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Will they hate me?

2020 Camino Guides

J Willhaus

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016 CF;
Hospitalera, Zamora 2017, Hospitalera Grañón 2018, Hospitalera Estella 2019
I read a lot on the forum that I should try to stay in bed and not wake others until a "decent" hour on the camino. At home I get up at 5 a.m. each day, read the paper and drink my coffee, check the news and weather on my Kindle and lately practice my Spanish app until about 6:30 or 7 a.m. I often wake even earlier and hard as I try, I usually cannot go back to sleep so sometimes I am up at 4 or 4:30 a.m. Will I be able to get up and sneak off somewhere quiet until others begin to rise? I don't want to make others angry, but it might be better than me tossing and turning and squeaking around in my bunk until others think it is an appropriate time to get up. I'll have to wait for my husband to wake up and get going before I could begin to start walking anyway.
 

Tincatinker

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Lots ;0)
@J Willhaus , thank you for considering others! With a bit of careful planning you should be ok in most Albergues - there will be somewhere away from the dormitories to sit. Try to claim a bunk close to the door. Get yourself a red light for navigation and make sure your clothing and anything else you need are immediately to hand.

You may find that after a days walking you'll sleep a little longer anyways.

Buen camino
 

Aesklepius

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: St Jean Pied-de-Port to Santiago, on to Fisterra, Muxia and back to Santiago. (April-June 2016)
:) I've been thinking a lot about "dorm etiquette" these past days....most albergues require departure by 8am and I've experienced overhead lights being turned on by fellow peregrinos as early as 6, despite there being many still sleeping. You can usually find somewhere to sit outside of the room (prepare your exit the night before), mind the use of your personal light (even a red light is disturbing when shone directly at a sleeping face) and be as quiet as is possible. As far as turning the room light on - I'd say leave it off until 7, unless all are up and at it!!! Buen Camino!!!!
 

J Willhaus

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016 CF;
Hospitalera, Zamora 2017, Hospitalera Grañón 2018, Hospitalera Estella 2019
Thanks. I do have tiny red light squeeze light. I am an organized person and also prior military so I feel comfortable that I can keep my noise to a minimum. I just have to wonder how anyone could sleep until 7 a.m. though...:confused:
 

MichaelB10398

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago de Compostela, Lourdes to SdC, SJPP to SdC
Thanks. I do have tiny red light squeeze light. I am an organized person and also prior military so I feel comfortable that I can keep my noise to a minimum. I just have to wonder how anyone could sleep until 7 a.m. though...:confused:
It is your camino. Do what feels right for you. You already are considering others, so just continue to respect them, be as quiet as possible and move out when it is your time. If someone gets upset, don't take it personally, say you are sorry and don't take it personally. Enjoy the sunrise.

You are not alone. I am an early riser also and always have been. I try to get up and get out without anyone knowing I left. At times I think of being as quiet as a church mouse, but I suspect sometimes I am more like a bull in a china shop. I still try to be quiet and respectful of those asleep in their beds.
 
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natefaith

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria-Santiago (2009)
León-Ponferrada (2014)
Camino Inglés (2017)
Thanks. I do have tiny red light squeeze light. I am an organized person and also prior military so I feel comfortable that I can keep my noise to a minimum. I just have to wonder how anyone could sleep until 7 a.m. though...:confused:
For some reason this struck me as funny! I should join the military just so I can learn how to keep my noise to a minimum while I'm sneaking up on the kids to see what they're up to :)
Have a wonderful Camino!
Faith
 

J Willhaus

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016 CF;
Hospitalera, Zamora 2017, Hospitalera Grañón 2018, Hospitalera Estella 2019
Noise and light discipline--not something that seems to come naturally to everyone.
 

jirit

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2007,
Via Francigena Italy, 2008,
Jakobsweg Austria 2010,
Camino Frances 2011,
Le Puy to Lourdes 2012,
Via de la Plata 2013,
Future:
Ökumenischer (Via Regia), Germany,
Lycian Way, Turkey
I am sure after a few longest and maybe slightly painful days on the Camino...

