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Why does everyone have an opinion!

LesBrass

Likes Walking
Past OR future Camino
yes...
Hello everyone - My walk is getting closer and closer and I've noticed a change in the way folks around me talk about my forthcoming adventure.

A few months ago folks perhaps thought I wasn't serious, or perhaps I would change my mind? These days it seems that everyone has an opinion... and often these opinions are not very comforting!

This week I've been told I have to walk 25km every day and I have to finish each stage before the doors close... if I dont arrive in time at the refugio the doors will close and I'll have to walk the next stage (25km) to find a bed!

I've been told that it takes 2 years to train for the camino - I should be walking 12km every day for at least 6 months to have any hope of success.

I've been told that no-one walks the whole length in one go... it should be done in one or two week chunks

I've been told I must take a day off every 4 days or I'll exhaust myself

This is just a flavour of the kind of thing I'm hearing. Is it the same for any of you? It's disheartening... it feels like some folks are really saying that they think I'm crazy or they doubt I'll succeed. I feel that if anything goes wrong and I dont get to Santiago they'll all be saying... I told you so...

At least my workload is easing an I'll be back walking next week! :)
 
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Bajaracer

Camino Frances 2013 Jun-Jul SJPDP to Finisterre
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (2013) Jun-Jul SJPDP to Finisterre
YOUR Camino is YOUR Camino, not mine or anybody else's. YOU walk as much as YOU want walk, rest when YOU want to rest, take as long as YOU need to take to walk it.
 
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SabineP

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
some and then more. see my signature.
Just smile and shrug..:cool: Don't get into panicmode.... It will ALL work out. Thousands of people walked it before you...some with lots of training, others started in a spur of the moment....
In my " training " I never walked more than 20 k. a day...Sometimes even only in a weekend... All ok. Don't worry either about finding albergues : more than enough....Again it is ALL good.
Buen Camino!
 
M

Metropolly

Guest
It's just a walk - that's all. Tell them you've been training for it since you were about a year old. You're not going into the wilderness; you're in a temperate climate; you're not going through a war zone or a developing nation. People love to have an opinion, but that's just their way of being engaged in your adventure. Sometimes even reading this forum can be off-putting, if you believe the 'war stories' of some ex-pilgrims who love to recount the tremendous difficulties encountered. Some people do suffer, quite often because of over-reaching/poor equipment choices/bad weather/not listening to local advice. But if you try to carry as little as possible and buy the best socks you can afford, there's not much to fear. Don't let them put you off
 

tyrrek

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
SJPP-SdC (4-5/2011), Ferrol-SdC (9/2011), Pamplona-SdC (3-4/2012), Camino Finisterre (10/2012), Ourense-SdC (5/2014)
Who are these people? They've obviously never done it, been there, or even spoken to people who have! Take it in that context. And for the record I did it all at once with no training and only once 'had to' walk another 10kms to an albergue. Have fun!
 
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Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Past OR future Camino
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
It is better preparation for the Camino listening to birdsong than to naysayers.
In 7 caminos I've never had to walk an extra 25 kilometres to find a bed. I sometimes only walk 8 kilometres in a day. I've walked the Camino Frances from SJPDP to Santiago in one go 3 times. I have never trained other than by trying to get a bit fit beforehand. I only take a day off when I feel like it, usually in the major towns when I want extra time to see things.
Take heart, soon you will be an expert and can tell these people what YOU think!
 

RobertS26

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances, (2013)
Camino Frances, (2014)
Camino Frances, (2015)
This week I've been told I have to walk 25km every day and I have to finish each stage before the doors close... if I dont arrive in time at the refugio the doors will close and I'll have to walk the next stage (25km) to find a bed! :)

You don't have to walk any set distance each day unless you must return home in a set number of days. Otherwise, you can walk as far as you want each day. Do individual refugios get full sometimes? Yes, of course. Is the next one 25 km away? No, absolutely not. There may be one across the street or a few blocks away. There are also plenty of rural casas (bed and breakfasts) and cheap hotels. Absolute worst case scenario is that you have to take a taxi 5 miles forward or five miles back to get a place to sleep. But rest assured you will find a place to sleep each night with little or no hassle.
 

RobertS26

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances, (2013)
Camino Frances, (2014)
Camino Frances, (2015)
I've been told that it takes 2 years to train for the camino - I should be walking 12km every day for at least 6 months to have any hope of success.
:)

That is absolutely not true. Plenty of people start the Camino without ever training for it at all before they leave home. They simply walk a shorter distance the first few days to build up their legs. If you are walking 2.5 miles every other day in the weeks before your Camino you will be fine. It's just walking. It's not the Bataan Death March.

Get properly fitted for your boots by a professional and break them in before you go. But don't over think this. Just do it.
 

RobertS26

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances, (2013)
Camino Frances, (2014)
Camino Frances, (2015)
I've been told I must take a day off every 4 days or I'll exhaust myself.

You should take a day off when your body tells you to take a day off. Or, you take a day off in major cities, such as Leon, to take in the sights. But anybody who is telling you that have to take a day off every four days does not know what they are talking about. Relax. Literally tens of thousands of ordinary people complete the Camino every year.
 
M

Mark Lee

Guest
I'm sorry that some out there have misled you, of sorts. Don't let those various, somewhat negative opinions/advice put you off. Like others have said already, the Camino is simply a walk. Your walk. Walk your own Camino.

I did it with no preparation or really any special equipment and I was fine. It was done on a whim when my job overseas ended early. While on the Camino I always had a place to clean up and shower and never missed a meal. I did not find it to be roughing-it or austere. Actually I found it to be quite comfortable and enjoyed a return to life's simplicity. I never walked hours to find a bed in the next town. You will see. You will get your own rhythm and pace.
 
