bag liner
Travel Pillow
3 Pairs of Zip off walking trousers
2 long sleeve Merino Tops
2 short sleeve Merino Tops
2 Gaelic tops
1 Hooded fleece
Rain Poncho
2 pairs light guage Merino sock
2 pairs medium guage Merino sock
4 pairs of Runderwear
Swimmers
Buff
Turkish Towel
Toiletry bag
Black African Soap
Full-size toothbrush
Travel toothpaste
Shaving foam stick
Safety Razor
Blades
6 large safety pins
Cotton buds
Voltaroil
Compeed
Gehwol foot cream
Water cleansing tablets
Performance tablets
Vaseline
Travel first aid kit
Nail clippers
Cork screw with small blade
Survival bag
Waterproof internal bag
Sunnies
2 silicone wine glasses
1 travel draught set
500 ml bottle of water
Samsung mobile (acts as camera, notebook and kindle)
Michelin Camino pocket size guide
Fabric patches
Scallop Shell
2 Caribineers

Bum bag
Cash
Cards
Passports
Head torch
Random stones and Camino trophies

The selection of pack size helps to focus attention on kit priorities.

2,400 kms walked without a blister or bug bites and no problems with back, averaging 25km per day with 70km day longest walk.

A pack for all Caminos any-time of year and in my experience its better looking at it than looking for it 🤠

Total weight (excluding what I walk in)
8kg

A light pack for the sake of lightening load may not be fit for purpose. A well thought out pack and multiple use kit items goes a long way to providing a fuller experience 🤠
I agree, this has been my conundrum with preparing to walk the Camino for the 2nd time, do I bring less and just wind up buying it in the long run anyways....or just do without whatever I think I need, I kept a detailed list like yours last time and I’ll compare it with yours, thanks so much for sharing such a detailed list!!!
 

Derrybiketours

A journey of 500 miles begins with one step!
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdeP-SANT-FIN (09/2018)
PORTO-SANT (11/2018)
Caminho Da Fe, BR (01/2019)
SJPdeP- SANT (09/2019)
.. and the 70km day????
I always try to arrive into Santiago on time, Halloween called and was day behind schedule. I often walk through the night with the spirit inside me 🤠
love the 2 wineglasses!!!
glugglug PREMIUM Unbreakable Wine Glasses Set of 2 + Carry Bags (x2) - BPA - Free Silicone | Solid, Seamless, Reusable Higball Glasses | For Travel, Camping, BBQs, Parties, Picnic, Festivals - UK Company - FREE 'Wine for Beginners' eBook https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B01HDPWSSG/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_TQmhEb96FQ9RS
 

Derrybiketours

A journey of 500 miles begins with one step!
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdeP-SANT-FIN (09/2018)
PORTO-SANT (11/2018)
Caminho Da Fe, BR (01/2019)
SJPdeP- SANT (09/2019)

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2017)
Frances(2018)
Ingles(2019)
Aragones(2020)
Portuguese(2020)
As a comparison to the list I posted above, I thought that, just for fun, I'd post a comparison list of what I carried during my thru hike on the Pacific Crest Trail.

I thought this might give an idea (for those who do not backpack in the wild) of the difference between what one might carry on a 7 to 10 day backpacking trip (minus the foodstuffs) vs Why I Love My Load On Camino :)

To the list below, add 8 to pounds of food stuffs for 7 to 10 days, which was the interval between my resupply points along the PCT and Colorado Trail thru hikes.

I also used ULA Catalyst and Circuit backpacks at different points during the 5.5 month PCT hike. On the Colorado Trail I used the Gossamer Gear Mariposa and Silverback. I switched out backpacks during both backpacking trips primarily because I was hired to gear test them.

1578945367308.png
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2017)
Frances(2018)
Ingles(2019)
Aragones(2020)
Portuguese(2020)
Added these too my kit this year but lost all four before getting to Burgos

SENHAI Foldable Wine Bag, 750 ml, https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B073W9S8DL/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_9SmhEbBZY669F
That's not a wine bag, now THIS is a wine bag
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2020)
22 litre Osprey Talon
Tiley Hat
Merrell Moab Ventilator
Toms
Jungle blanket
Anti-bedbug sheet
Silk sleeping bag liner
Travel Pillow
3 Pairs of Zip off walking trousers
2 long sleeve Merino Tops
2 short sleeve Merino Tops
2 Gaelic tops
1 Hooded fleece
Rain Poncho
2 pairs light guage Merino sock
2 pairs medium guage Merino sock
4 pairs of Runderwear
Swimmers
Buff
Turkish Towel
Toiletry bag
Black African Soap
Full-size toothbrush
Travel toothpaste
Shaving foam stick
Safety Razor
Blades
6 large safety pins
Pack of 8 silicone earplugs
Pack of 20 foam earplugs (to hand out)
Cotton buds
Voltaroil
Compeed
Gehwol foot cream
Water cleansing tablets
Performance tablets
Vaseline
Travel first aid kit
Nail clippers
Cork screw with small blade
Survival bag
Waterproof internal bag
Sunnies
2 silicone wine glasses
1 travel draught set
500 ml bottle of water
Samsung mobile (acts as camera, notebook and kindle)
Michelin Camino pocket size guide
Fabric patches
Scallop Shell
2 Caribineers

Bum bag
Cash
Cards
Passports
Head torch
Random stones and Camino trophies

The selection of pack size helps to focus attention on kit priorities.

2,400 kms walked without a blister or bug bites and no problems with back, averaging 25km per day with 70km day longest walk.