... at the end of each day, you are served plenty of dishes of pilgrim meals all of which must be washed down with even larger quantities of Spanish wine, followed by fitful nights of sleeping on lunpy bunk beds surrounding by loud snoring neighbours, in damp cold albergues ...

...you will settle into the standard Spanish pilgrim Camino daily routine...

Not to worry.
 

RobertS26

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, (2013)
Camino Frances, (2014)
Camino Frances, (2015)
Noise and light discipline--not something that seems to come naturally to everyone.
Because it's "their Camino" and they are going to do what they normally do in the morning. If they sing at home, they sing while others are trying to sleep in the albergue. If they slam doors at home, they are going to slam doors while others are trying to sleep in the albergue. Again, because it's "their Camino" they are not going to conform to anyone else's standards.
 

tyrrek

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-SdC (4-5/2011), Ferrol-SdC (9/2011), Pamplona-SdC (3-4/2012), Camino Finisterre (10/2012), Ourense-SdC (5/2014)
If you can, sneak outside in the early hours of the morning while the others are still sleeping. So often there's something special to see; the sunrise, the moving mists, birds of prey etc.
 

rometimed

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
(SJPdP: 2015, June2020!) (Eng Way: 2015)
Try to take bottom bunks and warn people and it shouldn't be an issue.
 

J Willhaus

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016 CF;
Hospitalera, Zamora 2017, Hospitalera Grañón 2018, Hospitalera Estella 2019
I am praying for patience and hope to maintain kind thoughts for everyone I meet on the Camino. My husband says when you pray for some attribute that God always tends to provide more tests to help you practice ;). I will be glad for quiet time in the morning before the rush to get out on the road to help me center my thoughts. I'll just have to use my ninja skills to get out of the dormitory without annoying everyone else. Thank you for your support and suggestions. I look forward to starting the pilgrimage in less than 10 days now.
 

Pat Kenny

New Member
Or, instead of taking the risk waking up other fellow peregrinos, you could actually apply the empathy and consideration talked about, and stay in bed, quietly, and use the time for some reflection or pray.
buen camino
 

Sur Plus

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances May 2014
Portugues April 2017
Ditto. Like Pat Kenny said!
Needless to say, a dose of respect goes a long way on confined living space. Stay in bed and you don't run the risk
 

Icacos

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013)
Because it's "their Camino" and they are going to do what they normally do in the morning. If they sing at home, they sing while others are trying to sleep in the albergue. If they slam doors at home, they are going to slam doors while others are trying to sleep in the albergue. Again, because it's "their Camino" they are not going to conform to anyone else's standards.
:D What about the wife/husband who gets up before anyone else, goes into the kitchen, then returns ten minutes later and announces to the dormitorio, still full of sleeping pilgrims, "Tea's ready, dear"? :p
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
I read a lot on the forum that I should try to stay in bed and not wake others until a "decent" hour on the camino. At home I get up at 5 a.m. each day, read the paper and drink my coffee, check the news and weather on my Kindle and lately practice my Spanish app until about 6:30 or 7 a.m. I often wake even earlier and hard as I try, I usually cannot go back to sleep so sometimes I am up at 4 or 4:30 a.m. Will I be able to get up and sneak off somewhere quiet until others begin to rise? I don't want to make others angry, but it might be better than me tossing and turning and squeaking around in my bunk until others think it is an appropriate time to get up. I'll have to wait for my husband to wake up and get going before I could begin to start walking anyway.
Will you hate me if I snore?

Seriously:
- do the same as at home if you wish but not in the dorm,
- pack your things in the evening to reduce the noise in the morning (you can still change your clothes in the kitchen or etc. if needed),
- use head-lamp but possibly with red light or at least shade it with your palm,
- to take a bottom bunk is not a bad idea at all,
- have a great Camino ;)

Ultreia!
 

