A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it

Advertisement

Why Pilgrimage?

peregrin peregrina

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
april 2021
Why pilgrimage?

The advent of Covid 19 has brought this question to the fore.

Do I not find spiritual satisfaction during my daily walks in nearby parks, natural reserves and even urban areas? The answer is: yes, it is true that I usually do experience some overwhelming and inspiring realization of the beauty, diversity, joy and love of life on these journeys, large or small, arriving home bursting to paint or write to capture some of the intense inspiration and love in life. The source of this I don’t really name, but you might call it God.

So you see, I won’t be doing the Camino as a Catholic, but as mentioned above I do have a spiritual connection and awareness of the world and my purpose for this pilgrimage would definitely be spiritual. Since learning of the Camino I have been very powerfully drawn to it, often breaking into tears by the mere thought of it, overcome by a strong sense of need to do it, even having all sorts of “weird” experiences and serendipitous occurrences relative to it and to St. James, overcome by the allure of participating in this ancient journey connecting to pilgrims who have done this for thousands of years, hoping for some inexplicable enlightenment, connection, inspiration, change…perhaps as a “stranger” on earth, the need to feel part of a group of likeminded individuals who would even want to do such a thing to begin with! That unnamed, unknown-yet-known spirit that compels me to this journey!

But, with Covid 19, now I think: Is it really necessary to travel half-way around the world, perhaps risking my own health and that of others to do what might be found anywhere? After all, God is everywhere. Is this an unnecessary and somehow false need to perform a particular pilgrimage to accomplish the sorts of experiences named above? (this is a sincere question not a judgement please understand!)

As for feeling a connection with ancient people and spirituality, when I lived in northern Minnesota I always found that connection in the forests where Native American people so aptly appreciated the land with a deeply and richly felt spiritual heritage that reverberates to all who want to hear it. I agree so much with their concept that every step on the shelf of that great arrowhead reverberates through time and space to all of its inhabitants. I could hear their voices whispering in the trees and laughing along the brooks. Come to think of it, I have experienced this sort of time-transcendence all over the world and at home. It is available.

I know that many people on this forum have done Caminos in Spain on numerous occasions. What is it that makes you want to repeat this particular journey time and again? Or if you are looking at doing it for the first time, such as me, what are your thoughts?

I still want to do it but question why - why there, why now (when possible)? These are my questions but I would love to hear your answers! (Also, if anyone knows of any books written on this topic that you’d recommend please let me know. I can’t imagine I’m the first one to ask the question!)
 

mspath

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
Why pilgrimage?

The advent of Covid 19 has brought this question to the fore.

Do I not find spiritual satisfaction during my daily walks in nearby parks, natural reserves and even urban areas? The answer is: yes, it is true that I usually do experience some overwhelming and inspiring realization of the beauty, diversity, joy and love of life on these journeys, large or small, arriving home bursting to paint or write to capture some of the intense inspiration and love in life. The source of this I don’t really name, but you might call it God.

So you see, I won’t be doing the Camino as a Catholic, but as mentioned above I do have a spiritual connection and awareness of the world and my purpose for this pilgrimage would definitely be spiritual. Since learning of the Camino I have been very powerfully drawn to it, often breaking into tears by the mere thought of it, overcome by a strong sense of need to do it, even having all sorts of “weird” experiences and serendipitous occurrences relative to it and to St. James, overcome by the allure of participating in this ancient journey connecting to pilgrims who have done this for thousands of years, hoping for some inexplicable enlightenment, connection, inspiration, change…perhaps as a “stranger” on earth, the need to feel part of a group of likeminded individuals who would even want to do such a thing to begin with! That unnamed, unknown-yet-known spirit that compels me to this journey!

But, with Covid 19, now I think: Is it really necessary to travel half-way around the world, perhaps risking my own health and that of others to do what might be found anywhere? After all, God is everywhere. Is this an unnecessary and somehow false need to perform a particular pilgrimage to accomplish the sorts of experiences named above? (this is a sincere question not a judgement please understand!)

As for feeling a connection with ancient people and spirituality, when I lived in northern Minnesota I always found that connection in the forests where Native American people so aptly appreciated the land with a deeply and richly felt spiritual heritage that reverberates to all who want to hear it. I agree so much with their concept that every step on the shelf of that great arrowhead reverberates through time and space to all of its inhabitants. I could hear their voices whispering in the trees and laughing along the brooks. Come to think of it, I have experienced this sort of time-transcendence all over the world and at home. It is available.

I know that many people on this forum have done Caminos in Spain on numerous occasions. What is it that makes you want to repeat this particular journey time and again? Or if you are looking at doing it for the first time, such as me, what are your thoughts?

I still want to do it but question why - why there, why now (when possible)? These are my questions but I would love to hear your answers! (Also, if anyone knows of any books written on this topic that you’d recommend please let me know. I can’t imagine I’m the first one to ask the question!)

peregrin peregrina,

Welcome to the Forum.

Many of us in earlier threads have addressed your questions. Perhaps you will find our various answers helpful and informative.

For starters see


and


Happy research and whenever/wherever you might decide to walk, Buen Camino!
 
Last edited:

peregrin peregrina

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
april 2021
peregrin peregrina,

Welcome to the Forum.

Many of us have in earlier threads have addressed your questions. Perhaps you will find our various answers helpful and informative.

For starters see


and


Happy reserach and whenever/wherever you might decide to walk, Buen Camino!
thanks for the response and threads! probably looking for a reason where none exists! :)
 

Jenibee

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
TBD
I so appreciate what you've written. I'm brand new here myself, and grappling with the mere understanding of why this thing I've never done and that previously held no appeal for me now seems to be calling out to me in so many unexpected ways. I fully relate to the emotions that are suddenly welling up inside, and posted about that on another thread. I've got two lengthy hiking trips planned in the states for later this year, and while I'm looking forward to them (circumstances allowing), the mere thought of them does not stir something in my soul as do thoughts of the Camino.