A pack for all Caminos any-time of year and in my experience its better looking at it than looking for it 🤠

Total weight (excluding what I walk in)
8kg

A light pack for the sake of lightening load may not be fit for purpose. A well thought out pack and multiple use kit items goes a long way to providing a fuller experience 🤠
Wow! That seems like everything I imagine taking. But everybody seems to think one needs at least a 38 L pack unless you really go ultra-light. I guess I need to finish gathering all the equipment to be sure how big a bag I’ll actually need. Glad I saw this.
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2017)
Frances(2018)
Ingles(2019)
Aragones(2020)
Portuguese(2020)
@davebugg - Nice list! You didn’t miss long pants or a sleeping liner?
Him Stephan. :) I use a backpacking quilt, so a liner would be redundant weight. I never hike in long pants. If I do take long pants, they are a lightweight pair of zip offs, so I carry the legs of the pants and wear the shorts. But usually it is running shorts. If it gets below around 35 degrees F, I might put on my baselayer bottoms under the shorts.

The only time I want long pants on Camino is for the flight over to get to my starting point, and then again after I reach Santiago de Compostela at the end, and spend a couple of days enjoying the time visiting there.

When I arrive in Spain, I find the nearest Correos and mail off a package to Ivar's store in SdC that contains my 'travellin' pants', and a few other things that I do not want in my backpack. When I get to SdC, it is there waiting for me :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2020)
Him Stephan. :) I use a backpacking quilt, so a liner would be redundant weight. I never hike in long pants. If I do take long pants, they are a lightweight pair of zip offs, so I carry the legs of the pants and wear the shorts. But usually it is running shorts. If it gets below around 35 degrees F, I might put on my baselayer bottoms under the shorts.

The only time I want long pants on Camino is for the flight over to get to my starting point, and then again after I reach Santiago de Compostela at the end, and spend a couple of days enjoying the time visiting there.

When I arrive in Spain, I find the nearest Correos and mail off a package to Ivar's store in SdC that contains my 'travellin' pants', and a few other things that I do not want in my backpack. When I get to SdC, it is there waiting for me :)
I’m just starting my equipment gathering phase, and I was actually planning on a backpacking quilt. I’ve never actually seen one, but the quilt almost seems like just a blanket? So I thought I would need a sleep liner as well. Perhaps for personal hygiene in the Albergues?
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2017)
Frances(2018)
Ingles(2019)
Aragones(2020)
Portuguese(2020)
Wow! That seems like everything I imagine taking. But everybody seems to think one needs at least a 38 L pack unless you really go ultra-light. I guess I need to finish gathering all the equipment to be sure how big a bag I’ll actually need. Glad I saw this.
That is the best approach. . . get a tub or box, and as you gather clothing and gear put them all together until you are finished you gathering and purchasing.

If you will be using stuff sacks (I use one ultralight sack for my 'closet', another for the 'bathroom', and one other for everything else), place the things that will go into your backpack in their associated sack. Then take all of that stuff with you when you shop for a backpack or have it handy if you order your pack online.

The volume and carrying capacity of the backpack (which is different than its size) is important in one meaningful parameter: weight. A backpack that is 40 liters in capacity can generally be heavier than one weighing 30 liters; although that is not always the case.

Discipline and knowledge and circumstance will dictate how much one will carry. One can compete with the "I have the smallest backpack" contest, but a backpack that is small can make it tough to pack and unpack. It also limits the backpack's flexibility for changes of circumstance. . . what happens if you want to add some stuff along the way?

Oh, and dangling stuff on the pack so that you can carry it can be done, but that's a non no for me, Dangly stuff can snag, shift the pack around if it swings, and gets exposed to dust and weather. The only stuff I keep outside of the main bag, are those things that I need to quickly access in their exterior pockets. . . water containers, ponchos, first aid/blister kit, guide, etc.

And yes. . there have been occasions where I put stuff that was still wet in my outside mesh pocket to finish drying :).

MY advice then is to not get a backpack that will JUST fit your clothes and gear. Get a backpack capacity which allows you to easily and comfortably manipulate and pack your gear, PLUS has a bit of extra room.

Also, if you are planning to take up wilderness backpacking, buy you gear and clothes with those longer term multi-uses in mind :)
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2017)
Frances(2018)
Ingles(2019)
Aragones(2020)
Portuguese(2020)
I’m just starting my equipment gathering phase, and I was actually planning on a backpacking quilt. I’ve never actually seen one, but the quilt almost seems like just a blanket? So I thought I would need a sleep liner as well. Perhaps for personal hygiene in the Albergues?
A backpacking quilt is a bit more specialized. It has strategically place fasteners ( they can be snaps, velcro, partial zippers) which allow the flat 'blanket' to be shaped into a blanket with a foot box, or made into a more conventional modified sleeping bag shape, or anything in between.

If I take one on Camino, I typically use it more like a blanket. Sometimes I will form a footbox to place my feet in, but the footbox is shallow and allows me to quickly toss of the quilt to get up for bathroom breaks and general restless wandering :)

There are down quilts which are just blankets. One's from places like Costco or on Amazon (Double Black Diamond) can have fasteners added.
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
I had around a 2.5 to 3 kilo job on the 1993 (not counting water) -- but well, sue me, I was 28 years old, and a wide-eyed complete Camino novice ... Most of that was the ultra-light military sleeping bag. I think I was also carrying a spare t-shirt + 1 or 2 underwear ? Honestly, apart from passport and toothpaste & stuff, I cannot for the life of me remember anything else at all I was carrying. Oh, food for the others and me when that became necessary, but that was extra weight ; not the base.

Worked out OK, it was a good, warm, dry, bright, comfortable summer that year.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2020)
A backpacking quilt is a bit more specialized. It has strategically place fasteners ( they can be snaps, velcro, partial zippers) which allow the flat 'blanket' to be shaped into a blanket with a foot box, or made into a more conventional modified sleeping bag shape, or anything in between.

If I take one on Camino, I typically use it more like a blanket. Sometimes I will form a footbox to place my feet in, but the footbox is shallow and allows me to quickly toss of the quilt to get up for bathroom breaks and general restless wandering :)

There are down quilts which are just blankets. One's from places like Costco or on Amazon (Double Black Diamond) can have fasteners added.
Thank you for that excellent information, sir! Very helpful.
 

Sjp007

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2017 St James
2020 St James
Him Stephan. :) I use a backpacking quilt, so a liner would be redundant weight. I never hike in long pants. If I do take long pants, they are a lightweight pair of zip offs, so I carry the legs of the pants and wear the shorts. But usually it is running shorts. If it gets below around 35 degrees F, I might put on my baselayer bottoms under the shorts.