Felipe

Veteran Member
As far as I remember, 6 AM is usually OK for getting up from bed, although early risers try not to disturb late sleepers. At 7 AM, hospitaleros turn on the lights. One hour later, we are expected to be in the street.
I think that if somebody can't sleep, the proper thing would be having everything packed and leave as discreetely as possible to the common room. It is the packing, not the leaving itself, what causes disturbances and protests.
I have not walked in summer, but apparently many early risers are not people with light sleep, but the not-so-popular "bed racers"; hence another reason for the scarce collective tolerance. For the same motive, some hospitaleros, as a matter of principle, don't open doors before 6 AM.
I, too, wake up around 5 AM. But as I walk in winter or early spring, I rest comfortably in bed....I assure you, when it is freezing outside, nobody is in a hurry for leaving the warm comfort of the albergue...
 

koknesis

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances June/July 2014
Camino Aragones August 2015
Camino Sanabres (Ourense-SdC) August 2015
VdlP 2017
.... At home I get up at 5 a.m. each day, read the paper and drink my coffee, check the news and weather on my Kindle and lately practice my Spanish app until about 6:30 or 7 a.m. I often wake even earlier and hard as I try, I usually cannot go back to sleep so sometimes I am up at 4 or 4:30 a.m. ....
do you walk 20+ miles daily carrying 18+ lb backpack? some day under burning sun, some day in wet and cold. i guess it will not be a problem when you are on the trail. buen camino anyway!
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Ch. d'Arles: Oloron Ste Marie to Aragones; Frances (2016); V.d.l.P.; Sanabres (2017)
I responded to a similar thread a while ago. The preference, from the late risers, was that I should stay in bed so others can be comfortable. But the others in the albergues where I stayed last fall were often late risers. I never got up before 6:30, unless the whole room was already hopping, but I do not find it comfortable to force myself to stay in bed when I am ready to move. And the design of my backpack means that I must pack my sleeping bag first, on the bottom, if I am going to have access to the other things that I may need during the day. I don't expect those who come in later in the evening to get settled in the dorm in the dark, unless it is very late. I wear earplugs and a sleeping mask and ignore them as they do what they must to get ready for bed. But there seems to be a rule that it is inconsiderate to get up and move in the morning unless the majority is ready to do so. No, I can't drag all my gear out of the dorm to pack in the hallway. I have tried it and it doesn't work. By the way, I don't think that I have ever put a light on in a dorm, just too terrified to try. I stayed in bed in Emaus until 7am, because that was the rule of the house, and I barely had time to pack and dress and eat breakfast and help to clean up before the compulsory exit at eight. I don't have any answers; I am certainly not going to bust my budget staying in hostals and pensions so that others will not be disturbed by my rustling around at 6:30 am. Let me admit it, I don't think that is a particularly early hour and if I cannot be totally quiet I don't see why I should be urged to feel guilty about it.
 
M

Mark Lee

Guest
Have all you stuff (except your sleeping bag of course) packed the night before and ready to go. Quietly roll out of the bunk, grab your stuff and move to the common area away from the sleeping quarters. There you can organize what you need to, relax a bit and get to going without disturbing others. I don't think I stayed in an albergue that didn't have a common area, or at least a place outside to do that.
 

MTtoCamino

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francis SJPdP to Finnestere April(2014)
J Wilhaus

Do the best you can, most folks can tell when you are trying to keep quiet. You will probably have a harder time with not having access to coffee some days it may take a couple hours before you find a place open.
The vast majority of folks will not have a problem with you as long as no lights disturb them & you move into an outer room, many of the outer rooms are very comfortable.
Buen Camino
Keith
 

grayland

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Yes
If you are walking in the busy time (which now seems to be always) you may find that you are not the first one up. It has become common for people to get up at 5am or before and rush out to get to the next albergue to secure a "good" bed.
These folks are often unconcerned about waking anyone else or disturbing others. It is "their" camino and beating everyone else to the next albergue is the important thing.
It is called "The Great Bed Race" :rolleyes:
 

