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Who has packed the lightest pack?

Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2018)
This is REALLY good advice!! I appreciate the effort in your response! I will keep “ Start from the extremes” and “ grams that my feet won’t have to carry for 9 hours a day” in my mind as I decide what to bring this 2nd time around 🥰
Yay! I’m glad you found it useful! I spent a lot of time really thinking about this stuff, so it’s fun to blab about it every once in a while!

Related to ‘starting from the extremes’ – I didn’t explain why I started from ‘bring nothing, walk naked’ instead of ‘bring everything’ – I did it this way because it is psychologically easier to ‘give yourself things’ than to ‘take things away from yourself.’ Giving your hypothetically-naked self a pair of pants to wear feels better than ‘taking away all but one pair of pants’.

Another little mental framing exercise that is maybe more fun is ‘have you asked your feet about that?”

Your feet and your butt are going to be in a constant battle. Your butt wants to be comfortable in the evenings when you are sitting around at the Albergue, but your feet want to be comfortable when you are walking. Be honest with yourself about what the Camino is, primarily….it’s walking! However, when you are packing, your butt is going to be on one shoulder whispering in your ear ‘bring the quilt, it will be soooo warm at night’ and your poor feet are on your other shoulder whispering ‘please don’t! quilts are heavy!’ So basically, when your butt is telling you to bring something, just make sure you ask, ‘have I talked to me feet about this?’’
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
I want to reiterate; instead of framing the thought process around not bringing an item as ‘luxuries I can live without at the Albergues’ – frame it as ‘grams that my feet won’t have to carry for 9 hours a day.
Well stated. 👍 :)
 

Sjp007

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2017 St James
2020 St James
Yay! I’m glad you found it useful! I spent a lot of time really thinking about this stuff, so it’s fun to blab about it every once in a while!

Related to ‘starting from the extremes’ – I didn’t explain why I started from ‘bring nothing, walk naked’ instead of ‘bring everything’ – I did it this way because it is psychologically easier to ‘give yourself things’ than to ‘take things away from yourself.’ Giving your hypothetically-naked self a pair of pants to wear feels better than ‘taking away all but one pair of pants’.

Another little mental framing exercise that is maybe more fun is ‘have you asked your feet about that?”

Your feet and your butt are going to be in a constant battle. Your butt wants to be comfortable in the evenings when you are sitting around at the Albergue, but your feet want to be comfortable when you are walking. Be honest with yourself about what the Camino is, primarily….it’s walking! However, when you are packing, your butt is going to be on one shoulder whispering in your ear ‘bring the quilt, it will be soooo warm at night’ and your poor feet are on your other shoulder whispering ‘please don’t! quilts are heavy!’ So basically, when your butt is telling you to bring something, just make sure you ask, ‘have I talked to me feet about this?’’
I like your sense of humour...too bad you weren’t walking the Camino this July 😁
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
There are pilgrims out there who enjoy carrying heavy packs, and they are quite fit and are able to do so with no problems. I had to carry a heavy pack in the army. I was much younger, much fitter, much everything more back then. Now I do not want to carry a heavy pack and I do not have to (I look upon walking in the rain the same way...had to do it in the army, do not have to on the Camino lol). That being said I always try and carry the lightest pack possible.
For those less experienced, less fit, less whatever perhaps a lighter pack is best. If whilst walking you decide you can carry more, there are many shoppes along the Camino that are more than happy to sell you a larger pack and more gear. I suggest leaving your old pack at an albergue. There is an anonymous pilgrim out there that will like you for it.
I think my lightest pack while walking the Camino was a 32L Deuter, about 5 kg's fully loaded.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
Sounds like you did great carrying 20lbs (9kg) for 14miles (22.5kms)...well done...but what were you carrying at that weight?
Feel free to carry little, but please forgo assuming things about the rest of us. Not everyone can manage to go light. I have 'regulation clothes' and they're relatively heavy. And I have one pack that's too big, but that's the one I have. So for fear of ridicule I won't even post the weight I carry, except to say it's over 9kg.

But these days I try to carry nothing that I don't use at least once, and sometines many times. The litmus test is after the camino, when I cull what wasn't worth carrying. This time it was almost nothing, so I was proud of myself!
 

Dromengro

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP - Leon 1984
Frances (2021)
I never weigh my pack. Once you have cut it down to the basics that you need to live comfortably, using the lightest versions of items that are available or you can afford, weighing it won't make it any lighter.
I've carried 100Lb+ packs on winter climbing expeditions and inter-railed around Europe with only passport, money and sleeping bag, buying what I needed on the way.
Sjp007 doesn't say which camino she is walking, as some may need more than others. I'd imagine that walking the Frances in summer you could start naked and pick up what you need free from what others have left behind.
 

Bradypus

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
I'd imagine that walking the Frances in summer you could start naked and pick up what you need free from what others have left behind.
If you started walking naked it would not surprise me if other people were offering you their spare clothes very soon. Even generously insisting upon it. You probably wouldn't have to rely on finding cast-offs.

I never weigh my pack. Once you have cut it down to the basics that you need to live comfortably, using the lightest versions of items that are available or you can afford, weighing it won't make it any lighter.
My thinking too. If you have pared your load down to essentials what would you throw out if you found the pack was above the magic weight number? If you need it then you have to carry it. If you do not need it why put it in there in the first place?
 

Dromengro

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP - Leon 1984
Frances (2021)
If you started walking naked it would not surprise me if other people were offering you their spare clothes very soon. Even generously insisting upon it. You probably wouldn't have to rely on finding cast-offs.
Probably the reason why Stephen Gough (the naked rambler) had such a big pack.
 

Michael-FL

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Caminho Portugues (2017)
Frances/Salvador/Primitivo (2021)
When I walked in 2017, my pack was 17lbs (7.7kgs)...this time (July/Aug 2020) I want to carry less....just curious who here has carried less lbs and if so, what did you pack?
Honestly, I couldn’t pack light to save my life! I found myself “what-iffing” myself to death and adding stuff for every contingency. It’s the Eagle Scout in me. It took a screaming knee injury to beat the lesson into my head to pack light - and throw stuff out! I learned I could get by on a LOT less: 2 teeshirts, 2 prs skivvies, 2 prs sox. This isn’t a wilderness trek. It’s a pilgrimage and to be a pilgrim is to suffer at least a little, forgoing some of the creature comforts. It’s becoming poor in spirit - and we’re told how blessed they are.
 

Sjp007

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2017 St James
2020 St James
Honestly, I couldn’t pack light to save my life! I found myself “what-iffing” myself to death and adding stuff for every contingency. It’s the Eagle Scout in me. It took a screaming knee injury to beat the lesson into my head to pack light - and throw stuff out! I learned I could get by on a LOT less: 2 teeshirts, 2 prs skivvies, 2 prs sox. This isn’t a wilderness trek. It’s a pilgrimage and to be a pilgrim is to suffer at least a little, forgoing some of the creature comforts. It’s becoming poor in spirit - and we’re told how blessed they are.
Feel free to carry little, but please forgo assuming things about the rest of us. Not everyone can manage to go light. I have 'regulation clothes' and they're relatively heavy. And I have one pack that's too big, but that's the one I have. So for fear of ridicule I won't even post the weight I carry, except to say it's over 9kg.

But these days I try to carry nothing that I don't use at least once, and sometines many times. The litmus test is after the camino, when I cull what wasn't worth carrying. This time it was almost nothing, so I was proud of myself!
I hear you, I’m trying to see for my 2nd Camino if carrying lighter improves that wandering pain I had that went from my knee to my back to my baby finger....just curious what other people packed when going lighter and am getting some great replies to think over
 

Sjp007

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2017 St James
2020 St James
Feel free to carry little, but please forgo assuming things about the rest of us. Not everyone can manage to go light. I have 'regulation clothes' and they're relatively heavy. And I have one pack that's too big, but that's the one I have. So for fear of ridicule I won't even post the weight I carry, except to say it's over 9kg.