So I don't know why, but I do know there is something real happening. Something undeniably real.
 

peregrin peregrina

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
april 2021
I so appreciate what you've written. I'm brand new here myself, and grappling with the mere understanding of why this thing I've never done and that previously held no appeal for me now seems to be calling out to me in so many unexpected ways. I fully relate to the emotions that are suddenly welling up inside, and posted about that on another thread. I've got two lengthy hiking trips planned in the states for later this year, and while I'm looking forward to them (circumstances allowing), the mere thought of them does not stir something in my soul as do thoughts of the Camino.

So I don't know why, but I do know there is something real happening. Something undeniably real.
yes - very well said!
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
mspath points to answers to the question "why do the Camino multiple times?"

I will provide a few thoughts on the more general question "why do the Camino?" which seems to be at the root of what you were asking.

Of course, there are many reasons people do the Camino. There are probably more reasons than pilgrims. While there are recurring themes, everyone's precise reasons are unique, and many walk with more than one reason. And there are so many pilgrims. That means a lot of reasons.

So I will rotate the question a little bit to "what does the Camino have to offer?" The answer is, obviously, lots:
- lots of landscapes, exciting and boring, mountainous and flat, urban and rural
- lots of culture, and a chance to experience cultures that are not necessarily our own (I say cultures in the plural because just about all Caminos will involve walking through several distinct cultures)
- lots of history, going back thousands of years, and from that, lots of art and architecture
- lots of time, time away from the distractions of regular life - time to think, time to feel, time to process, time to grow
- lots of challenge (especially for first-time pilgrims), a chance to see and prove to yourself what you are capable of
- lots of camaraderie, and with that lots of opportunity to see the goodness in people, the kindness they are capable of, to share that, be a part of it, and extend it yourself
- lots of religious reasons, for those who lean that way, both along the way and at the destination

There are other places on the Earth that have some or many of these. But none offers them in precisely the same way that the Camino does. (Heck, there are many Camino routes, and each offers its own unique expression or combination of these.) It is the way that the Camino offers these that draws us to it over other possible destinations.
 

alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Camino(s) past & future
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
mspath points to answers to the question "why do the Camino multiple times?"

I will provide a few thoughts on the more general question "why do the Camino?" which seems to be at the root of what you were asking.

Of course, there are many reasons people do the Camino. There are probably more reasons than pilgrims. While there are recurring themes, everyone's precise reasons are unique, and many walk with more than one reason. And there are so many pilgrims. That means a lot of reasons.

So I will rotate the question a little bit to "what does the Camino have to offer?" The answer is, obviously, lots:
- lots of landscapes, exciting and boring, mountainous and flat, urban and rural
- lots of culture, and a chance to experience cultures that are not necessarily our own (I say cultures in the plural because just about all Caminos will involve walking through several distinct cultures)
- lots of history, going back thousands of years, and from that, lots of art and architecture
- lots of time, time away from the distractions of regular life - time to think, time to feel, time to process, time to grow
- lots of challenge (especially for first-time pilgrims), a chance to see and prove to yourself what you are capable of
- lots of camaraderie, and with that lots of opportunity to see the goodness in people, the kindness they are capable of, to share that, be a part of it, and extend it yourself
- lots of religious reasons, for those who lean that way, both along the way and at the destination

There are other places on the Earth that have some or many of these. But none offers them in precisely the same way that the Camino does. (Heck, there are many Camino routes, and each offers its own unique expression or combination of these.) It is the way that the Camino offers these that draws us to it over other possible destinations.
Spot on.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
Why pilgrimage?

The advent of Covid 19 has brought this question to the fore.

Do I not find spiritual satisfaction during my daily walks in nearby parks, natural reserves and even urban areas? The answer is: yes, it is true that I usually do experience some overwhelming and inspiring realization of the beauty, diversity, joy and love of life on these journeys, large or small, arriving home bursting to paint or write to capture some of the intense inspiration and love in life. The source of this I don’t really name, but you might call it God.

So you see, I won’t be doing the Camino as a Catholic, but as mentioned above I do have a spiritual connection and awareness of the world and my purpose for this pilgrimage would definitely be spiritual. Since learning of the Camino I have been very powerfully drawn to it, often breaking into tears by the mere thought of it, overcome by a strong sense of need to do it, even having all sorts of “weird” experiences and serendipitous occurrences relative to it and to St. James, overcome by the allure of participating in this ancient journey connecting to pilgrims who have done this for thousands of years, hoping for some inexplicable enlightenment, connection, inspiration, change…perhaps as a “stranger” on earth, the need to feel part of a group of likeminded individuals who would even want to do such a thing to begin with! That unnamed, unknown-yet-known spirit that compels me to this journey!

But, with Covid 19, now I think: Is it really necessary to travel half-way around the world, perhaps risking my own health and that of others to do what might be found anywhere? After all, God is everywhere. Is this an unnecessary and somehow false need to perform a particular pilgrimage to accomplish the sorts of experiences named above? (this is a sincere question not a judgement please understand!)

As for feeling a connection with ancient people and spirituality, when I lived in northern Minnesota I always found that connection in the forests where Native American people so aptly appreciated the land with a deeply and richly felt spiritual heritage that reverberates to all who want to hear it. I agree so much with their concept that every step on the shelf of that great arrowhead reverberates through time and space to all of its inhabitants. I could hear their voices whispering in the trees and laughing along the brooks. Come to think of it, I have experienced this sort of time-transcendence all over the world and at home. It is available.

I know that many people on this forum have done Caminos in Spain on numerous occasions. What is it that makes you want to repeat this particular journey time and again? Or if you are looking at doing it for the first time, such as me, what are your thoughts?

I still want to do it but question why - why there, why now (when possible)? These are my questions but I would love to hear your answers! (Also, if anyone knows of any books written on this topic that you’d recommend please let me know. I can’t imagine I’m the first one to ask the question!)
If I haven't posted it before, let me say Welcome To the Forum :)

I have posted the following a couple of times, in various ways:

" I have always been of a mind that I do not do a Camino de Santiago as a walk or hike, I do it as a Pilgrimage for a spiritual/religious purpose. If all I wanted to do was to hike or walk or backpack, then I would not spend the money and time going to Europe to do so; I have a gazillion choices to do that sort of activity much closer to home".