J Willhaus

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016 CF;
Hospitalera, Zamora 2017, Hospitalera Grañón 2018, Hospitalera Estella 2019
Thanks again all for the feedback. I would just get up and go read a bit or enjoy the early morning. Would wait to pack when my husband awoke with the later risers. I have a few instant coffee packets to tide me over if needed. Will keep all this in mind. Like Albertagirl I find lying awake in bed to be very uncomfortable. As a grow older I have developed more sleep problems.
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia (May 2016)
C. Frances (Sept 2017)
Camino Portugues (June 2019)
When I get up, a couple of people are often gone without a peep. Others get up before me and rustle around for what seems like hours and it drives me nuts. I throw everything in my pack the night before and carry it and my sleeping bag to a common area with a light to organize it. If you don´t need to leave early but you´re awake, again you can either go to a common area or outside until others are awake.
Just realized others have posted this same advice. I wonder why everyone doesn´t do this?
 

Icacos

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013)
This has been discussed before on other threads, but just a reminder ... Not everyone who gets going early is racing to the next night's lodging. Some of us early risers just like walking in the early morning, and turning around every now and again to see the sun coming up. :)
 

Louise2016

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2014 from Pamplona to Estrella, then Astorga to Santiago, and June 2016
My husband and I were always up early and out the door before sunrise. Our experience was like the others. You have everything packed or within reach and you take it out to the common area to finish packing and put on your boots. Inevitably, someone else would have snuck out of the room even earlier than us, and if we woke up because of them, we fell back to sleep. I found people, with only a couple exceptions, to be very kind and courteous when they left early in the morning. We never used a light, never seemed to need it. A couple times, because of circumstances I cant remember, we stayed in bed until others moved around. But the early morning ritual of pilgrims leaving and hitting the road just seemed so sacred. It was normally a quiet and peaceful venture. Hope that is your experience.
 

JohnCP43

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino frances 2013; Camino portugues 2015; Via francigena 2016
Initially you may not have as big a problem as you anticipate given the time zone differences between Idaho and Spain. Your Idaho 0500 wake up will be late morning in Spain. In a few days your internal biorhyrhms will adjust to "camino time".
Buon camino!
 

Felipe

Veteran Member
I am sure about the usual curfew at 22:00, but I started to have doubts about the 6 AM "official getting up" hour. After a bit of browsing, it seems so. In some albergues hospitaleros put on the lights on at 6 AM, in others cases (as Roncesvalles) they play music (Gregorian chants seems a Camino favorite). But in many other places is a kind of consensual thing...Sometimes it seems that everybody is waiting for another person to start moving, as a kind of odd psychological game.
 
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basquelady

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF (2013), CF Pamplona to V del Bierzo (2014), Baztanés, then CF (2016), CF Sahagun to SDC (2017)
I read a lot on the forum that I should try to stay in bed and not wake others until a "decent" hour on the camino. At home I get up at 5 a.m. each day, read the paper and drink my coffee, check the news and weather on my Kindle and lately practice my Spanish app until about 6:30 or 7 a.m. I often wake even earlier and hard as I try, I usually cannot go back to sleep so sometimes I am up at 4 or 4:30 a.m. Will I be able to get up and sneak off somewhere quiet until others begin to rise? I don't want to make others angry, but it might be better than me tossing and turning and squeaking around in my bunk until others think it is an appropriate time to get up. I'll have to wait for my husband to wake up and get going before I could begin to start walking anyway.
Earliest departure we endured was at 3.37! That peregrino had amused the rest of the room by loud snoring before 8pm the previous evening.
 