But these days I try to carry nothing that I don't use at least once, and sometines many times. The litmus test is after the camino, when I cull what wasn't worth carrying. This time it was almost nothing, so I was proud of myself!
I’m assuming this hit a nerve somehow but my question is not about people who carry heavy weight, I carried 17lbs (7.7kg) my 1st Camino and I’m trying to carry less this time around...I’m 3years older this time...and want to make sure I have another great Camino this year and if this means carrying less, then fantastic...therein lies my question of ‘what did you carry if you carried less than 7.7kgs (17lbs)?’ by noooo means is this a criticism or an assumption of those who carry more or need to carry more weight.
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
Honestly, I couldn’t pack light to save my life! I found myself “what-iffing” myself to death and adding stuff for every contingency. It’s the Eagle Scout in me. It took a screaming knee injury to beat the lesson into my head to pack light - and throw stuff out! I learned I could get by on a LOT less: 2 teeshirts, 2 prs skivvies, 2 prs sox. This isn’t a wilderness trek. It’s a pilgrimage and to be a pilgrim is to suffer at least a little, forgoing some of the creature comforts. It’s becoming poor in spirit - and we’re told how blessed they are.
Very true, not a true hike, wilderness trek etc at all. Just many long walks.
Even carrying very little I cannot say I ever really suffered while walking the Camino. That is other than sore knees, feet etc and that is not really suffering. One could get those from playing tennis too much, lol. On the Camino I always had a dry, warm place to sleep, food to eat and cold beer. As we said in the military, "three hots and a cot" lol.
 

camino.ninja

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 5 6,16,17,18,19,20
Primiti+Salvador 19
Portug. 17,18,20
Catalan 17
Norte 17
Plata 18
When I walked in 2017, my pack was 17lbs (7.7kgs)...this time (July/Aug 2020) I want to carry less....just curious who here has carried less lbs and if so, what did you pack?
I usually pack less than 5 kilos all year round. I met two guys packing 3.5 kilos ...and actually a woman packing less than one kilo.

My pack list here:
https://camino.ninja/packlist

Best,
Andy
 

Gilles

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Many caminos since 2009 !
Depends of the season too. Walking twice a year, each time around 2500 kms on camiños starting mid-february or end september for me it's 5 kilos including my backpack of 23 liters. Starting with 270 medical pills of my daily treatment: my backpack is lighter every day !
(could but won't do less for safety reasons)
 

Colette Z

Happy Pilgrim
Camino(s) past & future
CF- Finisterre-Muxia 03/17; Camino SK 10/17; Norte 03/18; Ingles 11/18; Augusta 03/19
When I walked in 2017, my pack was 17lbs (7.7kgs)...this time (July/Aug 2020) I want to carry less....just curious who here has carried less lbs and if so, what did you pack?
5kg pack included maximum.....if over I eliminate.
 

mikebet

Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP to Pamplona (2016); Baiona to Santiago (2018); Sarria to Santiago (2018)
I always try to arrive into Santiago on time, Halloween called and was day behind schedule. I often walk through the night with the spirit inside me 🤠


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Whatever happened to drinking from the bottle? Dang, this Camino is getting too civilized! What's next...canape forks? LOL
 

Vince1958

Experienced Hiker
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, Via de la Plata, Portugues, Salvador, Madrid, Ingles and Fisterra
I carried a 28lb pack for 6 weeks on the Via de la Plata. I had everything I needed and was happy carrying the weight so never gave it a second thought. Carry what you're comfortable with!
 

zrexer

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2014, 15,16 & 19 Camino Frances
2017 Camino Portuguese
2018 Camino Primitivo
2020 Camino Del Norte
Not me, that is for sure. I have a 65L pack and love the fit of it, although it is a fairly heavy pack even empty.
To be honest after six Camino's I have never actually weighed my pack yet. I have changed up what I take over the years and of course the time of year is a major influence as to what I take along.
At the end of the day, the weight is kind of immaterial as I use everything I take, so it is as light or heavy as it is going to be.
I know I am out of step with the 'ultra-minimalist' trend of day pack sized back packs, but that is OK.
I do see many with smaller packs, but often they have fanny packs or alot dangling and flopping gear attached around the outside of their packs which makes me think they should just have bought a proper sized pack to start with.
I also see the challenge they have each day to repack their micro packs each morning. Looks way too challenging for a pre-coffee exercise!
 
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Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Aragones-Frances (2016); VdlP-Sanabres (2017); Madrid-Frances-Invierno (2019)Levante
I have checked the heading and find that this is a thread for all caminos, not just for the Camino Frances, which has numerous walkers and short distances between facilities. But I should like to remind walkers that you only need to be without necessary supplies and gear (water, clothing, shelter) on one day in order to end up dead. Multiple walkers have ended up dead on the Napoleon route from foul weather and getting lost or making bad decisions at different times of year. To a lesser extent, a number of walkers have ended up dead on the VdlP during the walk to Canaveral, when heat, a closed albergue at the Embalse, and inadequate water have combined. Please do not tell yourself that you are okay with being uncomfortable for one day in favour of carrying a lighter pack. You might be lucky, and you might end up dead.
 

MichelleElynHogan

Veteran Member
1st Camino - 9.7 kg.
2nd Camino - 4.5 kg.
3rd Camino - Goal Weight is 3.0 kg. This year or next. Will be using a GobiGear
30L Free Spirit Travel Backpack which is less than 400 gm empty. This alone will drop at least 1.0 kg.
 

Ronald H

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2012
My contents did not include any hair care because I got a buzz cut before I left. The weights are oz except for the totals which are lbs. I took two pairs of zip off bottoms pants but only carried one bottom. You don't really need two bottoms. If you did not want to shave, you could forget the razors.
 

Derrybiketours

A journey of 500 miles begins with one step!
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdeP-SANT-FIN (09/2018)
PORTO-SANT (11/2018)
Caminho Da Fe, BR (01/2019)
SJPdeP- SANT (09/2019)
Whatever happened to drinking from the bottle? Dang, this Camino is getting too civilized! What's next...canape forks? LOL
You wouldn't wrap your mouth around my bottle if you knew where it had been, canape forks, use your spork 🤠
 

spursfan

Veteran Member
But I should like to remind walkers that you only need to be without necessary supplies and gear (water, clothing, shelter) on one day in order to end up dead. Please do not tell yourself that you are okay with being uncomfortable for one day in favour of carrying a lighter pack. You might be lucky, and you might end up dead.
Indeed I pack light so that I can carry as much water as I need - occasionally the water is heavier than the rest of my pack (well at the beginning of the day at least)
 

Ronald H

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2012
I always buy two small bottles of water at the store and use them when I hike. I just refill the all the time. Hard to find anything lighter. Depending on how far I walk that day and number of places to stop, I sometimes only fill one bottle.
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Aragones-Frances (2016); VdlP-Sanabres (2017); Madrid-Frances-Invierno (2019)Levante
I always buy two small bottles of water at the store and use them when I hike. I just refill the all the time. Hard to find anything lighter. Depending on how far I walk that day and number of places to stop, I sometimes only fill one bottle.
There is sometimes a challenge as to the number and distance of places to stop. The albergue at the Embalse on the way to Canaveral on the VdlP has a reputation for being unreliable as to when it is open. I knew from reading this forum that it was supposed the be open when I passed through in September, 2017, but I did not count on it. That was just as well, as it was not open, so I had to walk a 32 km day, which is more than I usually do. But I had heard of a man dying near there who had also found the albergue shut, so I had lots of water and had planned for a possible longer walk. My point here is that, when walking alone in an area which may be problematical I prefer to assume that "whatever can go wrong will go wrong" and to prepare for it.
 