So I do attach a uniquely religious aspect to the Camino, via the traditions and history and past purpose, which I do not when backpacking. . not on my thru-hikes of the PCT, or Colorado Trail and the thousands of other backpacking miles I've done. I'm not to saying that times of spiritual refreshing and prayer and meditation never occur while I backpack, but that is not why I go backpacking. . it is a side effect not the primary focus.

Something I wrote a while back seems to heavily underscore this difference for me:

"During the last couple of days of the Walk to Santiago, so many feelings had occurred ranging the gamut of emotions: Joy, anger, despair, happiness, sadness, hopefulness, regret, contentment… it’s as if my mind, heart, and soul were having a go at playing tug-of-war. One example was when it came my turn for the Compostela in the Pilgrim’s Office in Santiago de Compostela. When I walked up to the counter window, I was greeted by the smiling face of a young woman in her early 20s. I requested that my pilgrimage be done in the name of my oldest son, Joshua David, who went to be with God shortly after his birth. I had discussed doing this with his mother, Denise, the previous day to make sure it was ok.

The young volunteer seemed a bit puzzled, but a more experienced volunteer knew what my request was about and briefly talked with the young woman, pointing to a space on the yet-to-be filled out Compostela.

As I watched the Pilgrim Office volunteer add Joshua’s name to that certificate of completion, I suddenly couldn’t hold back the tears. The long miles, the aches and pains, the mental trauma, the hundreds of times I prayed and talked with Jesus, the fatigue, and the meaning that I gave behind the purpose of my walk/pilgrimage seemed to suddenly become narrowly focused into a pinpoint with my dear son’s name.

The poor, sweet volunteer who spoke in halting, but understandable English asked, with a look of concern on her face, if I was alright. All I could do was smile through the tears and tell her, “Yes”, I was better than when I took my first step 30 days before”.
 

peregrin peregrina

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
april 2021
mspath points to answers to the question "why do the Camino multiple times?"

I will provide a few thoughts on the more general question "why do the Camino?" which seems to be at the root of what you were asking.

Of course, there are many reasons people do the Camino. There are probably more reasons than pilgrims. While there are recurring themes, everyone's precise reasons are unique, and many walk with more than one reason. And there are so many pilgrims. That means a lot of reasons.

So I will rotate the question a little bit to "what does the Camino have to offer?" The answer is, obviously, lots:
- lots of landscapes, exciting and boring, mountainous and flat, urban and rural
- lots of culture, and a chance to experience cultures that are not necessarily our own (I say cultures in the plural because just about all Caminos will involve walking through several distinct cultures)
- lots of history, going back thousands of years, and from that, lots of art and architecture
- lots of time, time away from the distractions of regular life - time to think, time to feel, time to process, time to grow
- lots of challenge (especially for first-time pilgrims), a chance to see and prove to yourself what you are capable of
- lots of camaraderie, and with that lots of opportunity to see the goodness in people, the kindness they are capable of, to share that, be a part of it, and extend it yourself
- lots of religious reasons, for those who lean that way, both along the way and at the destination

There are other places on the Earth that have some or many of these. But none offers them in precisely the same way that the Camino does. (Heck, there are many Camino routes, and each offers its own unique expression or combination of these.) It is the way that the Camino offers these that draws us to it over other possible destinations.
If I haven't posted it before, let me say Welcome To the Forum :)

I have posted the following a couple of times, in various ways:

" I have always been of a mind that I do not do a Camino de Santiago as a walk or hike, I do it as a Pilgrimage for a spiritual/religious purpose. If all I wanted to do was to hike or walk or backpack, then I would not spend the money and time going to Europe to do so; I have a gazillion choices to do that sort of activity much closer to home".

So I do attach a uniquely religious aspect to the Camino, via the traditions and history and past purpose, which I do not when backpacking. . not on my thru-hikes of the PCT, or Colorado Trail and the thousands of other backpacking miles I've done. I'm not to saying that times of spiritual refreshing and prayer and meditation never occur while I backpack, but that is not why I go backpacking. . it is a side effect not the primary focus.

Something I wrote a while back seems to heavily underscore this difference for me:

"During the last couple of days of the Walk to Santiago, so many feelings had occurred ranging the gamut of emotions: Joy, anger, despair, happiness, sadness, hopefulness, regret, contentment… it’s as if my mind, heart, and soul were having a go at playing tug-of-war. One example was when it came my turn for the Compostela in the Pilgrim’s Office in Santiago de Compostela. When I walked up to the counter window, I was greeted by the smiling face of a young woman in her early 20s. I requested that my pilgrimage be done in the name of my oldest son, Joshua David, who went to be with God shortly after his birth. I had discussed doing this with his mother, Denise, the previous day to make sure it was ok.

The young volunteer seemed a bit puzzled, but a more experienced volunteer knew what my request was about and briefly talked with the young woman, pointing to a space on the yet-to-be filled out Compostela.

As I watched the Pilgrim Office volunteer add Joshua’s name to that certificate of completion, I suddenly couldn’t hold back the tears. The long miles, the aches and pains, the mental trauma, the hundreds of times I prayed and talked with Jesus, the fatigue, and the meaning that I gave behind the purpose of my walk/pilgrimage seemed to suddenly become narrowly focused into a pinpoint with my dear son’s name.

The poor, sweet volunteer who spoke in halting, but understandable English asked, with a look of concern on her face, if I was alright. All I could do was smile through the tears and tell her, “Yes”, I was better than when I took my first step 30 days before”.
thank you so much for sharing this. i can see how it could be that the camino offers something different than the usual backpacking experience, no matter how spiritual those may be. When I go to the woods with any intention i find i'm hit between the eyes with the whole spiritual aspect of things, and with the whole covid 19 epidemic it's been sort of throwing me into doubt re the pull or need to do the camino, but as i review the threads given and your comments, i realize what i wrote came out of a sort of covid-19 context and that my resolve to do the camino is not somehow misguided, unnecessary or selfish, but now i feel more grounded by the comments given here, that yes i am on the right track. so thank you. the fact is i very much look forward to doing it and finding out its purpose for me. thanks again for your reply and other very helpful posts on this forum!
 
