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Women over 60 who DON'T take a sleeping bag...

Sharry

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2020)
I'd like to hear from you.

I am struggling with whether to take or not take a sleeping bag. I know many people just take a liner, sleep with their clothes/jackets on, rely on a blanket at the albergues, etc. I'd kind of settled on that approach and then read a thread where a number of women said they would never walk without a bag or blanket of some sort. Now I'm thinking of carrying the extra pound or two just to ensure comfort and a good night's sleep.

So, women in my age group (I'm 65) who don't take a bag - how do you stay warm and comfortable at night? Any regrets to not taking one?

Thanks for your input.

Sharry
 

Theatregal

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
So far...
2012 ~ 2019
Hi @Sharry. For me, it depends on the time of year and the route I'm walking. I always bring something. In the fall or early spring I would bring a light weight bag. In the later spring or summer, a liner is fine. I also always have a light weight fleece top or jacket because even in the summer sometimes it can be cool at night - especially if you are on a mountainous route. A fleece jacket with the liner keeps you cozy.
 

WildPlace

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2013, 2015
Via de la Plata (2021)
I’m 60 it would depend on what time i’m walking, first time i walked the Frances in September took a sleeping bag, didn’t use it, next time i didn’t bother and didn’t regret it. When i walk again in April/May i’ll take it because i’m not sure how warm it will be - especially if i decide to swap over to the San Salvador and then Primitivo when i get to León.

My sleeping bag weighs at 850g it’s small, cheap and quite thin but with a merino top & leggings will be fine. I would much prefer it to albergue blankets.
 

andycohn

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF (12-15); Muxia (15); Portuguese, Primitivo (17); Norte, Ingles, VF partial (18), Le Puy (19)
Hi Sharry: There's also a compromise solution: take a sleeping bag liner and a lightweight down throw, which you can use with the liner if you feel cold. Look for the Double Black Diamond Packable Down Throw, which is available on Amazon and sometimes at Costco for $20-30. It weighs less than a pound, and the combination with the sleeping bag liner will be about 1.5 pounds, a full 1/2 pound lighter than the lightest sleeping bag you'll find. And cheaper.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
Hi Sharry: There's also a compromise solution: take a sleeping bag liner and a lightweight down throw, which you can use with the liner if you feel cold. Look for the Double Black Diamond Packable Down Throw, which is available on Amazon and sometimes at Costco for $20-30. It weighs less than a pound, and the combination with the sleeping bag liner will be about 1.5 pounds, a full 1/2 pound lighter than the lightest sleeping bag you'll find. And cheaper.
Or, to save more weight, cut the Costco blanket in half, and tuck it inside the silk liner. That's what I do with my tiny down blanket, which is just about the same size as half of a Costco blanket.
 

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016), VDLP (2017), Mozarabe (2018), Vasco/Bayona (2019)
I realize that the question wasn't directed to me - I am an old woman, according to my birth certificate, but those many years have led me to the decision to always take a sleeping bag of some sort. Maybe in July-August, which I have not done, I would consider taking only a liner.

Walking in the spring and fall, I currently favour a cheap down blanket with a zipper added (no 1/2 blanket for me!), inside a silk liner, with a merino layer and down vest added as necessary. Covering everything with a rain poncho could also help, but I don't carry a poncho.

It is important to think of your entire kit - how the layers can be used at night, remembering that they need to be dry! Merino and down are lightweight and warm. A merino buff is good at night or in early morning. A down vest can be very welcome at any time of year, and doesn't weigh much.
 