Ronald H

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2012
You are absolutely right. I have run out of water once - never again. I always top off my water whenever I have the opportunity and not wait until my bottle is empty.
 

Deputy Dan

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Logrono to Burgos in week of October (2017); SJPP - ?, three weeks in 2020!
So much to learn in this thread and so many thoughts!

First - easiest way (for many of us!) to reduce "carry" weight is to start with ourselves. Over a six-month period (and about a year ahead of my next venture onto the Camino) I've shed 65 pounds (29.5 kg) which sounds impressive until you hear I started at 265lbs/120kg. Legs/knees already feel better.

Regarding pack size/carry weight, it clearly depends on what you need to carry: I have a 74L pack, rated to carry 120lbs/55kg - used by 18 year-old Marines (includes outside pockets to carry mortar rounds, though the pockets neatly fit 2-liter water bottles). I haven't been an 18 year-old for a long time (or a Marine!) but I admit I DO use this one occasionally: usually for mission trips with my wife when we're taking lots of stuff that will get left behind. I top it out at the airlines max checked bag weight of 50lbs/23kg. Wearing the pack leaves my hands free in the airports to assist my wife with (all!) her suitcases, and I rarely have to wear it for more than a few blocks. Clarification - I COULDN'T carry it for more than a few blocks.

I bought an inexpensive 1lb/.5kg frameless "35L" pack intending to use it for my first Camino outing and managed to stuff it with about 18lbs/8kg of gear. It didn't survive its first encounter with a long distance training hike. (Test. Test. Test!) Walked instead with a modified US Army medium ruck - very comfortable but the pack itself weighs 9 lbs/4kg taking me well over 26lb/12kg total carry weight. I thought the comfort factor would overcome the weight factor, but combined with my personal weight at the time it was really too much.

I've since obtained an REI Flash 45L pack in part because if I remove the detachable lid it comes in under the airlines' carry-on requirements. More volume than I need but convenient to get at anything inside.

I weigh everything primarily because when I read threads like these and see that something I carry is two to three times (or more!) the weight of what some of the more experienced or expert (thanks Dave!) hikers use, I know I can be on the lookout for lighter gear. I don't always go out and buy the premium ultralight gear, but Yes, I've purchased some speciality items new. I've also got plenty of second-hand-store items in the current pack as well that are lighter than what I'd otherwise use around the house. I weigh stuff because - Why carry more weight than I have to for the same gear/utility?

I'm a recovering Boy Scout and still desire to Be Prepared", as they say. Shout out to the Eagle Scout here - I didn't make it quite that far, succumbing to fumes - gasoline and perfume - as I got older Anyway, it's always been a struggle to eliminate things that "might" be necessary. I'm getting better. I know I could shave 8oz/.25kg from my repair and medical supplies, and another 3oz/.125!kg in comfort items, but I can live with the extra pound.

As has been pointed out, a lot depends on time of year. My "cold weather" gear accounts for a bit over 4lbs/1.8kg but without the heat of the day sapping my strength as it does in the summer I can handle the extra.

Having said all that - my summer pack weight is 13.7lbs/6.2kg and the winter weight is 17.9lbs/8.1kg. I know the winter weight is correct as I just finished packing for my next Camino. In October. Yep. I'm ready. Got the plane ticket and I'm all packed. Let's go. Nope - not eager at all.
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
So much to learn in this thread and so many thoughts!

First - easiest way (for many of us!) to reduce "carry" weight is to start with ourselves. Over a six-month period (and about a year ahead of my next venture onto the Camino) I've shed 65 pounds (29.5 kg) which sounds impressive until you hear I started at 265lbs/120kg. Legs/knees already feel better.

Regarding pack size/carry weight, it clearly depends on what you need to carry: I have a 74L pack, rated to carry 120lbs/55kg - used by 18 year-old Marines (includes outside pockets to carry mortar rounds, though the pockets neatly fit 2-liter water bottles). I haven't been an 18 year-old for a long time (or a Marine!) but I admit I DO use this one occasionally: usually for mission trips with my wife when we're taking lots of stuff that will get left behind. I top it out at the airlines max checked bag weight of 50lbs/23kg. Wearing the pack leaves my hands free in the airports to assist my wife with (all!) her suitcases, and I rarely have to wear it for more than a few blocks. Clarification - I COULDN'T carry it for more than a few blocks.

I bought an inexpensive 1lb/.5kg frameless "35L" pack intending to use it for my first Camino outing and managed to stuff it with about 18lbs/8kg of gear. It didn't survive its first encounter with a long distance training hike. (Test. Test. Test!) Walked instead with a modified US Army medium ruck - very comfortable but the pack itself weighs 9 lbs/4kg taking me well over 26lb/12kg total carry weight. I thought the comfort factor would overcome the weight factor, but combined with my personal weight at the time it was really too much.

I've since obtained an REI Flash 45L pack in part because if I remove the detachable lid it comes in under the airlines' carry-on requirements. More volume than I need but convenient to get at anything inside.

I weigh everything primarily because when I read threads like these and see that something I carry is two to three times (or more!) the weight of what some of the more experienced or expert (thanks Dave!) hikers use, I know I can be on the lookout for lighter gear. I don't always go out and buy the premium ultralight gear, but Yes, I've purchased some speciality items new. I've also got plenty of second-hand-store items in the current pack as well that are lighter than what I'd otherwise use around the house. I weigh stuff because - Why carry more weight than I have to for the same gear/utility?

I'm a recovering Boy Scout and still desire to Be Prepared", as they say. Shout out to the Eagle Scout here - I didn't make it quite that far, succumbing to fumes - gasoline and perfume - as I got older Anyway, it's always been a struggle to eliminate things that "might" be necessary. I'm getting better. I know I could shave 8oz/.25kg from my repair and medical supplies, and another 3oz/.125!kg in comfort items, but I can live with the extra pound.

As has been pointed out, a lot depends on time of year. My "cold weather" gear accounts for a bit over 4lbs/1.8kg but without the heat of the day sapping my strength as it does in the summer I can handle the extra.

Having said all that - my summer pack weight is 13.7lbs/6.2kg and the winter weight is 17.9lbs/8.1kg. I know the winter weight is correct as I just finished packing for my next Camino. In October. Yep. I'm ready. Got the plane ticket and I'm all packed. Let's go. Nope - not eager at all.
Congratulations on the weight loss. Kudos to you, and yes with quite a few prospective and experienced pilgrims on here who have a concern about pack weight their first order of business should be body weight, and I do not mean that in an offensive way. That is a topic not covered much on here very much. Diet and exercise, actual lifestyle changes. I have seen more than one overweight pilgrim unable to complete the Camino, and suddenly they have to go home or turn a walking trip into a bus and train trip. That would truly suck. Walking the Camino will not get you in shape if you cannot walk long distances in the first place.

BTW, ditch the extra medical and repair supplies. I have over 180 days of walking different Camino's. Not once have I had to repair anything on my pack etc and have never had to use any medical supplies save for aspirin and bandaids. I have broken boot laces twice, but always pack extra ones.
 