Last edited:
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
As for feeling a connection with ancient people and spirituality, when I lived in northern Minnesota I always found that connection in the forests where Native American people so aptly appreciated the land with a deeply and richly felt spiritual heritage that reverberates to all who want to hear it.
I wanted to address this in a separate post. I also want to make a special point that I am not personally offended nor should I be. I am just sharing this as a personal observation. And I do not discount any spiritual value you find while going into the wild areas.

I am a Native Indian. Both my paternal and maternal grand-parents were born and raised in the area of Tahlequah, Oklahoma. My family history, as far back as I can find, originated in the Carolinas, although many were relocated into the Oklahoma territory and Missouri.

I find what you wrote, as quoted, a bit stereotypical. The history of my people and other Native Tribes, if thoroughly researched and looked at objectively, is quite different than how many have tried to define us in terms of the environment and other ways. To me, what was posted was on the same level as those who defend Native American-themed mascots for sports teams. Whether meant as a compliment or as a derision, stereotyping is what it is.

I do not mean to offend, but thought a personal viewpoint might provide some insight.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
Why pilgrimage?

The advent of Covid 19 has brought this question to the fore.

Do I not find spiritual satisfaction during my daily walks in nearby parks, natural reserves and even urban areas? The answer is: yes, it is true that I usually do experience some overwhelming and inspiring realization of the beauty, diversity, joy and love of life on these journeys, large or small, arriving home bursting to paint or write to capture some of the intense inspiration and love in life. The source of this I don’t really name, but you might call it God.

So you see, I won’t be doing the Camino as a Catholic, but as mentioned above I do have a spiritual connection and awareness of the world and my purpose for this pilgrimage would definitely be spiritual. Since learning of the Camino I have been very powerfully drawn to it, often breaking into tears by the mere thought of it, overcome by a strong sense of need to do it, even having all sorts of “weird” experiences and serendipitous occurrences relative to it and to St. James, overcome by the allure of participating in this ancient journey connecting to pilgrims who have done this for thousands of years, hoping for some inexplicable enlightenment, connection, inspiration, change…perhaps as a “stranger” on earth, the need to feel part of a group of likeminded individuals who would even want to do such a thing to begin with! That unnamed, unknown-yet-known spirit that compels me to this journey!

But, with Covid 19, now I think: Is it really necessary to travel half-way around the world, perhaps risking my own health and that of others to do what might be found anywhere? After all, God is everywhere. Is this an unnecessary and somehow false need to perform a particular pilgrimage to accomplish the sorts of experiences named above? (this is a sincere question not a judgement please understand!)

As for feeling a connection with ancient people and spirituality, when I lived in northern Minnesota I always found that connection in the forests where Native American people so aptly appreciated the land with a deeply and richly felt spiritual heritage that reverberates to all who want to hear it. I agree so much with their concept that every step on the shelf of that great arrowhead reverberates through time and space to all of its inhabitants. I could hear their voices whispering in the trees and laughing along the brooks. Come to think of it, I have experienced this sort of time-transcendence all over the world and at home. It is available.

I know that many people on this forum have done Caminos in Spain on numerous occasions. What is it that makes you want to repeat this particular journey time and again? Or if you are looking at doing it for the first time, such as me, what are your thoughts?

I still want to do it but question why - why there, why now (when possible)? These are my questions but I would love to hear your answers! (Also, if anyone knows of any books written on this topic that you’d recommend please let me know. I can’t imagine I’m the first one to ask the question!)
As an aside to the direct topic of this thread, this was posted by Dromengro into a different thread, for those in North America who want to still do a Pilgrimage walk but cannot do so on a Camino de Santiago pilgrimage.

 

alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Camino(s) past & future
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
I wanted to address this in a separate post. I also want to make a special point that I am not personally offended nor should I be. I am just sharing this as a personal observation. And I do not discount any spiritual value you find while going into the wild areas.

I am a Native Indian. Both my paternal and maternal grand-parents were born and raised in the area of Tahlequah, Oklahoma. My family history, as far back as I can find, originated in the Carolinas, although many were relocated into the Oklahoma territory and Missouri.

I find what you wrote, as quoted, a bit stereotypical. The history of my people and other Native Tribes, if thoroughly researched and looked at objectively, is quite different than how many have tried to define us in terms of the environment and other ways. To me, what was posted was on the same level as those who defend Native American-themed mascots for sports teams. Whether meant as a compliment or as a derision, stereotyping is what it is.

I do not mean to offend, but thought a personal viewpoint might provide some insight.
Respect. Agree.My grandaugher is part indigienous. Proud of that.
 

peregrin peregrina

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
april 2021
I wanted to address this in a separate post. I also want to make a special point that I am not personally offended nor should I be. I am just sharing this as a personal observation. And I do not discount any spiritual value you find while going into the wild areas.

I am a Native Indian. Both my paternal and maternal grand-parents were born and raised in the area of Tahlequah, Oklahoma. My family history, as far back as I can find, originated in the Carolinas, although many were relocated into the Oklahoma territory and Missouri.

I find what you wrote, as quoted, a bit stereotypical. The history of my people and other Native Tribes, if thoroughly researched and looked at objectively, is quite different than how many have tried to define us in terms of the environment and other ways. To me, what was posted was on the same level as those who defend Native American-themed mascots for sports teams. Whether meant as a compliment or as a derision, stereotyping is what it is.

I do not mean to offend, but thought a personal viewpoint might provide some insight.
thanks- i meant no offense whatsoever either. i only found that when i lived up next to the ojibwe band of chippewa reservation in grand portage mn, that what those folks had to teach personally about the natural world became very real to me in my own experience and i found a lot of wisdom there. i can't say otherwise than this was the truth of my experience and was very meaningful to me and the viewpoints i learned among my friends over the years at that reservation have been among the most informative and resounding of the truths i hold most dear. I don't like justifying myself but I feel I've got to say that I was speaking from first hand experience and the truth of what i know. In some way I feel that I have caused offense by my post which was not the intent. I have merely been trying to sort out the actual necessity for any pilgrimage. It is not a actually a well-thought out idea I put here and perhaps I could have counted to 10 before posting. Anyway, apologies across the boards for any offense if taken. Thank you!
 