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koilife

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016); Portugues w/ son #3 (2020)
Welcome to the club.....alot of us have had to deal with that. That's why we come here to this awesome forum to be surrounded by people that "get it".
Stick around these forums for very long, ask a few questions, and you'll find just as many opinions here too! :D

However, I also ditto all of the above opinions of forum members. The real challenge of the Camino isn't physical, it's mental and spiritual. It's in deciding to walk while looking at a cold drizzle in the morning and knowing the weather report says it won't get better for the next three days. It's in deciding to walk when your muscles are sore and your feet hurt. It's in charity towards the mountain bikers who yell at you at the last moment for not moving when they zoom up on you without warning. It's in charity towards the hordes of walkers who join in for the final 100 kilometers and have no understanding of what it means to be quiet enough to allow others an afternoon nap or early night's sleep, or even to just keeping their gear from sprawling everywhere.

The Camino is not a superhuman activity --- just a human activity. And often, the very best of humanity shines forth. I saw more kindness and generosity in 33 days, than probably in 33 years. I experienced instant community with people I had never before met, from countries I've only seen on maps, and cultures I won't pretend to understand. The community of Camino pilgrims, for all its variety and sometimes differences, is bound by a fundamental experience --- we walk, we pedal, we ride, we seek, we laugh, we cry, we suffer, we triumph, and we are so very, wonderfully, beautifully human from one moment to the next along this most ancient of routes.

Since my Camino, I have met dozens of people who have walked the Camino at one time or another; people who I never knew before, and may never meet again, but we shared this one great experience---that of pilgrimage itself. The old adage holds in these encounters, "For those who know, no words are necessary; for those who don't, no words will suffice," and it can be restated for the Camino as, "For those who have, no words are necessary; for those who haven't, no words will suffice."

So, LesBrass, stay the course in the face of these uninformed opinions. Walk within your abilities, but don't be afraid to stretch them when the moment seems right. And, take comfort in the power of the ancient blessings that strengthen and protect us as pilgrims.

But, hey, that's just my opinion.
 
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OTH86

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2017
Be strong, LesBrass, and just do what feels right to you! Walking the Camino is such an individual thing. Take heart and inspiration from all the positive comments and suggestions you find here on the Forum. You'll do just fine, and in September, you shouldn't have problems finding a bed! Last Sept / Oct I found the albergues were frequently less than half full - look for the smaller ones that are between stages.
Buen Camino, my friend!
Terry
 
Past OR future Camino
Frances 2014
You will be fine. Lots of people are afraid of anything out of the ordinary so they are sure those who do something a little different will come to some bad end, not because YOU will but because THEY are afraid. My Doctor's nurse is always afraid for me when I go on a long hike. I am 72 years old, have a knee replacement and don't walk fast, I have not done the Camino (yet) but I have walked more than 6,000 long distance miles in the US, in wilderness, desert and on snow. 90% of thru hikers are faster than me. So what? So what also if you are unable to complete the whole thing this year? (Not that I think you won't.) That would just mean you would have something wonderful to look forward to in another year as you complete it. I have a 76 year old friend who started the Camino one year and had to skip some so she came back the next year to finish and had even more fun. Why stop with one great experience anyway? You may find this Camino is addicting and you can't wait to go again, to finish or to do a different route or a different trail in a different part of the world.

If you cannot arrive before the alburgue closes, something else will turn up, some other opportunity which you would have never known if the alburgue was empty. In my experience the worst of times brings out amazing experiences. Don't be shy about asking for help. Asking for help lets you know how interdependent we are on one another and how we need each other - a good lesson for any camino.

What I am trying to say is that most negative appearing situations (to other people or to ourselves) often can be opportunities for something else wonderful in disguise. Don't let others' fears keep you from following your way/camino.
 

Thomas1962

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2010/2011/2012/2013: Madrid -Salvador -Primitivo 2014: EPW 2015: Amsterdam - SdC
One only has to walk at least 25 kms if one thinks so himself. One only has to train for 2 years if one thinks so himself. One only has to break up the Camino if one thinks so himself.
I don' think I have to do these things myself. But every time I walk the Camino I bump up against the things I think I have to do from myself. For me the Camino is a training to let go these thoughts. If I do I start to live day by day, moment by moment. I'm free then!
 
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mspath

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
Relax and follow this laconic nugget of 19th c advice. "Few people know how to take a walk. The qualifications are endurance, plain clothes, old shoes, an eye for nature, good humor, vast curiosity, good speech, good silence and nothing too much...." Ralph Waldo Emerson, Country Life, 1858
 

Magwood

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
See signature line for links to daily posts to blogs from many caminos
The Camino is not a superhuman activity --- just a human activity. And often, the very best of humanity shines forth. I saw more kindness and generosity in 33 days, than probably in 33 years. I experienced instant community with people I had never before met, from countries I've only seen on maps, and cultures I won't pretend to understand. The community of Camino pilgrims, for all its variety and sometimes differences, is bound by a fundamental experience --- we walk, we pedal, we ride, we seek, we laugh, we cry, we suffer, we triumph, and we are so very, wonderfully, beautifully human from one moment to the next along this most ancient of routes.

This is one of the most beautiful opinions I have read on this forum. And I am sure we all echo the thought. Thank you @koilife for these wonderful words.
 

StuartM

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (2012)
Every sport and activity that is a bit specialised has the same thing. I scuba dive and you should hear some of the drivel spouted by "experts".

Some people like to judge themselves by how much "secret" knowledge they have. So it's been from the druids' time to celebrity gossip magazine readers.

It's just a big long walk. How complicated can it get? Get up, walk, eat, walk some more, stop, eat, sleep. Repeat until Santiago.
 
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mralisn

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
SJPdP-SdC (2005), Camino Norte-Fisterra (2010), SJPdP-Muxia-Fisterra (2012), Camino Norte w/Primitivo-Muxia-Fisterra (2014), Camino Portuguese (2016)
Hi LesBrass,

Very sorry to read of your experience. Some talk just to hear themselves talk. You know what will set you apart? You will do because you desire more than talk. As you have seen here and even more on the Way, there are others who will embrace you, support you, laugh with you, share with you.

Many wishes for you to have an incredible experience the way YOU want to experience. Allow yourself to do what you need to elevate your spirit and feed your soul.

Keep a smile,
Simeon
 
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hampshire!tim

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances (2013), Ingles (2014), Finisterre (2015)
I do not sense that the original poster is actually worried about any of these issues at all. It's just how you deal with people saying these things.
Just bear in mind that these naysayers Are simply worried for you, love you, and are concerned for you.
Just thank them for their love and concern, and reassure them you will be fine with all the support from the forum.
Buen Camino !
 