Old Kiwi

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2016
Camino Frances 2019
SdC to Muxia and Fisterra 2019
Camino Portuguese "2021"
On my first Camino, my pack weight (including pack but no water) was 6.5 kilos. My second Camino, after learning what I could do without, the weight was 5.5 kilos. On my second Camino, my pack disintegrated on me and I replaced with a day pack, which of course could only fit just over half of my gear. The lesson I learnt from that is that I am packed for my next Camino and my pack weight is now 4.5 kilos. As I am doing the Portuguese (which I hope will be warmer) I am thinking about reducing that by a T shirt, a sweat shirt and a pair of shorts.
 

Deputy Dan

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Logrono to Burgos in week of October (2017); SJPP - ?, three weeks in 2020!
BTW, ditch the extra medical and repair supplies. I have over 180 days of walking different Camino's. Not once have I had to repair anything on my pack etc and have never had to use any medical supplies save for aspirin and bandaids. I have broken boot laces twice, but always pack extra ones.
Ditching gets blocked by emotions, or at least exposed scars from prior hikes.

Just after getting dropped of by a shuttle for a two-day Appalachian Trail hike, the buckle on my pack's hip belt broke with no good way to jury-rig any sort of substitute. It's amazing how painful hanging 20 lbs off you shoulders can be. So now I carry extra hardware, duct tape, some zip-ties, and other parts for expedient repairs. Repair kit also includes the safety pins I use to pin stuff to the pack to dry it out, and the hank of para-cord that serves as auxiliary clothes line - and can provide replacement shoe-laces if needed.

My med kit is mostly blister prevention and/or care; After about 200 km of training hikes with nary a hotspot, I got an enormous blister just two days into my week-long Camino in 2017. Ended up losing the toenail, and the toe took weeks to heal/recover. I'll leave the trauma stuff at home knowing I can hit la farmacia for most any major need. But I have actually reinforced my kit for foot care with a broad selection of moleskin, bandages, antiseptic wipes, gauze, and Leukotape. In keeping with the notion of learning from the forum - I noticed that Davebug carries 0.8oz of Leukotape while I had a 4oz roll in my bag. So I've now stripped off about 3 yards of the stuff to carry and that should be more than enough for my next three week walk; eliminated a bit more than 3 oz right there!
 

Globalroaming074

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
El Norte (May 2020)
Thanks Dave! I’ll be doing el Norte end April this year so I read your packing list with great interest. I have a couple of questions regarding your closet section.
You’re packing 1 short and 1 tee - so you’re washing at the end of each day? Are they always dry by morning?
At the end of the day, once showered, what do you change into? The base layer top and pant?
At night, what do you put on your feet? Do you put your hiking shoes back on or??
And at night, what do you sleep in as I can’t see any mention of underwear or cotton tee that others have listed?
My current plan is as follows but I’m desperate to pack light so any insights you can provide would be great.
2 x gym shorts w liners (Nike / under armour etc)
2 x sleeveless gym tops (as above)
1 x boxer brief + 1 cotton tee for sleeping
3 Smartwool Merino hiking socks
1 x ice Breaker Merino wool long sleeve tee
1 x light weight pant (to wear at night)
1 x long sleeve fleece
1 x Altus rain poncho
1 x change of shoes - this is a hard one as I’d love to not pack this but will it be torture putting my walking shoes back on?
In your opinion is there anything I’m missing or should live without to make my pack as light as possible?
Thanks for your time, and as always, any suggestions are greatly appreciated!
 

spursfan

Veteran Member
Merino wool is one way to avoid/reduce laundry (as well as covering a wide range of temperatures)

I only bring one pair of trail runners - if wet, they dry out while walking
 
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Deleted member 67185

Guest
Thanks Dave! I’ll be doing el Norte end April this year so I read your packing list with great interest. I have a couple of questions regarding your closet section.
You’re packing 1 short and 1 tee - so you’re washing at the end of each day? Are they always dry by morning?
At the end of the day, once showered, what do you change into? The base layer top and pant?
At night, what do you put on your feet? Do you put your hiking shoes back on or??
And at night, what do you sleep in as I can’t see any mention of underwear or cotton tee that others have listed?
My current plan is as follows but I’m desperate to pack light so any insights you can provide would be great.
2 x gym shorts w liners (Nike / under armour etc)
2 x sleeveless gym tops (as above)
1 x boxer brief + 1 cotton tee for sleeping
3 Smartwool Merino hiking socks
1 x ice Breaker Merino wool long sleeve tee
1 x light weight pant (to wear at night)
1 x long sleeve fleece
1 x Altus rain poncho
1 x change of shoes - this is a hard one as I’d love to not pack this but will it be torture putting my walking shoes back on?
In your opinion is there anything I’m missing or should live without to make my pack as light as possible?
Thanks for your time, and as always, any suggestions are greatly appreciated!
Keep in mind that I am also WEARING a pair of shorts and a shirt for walking. I never include what I wear as part of what I carry in my backpack. So, I change into the clean stuff in my pack when doing wash after showering :)

I wear what I will be walking in the next day for sleeping in. So my list would not include separate sleeping attire.

I only take two shirts, period. . one to wear and one in the closet.

I only use long sleeve shirts, so I do not have any short sleeved shirts. The long sleeves can be rolled up if I want to expose skin to air. However, when walking in heat with sun, long sleeves will keep skin cooler because it does no let infrared radiation directly hit your skin, which sunscreen does not help with one bit. Long sleeves also keeps UV from allowing burning eliminating the need for carrying and using sunscreen.

Long sleeves also provide good layering for cool weather.

From mid spring through late fall, I take a lightweight vest as an insulating layer. Since I use long sleeved shirts, that provides plenty of warmth during cold spells. . . . especially when my 'closet' is designed for layering for a wide temperature range.

I only take one pair of shoes, those that I will be walking in. I also take the insoles that came with the shoes as extras, which are usually very light. IF my shoes are comfortable enough for walking, they are comfortable for AFTER walking, too.

At the end of the day, I pull out my walking insoles and use some toilet paper or paper towels to swipe/wipe out the inside of the shoe. Then I put in the extra insoles for the rest of the evening. After showering, I put on clean socks, loosen the laces to the shoes, and they are good to go. The next morning, I put the walking insoles back in the shoes and put the evening insoles in the pack.

Anyway, that is what I do. Perhaps that will give you some ideas. . . or not. :)
 

martin1ws

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Somport to Finisterre Jul-Aug 2018
That rule is nonsense. ...
In this day and age, I find the 10% rule nonsensical for two reasons:
...
I think as a rule of thumb the 10% rule (do not pack more than 10% of your body weight) is okay. I think this rule of thumb is for "new" pilgrims that have never walked long distances with albergues before and have not thought much about it. And most of pilgrims really do not need to pack more than 10% if they use for example the infrastructure of the Camino Frances in the main season.

If you have more than 10% then you should think about it... and often it is perfectly okay... for example if you want to camp or if you want to have food for a 5 day trip.

I think if you write in a light-packing thread you probably know so much about hiking and pack weight... and so much more than the 10% rule can say... that the rule is not for you.

At the Bodegas Irache's Wine Fountain I met 3 German girls... I do not know, probably somewhere between 50 and 65 kg bodyweight... one girl had a normal back weight and the two others had a backpack of 11 and of 13kg. And the both girls with the heavy backpacks had problems with their knees and / or feet after only a few days on the camino. The three girls had finished their school and wanted to do a camino and were "new" pilgrims who did not know much about walking long distances. And there I see the target group for the 10% rule...

Something like that:
Lighter backpacks are normally better.
Do not pack your fears.
If you have packed more than 10% of your body weight on the Camino... think about, why. And if you have not done it before, read a little bit about pack weight and packing lists for a Camino.
 