AKBee

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
September 2020
Hi Sharry: There's also a compromise solution: take a sleeping bag liner and a lightweight down throw, which you can use with the liner if you feel cold. Look for the Double Black Diamond Packable Down Throw, which is available on Amazon and sometimes at Costco for $20-30. It weighs less than a pound, and the combination with the sleeping bag liner will be about 1.5 pounds, a full 1/2 pound lighter than the lightest sleeping bag you'll find. And cheaper.
That is what I am planning to take for a September 2020 Camino. It will be my first time on the Camino but I want to have a cover at night.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
Like others have said, it depends on the time of year.
Summer months, June, July, August, maybe not, but I'll tell you I about FROZE one year in mid June in Santo Domingo, so don't think just because it's summer you'll be warm.
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2020? Looks like.... nowhere! 😁
I realize that the question wasn't directed to me - I am an old woman, according to my birth certificate, but those many years have led me to the decision to always take a sleeping bag of some sort. Maybe in July-August, which I have not done, I would consider taking only a liner.
I always take a (light!) sleeping bag even when I walk in July/August. I have been really cold in the mountains (around and after Foncebadon) and also on the way to Finisterre, where the weather turned and I even slept with all my layers on. That was in August where in other parts of the country there was a heatwave.
I would never advise to leave without some warm covering, be it a sleeping bag or a quilt as recommended by others. But hey, that is what works for me.
PS: This only applies if staying in albergues of course. If you sleep in hostals, they have sheets and blankets.
 

Stivandrer

Perambulating & Curious. Rep stravaiging offender
Camino(s) past & future
I´ve got Camino plans until 2042,
- or till I fall flat on my face, whichever comes first !!
I have a light sleeping bag ( 650 grs), always with me. ( Deuter Dreamline 500)
It is a bit on the cold side in the spring ( April / May), sufficient in Sept/ October)
I cool down in the night, my wife beams like an oven, so people are very different,
- I would never go w/out a sleeping bag... I always sleep in Albergues

post scriptum - I always sleep in wool - top to bottom....
 
Last edited:
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
I'd like to hear from you.

I am struggling with whether to take or not take a sleeping bag. I know many people just take a liner, sleep with their clothes/jackets on, rely on a blanket at the albergues, etc. I'd kind of settled on that approach and then read a thread where a number of women said they would never walk without a bag or blanket of some sort. Now I'm thinking of carrying the extra pound or two just to ensure comfort and a good night's sleep.

So, women in my age group (I'm 65) who don't take a bag - how do you stay warm and comfortable at night? Any regrets to not taking one?

Thanks for your input.

Sharry
Test out sleep systems at home. Start with some of the suggestions here.

For early spring/late fall: Turn off the heat, open your bedroom windows, (or crank down the air conditioning to the expected temperatures), and see what changes can be made or added to what you are using.

For late spring/summer: Close the windows, crank up the heat, add a humidifier, and check out a sleep system for that seasonal temp range.

This will give you an idea of what your tolerance is and what feels comfortable. If you are also willing to use clothing layers, this will give you an easy way to try things out to see if adding layers allows the potential for comfortable rest, or restlessness from wearing them.
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
I am not sure if age plays a role every time in deciding whether or not to bring a sleeping bag on the Camino. Sometimes when they are full during the height of the summer, albergue sleeping quarters are stuffy, smelly and so warm that getting into a sleeping bag is unfathomable no matter your age.
 

Cariad

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2019
I'd like to hear from you.

I am struggling with whether to take or not take a sleeping bag. I know many people just take a liner, sleep with their clothes/jackets on, rely on a blanket at the albergues, etc. I'd kind of settled on that approach and then read a thread where a number of women said they would never walk without a bag or blanket of some sort. Now I'm thinking of carrying the extra pound or two just to ensure comfort and a good night's sleep.

So, women in my age group (I'm 65) who don't take a bag - how do you stay warm and comfortable at night? Any regrets to not taking one?

Thanks for your input.