F

Former member 19626

Guest
I experienced a growing negativity from friends and acquaintances before I left for my Camino too.
Now, after some post-Camino reflection I see this as just one of the burdens I had to deal with. I think it just goes with the "territory".
Ultria and Buen Camino!

John
 

lynnejohn

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances(2005), VDLP(2007), Madrid(2009), Ingles(2009), Sur (2011), VDLP(2011)-partial, VDLP(2014)
It reminds me of having my first child. Everyone had an opinion on how to properly care for an infant. If I listened to them all, I would have gone batty. I just said "It will be an adventure, won't it!" I say the same thing to people who have opinions about me walking caminos. But now that I think of it, I don't get that many negative responses - more like "Wow, I've heard about it - I'd love to do that", or "I really envy/admire you". Maybe I just have more positive friends and acquaintances.
 
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D

Deleted member 3000

Guest
I think the negative comments return a benefit after a couple of weeks when everything hurts; remembering the comments provides an incentive to show the naysayers! Nothing motivated me more until I came to the realization that I did not have to walk the Camino, and could quit anytime I wanted. That thought sustained me much more than proving something to someone else.
 

jpflavin1

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Madrid/San Salvador/Primitivo-2021
Hello everyone - My walk is getting closer and closer and I've noticed a change in the way folks around me talk about my forthcoming adventure.

A few months ago folks perhaps thought I wasn't serious, or perhaps I would change my mind? These days it seems that everyone has an opinion... and often these opinions are not very comforting!

This week I've been told I have to walk 25km every day and I have to finish each stage before the doors close... if I dont arrive in time at the refugio the doors will close and I'll have to walk the next stage (25km) to find a bed!

I've been told that it takes 2 years to train for the camino - I should be walking 12km every day for at least 6 months to have any hope of success.

I've been told that no-one walks the whole length in one go... it should be done in one or two week chunks

I've been told I must take a day off every 4 days or I'll exhaust myself

This is just a flavour of the kind of thing I'm hearing. Is it the same for any of you? It's disheartening... it feels like some folks are really saying that they think I'm crazy or they doubt I'll succeed. I feel that if anything goes wrong and I dont get to Santiago they'll all be saying... I told you so...

At least my workload is easing an I'll be back walking next week! :)

My wife and most of my friends think I am crazy. I have walked 4 Camino's and their opinions have not changed. That said, they always want to hear about my trip.

My first Camino, I never did any training. That said, I now do train by walking and doing back and core exercises.

You do not have to walk 25 km's per day. Walk whatever distance you feel like.

Most people walk in one chunk. Others walk in sections due to time constraints.

I have never taken a rest day but many do.

Why our families, friends and co-workers are like this only they know for sure.

Ultreya,
Joe
 

annelise

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Past
I will chime in with previous posters.

For me, the biggest naysayer was probably myself! – But I suddenly got the urge when a son said to me "Mom, the biggest event of your day should not be your daily walk to the supermarket and back again"! (I had known about the Camino for some time then).

So I upped and went (on rather short notice) – not overly fit, a bit overweight, and at 65 – with only a few short walks on flatland in preparation. – I went prepared to abort at any time – but to the amazement of my sons and myself, I just continued, slowly at first and then getting more and more fit.

Please go! It will be something you will cherish for the rest of your life. I think about it almost every day and therefore keep checking in here in this wonderful forum. I wish to go again anytime but have some health impediments.

annelise
 

RCTemplar

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino del Norte August 2014
Hi.....I am planning on walking Camino del Norte in August/September 2014 and I am giving myself 6 weeks. If it goes over , so be it. I will will be walking 825 km in one shot and hopefully nothing will sway me from my goal......Here is what I think and yes, hehehehhe I do have an opinion.

I have watched numerous videos, read posts, and opinions of others and it seems that lots of people are not really ready to do the Camino. I have seen blisters as big as the Smart car (wink), backpacks with everything in it but a kitchen sink and cute but not too smart shoes.

Walking the Camino suppose to be a joy and not a chore. When it becomes a chore, then I believe you are doing something that you should not have been doing in the first place.

I have developed a plan that hopefully will work for me and I am going to stick to it.

I still remember those horrific blisters that pilgrims got (youtube) and worried about it. It doesn't have to happen this way. I went to REI store in Houston and spent some time with the staff of the store. It took me almost an hour trying many pairs to get the right boots for this walk, and NO, the blisters will not form if you have a good fitted boots and good pair of socks that don't rub and keep the moisture away.

Everything I will bring with me was well researched and wisely chosen (I hope).

Sure, we all have to walk 20-30 k every day but when you think about it, how many k's do you walk daily just living and doing everyday stuff? Probably 5-10k's. Just walk twice as much and when you are tired, rest, have some water and a snack and when you are ready, start walking.
I am not saying that it will be a peace of cake but please do not believe in the horror stories and negativity of others. If you do, you have 50% more chances of failing. That is my opinion......Stick with people who are optimistic and full of joy and ditch the others.

Invest in a right equipment, don't take too much stuff with you and try your backpack before you start walking...I was bent on buying Osprey because everyone said it was the best one for the trail but it didn't fit my frame as well as Gregory....Packed with 15 lbs (6.8 kilos), felt so light that I was surprised. Go figure......So, I have a grey Gregory backpack instead of the cute lime green Osprey....hehehe....Gofigure again.

So, I will try not to go over that 15 lbs and may have to do more laundry but the extra clothes have to go so I can bring my Iphone and my Ipad....Oh well, we all have things that we won't part with...hehehe.

Again, it is my first Camino and I hope that I made a right decision when it comes to the equipment I will bring and if something doesn't work, Oh well, I tried.

Remember, when it comes to Camino, there are no coincidences, you were meant to be on it for the reason that only higher power knows about. Enjoy the walk and don't let the negativity bring you down. You will succeed and maybe I will see you some day on the another Camino.

Buen Camino

Ania (57 years old) Gdansk, Poland
 

CaminoKris2013

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
(2014)
Oh my, I read your post lesbrass, and hear the echoes coming from my mom just this morning! My sister who is a big supporter that told her (for her benefit) that I am going to Spain and while I am there, I'll do a little walking.

