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2019 Camino Guides

Width of paths west of Santiago

WGroleau

Wandering Weirdo
Camino(s) past & future
2015 & 2016 (partial)
#1
I was planning to start the Fisterra-Muxia triangle tomorrow, but having already seen several sections of camino, I am concerned about the width of the path. I have a trailer behind my bicycle that is about 75 centimeters wide. I'd prefer to do the regular camino, but maybe I should stick to paved roads. I'm not worried about hills, as I have already survived ascents that forced me to dismount and push. (And descents that made me dismount and restrain the beast!) But I don't want to have to figure out how to get past two trees a half meter apart, and I don't want to make an already weary pilgrim climb over my trailer!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Mar 2010, May/Jun 2016, Sep 2011, 2012, Apr 2014, St Olav's Way 2018
#2
There are narrow parts of the path, and like many walking and cycling paths, the wear on the dirt and gravel sections tends to reduce the width of the usable surface. There are also sections where the wear has exposed tree roots and the underlying rocks. I don't recall seeing any sections signposted as 'no cycling', but as a walker, its not something one looks for necessarily. So it would not surprise me if there were some sections like that. Equally, I cannot remember anywhere where there were really narrow gaps, but then I wasn't reconnoitering the route to assess its utility for cycling with a trailer!

If you are doing this tomorrow, it's probably too late to suggest getting in touch with a local off-road cycling organisation to see if they know of any limitations that would stop you cycling the whole route - other than tired walkers meandering along the path.

ps. there is still a lot of road as well as forest path and roadside trail on this route. Enjoy the ride.
 

WGroleau

Wandering Weirdo
Camino(s) past & future
2015 & 2016 (partial)
#3
any limitations that would stop you cycling the whole route - other than tired walkers meandering along the path.
No problem there. Walkers have the right-of-way in my opinion. I am aware that some cyclists don't think so. My opinion of them would probably be censored were I to say it clearly.
ps. there is still a lot of road as well as forest path and roadside trail on this route. Enjoy the ride.
Yeah, I went as far as Ventosa and back a couple weeks ago without the trailer. Definitely some narrow spots, but it didn't occur to me to measure them. Also some awesome hills, but I don't think as steep as getting from the airport to the bus station in Bilbao. That one got my heart rate to 160 pedaling in low gear, and dismounted, kept it at 140.
 

WGroleau

Wandering Weirdo
Camino(s) past & future
2015 & 2016 (partial)
#4
But I don't want to have to figure out how to get past two trees a half meter apart, and I don't want to make an already weary pilgrim climb over my trailer.
Another forum thread reminded me of this wheelchair story. I used to work in an American hospital, and doors were required to be 42 inches wide for wheelchairs. That's a little more than one meter, so I may be OK.

Update: A longer version of Justin's story (eighteen minutes).
 
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KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
#5
I don't remember any really narrow (less than 75cm) on route either to Fisterra (walked it 3 times) and Muxia (one) but I don't know the Fisterra-Muxia route. Yes some parts are steep but for example just before Cee last year they made a pilgrim highway 3 meters wide, light gravel etc. on one of the steepest sections.
And as already said there are longer sections completely on asphalt. Although not a cyclist I think it's doable. Inclines are something else :)
- I especially remember the one just after Augapesada, that one is a killer.
- After Santa Marina when you turn right off the main road and go through the village you come to kind of a pass. Last year there was a diversion marked but I stayed on tarmac road as previous years and all was well. Also less altitude gain I think. - - After Sardineiro maybe it would be better to stay on the main road because there are few meters of really narrow and steep climbs. To be more exact you can stay on the Camino going out of the village but then you cross the main road and it's there were few tricky spots are. The Camino just cuts through a long curve and rejoin the main road so you will see the marker to descend to the beach.

On Muxia I don't really recall any of this spots. It might be just wise to stay on road after Dumbria (to Hospital). Easier too.

Enjoy!
 

hotelmedicis

Commercial Interests
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2001 (+more)
VDLP 2013, 2018
#6
I did it in May 2017 and I don't remember any paths narrower than 75cm. Not even narrower than 150 cms.
 

hel&scott

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2004 St Jean - Santiago, 2008 &18 Seville - Finesterre, 2010 Ferrol - Lisbon, 2012 from Cartehenga.
#9
No doubt easier, but I want the path unless really impossible.
Yes, but remember the path is the way you make it, the Camino routes have changed over the years and it's difficult to say which is the authentic route. If you are cycling with a trailer then probably best to stick to the roads, it can be a hilly narrow pitted path and walkers aren't always that receptive to bikes, as you probably know. It's also pretty quiet country road so not that bad to cycle or wander along, lovely views which ever way you go,
 

WGroleau

Wandering Weirdo
Camino(s) past & future
2015 & 2016 (partial)
#10
No doubt easier, but I want the path unless really impossible.
Santiago to Negreira: around KM 5, the "bridge" is a long piece of granite about fifteen CM wide, so everything had to be carried over that. A couple of spots where the trailer wheels brushed the thorny vines, but otherwise (so far) more than wide enough. Turns out that in the steeper parts, the dust and gravel would rather fly behind me than push the wheels forward. So I had to get off and walk. Glad there wasn't a pilgrim behind me while I was learning that.

At one point, I drank the last of the water because the map claimed there were two sources not far. One didn't exist, and the other was quite dry.
 
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WGroleau

Wandering Weirdo
Camino(s) past & future
2015 & 2016 (partial)
#11
Second day, to Ponte Olveira, where the albergue offered wifi—if someone offered them a euro to plug in the router for a half-hour. Got a flat tire on the way, so I changed the trailer wheels to put less weight on it and walked the last more than ¿five? kilometers. Here they say the nearest back shop is in CEE, eighteen kilometers. auto shop is only three, but they might not be able to fix it, and they're back the other way. So, perhaps I'll be walking all day.
 