The only time I want long pants on Camino is for the flight over to get to my starting point, and then again after I reach Santiago de Compostela at the end, and spend a couple of days enjoying the time visiting there.

When I arrive in Spain, I find the nearest Correos and mail off a package to Ivar's store in SdC that contains my 'travellin' pants', and a few other things that I do not want in my backpack. When I get to SdC, it is there waiting for me :)
What is Ivars store? (Newbie ti this forum)
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2017)
Frances(2018)
Ingles(2019)
Aragones(2020)
Portuguese(2020)
What is Ivars store? (Newbie ti this forum)
Rick posted the correct link to the Store. Since it can be a bit difficult to find, as he pointed out, below is the direct link to arrange for Ivar to hold suitcases, packages, etc until arriving in SdC.
 

Derrybiketours

A journey of 500 miles begins with one step!
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdeP-SANT-FIN (09/2018)
PORTO-SANT (11/2018)
Caminho Da Fe, BR (01/2019)
SJPdeP- SANT (09/2019)
But everybody seems to think one needs at least a 38 L pack unless you really go ultra-light
Some people do but for me its about packing smart and I have more than most I meet on the Camino carrying bigger pack and more weight. The bigger the sack, the more you'll pack. Plus advantage off smaller pack is that it passes all airlines baggage requirements and can carry on coach as driver assesses it as carry on-board pack. I never let my pack out of sight, at night its hanging from my top bunk post by belt, away from floor and makes easy to access in morning when getting ready. All items are stuffed inside a 25 litre waterproof compression bag which makes packing straightforward, towel, toiletry bag with toms at bottom of pack and the only thing that hangs from Caribineers are poncho inside waterproof bag, travel pillow inside compression bag and sometimes my lunch therefore pendulum swing of weight distribution is negligible. If expecting rain, poncho is loose inside mesh for quick access. Complimentary to main back is small bumbag that carries more than you think, (2 Passports, 2 Cards, Cash, Mobile, Cable, Pen, postit notes, Performance Tablets, water cleansing tablets, salt sachets, safety pins, foot cream, Michelin pocket guide and white feathers and heart shaped stones) I loop its strap through my walking trousers loop as extra precaution 🤠
 
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Derrybiketours

A journey of 500 miles begins with one step!
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdeP-SANT-FIN (09/2018)
PORTO-SANT (11/2018)
Caminho Da Fe, BR (01/2019)
SJPdeP- SANT (09/2019)
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koilife

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016); Portugues w/ son #3 (2020)
Just how do you lose 4 silicone wine bags between SJPdP and Burgos?
All I lost was about 7lbs!
Actually, after finishing the first bag, losing the next three is easy. After finishing the second bag, losing everything is easy.

And, St. Anthony very courteously finds me the 20 lbs or so I lose on every Camino, even when I don't ask him.
 

Hurry Krishna

Indian on the Way
Camino(s) past & future
2009 (from Sarria), 2014 from St Jean Pied de Port, 2016 from Porto, 2018 from Le Puy to Santiago.
When I walked in 2017, my pack was 17lbs (7.7kgs)...this time (July/Aug 2020) I want to carry less....just curious who here has carried less lbs and if so, what did you pack?
I can get down to 6 kilos including a litre of water if I don’t take sleeping bag :)
 

Bradypus

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
My last Camino was the Ingles, stayed in hostales and so no towel, no bedding just two changes clothes and an Altus raincoat. Didn't shave. Pack weight was 4.75kg and the pack weighs 1.34kg.
The shaving business - I wonder how long you would have to walk before the weight of accumulated stubble/beard overtook the weight of a disposable razor? :cool:
 

Derrybiketours

A journey of 500 miles begins with one step!
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdeP-SANT-FIN (09/2018)
PORTO-SANT (11/2018)
Caminho Da Fe, BR (01/2019)
SJPdeP- SANT (09/2019)
Actually, after finishing the first bag, losing the next three is easy. After finishing the second bag, losing everything is easy.
Less interesting I didn't get a chance too use as intended. The first one was filled with water and going from train station to Albergue Beilari in a hurry to make the 6:30pm pilgrim meal it decided it wasn't joining me and presume popped out of the pouch on the side of pack. After dinner I attempted to retrace my steps with newly added piece of kit, head torch light but was unable to find. Missing in action.

The second one was filled with leftover vino tinto and was too act as one of my five-a-day whilst el fresco on summit of Pyrenees and this time the third was being used as backup water carrier should my 500 ml bottle not be sufficient. Both bottles where snug as bug placed head to toe and compression strap had them, as thought securely stored. By the time I was ready to enjoy my Galician Pate on fresh boca, one of the bottles had managed to escape. I wasn't for going back down the mountain to retrieve but hoped that it was another Pilgrims 'Camino provides' moment. During that particular lunch I attempted, without success to turn the remaining pouch of water into vino tinto.

The third bottle was left behind in an Albergue de Peregrinos in Puente la Reina, the same albergue I contacted food poisoning and when I reported it the guy suggested I was lieing and locked himself in a room and wouldn't entertain the possibility as no one in his 20 years working in said Albergue has had food poisoning.

I was determined to not lose the fourth. My intention was to make it too the vino tinto fountain at Bodegas Irach. I kept it tightly wrapped in a coil secured by elastic band and tucked neatly inside my bumbag.
On arriving at said fountain the well had run dry so I attempted to pump the remainder of what was left in droplets. After couple minutes pumping I managed to fill remaining silicone bottle. I was amazed and felt like I had discoverd the holy grail and secret to filling my cup. It was late in the afternoon, a sunny day and I had plenty of water left so I removed a pen and post-it note from my bumbag and wrote, Camino provides and placed the note on the bottle and left it at the pump.