M

Mark Lee

Guest
When I get up, a couple of people are often gone without a peep. Others get up before me and rustle around for what seems like hours and it drives me nuts. I throw everything in my pack the night before and carry it and my sleeping bag to a common area with a light to organize it. If you don´t need to leave early but you´re awake, again you can either go to a common area or outside until others are awake.
Just realized others have posted this same advice. I wonder why everyone doesn´t do this?
ha ha....I don't know and often wondered that as I lay on my albergue bunk listening to endless minutes of rustling around by pilgrims organizing their packs in the dark in the sleeping area. It's absurdly comical sometimes. I mean just a few meters away, through a door or two is an area that is lighted and where you can actually see your stuff to organize it, ha ha. Heck, if you are carrying so much stuff it has to be inventoried and organized everyday, you are probably carrying too much.
 

bsewall

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Via de la Plata & Camino Frances (2013 & 2016).
Had a challenging experience this morning in the albergue. In a dorm room adjacent to ours the pilgrims got up at 6, turned on their room lights, opened the door to our dorm room, and turned on the lights in our room (no one in our room was awake). They ignored our protests to turn off the light and close the door. I finally got out of bed and turned off the light to our room, but closing the door was hopeless. They just opened it again and kept it open flooding our room with light. When our room finally arose 45 minutes later I went next door and asked (politely) why they kept the door open. I then received a lecture that it was the rule on the Camino that the lights went on at 6 in all albergues. I said there was no such rule. I was promptly told by one of the pilgrims that they had walked the Camino twice and they were sure of the rules. Not wanting to get into an argument, I stomped off muttering, "You don't get to make up the rules."
 

BrienC

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés 2015
Via de la Plata, 2016
Camino del Norte, 2019
Portuguese, 2021
From my experience:

The day begins, perhaps an hour before good light, our senses dull from the previous day’s exertion. Eyes kept closed as long as possible as other walkers of the Camino are heard nearby, rustling through bags, dressing, finding a lost whatever. Each morning starts the same. This fight to put off the inevitable. Putting off the effort to get up from the bunk, wriggle out of the sleeping bag and find your backpack, digging around for those clothes that smell the least. Then grabbing your toothbrush and toothpaste to seek out water and become at least a semblance of human, presentable and hygienic. Only a half hour has passed, but time seems forever in slow motion: dressing, primping, repacking for the day, strapping on trail shoes before leaving the albergue.

That is how the day begins for me. For each it is different. Simple respect is all we can give, and ask for.

Buen Camino!
 

ShellsG

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (Sept/Oct. 2015)
Life in the alberques was one of the biggest challenges of my Camino but one of the best parts of my Camino.

In Puente la Reina two of the lower bunks were taken by two ladies who kept everyone awake late packing their bags, they woke at 0530 and repacked their bags (all the while flashing those damn headlamps into my face on the upper bunk), there was a huge common kitchen area yet they chose to eat breakfast sitting on their bunks. I was beyond angry by the time I left, yet the previous evening with my new friend Clara is one of my fondest memories.

In Ages I was greeted by Esther who ran over to me, threw her arms around me and said she was so excited to see me, we spent the afternoon and evening in the bar, it was fantastic, but then I slept with 160 of my dearest and nearest friends ;-) many who snored.

In Ponferrada a German fellow told me I should be ashamed, I kept him awake with my snoring and I should be taking private rooms. I told him I could hardly prevent my snoring and he looked at me and said "Of course you can, you are fat". I was horrified and embarrassed yet none of the other roomies had been kept awake.

In one albergue the host kept his music playing until almost midnight, now it was, I suppose, to be the soothing tones of chimes and gentle sounds but it drove me batty (I also wasn't feeling well). I did finally get up and ask him to turn it off and I get the idea I may have hurt his feelings but each little chime was a needle into my head. He was also sitting at a table behind a very thin wall talking with a guest until well into the early mornings.

So, my point, some days you will be the friend and some days you will be the foe. Do what you can, be respectful of others as much as you can and accept that each night will be unique in so many many ways!
 

Phil W

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2016; Hospitalero 2017, 2018
This has been discussed before on other threads, but just a reminder ... Not everyone who gets going early is racing to the next night's lodging. Some of us early risers just like walking in the early morning, and turning around every now and again to see the sun coming up. :)
I agree, stopping to watch the sun come up or to just enjoy the morning is wonderful. I am Janet Willhaus' husband. She normally gets up before I do.
 