Ironically it is the people closest to you who give their advice and opinions have never done the Camino. I just smile and think of the wonderful adventure I am embarking on...just taking and enjoying everyday.
 
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Larazet

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances "2013" had to stop half way due to tendonitis ... Continuing May 2014..postponed to 2015. SdC to Muxia 2016.
Hello everyone - My walk is getting closer and closer and I've noticed a change in the way folks around me talk about my forthcoming adventure.

A few months ago folks perhaps thought I wasn't serious, or perhaps I would change my mind? These days it seems that everyone has an opinion... and often these opinions are not very comforting!

This week I've been told I have to walk 25km every day and I have to finish each stage before the doors close... if I dont arrive in time at the refugio the doors will close and I'll have to walk the next stage (25km) to find a bed!

I've been told that it takes 2 years to train for the camino - I should be walking 12km every day for at least 6 months to have any hope of success.

I've been told that no-one walks the whole length in one go... it should be done in one or two week chunks

I've been told I must take a day off every 4 days or I'll exhaust myself

This is just a flavour of the kind of thing I'm hearing. Is it the same for any of you? It's disheartening... it feels like some folks are really saying that they think I'm crazy or they doubt I'll succeed. I feel that if anything goes wrong and I dont get to Santiago they'll all be saying... I told you so...

At least my workload is easing an I'll be back walking next week! :)
Don't listen to them! You will be fine and when you return they will be full of admiration for you even if you have to stop for some reason through injury, (as I had to after 580 kms). I didn't walk 12 kms every day, just occasionally. I never had a problem with beds (May-June). I did take far too much 'stuff', but was very glad of my iPad mini, my poles, my gaiters, poncho and baseball cap (think poncho hood falling down over face in a headwind!). I can't wait to start again, now not possible until April 2015 as my husband is having chemo. Wishing you well, with envy.
 
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances May/June 2014
Del Norte/Primitivo (Sept/Oct 2016)
You don't have to walk any set distance each day unless you must return home in a set number of days. Otherwise, you can walk as far as you want each day. Do individual refugios get full sometimes? Yes, of course. Is the next one 25 km away? No, absolutely not. There may be one across the street or a few blocks away. There are also plenty of rural casas (bed and breakfasts) and cheap hotels. Absolute worst case scenario is that you have to take a taxi 5 miles forward or five miles back to get a place to sleep. But rest assured you will find a place to sleep each night with little or no hassle.

You are very encouraging. Tell it like it is!
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2022
Two words: "Noblesse Oblige..." YOU will be the one who actually walks the Camino, not your friends. You owe them the courtesy of listening as they are entitled to their opinions. But that is where the courtesy ends, at least in my opinion.

However, when all is said and done and after you complete your Camino, it will be YOU wearing the "Cheshire Cat" grin on your face and the glow about your body as you regale these chair-bound folks with tales of your Camino experiences.

The Camino WILL change you both inside and out. Most people regard those changes as positive. I know I did and continue to try to allow the Camino spirit work in my daily life.

Fortunately I have only about three weeks until I fly to Paris to start my second Camino. Yippee!!!

I also second and concur with everything written above.
 
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Pruden

Pilgrim of life
Past OR future Camino
October 2012 Camino Francés Sarria /Santiago.
November 2013 Camino Francés
León to Sarria
June 2014 Camino Francés San Juan Pie de Port to Logroño.
November 2016 Camino Frances ,Logroño to León.
You are already walking your Camino! Since the day you started thinking of walking it, so don't worry and go ahead .
Training or no training is important but no the most important!
Mental strength and spiritual desire is the real force that would make your self to achieve your objectives.
Go ahead and everything would be unfold before your eyes ....internal and external once.

Enjoy your Camino because it is your , not o anybody else.

Buen Camino! Ultreia!
 
Past OR future Camino
October (2021)
I've been told I have to walk 25km every day and I have to finish each stage before the doors close... if I dont arrive in time at the refugio the doors will close and I'll have to walk the next stage (25km) to find a bed!

I've been told that it takes 2 years to train for the camino - I should be walking 12km every day for at least 6 months to have any hope of success.

I've been told that no-one walks the whole length in one go... it should be done in one or two week chunks

I've been told I must take a day off every 4 days or I'll exhaust myself

I don't agree with any of these things. I haven't done the Camino yet, but I am the type to get worried about anything in the future that I could possibly need to be ready for ... and that is why I am on this Forum, to find out people's experience of what it is like.
If you feel called to the Camino, you are called to the Camino, and you prepare and train with the opportunities that you have.
 

jumpingin2014

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances 2013
My guess is they are a bit jealous of your enthusiasm and excitement. People who "nay say" are normally afraid or lazy and when they see your courage in doing something new it makes them self conscious about themselves. What you are experiencing is their own sense of inadequacy - thats what I think. I could be wrong.
 
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LesBrass

Likes Walking
Past OR future Camino
yes...
You lovely lovely people! :D

I've read through all your thoughts and words and I am so grateful. I've read them out to my husband and we've had a little giggle together.

I agree with all that's been said... as someone also said I suspect folks are simply concerned and they're concerned because they care. I'm 3 years cancer free, a few too many pounds over weight and not the fittest person around... but I am in good health, I am an active busy person, I am walking most days (even if just a few km) ... or digging for 6 hours in the garden (like today) and I gig most weekends and rehearse once a week... which always involves about 6 hours on my feet moving and shaking :cool:

I've learned a great deal from folks here... I've lost 8 kilos and I'm determined to keep my pack under 8 kilos... and I hope to lose another 8kg before I leave... my pacer poles arrived yesterday so I'm looking forward to testing them this week.