Deputy Dan

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Logrono to Burgos in week of October (2017); SJPP - ?, three weeks in 2020!
I only take one pair of shoes, those that I will be walking in. I also take the insoles that came with the shoes as extras, which are usually very light. IF my shoes are comfortable enough for walking, they are comfortable for AFTER walking, too.

At the end of the day, I pull out my walking insoles and use some toilet paper or paper towels to swipe/wipe out the inside of the shoe. Then I put in the extra insoles for the rest of the evening. After showering, I put on clean socks, loosen the laces to the shoes, and they are good to go. The next morning, I put the walking insoles back in the shoes and put the evening insoles in the pack.
Like Dave I wear the same shoes in the evening, though I like the idea of swapping out the insoles - it will be like wearing new shoes!

Having said that - I've stayed at albergues where they want you to leave your shoes and poles by their front door and not take them to your bunk. If you don't take some sort of alternate footwear that means going barefoot into the bath/toilet areas and, well, Ew. No. Last trip I took some light shower shoes but they only served that one purpose and in keeping with the notion that everything could/should serve multiple purposes I'm now planning on taking some Crocs. I've vacillated between Crocs and sandals (no flip-flops thank you!) and settled on the Crocs because they offer better arch support if I need to use them as my walking shoes to recover from any foot ailments.

Just one more reason I carry twice the weight Dave does! But I'm getting better - it was nearly 4x before I first saw his list!!
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
I've stayed at albergues where they want you to leave your shoes and poles by their front door and not take them to your bunk.
If that is a house rule, I will let the hospitalera that I do not have any other footwear and my feet require their support, and that I will clean my shoes before going to the room. I have yet to be told that my shoes have to stay at the front door. If the shoes look filthy or muddy, I will clean them before arriving at the albergue, too.

I am only stating my experience, nothing more :)

IF that became an issue, I'd make either some featherlite Albergue Walkers from a cheap set of insoles, or some foam pad, since I have both types of materials around thee house.

Or I could go out to a China store on the Camino and grab a cheap pair of foam thongs that would weigh about the same. :)


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Camino(s) past & future
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
I like the sandals made from the spare insoles Dave. On my last camino when my only shoes were too muddy I put my spare set of insoles into socks and made them into booties. Next time I think I'll do it your way.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
I like the sandals made from the spare insoles Dave. On my last camino when my only shoes were too muddy I put my spare set of insoles into socks and made them into booties. Next time I think I'll do it your way.
Ya know, that is a great idea. . insoles in socks. Perhaps instead of socks, though, a pair of ultralight, waterproof stuff sacks can be substituted for the socks. :)
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
Just one more reason I carry twice the weight Dave does! But I'm getting better - it was nearly 4x before I first saw his list!!
As long as you're happy and comfortable, Dan -- regardless of weight -- then I am happy for you, too. :)
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
Ya know, that is a great idea. . insoles in socks. Perhaps instead of socks, though, a pair of ultralight, waterproof stuff sacks can be substituted for the socks. :)
I'd use those outside the socks, for comfortable feet. The stuff sacks or plastic bags would keep the socks clean. I did carry a pair or two more socks than you do though so the washing wasn't as much of a problem as it would be for you.
 

AlwynWellington

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
please see signature
In 2017 ... my pack was 7.7 kg. This time (July/Aug 2020) I want to carry less....just curious who here has carried less lbs and if so, what did you pack?
Been watching this thread while I was working at my pack list.

For a Camino my total morning start weight is 5.1 kg.
This includes some emergency food
When water and food for the day is included start weight is 6.5 kg.

On Caminos from Le Puy westward a tent is not required. So used some logic to set the weight to zero.

@Sjp007 , if you:
Have a phone rather than a tablet then save around 300 grams;
Only use your phone for photos than you would save another 320 gram camera from my list.
Ditch the emergency food etc and save another 900 grams.
In July/August you can most probably ditch the sleeping bag for another 380 grams.

If you need none of these you save nearly 2 kg

If this is the case then start weight each day using my rubbish would be around 4.5 kg.

And I tend to be heavy on bits and pieces that I find essential over longer distances I am now covering indicating possibly more savings from my list.

So, kia kaha (take care, be strong, get going)

Details are:Pack List on 2020 01 20 @ 16h20 - page 1 of 2.jpgPack List on 2020 01 20 @ 16h20 - page 2 of 2.jpgPack List on 2020 01 20 @ 16h20 - page 2 of 2.jpg
 
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Sjp007

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2017 St James
2020 St James
Been watching this thread while I was working at my pack list.

For a Camino my total morning start weight is 5.1 kg.
This includes some emergency food
When water and food for the day is included start weight is 6.5 kg.

On Caminos from Le Puy westward a tent is not required. So used some logic to set the weight to zero.

@Sjp007 , if you:
Have a phone rather than a tablet then save around 300 grams;
Only use your phone for photos than you would save another 320 gram camera from my list.
Ditch the emergency food etc and save another 900 grams.
In July/August you can most probably ditch the sleeping bag for another 380 grams.

If you need none of these you save nearly 2 kg

If this is the case then start weight each day using my rubbish would be around 4.5 kg.

And I tend to be heavy on bits and pieces that I find essential over longer distances I am now covering indicating possibly more savings from my list.

So, kia kaha (take care, be strong, get going)

Details are:View attachment 68832View attachment 68833View attachment 68833
WOW! I really appreciate this detailed list, I’ll go thru it as I’m deciding what to pack for the CF :)
 

koilife

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016); Portugues w/ son #3 (2020)
BTW, ditch the extra medical and repair supplies. I have over 180 days of walking different Camino's. Not once have I had to repair anything on my pack etc and have never had to use any medical supplies save for aspirin and bandaids. I have broken boot laces twice, but always pack extra ones.
Two days into my second Camino, I was rather surprised to discover I had a ripped crotch. Thankfully I had 2 grams of needles and thread, which was more than sufficient to the task.

10 days in, a man got stung on the neck by a bee and was going into anaphylaxis. My 6 gram plastic baggie with Benedryl probably saved his life.

20 days +/-, a slip on a rain-soaked, moss-covered rock on the Salvador meant a tear in the bottom of my pack. A 3 gram Dyneema patch saved my pack. (I had to take a bus to a town with a pharmacy for the knee brace I needed because of that slip.)

But, I can't say as I have ever needed extra laces . . . :)
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
Two days into my second Camino, I was rather surprised to discover I had a ripped crotch. Thankfully I had 2 grams of needles and thread, which was more than sufficient to the task.

10 days in, a man got stung on the neck by a bee and was going into anaphylaxis. My 6 gram plastic baggie with Benedryl probably saved his life.

20 days +/-, a slip on a rain-soaked, moss-covered rock on the Salvador meant a tear in the bottom of my pack. A 3 gram Dyneema patch saved my pack. (I had to take a bus to a town with a pharmacy for the knee brace I needed because of that slip.)

But, I can't say as I have ever needed extra laces . . . :)
My point was not to pack the "what if's". One could make a backpack the size and weight of a sofa if they were to carry all the "what if's" that could possibly occur when walking the Camino.
I think I'll stick to just the extra set of bootlaces, which actually doubled as laundry line for me a couple of times too, because what if I needed some laundry line for my wet clothing because there was no more room on the one at the albergue....😄
 

koilife

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016); Portugues w/ son #3 (2020)
Prudence is always a balancing act, isn't it?

The point being that you don't need much extra weight to cover a broad range of contingencies.
 
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Globalroaming074

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
El Norte (May 2020)
Keep in mind that I am also WEARING a pair of shorts and a shirt for walking. I never include what I wear as part of what I carry in my backpack. So, I change into the clean stuff in my pack when doing wash after showering :)

I wear what I will be walking in the next day for sleeping in. So my list would not include separate sleeping attire.