Sharry
Hi Sharry
I was 79!when I walked Camino last year. I only took a silk liner and I was fine. Now there was a few nights when it was cooler but there were extra blankets placed on my bed at the alburques. I was always fully dressed ready for the next day each night. I placed the blankets over my silk liner and was warm enough. My hubby took a light sleeping bag but very light. Buen Camino.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
The opinions are split and the advice inconsistent because people’s bodies are so different. I’m pasting in something I wrote a few years ago:

I think the "should I take a sleeping bag" question is the same as the "what are the best hiking boots" or "which backpack should I use" questions. This is a question that no one else can answer for you because it depends exclusively on your own body. I don't doubt that all of the posters have accurately reported on what feels good for them in those conditions, but they have their own unique internal heating and cooling systems. I always take a lightweight sleeping bag (850 grams), even last year arriving in Santiago in late July. But then I'm what the Spanish call "friolera", someone who gets cold easily. Only you know if that describes you too. If you're the one who always pulls out a sweater to warm up in summer air conditioning, or who needs extra layers when sitting around in the winter, then you will probably be very happy with the decision to carry a sleeping bag. If you sweat a lot and run around the house in shirt sleeves in winter, then you are likely to be fine with something much less.

Buen camino, Laurie (and I am an old woman, too, almost 70, gasp!)
 

Sharry

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2020)
Thank you all! I do think I'm going to be happiest if I take something more than a liner. I like the idea of trying out the system at home. I'm a light sleeper and it even takes a while for me to warm up in bed at night here in my 60 degree house. I don't imagine myself being comfortable sleeping with too many clothes on. (It may be that I suffer from the Princess and the Pea syndrome!) So I'll start looking at options and figuring out what more I can ditch from my pack to compensate for the weight of the quilt or sleeping bag.
 

Mycroft

Active Member
Or, to save more weight, cut the Costco blanket in half, and tuck it inside the silk liner. That's what I do with my tiny down blanket, which is just about the same size as half of a Costco blanket.
After you cut the throw in half, did you stitch up that end?
 

Mycroft

Active Member
I'd like to hear from you.

I am struggling with whether to take or not take a sleeping bag. I know many people just take a liner, sleep with their clothes/jackets on, rely on a blanket at the albergues, etc. I'd kind of settled on that approach and then read a thread where a number of women said they would never walk without a bag or blanket of some sort. Now I'm thinking of carrying the extra pound or two just to ensure comfort and a good night's sleep.

So, women in my age group (I'm 65) who don't take a bag - how do you stay warm and comfortable at night? Any regrets to not taking one?

Thanks for your input.

Sharry
Pretty much the same answers from me, Sharry--normally I do a Camino in March/April and would take my sleeping bag, and happy I did, especially that night we got 3 feet of snow at Canfranc. Then when I did the Ingles, I didn't take one--most of time it was OK/tolerable, but one albergue had not yet opened and while they kindly let me stay in the cinder block (read COLD all the time!), they would not turn on the heater. Despite wearing every stitch of clothing I brought with me, I was icy cold all night--little sleep, needless to say. Last year I shook up things, and went in September on the CP with only my liner, and that was more than enough. I've been nosing around for a used ultralight sleeping bag, but may get a compactable throw instead. Buen Camino.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
After you cut the throw in half, did you stitch up that end?
Yes. I sew a binding over that raw edge.
Before I cut I sew a row of stitches aboutn1/4 inch from the stitching on the quilt, then I cut between the two rows of stitching. This keeps too much down from escaping. Then I bind the cut edges.
 

Theatregal

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
So far...
2012 ~ 2019
Or, to save more weight, cut the Costco blanket in half, and tuck it inside the silk liner. That's what I do with my tiny down blanket, which is just about the same size as half of a Costco blanket.
Good idea! I recently bought the Costco blanket. Have you added anything (velcro tabs or little snaps) to keep the blanket from sliding around in the liner or does it stay put okay?
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia (May 2016)
C. Frances (Sept 2017)
Camino Portugues (June 2019)
I bit the bullet and bought a down quilt from Enlightened Equipment. It was expensive, but it is so comfortable in a range of temperatures and so lightweight, I never have to wonder whether I should carry it or not.
 