After Burgos the only thing I had left was too lose my mind. The Meseta took care of that then sometime later I happened upon a trespass silicone water pouch with a more technical mouth piece so I gratefully cleaned, filled with water and thought to myself, the Camino provides yet again. 🤠
 
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Derrybiketours

A journey of 500 miles begins with one step!
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdeP-SANT-FIN (09/2018)
PORTO-SANT (11/2018)
Caminho Da Fe, BR (01/2019)
SJPdeP- SANT (09/2019)
I used a bottle like this for washing powder. It was very convinient and relatively light.
Excuse me Sir, whats this white powder inside your vino tinto pouch, said the helpful custom and excise officer just before securing handcufffs 🤠
 
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Julie Benyo

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sept/Oct '16
When I walked in 2017, my pack was 17lbs (7.7kgs)...this time (July/Aug 2020) I want to carry less....just curious who here has carried less lbs and if so, what did you pack?
I’m baffled about the concern over weight. I walked the entire Camino when I turned 60. I averaged 14 miles/day. My pack weighed nearly 20lbs. I’m 5’3” and 115 lbs. I‘m not an athlete. All was well.
 
D

Deleted member 43780

Guest
😀
tucked into waist ban of thong.

not making any changes. Love my light weight pack list.
What I buy on the walk, I leave it there.
 

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
I may have the record for being super light:

-thong
-sandals
-one credit card
-sun hat
-walking staffs

that’s it folks.
It is essential to have enough to stay dry and warm in case of sudden change in weather or injury. Otherwise one puts oneself at risk and becomes a burden, even risk to others who come to assist. People have suffered exposure in temperature drops and died and if you fall and injure yourself and go into shock, you need to keep warm. Packing light in a sensible way is essential.
 

koilife

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016); Portugues w/ son #3 (2020)
I didn’t know that the Camino is a race of who can walk the longest and carry less, must have missed that part somewhere 🤔🤔🤔😳
Speaking only for myself (and not for the thong-wearing among us 😉), I focus a lot on carrying less (with all due prudence) so that I have more energy when I get to where I'm going (or so I have the energy to get there).

Besides, gram shaving has its own appeal to the engineering-minded among us. It's the adventure before the adventure.
 

koilife

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016); Portugues w/ son #3 (2020)
😀
tucked into waist ban of thong.

not making any changes. Love my light weight pack list.
What I buy on the walk, I leave it there.
Just make sure to bury it or pack it in plastic until the next trash can comes along. 😖🥳🗑
 

Bradypus

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
I may have the record for being super light:

-thong
-sandals
-one credit card
-sun hat
-walking staffs

that’s it folks.
A few years back Stephen Gough - aka "the Naked Rambler" - was a media celebrity here in the UK for walking the entire length of the country wearing even less than that. So why did he need such a huge rucksack? :cool:

1579028694768.png
 

koilife

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016); Portugues w/ son #3 (2020)
The shaving business - I wonder how long you would have to walk before the weight of accumulated stubble/beard overtook the weight of a disposable razor? :cool:
Dude, that's a heavy beard!
1579028753711.png
 

koilife

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016); Portugues w/ son #3 (2020)
On arriving at said fountain the well had run dry so I attempted to pump the remainder of what was left in droplets. After couple minutes pumping I managed to fill remaining silicone bottle. I was amazed and felt like I had discoverd the holy grail and secret to filling my cup. It was late in the afternoon, a sunny day and I had plenty of water left so I removed a pen and post-it note from my bumbag and wrote, Camino provides and placed the note on the bottle and left it at the pump.

After Burgos the only thing I had left was too lose my mind. The Meseta took care of that
On the first part of the journey
I was looking at all the life
There were plants and birds and rocks and things
There was sand and hills and rings
The first thing I met was a fly with a buzz
And the sky with no clouds
The heat was hot and the ground was dry
But the air was full of sound
I've been through the desert on a horse with no name
It felt good to be out of the rain
In the desert you can remember your name
'Cause there ain't no one for to give you no pain
La la la la la
La la la la la
La la la la la
La la la la la
After two days in the desert sun
My skin began to turn red
After three days in the desert fun
I was looking at a river bed
And the story it told of a river that flowed
Made me sad to think it was dead
You see I've been through the desert on a horse with no name
It felt good to be out of the rain
In the desert you can remember your name
'Cause there ain't no one for to give you no pain
La la la la la
La la la la la
La la la la la
La la la la la
After nine days I let the horse run free
'Cause the desert had turned to sea
There were plants and birds and rocks and things
There was sand and hills and rings
The ocean is a desert with it's life underground
And a perfect disguise above
Under the cities lies a heart made of ground
But the humans will give no love
You see I've been through the desert on a horse with no name
It felt good to be out of the rain
In the desert you can remember your name
'Cause there ain't no one for to give you no pain
La la la la la
La la la la la
La la la la la
La la la la la
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2020? Hopefully Via de Bayona/Burgos to Ponferrada/Camino de Invierno
Speaking only for myself (and not for the thong-wearing among us 😉), I focus a lot on carrying less (with all due prudence) so that I have more energy when I get to where I'm going (or so I have the energy to get there).
Before my first Camino, I had never walked 20 km + for days on end and never even carried a rucksack.
I was genuinely worried that I might not be able to do it so sheer panic made me pack light.
My bag weighed in at the airport at 4.9kgs (inc. the walking poles).
I had everything I needed so ... I never looked back 😎
(No thong though 😉)
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2017)
Frances(2018)
Ingles(2019)
Aragones(2020)
Portuguese(2020)
I didn’t know that the Camino is a race of who can walk the longest and carry less, must have missed that part somewhere 🤔🤔🤔😳
I’m baffled about the concern over weight. I walked the entire Camino when I turned 60. I averaged 14 miles/day. My pack weighed nearly 20lbs. I’m 5’3” and 115 lbs. I‘m not an athlete. All was well.

I would much rather carry 10 pounds than 20 :)

I can, and have, carried heavy loads, but thank goodness I do not have to with today's technology and manufacturing techniques for gear and clothing.