I shall take it all with a pinch of sale... and smile and say thank you for the advise. I did explain to my neighbour that it really is just a walk. A tough walk and a long walk and I'm taking it very seriously... but ultimately a walk. And with a fair wind I hope to be in Santiago by the end of October!

thank you again xx
 

Bajaracer

Camino Frances 2013 Jun-Jul SJPDP to Finisterre
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (2013) Jun-Jul SJPDP to Finisterre
My only real opinion is get your pack weight under 7KG and you'll be happier.
 

weekjchammings

KEITH JOHN
Past OR future Camino
GR10 HENDAYE - BANYULS SUR MERE 600+ MILES 2002 WITH MY SON.
ABERGAVENNY - BEAUPREAU TWIN TOWN 2009
ENGLISH SOUTH WEST COASTAL PATH 630 MILES 2010.
LE PUY EN VELAY -SANTIAGO - MUXIA - FINISTERRE 2011 1,000+ MILES
ABERGAVENNY WALES - MONT ST MICHEL - ST JEAN PdP - CAMINO FRANCES FRANCE - FINISTERRE 2013 1,400+ MILES.
SEVILLA - SANTIAGO VIA DE LA PLATA 2014
LISBON - PORTO - SANTIAGO - MUXIA - FINISTERRE CAMINO PORTUGUESE. 2016.
CAMINO DE LEVANTE PLANNED 2017.
My only real opinion is get your pack weight under 7KG and you'll be happier.
Hi Bajaracer,

Not a Cliff Richard fan myself but he seems to be on your wavelength. Mine is usually 15/16 Kilos, maybe the answer is just one pair of pants.

Traveling Light........................................

I got no bags and bags to slow me down
Well, I'm traveling so fast my feet ain't touching the ground
Traveling light_Traveling light_
Well, I just can't wait to be with my baby tonight
No comb and no tooth brush
I got nothing to haul
I'm carrying only
A pocketful of dreams a heart full of love
And they weigh nothing at all

Soon, I'm gonna see that love look in her eyes
I'm a hoot and a holler away from paradise
Traveling light
Traveling light
Well, I just can't wait to be with my baby tonight
 

raydercha

Member
People iltellectualize faith and know little of the fact that a religion or spirituality is a verb. They are the majority of people and they are content to ponder from the couch. Others like the people here exercise (pun intended) faith. You will be a source of inspiration particilarlay to those with styrofaith. If anything this should give you strenght knowing your mission is larger than you. Ultreiya (sp?)
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Past OR future Camino
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
Hi......

Sure, we all have to walk 20-30 k every day

Ania (57 years old) Gdansk, Poland

Ania, why? I often walk much shorter distances. Sometimes I take days off from walking. Sometimes I walk longer distances.

We all have choice about these things.

The most valuable advice I received when I first walked the Camino was "don't have a timetable". Sure, travelling from Australia I have a return flight date. But I either give myself a VERY generous number of days, or (more often) don't have any preconceived destination.

Some people will have a detailed timetable. If that is their choice, fine. But it is not compulsory. Nothing is.

The Camino is a journey, not a destination.
 
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koilife

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016); Portugues w/ son #3 (2020)
The most valuable advice I received when I first walked the Camino was "don't have a timetable". Sure, travelling from Australia I have a return flight date. But I either give myself a VERY generous number of days, or (more often) don't have any preconceived destination.
I arrived with exactly that kind of timetable you talk about avoiding. The old adage, "Man plans and God laughs," played itself out in spades with me. My son and I had a return flight to the US with plenty of time to spare. My timetable (read: agenda) was intended to give extra time to stay long at some Camino locations, as well as to visit a number of off-Camino locations. I underestimated the overall effect of day after day of walking on my body overall, but I was OK with the extra suffering to keep my schedule. Then, my son developed tendinitis with his knee, and that agenda went out the window.

In the midst of this came one of the kindest hospitaleros ever. She helped me arrange a taxi to pick up my son whom I left at the outskirts of town at the first cafe when he lamed up (the last 1 km to the edge of town took us over an hour). After we got him delivered to the albergue, she got out a bag of frozen vegetables for his knee (it was used so many times, the label was worn completely off). She insisted that I take care of him and that she would wash and dry our laundry (which she returned to us folded!). It was as if we were the only two people in the world for her, instead of the entire albergue, and I cried at her kindness. All the frustration I had at losing time and mileage against our schedule melted away in the face of her kindness as her example reminded me that to care for my son (and myself) trumped my agenda.

By the end, we were walking very strong, and with the activities we cut out, we made Santiago on our original schedule, which meant we still got to spend a couple days on Langostiera Beach and another couple in Avila. And, although we sacrificed a number of the things I'd planned to do and see, our trip was richer for it.
 

indyrem

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances June-July (2013) Camino Ingles (2015)
Hello everyone - My walk is getting closer and closer and I've noticed a change in the way folks around me talk about my forthcoming adventure.

A few months ago folks perhaps thought I wasn't serious, or perhaps I would change my mind? These days it seems that everyone has an opinion... and often these opinions are not very comforting!

This week I've been told I have to walk 25km every day and I have to finish each stage before the doors close... if I dont arrive in time at the refugio the doors will close and I'll have to walk the next stage (25km) to find a bed!

I've been told that it takes 2 years to train for the camino - I should be walking 12km every day for at least 6 months to have any hope of success.

I've been told that no-one walks the whole length in one go... it should be done in one or two week chunks

I've been told I must take a day off every 4 days or I'll exhaust myself

This is just a flavour of the kind of thing I'm hearing. Is it the same for any of you? It's disheartening... it feels like some folks are really saying that they think I'm crazy or they doubt I'll succeed. I feel that if anything goes wrong and I dont get to Santiago they'll all be saying... I told you so...

At least my workload is easing an I'll be back walking next week! :)

Hi, LesBrass-
Listen to the peregrinos that encourage you not the ones that discourage you. This is "Your" Camino. You walk it in however way you want to do it. You're walking this pilgrimage for yourself & for whatever reason only known to yourself. I walked from SJPP to Santiago almost a year ago. It was not easy but it's doable. I did not walk 25 kms or more per day because I couldn't. I took my time-rested when my body said so. I was not racing with anybody, did not have any expectations . I just walked. I made sure I had good comfortable shoes, smart wool socks, shirts that wick, & pacer poles. I had to "donate" & got rid of some of my stuff in my backpack to some albergues . You will know what you "really" need to keep in your backpack. Also pamper your feet. I took care of my feet-changed socks halfway during the day & massaged my feet too. Did not get any blisters. Make sure you hydrate yourself-drink lots of fluids. It's ok to be a little apprehensive at first ( I was) but as you walk you will meet the most wonderful people on this planet. Enjoy your Camino- you won't regret it. By the way, I was 69 years old when I walked the Frances & am also a diabetic and with the grace of God I hope to walk again next year.
Buen Camino.
Remy from Indianapolis
 

meriPNG

Loving Life! :-)
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances through to Finisterre (May-June 2014)
Hola LesBrass

Negative comments probably stem from people who admire your courage in wanting to do something as outrageously awesome as walking your Camino... they're just too darn stubborn to admit that they actually envy you!
I bet they probably wish they were as gutsy as you are and wish they had the determination and desire to do something as wonderful as this.