J Willhaus

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016 CF;
Hospitalera, Zamora 2017, Hospitalera Grañón 2018, Hospitalera Estella 2019
When I was mobilized in the military we called this rustling of bags "ferreting"--as if some ferret was going through everything in your duffleback. Whatever was needed always seemed to be in the bottom of the bag and the "ferreter" was always looking for it in the middle of the night--usually this turned out to be some personal feminine hygiene product or a bottle of Tylenol, etc. that was needed during the sleep hours. Although it was mildly annoying, I don't recall anyone being angry--although the next day the "ferreter" was usually asked about the importance of said item in the depths of the duffle bag. I don't plan to dig in my bag or rustle around.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
I don't have any answers; I am certainly not going to bust my budget staying in hostals and pensions so that others will not be disturbed by my rustling around at 6:30 am. Let me admit it, I don't think that is a particularly early hour and if I cannot be totally quiet I don't see why I should be urged to feel guilty about it.
Completely agree, 06:30 isn't inappropriately early for anyone I suppose. But I did encountered early risers in summer at 03:30!!!
All I can say or think about that was "weird". But then again the same night I most possibly snored. So sorry for that!
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
In Ponferrada a German fellow told me I should be ashamed, I kept him awake with my snoring and I should be taking private rooms. I told him I could hardly prevent my snoring and he looked at me and said "Of course you can, you are fat". I was horrified and embarrassed yet none of the other roomies had been kept awake.
Whaaat??? That's so very far away from any acceptable behaviour. Pilgrim or not!
 

Tincatinker

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Lots ;0)
Whaaat??? That's so very far away from any acceptable behaviour. Pilgrim or not!
I was violently shaken awake by an outraged pilgrim in an Albergue in Samos who told me in no uncertain terms that I should "stop snoring". It gave me little satisfaction to point out that I was wide-awake and her husband was still snoring.
 

Sur Plus

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances May 2014
Portugues April 2017
I responded to a similar thread a while ago. The preference, from the late risers, was that I should stay in bed so others can be comfortable. But the others in the albergues where I stayed last fall were often late risers. I never got up before 6:30, unless the whole room was already hopping, but I do not find it comfortable to force myself to stay in bed when I am ready to move. And the design of my backpack means that I must pack my sleeping bag first, on the bottom, if I am going to have access to the other things that I may need during the day. I don't expect those who come in later in the evening to get settled in the dorm in the dark, unless it is very late. I wear earplugs and a sleeping mask and ignore them as they do what they must to get ready for bed. But there seems to be a rule that it is inconsiderate to get up and move in the morning unless the majority is ready to do so. No, I can't drag all my gear out of the dorm to pack in the hallway. I have tried it and it doesn't work. By the way, I don't think that I have ever put a light on in a dorm, just too terrified to try. I stayed in bed in Emaus until 7am, because that was the rule of the house, and I barely had time to pack and dress and eat breakfast and help to clean up before the compulsory exit at eight. I don't have any answers; I am certainly not going to bust my budget staying in hostals and pensions so that others will not be disturbed by my rustling around at 6:30 am. Let me admit it, I don't think that is a particularly early hour and if I cannot be totally quiet I don't see why I should be urged to feel guilty about it.
Whoa Albertagirl! I think I lost count at 25 x "I" I guess it really is 'YOUR camino'.
I'm picking up from the forum that some balance and empathy would be welcome by all.
Buen camino to all
 
M

Mark Lee

Guest
When I was mobilized in the military we called this rustling of bags "ferreting"--as if some ferret was going through everything in your duffleback. Whatever was needed always seemed to be in the bottom of the bag and the "ferreter" was always looking for it in the middle of the night--usually this turned out to be some personal feminine hygiene product or a bottle of Tylenol, etc. that was needed during the sleep hours. Although it was mildly annoying, I don't recall anyone being angry--although the next day the "ferreter" was usually asked about the importance of said item in the depths of the duffle bag. I don't plan to dig in my bag or rustle around.
The units I was with in the military we called that something else. It started with the word "rat", but then again they were units where nobody had feminine hygiene products with them, ha ha. Also if one did that one would be barraged with a steady stream of vulgar and obscene words and names which questioned one's birth legitimacy and one's mother's moral standards, ha ha.
 