Last edited:

peregrin peregrina

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
april 2021
If I haven't posted it before, let me say Welcome To the Forum :)

I have posted the following a couple of times, in various ways:

" I have always been of a mind that I do not do a Camino de Santiago as a walk or hike, I do it as a Pilgrimage for a spiritual/religious purpose. If all I wanted to do was to hike or walk or backpack, then I would not spend the money and time going to Europe to do so; I have a gazillion choices to do that sort of activity much closer to home".

So I do attach a uniquely religious aspect to the Camino, via the traditions and history and past purpose, which I do not when backpacking. . not on my thru-hikes of the PCT, or Colorado Trail and the thousands of other backpacking miles I've done. I'm not to saying that times of spiritual refreshing and prayer and meditation never occur while I backpack, but that is not why I go backpacking. . it is a side effect not the primary focus.

Something I wrote a while back seems to heavily underscore this difference for me:

"During the last couple of days of the Walk to Santiago, so many feelings had occurred ranging the gamut of emotions: Joy, anger, despair, happiness, sadness, hopefulness, regret, contentment… it’s as if my mind, heart, and soul were having a go at playing tug-of-war. One example was when it came my turn for the Compostela in the Pilgrim’s Office in Santiago de Compostela. When I walked up to the counter window, I was greeted by the smiling face of a young woman in her early 20s. I requested that my pilgrimage be done in the name of my oldest son, Joshua David, who went to be with God shortly after his birth. I had discussed doing this with his mother, Denise, the previous day to make sure it was ok.

The young volunteer seemed a bit puzzled, but a more experienced volunteer knew what my request was about and briefly talked with the young woman, pointing to a space on the yet-to-be filled out Compostela.

As I watched the Pilgrim Office volunteer add Joshua’s name to that certificate of completion, I suddenly couldn’t hold back the tears. The long miles, the aches and pains, the mental trauma, the hundreds of times I prayed and talked with Jesus, the fatigue, and the meaning that I gave behind the purpose of my walk/pilgrimage seemed to suddenly become narrowly focused into a pinpoint with my dear son’s name.

The poor, sweet volunteer who spoke in halting, but understandable English asked, with a look of concern on her face, if I was alright. All I could do was smile through the tears and tell her, “Yes”, I was better than when I took my first step 30 days before”.
thank you so much for the welcome and for sharing this. beautiful.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
thanks- i meant no offense whatsoever either. i only found that when i lived up next to the ojibwe band of chippewa reservation in grand portage mn, that what those folks had to teach personally about the natural world became very real to me in my own experience and i found a lot of wisdom there. i can't say otherwise than this was the truth of my experience and was very meaningful to me and the viewpoints i learned among my friends over the years at that reservation have been among the most informative and resounding of the truths i hold most dear. I don't like justifying myself but I feel I've got to say that I was speaking from first hand experience and the truth of what i know. In some way I feel that I have caused offense by my post which was not the intent. I have merely been trying to sort out the actual necessity for any pilgrimage. It is not a actually a well-thought out idea I put here and perhaps I could have counted to 10 before posting. Anyway, apologies across the boards for any offense if taken. Thank you!
You did not offend at all. . I apologize for making you feel that way. I only meant to offer a personal insight, and not a condemnation. So please do not let what I posted upset you.

The topic is a good one. . it is a topic that can encourage us to introspectively review why we look at the Caminos in the way that each of us do as individuals. :)
 

peregrin peregrina

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
april 2021
You did not offend at all. . I apologize for making you feel that way. I only meant to offer a personal insight, and not a condemnation. So please do not let what I posted upset you.

The topic is a good one. . it is a topic that can encourage us to introspectively review why we look at the Caminos in the way that each of us do as individuals. :)
thanks, dave. it's all good :)
 

Rclarke

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Leaving April 6 from SJPP
I agree with all the points written by David Tallen, Ive done the camino and will answer the call to do so again, hopefully next April-May. But im not Catholic and being one is not a condition of doing the camino. I must say that I noticed when doing my first Camino just how un-religious the entire trip was. I watched for, and never saw in all 33 days, anyone saying grace before a meal, unless they did so in a very un-noticeable way. I didn't stay in Albergues and understand that there at least grace is usually given before the evening meal. I also attended a few Pilgrim masses, but very few people did.

My point is, if you feel compelled to walk due to religious calling, than thats great, doesn't have to be a Catholic calling. You will find a lot of long distance hikers on the trail for no other reason than this is a famous long distance hike. Many claim to be inspired by the movie "The Way", I wasn't. But I did encounter a lady one day who was there to spread her sons ashes, true storey. So if you are there just to knock off another long distance hike, great for you as well. One thing you will find that no matter what the reason people are on the trail, it does leave an impression that all who have gone can relate to, but few can explain what it is to those who have not walked the Way yet.
 

Anamiri

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016, 2017, 2019 Camino Frances
mspath points to answers to the question "why do the Camino multiple times?"

I will provide a few thoughts on the more general question "why do the Camino?" which seems to be at the root of what you were asking.

Of course, there are many reasons people do the Camino. There are probably more reasons than pilgrims. While there are recurring themes, everyone's precise reasons are unique, and many walk with more than one reason. And there are so many pilgrims. That means a lot of reasons.

So I will rotate the question a little bit to "what does the Camino have to offer?" The answer is, obviously, lots:
- lots of landscapes, exciting and boring, mountainous and flat, urban and rural
- lots of culture, and a chance to experience cultures that are not necessarily our own (I say cultures in the plural because just about all Caminos will involve walking through several distinct cultures)
- lots of history, going back thousands of years, and from that, lots of art and architecture
- lots of time, time away from the distractions of regular life - time to think, time to feel, time to process, time to grow
- lots of challenge (especially for first-time pilgrims), a chance to see and prove to yourself what you are capable of
- lots of camaraderie, and with that lots of opportunity to see the goodness in people, the kindness they are capable of, to share that, be a part of it, and extend it yourself
- lots of religious reasons, for those who lean that way, both along the way and at the destination

There are other places on the Earth that have some or many of these. But none offers them in precisely the same way that the Camino does. (Heck, there are many Camino routes, and each offers its own unique expression or combination of these.) It is the way that the Camino offers these that draws us to it over other possible destinations.
I agree wholeheartedly with all of these, but there is another important facet for me as well.
I believe that the walking in itself becomes a reason. Walking day after day after day. The Camino makes it so easy to just walk, you dont have to carry a lot of stuff, meals are available and regular , there is somewhere to sleep, and the way itself is well marked.
All you have to do is walk - every day until Santiago.
There is a magic number of consecutive days (differs for everyone) after which you fall into a "Camino state of Mind".
For me it seems to be 2, for others it can be up to a week.
Its almost impossible to describe that state of mind to people until they have walked. For some it awakens their beliefs, for others a type of mindfulness, for some mental freedom, for others it allows them to change their focus. I dont have the words, for me it is a feeling, walking long distances every day allows me to be the best 'me' I can be..