Anamya

Keeping it simple
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015)
Portugues (2017)
Lebaniego (2019)
I am a very young person (not even 40- not the intended audience, I know...), and also very small, so I don´t carry much weight. As I never walked I winter, I only use a liner.

On those nights I really want comfort, warmth and silence, I opt to sleep in an inn instead of albergues. I know it is not an option for everyone, but in my case I always make sure to save some money before the trip to be able to afford some of those nights along the way.
 

igailfh

Active member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Português, Camino de Tejo (Fatima)
Ok, I can only speak for me. We're all so different, feel things differently. I loathe being cold, so much so I migrated from New Zealand to Queensland, Australia so I could be warmer. You could say I'm a climate migrant, lol. I have only walked in the heat of summer. I have walked the Camino Português twice & once Lisbon to Fatima. I only take a cotton liner, have not got cold at night so far. Before I walked any Caminos though I spent a few weeks hiking in Italy in the heat of summer, & I did buy & carry a sleeping bag. That sleeping bag has never been taken out of it's bag five years later! I might need it one day, I guess.
Oh, I'll be 70 this year - I don't think age has anything to do with it. Only you can decide.
 

pelerine

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte 10, Primitivo 13, Plata 14+15, Salvador 16, Torres 17, Portugues 18, Mozarabe 19
I bit the bullet and bought a down quilt from Enlightened Equipment. It was expensive, but it is so comfortable in a range of temperatures and so lightweight, I never have to wonder whether I should carry it or not.
Many years ago I invested in a very expensive very light (300 gr) down mummy sleeping bag (Yeti I think). It has a zipper down the side which opens up completely into a blanket. And you can open the zipper from the top as usual, but also from the bottom. So you can stick out your feet when they get too hot during the night....

I will be 80 next month but, as igailfh said, age does not come into it - only you can decide!
 

easygoing

Camino Sharon
Camino(s) past & future
I have walked the Camino Francis 7 times, twice in 2017 and 2018. (2019)
I am laughing at the women that are calling themselves old in their 60s, I always thought old was 10 years older than my current age. Which is now 74. Lots of good ideas here for managing with or without a sleeping bag.
I enjoy being creative on the Camino instead of bringing everything I might need. My first Camino I brought a silk liner and one of the breathable emergency sleeping bags that inside is silver and on the outside is orange I think it was maybe 8 oz. I found I used it once.
My current system is to take a silk liner and use a blanket or two from the Albergue. I am one of these people that goes to bed cold and wakes up dripping with sweat many nights. So kicking off the blankets and a quick-drying silk liner works best for me.
I don't wear my clothes to bed like many of the people, not because it's uncomfortable, but because of the sweating issue. But this is my solution. I wear a thin tank top, silk boxer's and it I am chilly, wear my silky windbreaker (1.5 oz. Zpacks ). The windbreaker acts like a moisture barrier and keeps me extremely warm. Also dries fast.
One final word of advice. I don't understand the people that over think every small decision. Take what you think you need and if it's too heavy mail it to Ivar in Santiago. Or if you find you want more stop at one of the many outdoor stores along the Camino and buy something that you might only find in Spain. It's all part of the adventure.
Buen Camino
 

IngridF

Intrepid Peregrina
Camino(s) past & future
2012, 2015 ,2017, 2019
Or, to save more weight, cut the Costco blanket in half, and tuck it inside the silk liner. That's what I do with my tiny down blanket, which is just about the same size as half of a Costco blanket.
I like that idea. TX. I bought that blanket from Costco but decided to leave it at home. Never thought of cutting it to size for my silk liner.
 

Walking Lover

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CdS from Leon to Santiago, June 16, 2016 to June 30, 2016.
I'd like to hear from you.

I am struggling with whether to take or not take a sleeping bag. I know many people just take a liner, sleep with their clothes/jackets on, rely on a blanket at the albergues, etc. I'd kind of settled on that approach and then read a thread where a number of women said they would never walk without a bag or blanket of some sort. Now I'm thinking of carrying the extra pound or two just to ensure comfort and a good night's sleep.