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rappahannock_rev

Anglican Catholic Priest
Camino(s) past & future
Lourdes, Burgos & SdeC 77 (by train); Frances 12, 15 & 17; Finisterre 17; Lourdes & Aragones 18
#12
I don't remember any really narrow (less than 75cm) on route either to Fisterra (walked it 3 times) and Muxia (one) but I don't know the Fisterra-Muxia route. Yes some parts are steep but for example just before Cee last year they made a pilgrim highway 3 meters wide, light gravel etc. on one of the steepest sections.
And as already said there are longer sections completely on asphalt. Although not a cyclist I think it's doable. Inclines are something else :)
- I especially remember the one just after Augapesada, that one is a killer.
- After Santa Marina when you turn right off the main road and go through the village you come to kind of a pass. Last year there was a diversion marked but I stayed on tarmac road as previous years and all was well. Also less altitude gain I think. - - After Sardineiro maybe it would be better to stay on the main road because there are few meters of really narrow and steep climbs. To be more exact you can stay on the Camino going out of the village but then you cross the main road and it's there were few tricky spots are. The Camino just cuts through a long curve and rejoin the main road so you will see the marker to descend to the beach.

On Muxia I don't really recall any of this spots. It might be just wise to stay on road after Dumbria (to Hospital). Easier too.

Enjoy!
Yeah, I remember that hard hike up the hill after Augapesada..... But I also remember an absolutely lovely fountain of some sort half way up the hill, where one could sit and soak one's feet! And what a beautiful walk that was!
 

WGroleau

Wandering Weirdo
Camino(s) past & future
2015 & 2016 (partial)
#13
…, perhaps I'll be walking all day.
Got to Hospital, info office confirmed Cee has the nearest bike shop. Actually the second nearest, but the other is well off the Camino and almost in Cee. Decided to stay in Hospital rather than get to Cee after dark. Now in Cee, and the three days of wet are finally over. Tomorrow, Fisterra and then ???
 

WGroleau

Wandering Weirdo
Camino(s) past & future
2015 & 2016 (partial)
#14
… If you are cycling with a trailer then probably best to stick to the roads, it can be a hilly narrow pitted path and walkers aren't always that receptive to bikes, as you probably know. …
No pilgrims appeared to have any problem with me, and several bikers passed while I was walking the flat tire. Last year, maybe four hundred kilometers, the only "problem" I had with pilgrims is scaring the pants off of them after I call out in two languages that a bicycle is about to pass on ____ side, and when there's no sign they heard me, I pass at walking speed and they jump. :) I do know, unfortunately, that some cyclists are <censored>, but not all walkers are civilizecd either. Barbarians have stolen almost half of the distance markers between Santiago and Cee.
 

hel&scott

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2004 St Jean - Santiago, 2008 &18 Seville - Finesterre, 2010 Ferrol - Lisbon, 2012 from Cartehenga.
#15
Barbarians have stolen almost half of the distance markers between Santiago and Cee.
Sorry to hear this, I would have thought those concrete bollards would have been hard to move, or is it the tiles and km markers they have knicked? Glad to hear you are making solid progress even with a flat.
 

WGroleau

Wandering Weirdo
Camino(s) past & future
2015 & 2016 (partial)
#16
Sorry to hear this, I would have thought those concrete bollards would have been hard to move, or is it the tiles and km markers they have knicked? Glad to hear you are making solid progress even with a flat.
They didn't steal the concrete; they just pried out the metal plates that had the distance down to the meter. I measured two other ways, and I am pretty sure they are quite accurate.
 
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WGroleau

Wandering Weirdo
Camino(s) past & future
2015 & 2016 (partial)
#17
Decided to stay in Hospital rather than get to Cee after dark. Now in Cee, and the three days of wet are finally over. Tomorrow, Fisterra and then ???
Took my daily thyroid medicine in Hospital that morning. Next morning in Cee, I couldn't find the medicine. Emptied all the bags and pouches; dug around for a half hour; not here. Went back to Hospital: not there either. Both ends claim they cleaned thoroughly and found no pill bottles. I guess some pilgrim found it and is hoping to find me. Liiothyronine is not available in Spain. I can partially compensate by increasing my dose of levothyroxine, but it's not perfect and makes me and my doctor have to redesign a testing schedule. Oh, well. Anyway, since I had already been the Hospital-Cee route in both directions, I decided to go south to Ézaro. Incredible view from the "Mirador do Ézaro" but halfway down the hill from there, the patch put on in Cee the day before came off. No bike shop in Ézaro, so walked to Cee again!
 
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hel&scott

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2004 St Jean - Santiago, 2008 &18 Seville - Finesterre, 2010 Ferrol - Lisbon, 2012 from Cartehenga.
#18
If this keeps up you are going to have to change your tag line to "Wandering Wounded" good luck for the the rest of your wanderings it's a lovely part of the world and I hope the clouds part and you get to see the amazing views and the light dance on silvery seas.
 

WGroleau

Wandering Weirdo
Camino(s) past & future
2015 & 2016 (partial)
#19
If this keeps up you are going to have to change your tag line to "Wandering Wounded" good luck for the the rest of your wanderings it's a lovely part of the world and I hope the clouds part and you get to see the amazing views and the light dance on silvery seas.
Well, the last two days have been sunny, and the view from the "mirador do Ézaro" is quite impressive. The "wounds" from dragging bike uphill are cured by a night's sleep.
 
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