I only take two shirts, period. . one to wear and one in the closet.

I only use long sleeve shirts, so I do not have any short sleeved shirts. The long sleeves can be rolled up if I want to expose skin to air. However, when walking in heat with sun, long sleeves will keep skin cooler because it does no let infrared radiation directly hit your skin, which sunscreen does not help with one bit. Long sleeves also keeps UV from allowing burning eliminating the need for carrying and using sunscreen.

Long sleeves also provide good layering for cool weather.

From mid spring through late fall, I take a lightweight vest as an insulating layer. Since I use long sleeved shirts, that provides plenty of warmth during cold spells. . . . especially when my 'closet' is designed for layering for a wide temperature range.

I only take one pair of shoes, those that I will be walking in. I also take the insoles that came with the shoes as extras, which are usually very light. IF my shoes are comfortable enough for walking, they are comfortable for AFTER walking, too.

At the end of the day, I pull out my walking insoles and use some toilet paper or paper towels to swipe/wipe out the inside of the shoe. Then I put in the extra insoles for the rest of the evening. After showering, I put on clean socks, loosen the laces to the shoes, and they are good to go. The next morning, I put the walking insoles back in the shoes and put the evening insoles in the pack.

Anyway, that is what I do. Perhaps that will give you some ideas. . . or not. :)
Thanks Dave, I’ve had a couple of days to digest your reply and have further queries which makes me wonder how you ever get anything done with the constant messages you must receive ;)
I love the idea of one pair of shoes but I was wondering how do you get on when you’ve walked all day in the rain, once showered and clean, putting wet shoes back on and wetting the clean pair of socks you’ve just put on?
Second, do you have any need for a compression stuff sack for your clothes?
Third, do you line your backpack with a waterproof liner?
Lastly, how many stuff sacks do you use - if any? Do you categorise them according to your list eg closet, bathroom etc
Oh and one more, do you wear a bumbag to keep your cards/cash/passport secure?
Ok, thanking you again in advance! Hoping the sun is shining in your part of the world today 🙏
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
Thanks Dave, I’ve had a couple of days to digest your reply and have further queries which makes me wonder how you ever get anything done with the constant messages you must receive ;)
I love the idea of one pair of shoes but I was wondering how do you get on when you’ve walked all day in the rain, once showered and clean, putting wet shoes back on and wetting the clean pair of socks you’ve just put on?
Second, do you have any need for a compression stuff sack for your clothes?
Third, do you line your backpack with a waterproof liner?
Lastly, how many stuff sacks do you use - if any? Do you categorise them according to your list eg closet, bathroom etc
Oh and one more, do you wear a bumbag to keep your cards/cash/passport secure?
Ok, thanking you again in advance! Hoping the sun is shining in your part of the world today 🙏
I do not treat wet shoes any different, so rain or shine I just use one pair. IF the upper of the shoe is a quick drying fabric, the only need is to take the walking soles out. The Evening Insoles are dry. So a quick swipping out of any residual moisture (keep in mind that most non gortex shoes will drain excess water while wearing) with toilet tissue or paper toweling.

The synthetic fabrics do not hold water well, so while damp, they will not readily soak a fresh, dry sock. So, wipe the interior, install the Evening Insoles that are dry, put on fresh sock that you will walk in tomorrow, and I am good to go.

Wearing them in the evening also tremendously accelerates the final drying process, as body heat helps, and the walking forces air movement through the shoe.

Nope, no Compression sacks. I use 3, lightweight, silnylon stuff sacks (Red, Blue, Black) for Camino. I use 5 stuff bags for backpacking.

They are waterproof, exceedingly lightweight, and allow me to keep my Closet, Bathroom, and Miscellaneous categories organized and able to quickly locate inside the backpack. Stuff I need quick or immediate access to, I keep in the outside pockets and hipbelt pockets.

No bumbag. For the last three Caminos, and the two this year, I use a two sided, lightweight, zippered pouch that is waterproof. Cash and debit cards in one side, identification stuff like passports and drivers license, etc in he other side. It has a neck cord, and will also fit inside a zippered pants or shorts pocket. It never leaves my person. My wife used the same thing on Camino Ingles last fall.

There are various brands and models, this is the one that I use. It is a tough kid:

The backpacks I use currently are highly water resistant. A lot of manufacturers will use fabrics that are the same. They have thin layers of waterproofing material coating the fabric. In fact, if one takes the time to carefully seal the interior seams of the backpack's bag, the would be pretty darned waterproof.

Since I use a poncho, I do not use an interior bag. When I used a rain jacket, I would line the interior with something like a garbage compactor bag or one of these:

I do not use a rain cover (for a variety of reasons) for my backpack if I use a rain jacket (there is no need with a poncho), just protect the gear and clothing with the stuff sacks that are inside the liner bag.

I've sent you a PM about wet weather walking. It is my guide on how I approach the issue of backpacking and hiking in wet weather from a foot care and shoe perspective.
 

AlwynWellington

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
please see signature
I love the idea of one pair of shoes
I also have but one pair of shoes. And, in this connection, they have an open weave.

I love wading through streams I encounter when walking on a beach and find the internal warmth has everything drying out quite quickly. If still damp some newspaper to add to the drying before next use. If still inside I would wear my hose if unsure of the surfaces I was to walk on.

I carry so few extra clothes so compressing them will not save much space. But, similar to compression, I roll them using the Ranger Roll method mentioned on another thread: very effective in both space saving and identification.

I have a liner bag inside my pack. When travelling it is outside the pack to protect all the straps etc from snagging etc. It has a carry handle and was made by the same crew that made my pack.

I use a pouch around my neck (there at all times, walking sleeping, eating etc, and easy to access) for passport, credential, cards and notes)
 

Ronald H

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2012
Compression bags are great. This contains 2 pairs of socks, t-shirt, underwear, shorts with bottoms, long john pants & fleece top.IMG_6452.JPG
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
Compression bags are great. This contains 2 pairs of socks, t-shirt, underwear, shorts with bottoms, long john pants & fleece top.
If space is limited, compression bags can help. On Camino, my backpack (Gossamer Gear Silverback) only gets filled to a third of its capacity. Compression isn't needed. :)
 

Derrybiketours

A journey of 500 miles begins with one step!
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdeP-SANT-FIN (09/2018)
PORTO-SANT (11/2018)
Caminho Da Fe, BR (01/2019)
SJPdeP- SANT (09/2019)
I
Leftover pilgrim wine???
I know its hard to fathom but some killyoys at the pilgrim meal don't finish the bottle, be rude not too 🤠
 

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016), VDLP (2017), Mozarabe (2018), Vasco/Bayona (2019)
I don't think the 10% rule is nonsense, although it can be applied in nonsensical ways. It is a good place to start, for people who have no idea what they can do.

I think it became well known in recent years for parents to have an idea of what weight of school books their kids should be carrying. Since children of school age vary a lot in size, this provided a bit of sensible guidance, even if it was not based on much science.
 

Dromengro

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP - Leon 1984
Frances (2021)
I don't think the 10% rule is nonsense, although it can be applied in nonsensical ways. It is a good place to start, for people who have no idea what they can do.
I believe originally the guidelines were 10% for day walks and 20% for backpacking. Most Caminos would usually fall somewhere in between, neither full backpacking with tent, stove, sleeping bag etc or a series of day walks.
As you say a good guide for beginners but not a rule, and needs adjusting depending on your body weight.
Very light folk might struggle to get pack weight down, very heavy might struggle to lift a 10% pack.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2015 entire CF, Porto and CF again in Feb 2020
On my last CF I met a French lady who carried less than 4 lbs. She had no sleeping bag (used Alburgue blankets), she carried only one extra pair of socks and a t-shirt that doubled as a towel. i went from 22lbs to 5lbs after meeting her (mailed it to Santiago) and walked farther and happier after that. No need to carry extra stuff - it's all available in towns and from kind pilgrims and Alburgues.
 