So, women in my age group (I'm 65) who don't take a bag - how do you stay warm andI comfortable at night? Any regrets to not taking one?

Thanks for your input.

Sharry
 

mismiki

New Member
I'd like to hear from you.

I am struggling with whether to take or not take a sleeping bag. I know many people just take a liner, sleep with their clothes/jackets on, rely on a blanket at the albergues, etc. I'd kind of settled on that approach and then read a thread where a number of women said they would never walk without a bag or blanket of some sort. Now I'm thinking of carrying the extra pound or two just to ensure comfort and a good night's sleep.

So, women in my age group (I'm 65) who don't take a bag - how do you stay warm and comfortable at night? Any regrets to not taking one?

Thanks for your input.

Sharry
I was in my mid 60s when I did the camino frances twice, May/jun. I took a silk liner. I never had any problem with the blankets, if you don't see any, ask and they will give you one.
 

Moorwalker

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
The Saint's Way, Cornwall
I don't think age makes any difference. I sleep cold so unless I'm expecting very warm nights I always take a light fleece blanket or a down camping quilt. I figured out when i was about 15 that I hated being cold at night.
 
Camino(s) past & future
in fall 2017
I don't think age makes any difference. I sleep cold so unless I'm expecting very warm nights I always take a light fleece blanket or a down camping quilt. I figured out when i was about 15 that I hated being cold at night.
i used a different option hiking from Leon to Santiago during one of the cold snaps several years back. At 66 then i needed a bit of warmth. Before leaving home i checked that my polar fleece poncho could double as a blanket. That wasn't quite warm enough so i added my rain poncho knotted at the feet so i could tuck my feet in and it didn't pull up. the rain poncho kept my heat in and i was plenty warm with my three part sleeping system: silk liner, polar fleece poncho, rain poncho. The ponchos were homemade for my height [short] and modified to fit under my pack. kept my packable weight low and me warm and dry day and night.
 

Ksalud

Member
I'd like to hear from you.

I am struggling with whether to take or not take a sleeping bag. I know many people just take a liner, sleep with their clothes/jackets on, rely on a blanket at the albergues, etc. I'd kind of settled on that approach and then read a thread where a number of women said they would never walk without a bag or blanket of some sort. Now I'm thinking of carrying the extra pound or two just to ensure comfort and a good night's sleep.

So, women in my age group (I'm 65) who don't take a bag - how do you stay warm and comfortable at night? Any regrets to not taking one?

Thanks for your input.

Sharry
I'd like to hear from you.

I am struggling with whether to take or not take a sleeping bag. I know many people just take a liner, sleep with their clothes/jackets on, rely on a blanket at the albergues, etc. I'd kind of settled on that approach and then read a thread where a number of women said they would never walk without a bag or blanket of some sort. Now I'm thinking of carrying the extra pound or two just to ensure comfort and a good night's sleep.

So, women in my age group (I'm 65) who don't take a bag - how do you stay warm and comfortable at night? Any regrets to not taking one?

Thanks for your input.

Sharry
 

Ksalud

Member
I am 78 and ALWAYS carry a light wgt sleeping bag. Many Albergues no longer provide blankets due to Bedbugs and peregrino ladrones.
 

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
I'd like to hear from you.

I am struggling with whether to take or not take a sleeping bag. I know many people just take a liner, sleep with their clothes/jackets on, rely on a blanket at the albergues, etc. I'd kind of settled on that approach and then read a thread where a number of women said they would never walk without a bag or blanket of some sort. Now I'm thinking of carrying the extra pound or two just to ensure comfort and a good night's sleep.

So, women in my age group (I'm 65) who don't take a bag - how do you stay warm and comfortable at night? Any regrets to not taking one?

Thanks for your input.