A lighter weight in the backpack increases the enjoyment of walking. It also can reduce risks of injury. . .less stress on lower back, knees, ankles, and foot structures. Even the risk of a stumble leading to a fall is mitigated further with backpack that is lighter.

Then there is the issue of stamina. Regardless of walking pace, at the end of the day the same person who carries 20 pounds will have more reserve if s/he, instead, carried 10 pounds.

It is NOT about surviving a heavy backpack, it is about thriving with a light backpack. :)
 
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Bradypus

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
It is NOT about surviving a heavy backpack, it is about thriving with a light backpack. :)
I sort-of agree :cool: All things being equal I would much rather walk with a light pack than a heavy one. My hesitation comes when some abstract piece of doctrine like the "10% rule" is being thrown around as gospel. Although parts of me are definitely past their best I am not yet ready to give up on the idea of some relatively lightweight backpacking and camping. Having walked long-distance on and off for 40+ years I know that I can carry considerably more than 10% of my body weight without undue difficulty. Obviously I do not have to do so on the Caminos where I can easily walk with far less. Far too many memorable experiences in my life would not have happened if I had allowed myself to be limited by excessively cautious advice. I am saddened when I read of healthy people in their 40s and 50s who will not walk any Camino or other route without luggage transfer services because they either refuse to trim their load to a sensible minimum or have been persuaded that anything beyond a guidebook and a water bottle is next to impossible to carry :rolleyes:
 

Derrybiketours

A journey of 500 miles begins with one step!
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdeP-SANT-FIN (09/2018)
PORTO-SANT (11/2018)
Caminho Da Fe, BR (01/2019)
SJPdeP- SANT (09/2019)
On the first part of the journey
I was looking at all the life
There were plants and birds and rocks and things
There was sand and hills and rings
The first thing I met was a fly with a buzz
And the sky with no clouds
The heat was hot and the ground was dry
But the air was full of sound
I've been through the desert on a horse with no name
It felt good to be out of the rain
In the desert you can remember your name
'Cause there ain't no one for to give you no pain
La la la la la
La la la la la
La la la la la
La la la la la
After two days in the desert sun
My skin began to turn red
After three days in the desert fun
I was looking at a river bed
And the story it told of a river that flowed
Made me sad to think it was dead
You see I've been through the desert on a horse with no name
It felt good to be out of the rain
In the desert you can remember your name
'Cause there ain't no one for to give you no pain
La la la la la
La la la la la
La la la la la
La la la la la
After nine days I let the horse run free
'Cause the desert had turned to sea
There were plants and birds and rocks and things
There was sand and hills and rings
The ocean is a desert with it's life underground
And a perfect disguise above
Under the cities lies a heart made of ground
But the humans will give no love
You see I've been through the desert on a horse with no name
It felt good to be out of the rain
In the desert you can remember your name
'Cause there ain't no one for to give you no pain
La la la la la
La la la la la
La la la la la
La la la la la
One of my favourite yacht music melodys especially like the classic line 'La la la la la' inspiration behind the teletubies 🤠
 

Sara_Dhooma

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances/Muxia (14), Portuguese (15), Le Puy (17), Norte (17), Ingles (17), VDLP (18), Lana (18)+more
I carried this 11L pack on the Camino Frances in August 2014. No need for warm clothing or a sleeping bag in the hot summer. It weighed maybe 3 pounds with my gear inside.

I just realized that over five years later - I am currently wearing the same 3.4oz dress (in an Albergue on the Camino Mozarabe)!

13790BF9-1B51-4E9F-A9C0-F1EF372C7B4D.jpeg
 

Sjp007

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2017 St James
2020 St James
I would much rather carry 10 pounds than 20 :)

I can, and have, carried heavy loads, but thank goodness I do not have to with today's technology and manufacturing techniques for gear and clothing.

A lighter weight in the backpack increases the enjoyment of walking. It also can reduce risks of injury. . .less stress on lower back, knees, ankles, and foot structures. Even the risk of a stumble leading to a fall is mitigated further with backpack that is lighter.

Then there is the issue of stamina. Regardless of walking pace, at the end of the day the same person who carries 20 pounds will have more reserve if s/he, instead, carried 10 pounds.

It is NOT about surviving a heavy backpack, it is about thriving with a light backpack. :)
Nicely said! I averaged 27kms last time and figured I’d do about the same this time ...I’m goin’ for the reserve/stamina you talk about this time around 😉
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2017)
Frances(2018)
Ingles(2019)
Aragones(2020)
Portuguese(2020)
My hesitation comes when some abstract piece of doctrine like the "10% rule" is being thrown around as gospel.
That rule is nonsense. It came about in the long ago mists of post WW2 interest in backpacking. Surplus military gear and canned foods were the standard fare, along with heavy cookware for open fires.

Someone, somewhere, at sometime, for some reason, speculated that they were OK with the heavy loads from this stuff, as long as it stayed about 10% of his weight.

So, when backpacking gear and food for a 5 day trip could easily reach 60 pounds, this became a 'test' for those of slighter builds. Could a 95+ pound person really expect to be able to carry 40 to 60 pounds of stuff?

In this day and age, I find the 10% rule nonsensical for two reasons:

1. With proper consideration and consultation, even a novice adult can easily stay under the weights suggested by such a dictum. Lightweight stuff can be gleaned inexpensively. The days of post-WW2 military surplus have vanished into the dark void as far as backpacking is concerned.

2. Folks seem to use the 10% rule as a defense, thinking justification is needed for a personal decision to carry heavier (in relative terms) loads. A Gently Given News Flash folks: no one needs to justify a thing. If someone is willing to carry 20 or 30 or 120 pounds, that is their business. :)

So for those who are irritated or angered by discussions of how light backpack weights can be. . don't be. There are two choices you can make:

1. Be happy and content with what you are doing and with what you have. If you are happy, then we are happy for you. :) Seriously.

2. If you feel like you are missing out, or that you wish you could have a lighter weight backpack and want more information or help, help is here on this Forum. Even in this thread there are a multitude of thoughts observations and suggestions that have been made.