We have beautiful long walks in NZ as well, but nothing that is similar to the Camino with its well marked trail, services etc and length. The Camino allows you to just walk, and that is a magic in itself.
 
Last edited:

kazrobbo

Tassie Kaz
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2012
CP 2015
St Olavs Norway 2016
88T Japan 2017
PWC/VF 2019
Israel 2020 X
Wales CP 21?
KK?
VdlP?
Do I not find spiritual satisfaction during my daily walks in nearby parks, natural reserves and even urban areas? The answer is: yes

Since learning of the Camino I have been very powerfully drawn to it, often breaking into tears by the mere thought of it, overcome by a strong sense of need to do it
…perhaps as a “stranger” on earth, the need to feel part of a group of likeminded individuals who would even want to do such a thing to begin with! That unnamed, unknown-yet-known spirit that compels me to this journey!

But, with Covid 19, now I think: Is it really necessary to travel half-way around the world, perhaps risking my own health and that of others to do what might be found anywhere?
I live in Tasmania & have many walking opportunities locally and around the state; world class trails (eg Overland Track, Three Capes Track), UNESCO World Heritage areas, stunning scenery & natural beauty all of which draw people from across the globe.
I've spent countless hours & days revelling in & marvelling at what is on my own doorstep.
And yet, I fling myself to the other side of the planet to tackle long distance trails... Why?...the answer is quite simple.

@Rclarke sums up beautifully some of the variety of reasons which drive people. From my own point of view, I'm not religious so that aspect does not compel me. What I love is the extra challenge & levels of complexity international walking brings. At home, even on a new trail, I pretty well know what to expect but overseas, each step is truly into the unknown (I don't repeat walks) especially with the additional layers of language, culture, customs, people, food, history, architecture, scenery, wildlife, vegetation & even different climates & weather.
For me, walking & all it entails is the foundation but it's the whole experience which draws me & will continue to call me to seek paths in far flung destinations.
It's all there waiting to be explored when the current situation eases.
Sempre avanti! 🤗
👣 🌏
 
Last edited:

Rclarke

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Leaving April 6 from SJPP
Thanks and I agree kazrobbo I live by the Canadian Rockies and they, and the trails there take my breath away. But I look forward to trekking in other parts of the world for an exciting change, Every corner has the potential to offer something new, and meeting like minded people (there’s always Australians everywhere) is the icing on the cake.
 

kazrobbo

Tassie Kaz
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2012
CP 2015
St Olavs Norway 2016
88T Japan 2017
PWC/VF 2019
Israel 2020 X
Wales CP 21?
KK?
VdlP?
Thanks and I agree kazrobbo I live by the Canadian Rockies and they, and the trails there take my breath away. But I look forward to trekking in other parts of the world for an exciting change, Every corner has the potential to offer something new, and meeting like minded people (there’s always Australians everywhere) is the icing on the cake.
Spot on @Rclarke...I wouldn't swap being able to travel near or far for anything...I feel very fortunate indeed.
And yep 🤣 we 🇦🇺 🐨 🦘 are everywhere;
distance, cost & long haul flights discourage us not! Sometimes 'out there' I hear the accent & cringe but other times it's a relief & brings sheer joy.
I've been to your part of the world (western 🇨🇦 ) a number of times & it never ceases to make my draw drop...stunning scenery & warm, welcoming people...it's a favourite.
Keep walking & best wishes for your future journeys.
👣 🌏
 

Rclarke

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Leaving April 6 from SJPP
Spot on @Rclarke...I wouldn't swap being able to travel near or far for anything...I feel very fortunate indeed.
And yep 🤣 we 🇦🇺 🐨 🦘 are everywhere;
distance, cost & long haul flights discourage us not! Sometimes 'out there' I hear the accent & cringe but other times it's a relief & brings sheer joy.
I've been to your part of the world (western 🇨🇦 ) a number of times & it never ceases to make my draw drop...stunning scenery & warm, welcoming people...it's a favourite.
Keep walking & best wishes for your future journeys.
👣 🌏
Thanks a lot of Australians come over to work at the resorts and I have been to your part if the world although many years ago 1977-78 I worked on a dairy farm at Tralagon and spent a week in Tasmania. Did Everest base camp with a bunch of ozzies 14 years ago and still keep in touch and now find them everywhere but enjoy them a lot. Take care and be safe and maybe we’ll see you on a trail somewhere
 

kazrobbo

Tassie Kaz
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2012
CP 2015
St Olavs Norway 2016
88T Japan 2017
PWC/VF 2019
Israel 2020 X
Wales CP 21?
KK?
VdlP?
Thanks a lot of Australians come over to work at the resorts and I have been to your part if the world although many years ago 1977-78 I worked on a dairy farm at Tralagon and spent a week in Tasmania. Did Everest base camp with a bunch of ozzies 14 years ago and still keep in touch and now find them everywhere but enjoy them a lot. Take care and be safe and maybe we’ll see you on a trail somewhere
I'm sending you a PM...you won't believe this... 😉
 

Zordmot

First timer Spring 2019
Camino(s) past & future
April-May 2019
Why pilgrimage?

The advent of Covid 19 has brought this question to the fore.