Sharry
I walk in June. Take double silk liner, use blankets, stay in more comfortable lodgings, interspersed with albergues...routes in France and Madrid, Finisterre and Salvador.
The Frances, I used a light down sleeping bag....more bedbug issues there and blankets can be a bit dodgy.
I am 64.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
I bit the bullet and bought a down quilt from Enlightened Equipment. It was expensive, but it is so comfortable in a range of temperatures and so lightweight, I never have to wonder whether I should carry it or not.
Which model and fill and temp rating did you end up getting, Jill?
 

Sixwheeler

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Arles Route (2013/2014 onwards)
I'm a gentleman of advancing years and any thought of sleeping in my clothes is anathema to me so I always take a VERY lightweight sleeping bag and a silk liner. I find this covers all bases for the times of year when I would be walking. Also much depends on whether you sleep 'hot or 'cold', Mrs Sixwheeler assures me that I sleep hot so maybe that's why my setup works for me. Hope you find what suits you.
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
After 19 years of walking caminos I'm very happy with my sleeping arrangement - it seems to work in every type of weather. I use an extra long silk liner, with a drawstring around the top, and into the liner I put a cut down Costco blanket. No need to sew on snaps or anything else. If it's hot I push the Costco blanket aside (inside the liner), if cold I snuggle into it. If fearful of bedbugs I pull the liner right up over my head and close the drawstring and breath through the silk>which is fine for me. If it made me claustrophobic I could sew mesh insect fabric around the top, and insert a drawstring in that, instead of just using the extra long silk.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Norte (2017-18)
Portugues (2015)
Frances (2014)
Like others have said, it depends on the time of year.
Summer months, June, July, August, maybe not, but I'll tell you I about FROZE one year in mid June in Santo Domingo, so don't think just because it's summer you'll be warm.
The Spaniards on the north coast don't think June is part of "summer." Just for perspective on the issues. :)
 

kelleymac

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
March/April 2015, Late April 2016, Sept/Oct 2017, April 2019.
I take a down sleeping bag with a two way zipper (can open the foot box). I thought about going with the silk liner/costco down throw option, but then realized I wouldn't be able to stick my feet out when I got a hot flash, and I wouldn't be able to throw the covers off and then back on when needed either. So I take my sleeping bag-- it's about 800g, and it's my nest. I'm always glad to know its there. Kind of like a teddy bear, I suppose.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
I cut the hood and zipper out of my down bag. Still have a foot box. Love it.
 

Meara

It's only rock n' roll but I like it
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Ingles May 2020
I'd like to hear from you.

I am struggling with whether to take or not take a sleeping bag. I know many people just take a liner, sleep with their clothes/jackets on, rely on a blanket at the albergues, etc. I'd kind of settled on that approach and then read a thread where a number of women said they would never walk without a bag or blanket of some sort. Now I'm thinking of carrying the extra pound or two just to ensure comfort and a good night's sleep.

So, women in my age group (I'm 65) who don't take a bag - how do you stay warm and comfortable at night? Any regrets to not taking one?

Thanks for your input.

Sharry

I'm 50 and turning 51 on my Camino Ingles journey. I have never been a sleeping bag user. I've always just left them unzipped like a blanket then one day I discovered <angels singing> the backpacking quilt. I have a Thermarest down quilt that I'll be bringing on my pilgrimage in May 2020. It's super light and packs down into nothing. I have used it camping etc. and if I get too hot I can kick it off. It was the perfect solution for me.
 

Terry Callery

Chi Walker
Camino(s) past & future
"Portuguese Camino - In Search of the Infinite Moment" Amazon/Kindle books authored
"Slow Camino"
Actually it really depends more on the level of accommodations you decide on. On my last Portuguese Camino
I took no sleeping bag in February-March! That is because every nice private albergue, Quinta, Pension, Paradore Hotel and every 2-3 star hotel had bed sheets. No need for sleeping bag. At the one municipal style albergue I stayed at since I was the only game in town, I simply used one of the extra blankets provided. I had a lot more room in my back pack with no sleeping bag or liner.
 