If you do not want to post questions on this Forum, you can Private Message most Forum members who you think may be of help. The Search Engine can be used to look for all sorts of information on gear, clothing, and techniques.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
So, when backpacking gear and food for a 5 day trip could easily reach 60 pounds, this became a 'test' for those of slighter builds. Could a 95+ pound person really expect to be able to carry 40 to 60 pounds of stuff?
I was taking a few days hike on the AT ages ago and spent part of it hiking with two young women doing a south bound section hike. They had already done 500 km over hills and through bogs. I asked the very petite one about her pack weight. 45 pounds (20 kg) when resupplied. That must have been 50% of her body weight.
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2017)
Frances(2018)
Ingles(2019)
Aragones(2020)
Portuguese(2020)
I was taking a few days hike on the AT ages ago and spent part of it hiking with two young women doing a south bound section hike. They had already done 500 km over hills and through bogs. I asked the very petite one about her pack weight. 45 pounds (20 kg) when resupplied. That must have been 50% of her body weight.
Wow. . . My backpack never went beyond 24 pounds of total weight on the PCT, and that was at resupply for 7 to 10 days worth of food and additional fuel canisters.
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
I'm not weighing in (pun) - but I do agree that having to squeeze everything into a pack that is just a bit too small, is a pain.
 

Jeff Mayor

Member
Camino(s) past & future
French route (04,05,06,18) Portugues (07) VDLP (09,10,11) Aragon (4,13) Levante (16) Ebro (19)
3kg including pack but then carry lots of water

I walk during May or September and stay mainly in hotels but use albergues occasionally - having fewer items is probably my main theme although I pretty much choose the lightest available - and no electronics

Gregory miwok 12L (c 600g) but well built and has moisture-wicking harness

Walking shorts, Underpants (2 pairs), Merino tshirt, tech tshirt, Merrell trail glove shoes (400g the pair), barefoot socks (4 pairs), rain jacket (100g or 250g if goretex paclite), lowe alpine "french foreign legion" hat, buff, light gloves

Silk sleeping bag liner (140g), waterproof bag for clothes, guidebook, elastoplast dressing strip, razor, vaseline, sun cream, nail clippers, ear plugs, pins, comb, spare battery for watch, toothpaste, toothbrush
Sounds about right to me. What is a “elastoplast dressing strip”???
 

spursfan

Veteran Member
Sounds about right to me. What is a “elastoplast dressing strip”???
Elastoplast is a UK/Aus brand name for plasters - the dressing strip is more padded then the thinner quasi-transparent plasters these days - search for "dressing strip" on Amazon, for example
 

Bradypus

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
Sounds about right to me. What is a “elastoplast dressing strip”???
Two nations divided by a common language? "Elastoplast" is a European brand name which has become genericized here - a fabric adhesive dressing which is the equivalent of "Band-Aid" in the USA. In this case in the form of a long strip which can be cut to the width required rather than in individual pieces.
1579081395627.png
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Currently on a "Virtual" Camino and striding out across Navarra!
Two nations divided by a common language? "Elastoplast" is a European brand name which has become genericized here - a fabric adhesive dressing which is the equivalent of "Band-Aid" in the USA. In this case in the form of a long strip which can be cut to the width required rather than in individual pieces.
View attachment 68625
On my last first-aid refresher course the instructor asked how many of us had these, opened and unopened, in our car first-aid kits. All of us (12 people) put our hands up.
"And how many of you have the scissors that came in your kit?"
Again, all of us put our hands up.
"So you'd be happy to treat an open wound with an already opened dressing cut by an unsterile pair of scissors?"
She then passed around a waste sack for us to throw the offending item away.
"It's called 'first-aid'" she said, "Not 'add infection to the injures'".
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Currently on a "Virtual" Camino and striding out across Navarra!
I carried this 11L pack on the Camino Frances in August 2014. No need for warm clothing or a sleeping bag in the hot summer. It weighed maybe 3 pounds with my gear inside.

I just realized that over five years later - I am currently wearing the same 3.4oz dress (in an Albergue on the Camino Mozarabe)!

View attachment 68613
Having a post-Christmas clear out I came upon the belt I wore on my first ever Camino, complete with extra holes made as my waist shrunk between SJPP and SdC. 19 years later I realise it will never even come close to reaching around my waist again but I'll hang on to it for sentimental reasons!
 

Bradypus

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
Having a post-Christmas clear out I came upon the belt I wore on my first ever Camino, complete with extra holes made as my waist shrunk between SJPP and SdC. 19 years later I realise it will never even come close to reaching around my waist again but I'll hang on to it for sentimental reasons!
I lost weight on my first Camino in 1990 because stages were much longer than today and food often hard to find. Also walking in summer heat killed my appetite. On more recent Caminos I have lost very little because of my love of the menu del dia - especially in places where they still hand you a full bottle of tinto :cool: But when I walked from Canterbury to Rome in 2015 carrying a heavier load with camping gear I lost 33lbs in 66 days - half a pound per day. When my wife met me in Rome and hugged me she said "Ribs! I haven't felt ribs in years!" :)
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Currently on a "Virtual" Camino and striding out across Navarra!
The shaving business - I wonder how long you would have to walk before the weight of accumulated stubble/beard overtook the weight of a disposable razor? :cool:
A disposable razor? How unwoke of you!
(See avatar) - Pre-Camino "training" would include a Grade 2 haircut (the barber's search fee forming the larger part of the cost) and a close shave (except for the moustache - we have only been parted from one another twice in 48 years).
Over the past 5 years I've tended towards using a cut-throat given to me by my father-in-law (1944 souvenir from Italy) but anti-coagulants and airport security have put paid to that!
 