Do I not find spiritual satisfaction during my daily walks in nearby parks, natural reserves and even urban areas? The answer is: yes, it is true that I usually do experience some overwhelming and inspiring realization of the beauty, diversity, joy and love of life on these journeys, large or small, arriving home bursting to paint or write to capture some of the intense inspiration and love in life. The source of this I don’t really name, but you might call it God.

So you see, I won’t be doing the Camino as a Catholic, but as mentioned above I do have a spiritual connection and awareness of the world and my purpose for this pilgrimage would definitely be spiritual. Since learning of the Camino I have been very powerfully drawn to it, often breaking into tears by the mere thought of it, overcome by a strong sense of need to do it, even having all sorts of “weird” experiences and serendipitous occurrences relative to it and to St. James, overcome by the allure of participating in this ancient journey connecting to pilgrims who have done this for thousands of years, hoping for some inexplicable enlightenment, connection, inspiration, change…perhaps as a “stranger” on earth, the need to feel part of a group of likeminded individuals who would even want to do such a thing to begin with! That unnamed, unknown-yet-known spirit that compels me to this journey!

But, with Covid 19, now I think: Is it really necessary to travel half-way around the world, perhaps risking my own health and that of others to do what might be found anywhere? After all, God is everywhere. Is this an unnecessary and somehow false need to perform a particular pilgrimage to accomplish the sorts of experiences named above? (this is a sincere question not a judgement please understand!)

As for feeling a connection with ancient people and spirituality, when I lived in northern Minnesota I always found that connection in the forests where Native American people so aptly appreciated the land with a deeply and richly felt spiritual heritage that reverberates to all who want to hear it. I agree so much with their concept that every step on the shelf of that great arrowhead reverberates through time and space to all of its inhabitants. I could hear their voices whispering in the trees and laughing along the brooks. Come to think of it, I have experienced this sort of time-transcendence all over the world and at home. It is available.

I know that many people on this forum have done Caminos in Spain on numerous occasions. What is it that makes you want to repeat this particular journey time and again? Or if you are looking at doing it for the first time, such as me, what are your thoughts?

I still want to do it but question why - why there, why now (when possible)? These are my questions but I would love to hear your answers! (Also, if anyone knows of any books written on this topic that you’d recommend please let me know. I can’t imagine I’m the first one to ask the question!)
I appreciate all that you wrote and can relate to your thoughts. My conclusion to the questions that you pose that I have asked myself is this: you walk the Camino when you cannot not walk the Camino. The Camino isn’t magical and it ultimately is not THE way. You are walking YOUR way through your life. The Camino provides time and space and things to think about as you reflect on YOUR way in a new context. And how it does this cannot be predicted or known before you walk. If you can possibly not walk the Camino, by all means don’t. If you must, put aside the valid questions you raise and go there as soon as it opens. Buen Camino!!!!!!!
 
Camino(s) past & future
The French Way (2016), Portuguese Camino (2018),
I wanted to address this in a separate post. I also want to make a special point that I am not personally offended nor should I be. I am just sharing this as a personal observation. And I do not discount any spiritual value you find while going into the wild areas.

I am a Native Indian. Both my paternal and maternal grand-parents were born and raised in the area of Tahlequah, Oklahoma. My family history, as far back as I can find, originated in the Carolinas, although many were relocated into the Oklahoma territory and Missouri.

I find what you wrote, as quoted, a bit stereotypical. The history of my people and other Native Tribes, if thoroughly researched and looked at objectively, is quite different than how many have tried to define us in terms of the environment and other ways. To me, what was posted was on the same level as those who defend Native American-themed mascots for sports teams. Whether meant as a compliment or as a derision, stereotyping is what it is.

I do not mean to offend, but thought a personal viewpoint might provide some insight.
I would honor peregrin perigrina's lived experience. No one of us owns the so called Black, Native, Irish, Spanish etc. culture. We may spring from these various cultures and hopefully we joyfully share them, warts and all.
 

peregrin peregrina

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
april 2021
I appreciate all that you wrote and can relate to your thoughts. My conclusion to the questions that you pose that I have asked myself is this: you walk the Camino when you cannot not walk the Camino. The Camino isn’t magical and it ultimately is not THE way. You are walking YOUR way through your life. The Camino provides time and space and things to think about as you reflect on YOUR way in a new context. And how it does this cannot be predicted or known before you walk. If you can possibly not walk the Camino, by all means don’t. If you must, put aside the valid questions you raise and go there as soon as it opens. Buen Camino!!!!!!!
thanks so much - i love the way you put this. no, i cannot not do it:). all the best to you.
 

Anto

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
September 2017 SJPDP to Pamplona
Hi Peregrin Peregrina
You ask a valid question. I enjoy walking but wouldn't describe myself as a hiker also I have travelled considerably before I had my first experience of Camino and whilst I always enjoy travel to new places the Camino was a whole new experience for me .
I would describe it as a spiritual experience to the extent it allowed me evaluate/cherish the life I lived up to that point in deep way that all other activities or time out periods I ever did never quite achieved.
I think there is something about walking a pilgrim path that has been there for so long and walked by countless others carrying there concerns and worries to St James in Santiago
If there's one fault I see with walking a Camino it's that returning to "real life" after a stint on the Camino can be difficult . This shouldn't be I suppose as the insights I gain into my own life with its twists and turns and ups and downs (like Camino) are relevant everywhere.
But still there is something I've found on Camino that I cannot seem to find elsewhere, but I will continue looking until I return again in 2021 please God.
 

Hugh Larkin

Perpetual Wanderer
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2014
Sanabria 2018
Pieterpad 2018
Kumano Kodo (202??)
For myself, it comes down to 4 basics:

Observe
Experience
Learn
Share

How each is utilized is as variable as us all, the same as our individual never-ending journeys whether virtual or actual.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
I would honor peregrin perigrina's lived experience. No one of us owns the so called Black, Native, Irish, Spanish etc. culture. We may spring from these various cultures and hopefully we joyfully share them, warts and all.
I do not believe that I was dishonoring anything. I do not understand what else your post is trying to say regarding the 'owning' of a culture. I do agree with those who desire the development of an insight into another 'culture', or that it can be a good thing to learn about the history of another 'race' IF it is based on facts and not on stereotypes.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Steve Goods

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2016)
Why walk the el Camino in Spain?
The question will be answered after you been walking 🚶the Way.
Many times we ask God; why, why, why? Most of the times we don’t get an immediate answer.
But for those who wait, and keep listening, will often hear an answer starting with “Because”.