Harington

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Vézelay/Francés 2011, Primitivo 2012, VdlP 2013, Via Domitia 2014, Inglés 2015, Francigena 2016
I'd like to hear from you.

I am struggling with whether to take or not take a sleeping bag. I know many people just take a liner, sleep with their clothes/jackets on, rely on a blanket at the albergues, etc. I'd kind of settled on that approach and then read a thread where a number of women said they would never walk without a bag or blanket of some sort. Now I'm thinking of carrying the extra pound or two just to ensure comfort and a good night's sleep.

So, women in my age group (I'm 65) who don't take a bag - how do you stay warm and comfortable at night? Any regrets to not taking one?

Thanks for your input.

Sharry
This does seem unnecessarily ageist. One might as well single out menopausal women who DON'T nned a sleeping bag at all.
 

alipilgrim

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Listed in my signature
For those of you who use a quilt, which is basically a blanket, what do put on the mattress for protection? Or are you lying on the bare mattress?
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
For those of you who use a quilt, which is basically a blanket, what do put on the mattress for protection? Or are you lying on the bare mattress?
I use a silk liner and a tiny down blanket. On cool/cold nights the blanket goes inside the silk liner.
On hot nights I put it under my silk liner on those vinyl covered mattresses to keep them from being sticky.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
On my first two caminos when I slept mostly in various albergues, I brought a cheap, super lightweight Dollar store fitted bottom twin sheet sprayed with Permathrin and placed my inexpensive lightweight sleeping bag on top. It gave me added peace of mind, along with the pillowcase which I do not spray. I now stay in a variety of private lodgings and hotels, so only bring a liner and the pillowcase for the "what if". They take up little room whether used or not.
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia (May 2016)
C. Frances (Sept 2017)
Camino Portugues (June 2019)
For those of you who use a quilt, which is basically a blanket, what do put on the mattress for protection? Or are you lying on the bare mattress?
Good questions. I bring a rectangular lightweight liner, too. This is the one I have https://www.rei.com/product/812068/sea-to-summit-premium-blend-silkcotton-liner-rectangular
(it's not cheap, but I don't scrimp on this kind of thing. One could probably make one with a sewing machine, too.) Yes, it is part cotton, but very thin and dries quickly. I hate the feel of silk or microfiber on my skin.) If it's warm, I sleep on top of the liner, just with my down quilt. Myself, I would never go to the trouble to cut my quilt in half or cut off a hood, etc. They are very lightweight and that sounds like a mess, cutting and resewing something filled with down.
 

Romalban

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2019 Camino Portugal
I'd like to hear from you.

I am struggling with whether to take or not take a sleeping bag. I know many people just take a liner, sleep with their clothes/jackets on, rely on a blanket at the albergues, etc. I'd kind of settled on that approach and then read a thread where a number of women said they would never walk without a bag or blanket of some sort. Now I'm thinking of carrying the extra pound or two just to ensure comfort and a good night's sleep.

So, women in my age group (I'm 65) who don't take a bag - how do you stay warm and comfortable at night? Any regrets to not taking one?

Thanks for your input.

Sharry
Another thing you can do is take thermal Marino long under wear, top and bottom. Can also be worn under shorts and t-shirt in the day if weather turns cold or slept in in the night. Also being Marino does not get smelly and can stretch out the days that they need to be washed.
 

alipilgrim

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Listed in my signature
I’m planning a March Camino and was wanting a warmer bag without giving up the weight savings of using my 1+ pound Costco sleeping bag. Since I have a spare bag I’ve decided to try something I read about on a Facebook Camino page. It’ll be a simple but time-consuming project:

Since the down on the underside of a sleeping bag contributes little warmth as it’s compressed when laid upon, I’m going to move most of the down from the underside to the topside, therefore doubling up the down to make a warmer sleepin bag while still keeping a thin layer of material on the bottom as protection from the mattress.