Sher

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning first Camino May (2019)
When I walked in 2017, my pack was 17lbs (7.7kgs)...this time (July/Aug 2020) I want to carry less....just curious who here has carried less lbs and if so, what did you pack?
 

Juana In España

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2017 Frances from StJPdP
2018 Santiago-Finisterre-Muxia-Santiago
2019 Ingles
22 litre Osprey Talon
Tiley Hat
Merrell Moab Ventilator
Toms
Jungle blanket
Anti-bedbug sheet
Silk sleeping bag liner
Travel Pillow
3 Pairs of Zip off walking trousers
2 long sleeve Merino Tops
2 short sleeve Merino Tops
2 Gaelic tops
1 Hooded fleece
Rain Poncho
2 pairs light guage Merino sock
2 pairs medium guage Merino sock
4 pairs of Runderwear
Swimmers
Buff
Turkish Towel
Toiletry bag
Black African Soap
Full-size toothbrush
Travel toothpaste
Shaving foam stick
Safety Razor
Blades
6 large safety pins
Pack of 8 silicone earplugs
Pack of 20 foam earplugs (to hand out)
Cotton buds
Voltaroil
Compeed
Gehwol foot cream
Water cleansing tablets
Performance tablets
Vaseline
Travel first aid kit
Nail clippers
Cork screw with small blade
Survival bag
Waterproof internal bag
Sunnies
2 silicone wine glasses
1 travel draught set
500 ml bottle of water
Samsung mobile (acts as camera, notebook and kindle)
Michelin Camino pocket size guide
Fabric patches
Scallop Shell
2 Caribineers

Bum bag
Cash
Cards
Passports
Head torch
Random stones and Camino trophies

The selection of pack size helps to focus attention on kit priorities.

2,400 kms walked without a blister or bug bites and no problems with back, averaging 25km per day with 70km day longest walk.

A pack for all Caminos any-time of year and in my experience its better looking at it than looking for it 🤠

Total weight (excluding what I walk in)
8kg

A light pack for the sake of lightening load may not be fit for purpose. A well thought out pack and multiple use kit items goes a long way to providing a fuller experience 🤠

Bravo! I've never understood the competition for the lightest backpack ... to each his own. My empty backpack weighs about 7-lbs and I usually carry 3-4 lbs in water, so I'm starting at 10-11 lbs with nothing but water. With essentials and electronics, I'm around 20lbs and it has never been a burden. I walk the same speed with or without a backpack ... and I'm not in a big hurry either. I dawdle, smell the roses and stop at churches and graveyards. I enjoy chatting with people and eventually get to where I need to be.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
Bravo! I've never understood the competition for the lightest backpack ... to each his own. My empty backpack weighs about 7-lbs and I usually carry 3-4 lbs in water, so I'm starting at 10-11 lbs with nothing but water. With essentials and electronics, I'm around 20lbs and it has never been a burden. I walk the same speed with or without a backpack ... and I'm not in a big hurry either. I dawdle, smell the roses and stop at churches and graveyards. I enjoy chatting with people and eventually get to where I need to be.
Your empty backpack weighs 7 pounds?!!!
 

Derrybiketours

A journey of 500 miles begins with one step!
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdeP-SANT-FIN (09/2018)
PORTO-SANT (11/2018)
Caminho Da Fe, BR (01/2019)
SJPdeP- SANT (09/2019)
My empty backpack weighs about 7-lbs and I usually carry 3-4 lbs in water, so I'm starting at 10-11 lbs with nothing but water
Thankyou for your acknowledgement and in a normal 25km walking day my intake of water is less as I supplement with sachets of pure salt and dehydration tablets therefore carry less and the affect is more energy. They can be disolved into existing 500 ml water bottle or as I do eat whole, the berry flavoured ones taste the best 🤠 Science in Sport Go Hydro Hydration Tablets - Berry, Tube of 20. https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B008AGN01C/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_H0QnEbG3WRABH
 
I may have the record for being super light:

-thong
-sandals
-one credit card
-sun hat
-walking staffs

that’s it folks.
My darn chronic medication weighs more than that and as I'm from South Africa I have to take it all with me for at least 30 days every time we walk and now I'm not even beginning to talk about my husband's chronic meds. Woe me!😢
 

Lady M

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
September - October (2019)
When I walked in 2017, my pack was 17lbs (7.7kgs)...this time (July/Aug 2020) I want to carry less....just curious who here has carried less lbs and if so, what did you pack?
I have to say I agree with the response about weight and comfort in carrying. My husband carried 2-3 lbs less than me and had back issues. I was fine. What I did learn was how to pack. Everything in my pack had its own mini sack...toiletries, clothing, electronics, etc. I have added a picture. I call these my Lilliputian sleeping bags. Good luck on your packing.
 

Attachments

LoriLosch

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to SJPP (Sept 2018)
Thankyou and still room on side pocket of bag to carry leftover of pilgrim wine from night before. The Caribineers permit hanging item's on outside which frees up internal space for munchies 🤠
Wait, what? You had leftover wine from the night before? Wth? Lol. Seriously though, impressed you fit all that into a 22L! Nice.
 

Jean Ti

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Norte, Primitivo, Frances,Via de la Plata

Camino Portuguese november 2019
My pacsac is minus 5 pounds!

In reality I am carrying a 15 pounds packsack but I successfully lost 20 pounds in a 6 months diet! So now I am ready to go with a minus 5 pounds bag!!!
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
I am thinking that if I lose 10 lbs before I leave, my 15 lb pack will really only really weigh 5 lbs :)
:) It really doesn't work that way, but it would help with your feet and knees.

Backpack weight is not carried in the same manner as body weight. A backpack does add to overall body weight, certainly. But the muscles, ligaments, tendons and nerves, that become engaged with the workload of carrying a backpack, do so differently than when only dealing with body-weight. Additionally, how those muscle groups are engaged, your center of gravity, and some specific stresses and damage that may occur, add additional issues when carrying backpack.

That is part of the reason why my view, (which admittedly stems from how the backpacking world has evolved in its philosophy) is that a backpack needs to be as light as an individual can reasonably make it, for the conditions that you will walk in, AND with the budget one has available. The Old Folk's (not Wive's) Tale of a set goal. . 10% of body weight. . . may get in the way of that. :)

I guess the fact that the 10% 'rule' went the way of the T-Rex a couple of decades ago in the recreational backpacking world, sort of takes me aback when I see it mentioned periodically on the Forum. While recreational backpacking is far removed from Camino walking, the crossover of carrying stuff in a backpack is shared by both. :)
 

Derrybiketours

A journey of 500 miles begins with one step!
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdeP-SANT-FIN (09/2018)
PORTO-SANT (11/2018)
Caminho Da Fe, BR (01/2019)
SJPdeP- SANT (09/2019)
Wait, what? You had leftover wine from the night before? Wth? Lol. Seriously though, impressed you fit all that into a 22L! Nice.
It wasn't mine, it was the dregs of others who didn't show gratefullness for hospitality by rudely not finishing bottle. I'm very grateful on my camino 🤠
 

Geodoc

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2018 (across Pyrenees, then Sarria to SdC), CF 2019 (SJPdP to Finisterra & Muxia), CI 2019
12.5 kg (27.5 lbs) - yeah, not light, but everything was used (even the sleeping pad in one refugio where the only place to sleep was on a thin pad on the floor). Didn't have any back issues, but would have preferred to leave the laptop and legal pad home (rather than carry them and work while doing the Camino).
 