Icacos

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013)
The units I was with in the military we called that something else. It started with the word "rat", but then again they were units where nobody had feminine hygiene products with them, ha ha. Also if one did that one would be barraged with a steady stream of vulgar and obscene words and names which questioned one's birth legitimacy and one's mother's moral standards, ha ha.
Mark, the Camino must be such a far cry from whence you come, don't you think?? :confused: ;)
 

MTtoCamino

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francis SJPdP to Finnestere April(2014)
Whoa Albertagirl! I think I lost count at 25 x "I" I guess it really is 'YOUR camino'.
I'm picking up from the forum that some balance and empathy would be welcome by all.
Buen camino to all
Sir Plus

OUCH!!!

I must disagree I believe if you take some time to look at Albertagirl posts you will find a very kind soul.
Keith
 
M

Mark Lee

Guest
Mark, the Camino must be such a far cry from whence you come, don't you think?? :confused: ;)
Ha ha...just younger days. Good bunch of guys. One just quickly learned how to live communally. That's why I never sweat it when I'm in an albergue. Sure, now and then you get snorers, farters, bag rustlers etc, but it's just for one night...a few hours. Tomorrow is a new day and a new albergue and a new experience.
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Ch. d'Arles: Oloron Ste Marie to Aragones; Frances (2016); V.d.l.P.; Sanabres (2017)
Whoa Albertagirl! I think I lost count at 25 x "I" I guess it really is 'YOUR camino'.
I'm picking up from the forum that some balance and empathy would be welcome by all.
Buen camino to all
Well, I guess (+1"I") they really will hate me. Do you not find it hard to encourage empathy be being so critical?
 
M

Mark Lee

Guest
Maybe..... but I shudder to think of that crowd being on the Camino. Still, if you guys had been there, no doubt you would have done your mothers proud. :)
Yeah, as most guys will tell you that while young and in the military the mantra was work hard, play harder.....ha ha.
 

Pat Kenny

New Member
I often wake even earlier and hard as I try, I usually cannot go back to sleep so sometimes I am up at 4 or 4:30 a.m. Will I be able to get up and sneak off somewhere quiet until others begin to rise? I don't want to make others angry,
J Willhaus - I think your consideration of other peregrinos is most welcome and thoughtful. The thread seems to have evolved into the dread of some inconsiderate early-risers (and for balance - some inconsiderate late-retirees). If you can find a quiet space for an early morning coffee or read, then good on you. It's a great time of the day. In all this, the irony is that, the peregrinos you do not wake, because of your consideration, will not know to thank you later in the day :)
 

Stellaluna

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Coast to Coast (2015)
Frances (July 2016)
This has been discussed before on other threads, but just a reminder ... Not everyone who gets going early is racing to the next night's lodging. Some of us early risers just like walking in the early morning, and turning around every now and again to see the sun coming up. :)
Exactly. And during the summer perhaps beating the afternoon heat.
 

J Willhaus

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016 CF;
Hospitalera, Zamora 2017, Hospitalera Grañón 2018, Hospitalera Estella 2019
Well I will let you all know how it goes. Will follow up with a couple of live from the Camino posts in the coming weeks.
 

Jools

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo Juky 2015
I'm not a particularly early riser but I did find the noise produced by the early crowd (4-6am departures) quite inconsiderate at ti,es so it's nice that you think about this before you start, I'm sure with a good attitude like yours you will have a great Camino, the one thing I found the most noisy was actually rustling plastic bags, many people use them to keep dirty washing in or toiletries and probably don't realise how loud they are to someone sleeping
 

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