There's such a varied range of people who have walked, are walking and will be walking their Caminos... different ages, fitness levels, backgrounds, etc who were/are/will be at different points in their lives while on the Camino... if they can, are and/or will be doing it, so can you!
Walk your Camino without any expectations, tuning in to your inner self, enjoying each step and be gentle and kind to yourself while walking so you listen to your body and do what you feel is best for you.

No one else can ever live our lives but ourselves so you go for it and don't mind them naysayers... smile at them whenever they try to psych you out because you know you got this girl!

Have a blast!
Buen Camino!
Marie
 

koilife

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016); Portugues w/ son #3 (2020)
I've lost 8 kilos and I'm determined to keep my pack under 8 kilos... and I hope to lose another 8kg before I leave...
Dropping 16 kilos is huge for its impact in every respect. I wish I had done so for my first camino. I will have done so by my second.

Agreed also on getting under 7 kilos pack weight, and 6 would be even better.
 
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David Edmond

Member
Past OR future Camino
VDLP April 2014
Hi lessbrass
Ive been lucky with good support from friends and family especially my lovely wife
Im in Seville now and start my first camino tomorrow
There could be a certain amount of jealousy or genuine concern but there is plenty of good advice on this and other forums to see you on your way.
Buen camino
 

weekjchammings

KEITH JOHN
Past OR future Camino
GR10 HENDAYE - BANYULS SUR MERE 600+ MILES 2002 WITH MY SON.
ABERGAVENNY - BEAUPREAU TWIN TOWN 2009
ENGLISH SOUTH WEST COASTAL PATH 630 MILES 2010.
LE PUY EN VELAY -SANTIAGO - MUXIA - FINISTERRE 2011 1,000+ MILES
ABERGAVENNY WALES - MONT ST MICHEL - ST JEAN PdP - CAMINO FRANCES FRANCE - FINISTERRE 2013 1,400+ MILES.
SEVILLA - SANTIAGO VIA DE LA PLATA 2014
LISBON - PORTO - SANTIAGO - MUXIA - FINISTERRE CAMINO PORTUGUESE. 2016.
CAMINO DE LEVANTE PLANNED 2017.
What a great way to start a monday morning... reading so much inspiration from you all :)

Hello LesBrass or even Bonjour,

I am sure you will change your OPINION, once you have started your Camino Frances in September to............................
Waking up in an Albergue on the Camino now that is a " GREAT WAY TO START A MONDAY, TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY ETC. MORNING ".

Buen Camino....................Keith.
 
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biarritzdon

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF&CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF&CP17, CdN18, CM18, CF18, LePuy19
Don't forget all the stories about falling off that mythical "cliff of death" somewhere along Stage 1. The very one that led to the death of Emilio Estevez aka Daniel in the movie. If you believe all the reports of the deaths during stage 1 you will also be led to believe there are also flesh eating wolves and birds of prey waiting for you to wander near said cliff :eek::eek:!
Just like you don't need to check under your bed every night for the bogeyman, please pay attention to what the locals have to say about crossing the mountain on the days you plan to cross. Snow, rain and high winds are common many times during the year and can be a reason to wait a day or take the Valcarlos.
BTW, I have yet to find the mythical "cliff of death" but I'm sure it exists somewhere, if you are fool hearty enough not to follow the arrows.
 
D

Deleted member 3000

Guest
BTW, I have yet to find the mythical "cliff of death"
The Canadian/Brazilian found it. The reports said he was found more than a week later last year after tumbling off a cliff while wandering through the snow. I agree that you cannot find that cliff on the marked route, but ...
 
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weekjchammings

KEITH JOHN
Past OR future Camino
GR10 HENDAYE - BANYULS SUR MERE 600+ MILES 2002 WITH MY SON.
ABERGAVENNY - BEAUPREAU TWIN TOWN 2009
ENGLISH SOUTH WEST COASTAL PATH 630 MILES 2010.
LE PUY EN VELAY -SANTIAGO - MUXIA - FINISTERRE 2011 1,000+ MILES
ABERGAVENNY WALES - MONT ST MICHEL - ST JEAN PdP - CAMINO FRANCES FRANCE - FINISTERRE 2013 1,400+ MILES.
SEVILLA - SANTIAGO VIA DE LA PLATA 2014
LISBON - PORTO - SANTIAGO - MUXIA - FINISTERRE CAMINO PORTUGUESE. 2016.
CAMINO DE LEVANTE PLANNED 2017.
The Canadian/Argentinian found it. The reports said he was found more than a week later last year after tumbling off a cliff while wandering through the snow. I agree that you cannot find that cliff on the marked route, but ...

Hello,
My understanding was that he fell off a cornice, hence the reason it is not shown on a map because its not there all year round.
But to return to THE THREAD its just my OPINION.


upload_2014-3-31_12-47-28.jpeg
 

ksam

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Portuguese '08, Frances '11, del Norte '14, Invierno '16, Ingles '17, Primitivo October 2018
Ok, having read your post I am now laughing!! Guess I didn't walk it in one go. Solo. After only a few months of training. Lovely dream I had then. 'Cause according to whom ever there, I can't and it didn't happen!! Relax. It's a walk. You will do just fine. It's one footstep at a time. One day at a time. With any reasonable degree of fitness and prep you are going to make it and show 'em all! Just because they can't find a way around their fears doesn't mean you can't. You will! Buen Camino!!
 