FooteK

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP to SdC, 2013; Lourdes to SdC, 2015; ??? to SdC (2020)
How to make sure you have fresh eggs! Where did he carry the feed for the chicken? Great vid!
I don't have a video, but I do have a photo! He was leaving as I was arriving. To say I was taken by surprise would be an understatement.
 

David from Montana

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
walked the camino de Santiago Frances, in (2018), and plan to walk the GR 65 route this fall (2019)
When I walked in 2017, my pack was 17lbs (7.7kgs)...this time (July/Aug 2020) I want to carry less....just curious who here has carried less lbs and if so, what did you pack?
1582567625313.png

This is my packing list. My pack weights 12 pounds (5 to 6 Kg). It feels good to go light but not really be deprived of anything essential. I have good rain gear (tops and bottoms) and a silk liner instead of a sleeping bag, which can save a lot of space and weight. This year I purchased a lighter pack (38 liter Exos), which is 1/2 pound lighter than my Black Diamond climbing pack that I used on the last two Caminos. I also now take two pair of mid-weight wool soxs and 2 pair of linner soxs. This works well for me. I walk in low-top, breathable, Obozs, which are similar to the Merrill Moab's except a little bit stiffer and they come with a better insert (1/2 size longer and wide versions than I usually use). I thought I could do without a headlamp, since my phone has a light, but I really apprecate being able to read at night (for 10 minutes :)) and the red-light feature is great for walking to the bathroom in the middle of the night without waking others. It is so much more enjoyable for me to have a light pack. Oh, and I don't take any cotton anymore. Even for my sleep shirt, since the tech shirts dry so much faster. And, I take it off at every oportunity and put on my foam Birkenstock sandles which are so comfortable and light! Enjoy!
 

camino.ninja

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 5 6,16,17,18,19,20
Primiti+Salvador 19
Portug. 17,18,20
Catalan 17
Norte 17
Plata 18
When I walked in 2017, my pack was 17lbs (7.7kgs)...this time (July/Aug 2020) I want to carry less....just curious who here has carried less lbs and if so, what did you pack?
Hi,

You are welcome to have a look through my pack list as well. It is less than 5 kilos all year and waterproof.

If you allready have a list, see what is not on yours.

https://camino.ninja/packlist

Best,
Andy
 

Colette Z

Happy Pilgrim
Camino(s) past & future
CF- Finisterre-Muxia 03/17; Camino SK 10/17; Norte 03/18; Ingles 11/18; Augusta 03/19
My starting pack weight is 5kg on every camino (10% my weight would be 6kg). That allows me to add food as needed. My 30L Millet women’s Venom pack without anything inside only weighs only 680 gm so quite a saving vs any Osprey. I’m now looking at 25-28L packs as my 30L has more space than I need given I’ve gone from a 780 gm sleeping bag to a 450 gm down quilt. I walk early spring (Feb-March).
 

Attachments

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Currently on a "Virtual" Camino and striding out across Castile y Leon!
My starting pack weight is 5kg on every camino (10% my weight would be 6kg). That allows me to add food as needed. My 30L Millet women’s Venom pack without anything inside only weighs only 680 gm so quite a saving vs any Osprey. I’m now looking at 25-28L packs as my 30L has more space than I need given I’ve gone from a 780 gm sleeping bag to a 450 gm down quilt. I walk early spring (Feb-March).
I can't believe I just browsed through a fellow Pilgrim's pack and thought: "Ooh, they do sachets of Bovril!", "Why does she carry a meat hook?" and "Ha! Hotel slippers like the ones I got from the Parador!"

Congratulations on fitting a quart into a pint pot (litre into a half litre pot?)
 

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
I really appreciate such a detailed list 🥰
I have packed the lightest pack! It is empty, in 2020, but I have a bucket full of hope...
 

zrexer

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2014, 15,16 & 19 Camino Frances
2017 Camino Portuguese
2018 Camino Primitivo
2020 Camino Del Norte
I have adjusted what I pack over my six Camino's, but have not actually ever weighed my pack. I am also hopelessly out of fashion still using my original 60L pack having not gotten into the proper fashionable 'micro pack' style.
I now realize that I am not worthy, I am not even close to being colour coordinated either. Amazed the 'Camino police' have not pulled me over for a chat yet!
 

camino.ninja

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 5 6,16,17,18,19,20
Primiti+Salvador 19
Portug. 17,18,20
Catalan 17
Norte 17
Plata 18
I have adjusted what I pack over my six Camino's, but have not actually ever weighed my pack. I am also hopelessly out of fashion still using my original 60L pack having not gotten into the proper fashionable 'micro pack' style.
I now realize that I am not worthy, I am not even close to being colour coordinated either. Amazed the 'Camino police' have not pulled me over for a chat yet!
Thank you for turning your Self in ;-)
 

Old Kiwi

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2016
Camino Frances 2019
SdC to Muxia and Fisterra 2019
Camino Portuguese "2021"
Hi Camino.ninja, My packing list is close to yours and comes out at just under 4.5 kilos. If you take your list and deduct
Sleeping bag
Beanie
Puffer jacket
Marino leggings
Sandals
Gaiters
Rain pants
Duct tape
Phone, charger and card
My pack only weighs 850g, my poncho 30g.
I do carry a Brierleys Guide Book, my heart medication, pillow case, towel, flannel, sink plug, safety pins and a couple of cable ties.
And that is enough for me.
 

Bob Howard

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2016
Frances 2018
View attachment 70211

This is my packing list. My pack weights 12 pounds (5 to 6 Kg). It feels good to go light but not really be deprived of anything essential. I have good rain gear (tops and bottoms) and a silk liner instead of a sleeping bag, which can save a lot of space and weight. This year I purchased a lighter pack (38 liter Exos), which is 1/2 pound lighter than my Black Diamond climbing pack that I used on the last two Caminos. I also now take two pair of mid-weight wool soxs and 2 pair of linner soxs. This works well for me. I walk in low-top, breathable, Obozs, which are similar to the Merrill Moab's except a little bit stiffer and they come with a better insert (1/2 size longer and wide versions than I usually use). I thought I could do without a headlamp, since my phone has a light, but I really apprecate being able to read at night (for 10 minutes :)) and the red-light feature is great for walking to the bathroom in the middle of the night without waking others. It is so much more enjoyable for me to have a light pack. Oh, and I don't take any cotton anymore. Even for my sleep shirt, since the tech shirts dry so much faster. And, I take it off at every oportunity and put on my foam Birkenstock sandles which are so comfortable and light! Enjoy!
12 lbs and not really scrimping. Excellent.
 

camino.ninja

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 5 6,16,17,18,19,20
Primiti+Salvador 19
Portug. 17,18,20
Catalan 17
Norte 17
Plata 18
Hi Camino.ninja, My packing list is close to yours and comes out at just under 4.5 kilos. If you take your list and deduct
Sleeping bag
Beanie
Puffer jacket
Marino leggings
Sandals
Gaiters
Rain pants
Duct tape
Phone, charger and card
My pack only weighs 850g, my poncho 30g.
I do carry a Brierleys Guide Book, my heart medication, pillow case, towel, flannel, sink plug, safety pins and a couple of cable ties.
And that is enough for me.


Beanie, Puffer jacket, Marino leggings and Phone is not really in your backpack and seasonal (except from the phone).

:) Andy
 

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