Bradypus

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
Over the past 5 years I've tended towards using a cut-throat given to me by my father-in-law (1944 souvenir from Italy) but anti-coagulants and airport security have put paid to that!
There was a time when I used one too. I loved the feel of it and the whole performance of using a strop. But I eventually gave up when I was living in a shared flat. People would sometimes knock loudly on the bathroom door while I was shaving and I would either jump a little or quickly turn my head towards the door - not the best of moves when using an open razor :oops:
 

koilife

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016); Portugues w/ son #3 (2020)
@Jeff Crawley, I too am always amazed at how my clothes have shrunk over the years. Belts I used in college have shrunk to the size of garters. The saying, "they don't make them like they used too" clearly doesn't apply to shrinking. It's very odd. I mean, I know leather can shrink if wet, but every piece of clothing?!

@Bradypus, the Francigena in 66 days? I'm impressed, especially assuming you took a few rest days or short stages for sightseeing.
 

Bradypus

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
@Bradypus, the Francigena in 66 days? I'm impressed, especially assuming you took a few rest days or short stages for sightseeing.
I do not really enjoy non-walking "rest days". Too impatient! The only places where I spent two nights in the same town before reaching Rome were Reims and Siena and I spent most of my days there wandering around and sightseeing.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances part (2019)
When I first started gathering camino trip stuff I thought it would be impossible to get it down to 5.2 k, which was 10% of my body weight, so thought I would just have to gain a few pounds in order to be able to carry enough.....

After a lot of ruthless elimination and a bit of sewing (lightweight pouch/shoulder bag, down quilt/poncho) I set off carrying 4.27 kilos/9.5 pounds (excl water) in a 20 litre pack. A friend's excellent tip to drink as much as possible when there was a water point, meant that I rarely needed to carry more than half a litre of water. But so much depends on season, route and the individual's needs. Larger sized clothes and shoes just weigh more.

It's not a competition. For me the simplicity of having so little (no decisions about what to wear!) felt good, and appropriate. And my ageing hips and knees were grateful.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
Wow. . . My backpack never went beyond 24 pounds of total weight on the PCT, and that was at resupply for 7 to 10 days worth of food and additional fuel canisters.
I wrote that it was ages ago. Let me reword. It was ages ago.

Regarding the attached pictures, the pack frame on the right is mine and was the one I used on that hike. I think I bought it and its attached nylon pack in 1970. Wide nylon webbing for back cushioning, adjusted with metal turnbuckles. It has cushioned shoulder straps.

The frame on the left is the expensive state of the art lightweight aircraft aluminum frame of my father's from about 1960. Four cross bars, rivets everywhere. Back cushioning by canvas straps adjusted with buckles like on a belt. Canvas shoulder straps "padded" with thick leather. It didn't come with a pack. That was canvas.

Screenshot_20200115-104724.png Screenshot_20200115-104713.png
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Currently on a "Virtual" Camino and striding out across Navarra!
There was a time when I used one too. I loved the feel of it and the whole performance of using a strop. But I eventually gave up when I was living in a shared flat. People would sometimes knock loudly on the bathroom door while I was shaving and I would either jump a little or quickly turn my head towards the door - not the best of moves when using an open razor :oops:
Wandering way off topic here but the advice that came with the razor was: "Never let your wife shave you with a straight razor . . . " (bearing in mind he was talking about his daughter). It probably has more significance in his original Polish!
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2017)
Frances(2018)
Ingles(2019)
Aragones(2020)
Portuguese(2020)
I wrote that it was ages ago. Let me reword. It was ages ago.

Regarding the attached pictures, the pack frame on the right is mine and was the one I used on that hike. I think I bought it and its attached nylon pack in 1970. Wide nylon webbing for back cushioning, adjusted with metal turnbuckles. It has cushioned shoulder straps.

The frame on the left is the expensive state of the art lightweight aircraft aluminum frame of my father's from about 1960. Four cross bars, rivets everywhere. Back cushioning by canvas straps adjusted with buckles like on a belt. Canvas shoulder straps "padded" with thick leather. It didn't come with a pack. That was canvas.

View attachment 68632 View attachment 68633
Oops. . .sorry Rick, I missed the part about it being ages ago when you ran across the girls. :)

Wow, those photos bring back memories.

I had a Trailwise and a Camp Trails backpack from 1967 until the late '70s that I used. This is a pic of the Trailwise, which was a Christmas present from my mom and dad in 1969.

The next backpack after that that moved to internal frame concepts, was a Dana Designs Terraplane. That thing was a wonderful pack with the harness and hipbelt design that are pretty standard - -with refinements - - on backpacks today. But the Terraplane's weight was nearly 5 pounds, mainly due to the heavy nylon
fabric of the bag.


The Campwise.
Bacpack2.pngBacpack1.png
 

DwainS

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances(2020)
I’m baffled about the concern over weight. I walked the entire Camino when I turned 60. I averaged 14 miles/day. My pack weighed nearly 20lbs. I’m 5’3” and 115 lbs. I‘m not an athlete. All was well.
i'am only worried about weight because I want mine to be light enough for a carry on, otherwise I could carry a lot more weight.
 

Sjp007

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2017 St James
2020 St James
I’m baffled about the concern over weight. I walked the entire Camino when I turned 60. I averaged 14 miles/day. My pack weighed nearly 20lbs. I’m 5’3” and 115 lbs. I‘m not an athlete. All was well.
I’m baffled you’re baffled 😉😉 I thought the purpose of the forum was to ask for suggestions and to share information about the Camino? Sounds like you did great carrying 20lbs (9kg) for 14miles (22.5kms)...well done!...my question however is for suggestions from those who carried less than 7kg and what did you pack?
(remember this is not a judgement to those who carried more)
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2018)
Hello friend and fellow Canadian!
I think you have an excellent goal and I believe you will be able to do it! You have so many replies here to sort through for thoughts and advice.

For my Camino, I developed a head-space around packing that I found very helpful. My pack landed at 3.9kg. I was very happy with it! There are definitely things I brought that have a 'lighter' option available as well, but I avoided buying new things at the time, so I used a lot of 'what I already had'. There's also a couple of things I would not bring again, which I noted in my list. Detailed pack list here, including descriptions and photos.

the head-space;
Normally I'd start by saying 'I recommend packing as light as possible'...but you are already interested in doing that, so yay!