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Hello everyone - My walk is getting closer and closer and I've noticed a change in the way folks around me talk about my forthcoming adventure.

A few months ago folks perhaps thought I wasn't serious, or perhaps I would change my mind? These days it seems that everyone has an opinion... and often these opinions are not very comforting!

This week I've been told I have to walk 25km every day and I have to finish each stage before the doors close... if I dont arrive in time at the refugio the doors will close and I'll have to walk the next stage (25km) to find a bed!

I've been told that it takes 2 years to train for the camino - I should be walking 12km every day for at least 6 months to have any hope of success.

I've been told that no-one walks the whole length in one go... it should be done in one or two week chunks

I've been told I must take a day off every 4 days or I'll exhaust myself

This is just a flavour of the kind of thing I'm hearing. Is it the same for any of you? It's disheartening... it feels like some folks are really saying that they think I'm crazy or they doubt I'll succeed. I feel that if anything goes wrong and I dont get to Santiago they'll all be saying... I told you so...

At least my workload is easing an I'll be back walking next week! :)

Hi there fellow pilgrim, Folks will think what they will. My wish for you :) ... Let the "advice" fall to the floor; celebrate your own strength and wisdom; and allow the journey ahead and the kindness of those you meet to assist you in making the right decisions for you as you set off on a truly remarkable journey. Travel well...and buen Camino. :)
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2022
Don't forget all the stories about falling off that mythical "cliff of death" somewhere along Stage 1. The very one that led to the death of Emilio Estevez aka Daniel in the movie. If you believe all the reports of the deaths during stage 1 you will also be led to believe there are also flesh eating wolves and birds of prey waiting for you to wander near said cliff :eek::eek:!
Just like you don't need to check under your bed every night for the bogeyman, please pay attention to what the locals have to say about crossing the mountain on the days you plan to cross. Snow, rain and high winds are common many times during the year and can be a reason to wait a day or take the Valcarlos.
BTW, I have yet to find the mythical "cliff of death" but I'm sure it exists somewhere, if you are fool hearty enough not to follow the arrows.

Don -

I doubt there is one mythical "cliff of death." Any steep drop-off will do. Along several sections of several Camino routes, there are ample opportunities for misfortune.

The location where the French day-hiker (non-peregrino) fell to her death early last May was just a very steep incline, not a cliff in the true sense. The location was to the east in the Pyrennes from St. Jean and Roncesvalles toward Somport. However, the fall / roll down the steep slope broke her neck and the result was the same. You might recall this was the instance where the Griffon Vultures got to her and rendered her to clothing and bones in the 45 minutes or so it took her walking companion to summon first responders.

Last year, during the last week of April, I was forced off the steep and winding trail (to the OUTSIDE - the steep drop side) going up Alto de Perdon by two local trail bikers clad head to foot in Lyrca spandex, bent on a FAST ride down the mountain. There was no warning, shout, bell, horn, etc. They were simply THERE!

Only my instinct to plant my right hiking pole (it arched like an archery bow), and the second cyclist dumping his fast-moving cycle into the upward side of the hill, grabbing my rucksack harness as I was going over, headed down the slope, stopped me from ending my Camino early and tragically. So, while I now tend to dislike sharing especially narrow trails with day-tripping bikers, I am forever grateful to the that anonymous Spanish fellow who saved me, said "lo siento" (I am sorry) and peddled on. I was too shook up to respond beyond "okay, I am fine..."

Incidentally, this event on Alto de Perdon was a few days BEFORE I read the news accounts of the vultures consuming the unfortunate day-hiker.

I guess the moral of this colloquy is to have fun. Enjoy your Camino. But, ALWAYS keep your situational awareness.

My mistake was giving in to the wind and rain on that day and looking down at the trail while failing to check my forward horizon. I was wearing a raincoat / poncho with the hood cinched close-in which narrowed my field of vision.

Hiking in the mountains is not unlike driving a car. In a car, we are taught to always keep our head moving, checking our mirrors, both sides, as well as what is coming ahead - constantly. I forgot that whilst I was walking and nearly paid for it. In short, I failed to maintain my situational awareness. Luckily I learned from that experience.

I leave for my next trip on the same route three weeks from Thursday...getting back on the proverbial horse...
 

biarritzdon

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF&CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF&CP17, CdN18, CM18, CF18, LePuy19
T2andreo,
I share your concern but my post was meant to be a tongue in cheek "sick humor" and not to be taken seriously, just like the boogey man under one's bed.
I have met a number of people in Biarritz who have walked the GR10 and they consider pilgrims on the Camino to be "wimps." They think we follow a way where we have comfy places to stay every night and don't have to carry a cooking kit. The GR10 is a spectacularly "dangerous" route from Hendaye to Perpignan and one I want to conquer one day when my son has the time to walk it with me, he is 40 and I am 68.
I too have been "nearly" run over by bikers, one memorable encounter was in a muddy ditch where there was no way to evade a peleton of 10 Spanish riders other than dive into the mud.
There are many place where someone can trip and fall and end their Camino, but my real point was about Stage 1 and to listen to the local about the conditions and don't walk if you are warned not to walk to Roncesvalles from SJPdP.
I live here and the storms, while predictable, they come out of no where some times and they will blow you on your a** with no warning.
Love and Peace to all!
Buen Camino
 

hampshire!tim

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances (2013), Ingles (2014), Finisterre (2015)
BTW, I have yet to find the mythical "cliff of death" but I'm sure it exists somewhere, if you are fool hearty enough not to follow the arrows.

There is a dangerously steep hillside - not quite a cliff - near the highest point of the day, where it is very hard to stay standing and probably impossible to walk down, but if you meet it, you're off track !!
 
M

Mark Lee

Guest
T2andreo,
I share your concern but my post was meant to be a tongue in cheek "sick humor" and not to be taken seriously, just like the boogey man under one's bed.
I have met a number of people in Biarritz who have walked the GR10 and they consider pilgrims on the Camino to be "wimps." They think we follow a way where we have comfy places to stay every night and don't have to carry a cooking kit. The GR10 is a spectacularly "dangerous" route from Hendaye to Perpignan and one I want to conquer one day when my son has the time to walk it with me, he is 40 and I am 68.
I too have been "nearly" run over by bikers, one memorable encounter was in a muddy ditch where there was no way to evade a peleton of 10 Spanish riders other than dive into the mud.
There are many place where someone can trip and fall and end their Camino, but my real point was about Stage 1 and to listen to the local about the conditions and don't walk if you are warned not to walk to Roncesvalles from SJPdP.
I live here and the storms, while predictable, they come out of no where some times and they will blow you on your a** with no warning.
Love and Peace to all!
Buen Camino

"Whimps"? Hmmm.