I have walked twice, in 2016 and 2017. Didn’t really know what to expect.
But I went for spiritual reasons.
In 2012 I had a born again experience, here is my testimony and I started to witness and pray for people.

Before I flew to Spain, I started a blog: www.bread4life.eu and a YT channel
One of the reason I went to Spain and the Camino, was that I really didn’t find my place as a Christian. So I thought being on a long walk and meet other people, for some I could give spiritual advice and some I could pray for, might help me find some answers. And it did. Like that there is something called Sanctification. And how the Catholics worship. And how other people perceived me, and I them. How I need not to put God, or myself into a box and make limitations, but let God lead me (not always take my own decisions).
That’s a general description but I’m sure you got the idea.

On my walks in Spain, I listened to worship music while walking through the scenery of the landscape. That put a lot of joy in my heart! I also listened to sermons and scriptures.
Truly filled with the Spirit.
I shared the good news, prayed for healing when opportunity was given. I know I made an impact for some.

So whatever questions you might have now, I’m sure some answers will be given you afterwards, even for questions you even didn’t have before you started the Camino.
All the best!
 
Last edited:

Oregon's Mark

Member
Camino(s) past & future
May, 2017; return, leaving SJPP May 24, 2018, Frances #3 in May-June, 2019
I so appreciate what you've written. I'm brand new here myself, and grappling with the mere understanding of why this thing I've never done and that previously held no appeal for me now seems to be calling out to me in so many unexpected ways. I fully relate to the emotions that are suddenly welling up inside, and posted about that on another thread. I've got two lengthy hiking trips planned in the states for later this year, and while I'm looking forward to them (circumstances allowing), the mere thought of them does not stir something in my soul as do thoughts of the Camino.

So I don't know why, but I do know there is something real happening. Something undeniably real.
"two lengthy hiking trips planned in the states...." Where? My July Camino is out, and I'm looking...."
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015)
Le Puy (2016)
Vézelay (2019)
Norte (2019)
I’ve tried to answer this a thousand times, to my friends, my family but mostly to myself.
I think the long walk is the framework, the skeleton on which the Camino experience is built. That’s just where it starts. I understand that for some, it’s where it ends too, but not for me.
Then add some special ingredients:
Delight in the unexpected
Acceptance of what happens
Extreme fatigue and physical challenge
Repetition but with daily novelty
The simplicity of life on the road
The company of people I would not otherwise meet
The close presence of spiritual entities, including God and Saint James
The passage through different cultures and geography along the way
A sense of witness to history
Meticulous planning of the simplest of things - food, water, clothing, footwear, toiletting
Lastly, the liberation of knowing all you have to do is keep going, be open and wonderful things will happen to you.
Bake in the oven between -1 and 32 degrees for 6 to 10 weeks.
(Sorry about the mixed metaphor)
John
 

peregrin peregrina

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
april 2021
I’ve tried to answer this a thousand times, to my friends, my family but mostly to myself.
I think the long walk is the framework, the skeleton on which the Camino experience is built. That’s just where it starts. I understand that for some, it’s where it ends too, but not for me.
Then add some special ingredients:
Delight in the unexpected
Acceptance of what happens
Extreme fatigue and physical challenge
Repetition but with daily novelty
The simplicity of life on the road
The company of people I would not otherwise meet
The close presence of spiritual entities, including God and Saint James
The passage through different cultures and geography along the way
A sense of witness to history
Meticulous planning of the simplest of things - food, water, clothing, footwear, toiletting
Lastly, the liberation of knowing all you have to do is keep going, be open and wonderful things will happen to you.
Bake in the oven between -1 and 32 degrees for 6 to 10 weeks.
(Sorry about the mixed metaphor)
John
sounds wonderful :) thank you!
 

Rclarke

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Leaving April 6 from SJPP
ha ha nothing tantalizing, I once worked in Australia on a agricultural exchange a few miles out of the town where kazrobbo grew up. She is much younger than I and we did not identify any people we both knew. Sorry for the let down
 

kazrobbo

Tassie Kaz
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2012
CP 2015
St Olavs Norway 2016
88T Japan 2017
PWC/VF 2019
Israel 2020 X
Wales CP 21?
KK?
VdlP?
Way to tantalize the rest of the forum! ;-)
Sorry.. 🤭 It was one of those 'it's a small world after all' moments... @Rclarke & I had been replying to each others posts when he mentioned that specific small (back then) town. Time there was many decades ago for both of us although I appreciate the "much younger" comment!
I PM'd him so we didn't bore everyone else & derail the thread...which I've now inadvertently done anyway! Oops... 😇 😁
👣 🌏
 
Last edited:

Jenibee

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
TBD
"two lengthy hiking trips planned in the states...." Where? My July Camino is out, and I'm looking...."
Hey, Mark -- These are not thru-hikes, but simply trips where we'll be gone for extended periods and basically doing a lot of day hikes with an established base. Plans are to be in southern Colorado, seeing as much of the Wemenuche Wilderness area as possible, and spend time in Big Bend National Park later this year.
 

Get on our Mailing list for new products on the Camino Store and news from the Camino Forum








Advertisement

Booking.com

Camino Conversations

Camino Conversations

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

Most downloaded Resources

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 16 1.2%
  • February

    Votes: 10 0.8%
  • March

    Votes: 55 4.2%
  • April

    Votes: 196 15.0%
  • May

    Votes: 325 24.8%
  • June

    Votes: 95 7.3%
  • July

    Votes: 24 1.8%
  • August

    Votes: 27 2.1%
  • September

    Votes: 379 29.0%
  • October

    Votes: 158 12.1%
  • November

    Votes: 17 1.3%
  • December

    Votes: 7 0.5%

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store
Top
AdBlock Detected

We get it, advertisements are annoying!

Sure, ad-blocking software does a great job at blocking ads, but it also blocks useful features of our website. For the best site experience please disable your AdBlocker.

I've Disabled AdBlock