So, how to pack light and be happy about it? Start from the extremes. On one end, that would mean you bring nothing, and walk naked and barefoot. On the other end, that would mean that you pack up everything in your house or apartment and put it on a trailer, which you then hitch to yourself and drag along every day. Obviously, neither of these is ideal. It is a good starting point though; and for this thought exercise, I started from the ‘going naked, bringing nothing’ version, and added things.

It starts out really easy; I don’t want walk naked. Ok, so, shoes, bottoms, top, sun protection. Is that enough? Do I need anything else?

After solving the ‘walking naked’ problem, I moved on to ‘things I will carry with me.’ Nothing was added to my pack list without careful consideration. Instead of framing the thought process as ‘this is a luxury I want to have at the Albergues every day,’ I framed it as ‘this is grams my feet will have to carry for five to nine hours a day.’

This part is a touch contentious, perhaps, but part of my headspace was to accept that I may be uncomfortable occasionally, perhaps for a few hours on a day or two throughout my Camino, due to having not packed for every last possible eventuality. I actually believe this means you nailed it! Being uncomfortable a little bit just a couple of times means you didn't pack things along that were only used to -'close the discomfort gap' for a couple of hours on multi-week adventure. It means your FEET and BODY were not 'a little bit extra uncomfortable' EVERY DAY that you carried that extra item just so you could use it to be 'not uncomfortable' for a couple of hours here and there. I hope that makes sense. Basically it is making sure to acknowledge that 'bringing an extra jacket in case it's cold at the top of that one mountain and I don't want to be cold that day' means realizing the underlying (less-easily-directly-associated) discomfort on your feet/body that results from extra weight...like..'sorry feet and body, you're going to have to carry these extra 9oz for 6 weeks so I am not cold on that one day' - that's an extreme example but it's easier to illustrate with extreme examples.

Also, thanks to guidebooks (yay guidebooks!), I was able to remind myself regularly through the packing process just how frequent towns and services are on the Camino. This is key, because if you bring something along, you will likely be averse to throwing it out if you aren’t using it (that feels wasteful). But if you don’t bring something and you decide you really want it; you can very easily buy it along the way. Err on the side of not bringing things! If you are on the fence with an item - consider whether you could easily buy it if you change your mind...if you can easily buy it..don't bring it!

I want to reiterate; instead of framing the thought process around not bringing an item as ‘luxuries I can live without at the Albergues’ – frame it as ‘grams that my feet won’t have to carry for 9 hours a day.

Best of luck and buen Camino!
 

alipilgrim

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Listed in my signature
For me, my pack weight differs with the seasons. Early Spring requires more layers for me and a heavier sleeping bag whereas a September walk I carried less. The climate is something to consider...
 

Sjp007

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2017 St James
2020 St James
Hello friend and fellow Canadian!
I think you have an excellent goal and I believe you will be able to do it! You have so many replies here to sort through for thoughts and advice.

For my Camino, I developed a head-space around packing that I found very helpful. My pack landed at 3.9kg. I was very happy with it! There are definitely things I brought that have a 'lighter' option available as well, but I avoided buying new things at the time, so I used a lot of 'what I already had'. There's also a couple of things I would not bring again, which I noted in my list. Detailed pack list here, including descriptions and photos.

the head-space;
Normally I'd start by saying 'I recommend packing as light as possible'...but you are already interested in doing that, so yay!

So, how to pack light and be happy about it? Start from the extremes. On one end, that would mean you bring nothing, and walk naked and barefoot. On the other end, that would mean that you pack up everything in your house or apartment and put it on a trailer, which you then hitch to yourself and drag along every day. Obviously, neither of these is ideal. It is a good starting point though; and for this thought exercise, I started from the ‘going naked, bringing nothing’ version, and added things.

It starts out really easy; I don’t want walk naked. Ok, so, shoes, bottoms, top, sun protection. Is that enough? Do I need anything else?

After solving the ‘walking naked’ problem, I moved on to ‘things I will carry with me.’ Nothing was added to my pack list without careful consideration. Instead of framing the thought process as ‘this is a luxury I want to have at the Albergues every day,’ I framed it as ‘this is grams my feet will have to carry for five to nine hours a day.’

This part is a touch contentious, perhaps, but part of my headspace was to accept that I may be uncomfortable occasionally, perhaps for a few hours on a day or two throughout my Camino, due to having not packed for every last possible eventuality. I actually believe this means you nailed it! Being uncomfortable a little bit just a couple of times means you didn't pack things along that were only used to -'close the discomfort gap' for a couple of hours on multi-week adventure. It means your FEET and BODY were not 'a little bit extra uncomfortable' EVERY DAY that you carried that extra item just so you could use it to be 'not uncomfortable' for a couple of hours here and there. I hope that makes sense. Basically it is making sure to acknowledge that 'bringing an extra jacket in case it's cold at the top of that one mountain and I don't want to be cold that day' means realizing the underlying (less-easily-directly-associated) discomfort on your feet/body that results from extra weight...like..'sorry feet and body, you're going to have to carry these extra 9oz for 6 weeks so I am not cold on that one day' - that's an extreme example but it's easier to illustrate with extreme examples.

Also, thanks to guidebooks (yay guidebooks!), I was able to remind myself regularly through the packing process just how frequent towns and services are on the Camino. This is key, because if you bring something along, you will likely be averse to throwing it out if you aren’t using it (that feels wasteful). But if you don’t bring something and you decide you really want it; you can very easily buy it along the way. Err on the side of not bringing things! If you are on the fence with an item - consider whether you could easily buy it if you change your mind...if you can easily buy it..don't bring it!

I want to reiterate; instead of framing the thought process around not bringing an item as ‘luxuries I can live without at the Albergues’ – frame it as ‘grams that my feet won’t have to carry for 9 hours a day.

Best of luck and buen Camino!
This is REALLY good advice!! I appreciate the effort in your response! I will keep “ Start from the extremes” and “ grams that my feet won’t have to carry for 9 hours a day” in my mind as I decide what to bring this 2nd time around 🥰
 

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