I wonder why someone would think that? I guess they are ignorant to the notion that the Camino is not walked simply as some type of "macho" physical challenge. Personally, I enjoyed the "comfy places to stay every night" and the meals in cafes in restaurants. I did enough of humping the hills with a ruck, weapon and kit on my back and living in the field eating MRE's when I was in the military. The old "been there, done that" adage. I wonder how many of those nimrods you mentioned in Biarritz ever humped the boonies with a military ruck on their back?

Oh, and yes, the bicyclists on the Camino can be quite dangerous at times when they go way too fast down a trail full of peregrinos simply walking and trying to enjoy the beauty of it all.
 
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tploomis

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances Sept. to Nov., 2013
Hello everyone - My walk is getting closer and closer and I've noticed a change in the way folks around me talk about my forthcoming adventure.

A few months ago folks perhaps thought I wasn't serious, or perhaps I would change my mind? These days it seems that everyone has an opinion... and often these opinions are not very comforting!

This week I've been told I have to walk 25km every day and I have to finish each stage before the doors close... if I dont arrive in time at the refugio the doors will close and I'll have to walk the next stage (25km) to find a bed!

I've been told that it takes 2 years to train for the camino - I should be walking 12km every day for at least 6 months to have any hope of success.

I've been told that no-one walks the whole length in one go... it should be done in one or two week chunks

I've been told I must take a day off every 4 days or I'll exhaust myself

This is just a flavour of the kind of thing I'm hearing. Is it the same for any of you? It's disheartening... it feels like some folks are really saying that they think I'm crazy or they doubt I'll succeed. I feel that if anything goes wrong and I dont get to Santiago they'll all be saying... I told you so…

At least my workload is easing an I'll be back walking next week! :)

Everybody is going to have opinions, and you have no control over their opinions. You do have control over how much credence you place in their opinions, however. I wouldn't pay much attention to the naysayers. They are probably trying to convince themselves they shouldn't be doing what you are doing. They seem a bit jealous to me.
 

biarritzdon

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF&CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF&CP17, CdN18, CM18, CF18, LePuy19
Mark Lee,
As one who has horded MRE in various situations living in Africa I share your thoughts, secretly. Some of these people I mentioned also want to have their country returned to them from the French and Spanish.
 

Oxford Alice

Member
Past OR future Camino
(Bits of) Camino Frances (2001)
Camino Frances (2014)
Camino Frances (2018)
I have loved reading this thread. I'm sorry for the negative comments that LesBrass has received. What a shame! All my friends have been encouraging, if somewhat incredulous. One, a musician, is putting together a playlist of music to meditate by. Others are praying for me. The Bishop of Oxford has laid hands on me and blessed me and signed me with the cross -- I was high as a kite after that! My husband will keep the home fires burning. My sons are bragging that their 60-year-old mum intends to walk the Camino. I leave on 25 April and I am so, so ready for this. Bring it on.
 

Kiwi-family

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Past: (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2018)-Frances, Baztan, San Salvador, Primitivo, Fisterra,VdlP, Madrid
Every time I open up the forum and see that there are MORE posts on the thread about people having opinions I have a wee chuckle to myself. In the interests of full disclosure I will admit that I have not read the whole thread (or even a good portion of it) so I realise I may be missing out. But I do so love the irony.
 
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daviddephillips

there are More than One Camino.
Past OR future Camino
(2013) sept. finished.
2017 Camino Porta
7 days into our first Camino , We tore up and discarded the guide books, we made NO reservations ahead. We just walked, communed with the elements, (human and emotional), and that is how we defined our Camino.



Sent from my iPad using Camino de Santiago Forum
 

angie

Member
I have 3 kids and they all have a different opinion. Youngest one says she doesn't want me to do it as she's scared for me being alone. Middle one is all for it and full of encouragement and the eldest one just sniggers a lot and doesn't believe that I will do it.
 
Past OR future Camino
2022
Stick around these forums for very long, ask a few questions, and you'll find just as many opinions here too! :D
The Camino is not a superhuman activity --- just a human activity. And often, the very best of humanity shines forth. I saw more kindness and generosity in 33 days, than probably in 33 years. I experienced instant community with people I had never before met, from countries I've only seen on maps, and cultures I won't pretend to understand. The community of Camino pilgrims, for all its variety and sometimes differences, is bound by a fundamental experience --- we walk, we pedal, we ride, we seek, we laugh, we cry, we suffer, we triumph, and we are so very, wonderfully, beautifully human from one moment to the next along this most ancient of routes.

This is one of the best descriptions of the Camino I have ever read. Fits my own experience perfectly. Thank you.

I quoted you today on the APOC Facebook page. I hope that was ok. Your wisdom needed to be shared.
https://www.facebook.com/groups/574...48/?comment_id=10152326489622348&notif_t=like
 

koilife

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016); Portugues w/ son #3 (2020)
I have 3 kids and they all have a different opinion. Youngest one says she doesn't want me to do it as she's scared for me being alone. Middle one is all for it and full of encouragement and the eldest one just sniggers a lot and doesn't believe that I will do it.
It sounds like your children are carbon copies of my boys.

BUT, when my oldest boy got the chance to walk it with me, suddenly his tune changed, and the two younger immediately wanted to know when their camino was (whether it's ice cream or walking across Spain, parity must be maintained!).
 

koilife

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016); Portugues w/ son #3 (2020)
Peaceable Projects Inc.
Peaceable Projects Inc. is a U.S.-based non-profit group that brings the vast resources of the wide world together with the ongoing needs of the people who live, work, and travel on the Camino de Santiago pilgrim trail network in Spain.
how to successfully prepare for your Camino
This book's focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared.

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