The idea is to unpick the first whole longitudinal column of stitching (keeping the row seams intact), shake all the down from the 2nd column squares into the first column squares, then resew the seam. Voila, it’s double-stuffed. Then you have to unpick the next two columns and shake all the down into the 2nd column so that’s double-stuffed and resew the column seam. And so on. Eventually all the down will be on the top half of the bag only.

I’ll let you know how it goes....
 

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016), VDLP (2017), Mozarabe (2018), Vasco/Bayona (2019)
I’m planning a March Camino and was wanting a warmer bag without giving up the weight savings of using my 1+ pound Costco sleeping bag. Since I have a spare bag I’ve decided to try something I read about on a Facebook Camino page. It’ll be a simple but time-consuming project:

Since the down on the underside of a sleeping bag contributes little warmth as it’s compressed when laid upon, I’m going to move most of the down from the underside to the topside, therefore doubling up the down to make a warmer sleepin bag while still keeping a thin layer of material on the bottom as protection from the mattress.

The idea is to unpick the first whole longitudinal column of stitching (keeping the row seams intact), shake all the down from the 2nd column squares into the first column squares, then resew the seam. Voila, it’s double-stuffed. Then you have to unpick the next two columns and shake all the down into the 2nd column so that’s double-stuffed and resew the column seam. And so on. Eventually all the down will be on the top half of the bag only.

I’ll let you know how it goes....
Wouldn't it be simpler to put both layers of the down on top of your body, inside a light-weight liner?

Or, sew another single layer on the bottom, so you have a 3-layer bag. You can either climb into the part where you have both down layers on top, or the part where you are in-between the down layers, or on a hot night you can just have the thin non-down layer on top. :D
 

chinacat

Veteran Member
Wouldn't it be simpler to put both layers of the down on top of your body, inside a light-weight liner?

Or, sew another single layer on the bottom, so you have a 3-layer bag. You can either climb into the part where you have both down layers on top, or the part where you are in-between the down layers, or on a hot night you can just have the thin non-down layer on top. :D

.... don’t you just?!! ... see clearly! 😉
 

Kumi

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
April 2020
Hi Sharry: There's also a compromise solution: take a sleeping bag liner and a lightweight down throw, which you can use with the liner if you feel cold. Look for the Double Black Diamond Packable Down Throw, which is available on Amazon and sometimes at Costco for $20-30. It weighs less than a pound, and the combination with the sleeping bag liner will be about 1.5 pounds, a full 1/2 pound lighter than the lightest sleeping bag you'll find. And cheaper.
I have that... I bought from, Costco
 

HeidiL

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2004-), Portugués, Madrid, 4/5 Plata, 1/8 Levante, 1/8 Lana, Augusta, hospitalera Grado.
I'm only 53, but since I often walk in the spring or in the winter, I need my sleeping bag. I actually ended up buying a bigger and heavier sleeping bag a few years ago, because I like being able to turn over inside my bag instead of turning over with the bag. I also had a few really cold nights - and refuse to use albergue blankets, I always think they smell.

For me, the extra weight is fine, and getting much better sleep makesme happy.
 

alipilgrim

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Listed in my signature
Wouldn't it be simpler to put both layers of the down on top of your body, inside a light-weight liner?

Or, sew another single layer on the bottom, so you have a 3-layer bag. You can either climb into the part where you have both down layers on top, or the part where you are in-between the down layers, or on a hot night you can just have the thin non-down layer on top. :D

I could, but then I’d be adding the extra 6-8 oz of weight for the liner....

This is just something fun to try.
 

FooteK

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP to SdC, 2013; Lourdes to SdC, 2015; ??? to SdC (2020)
I used a light weight sleeping bag from Decathlon, down to 45 degrees F, I believe. I did the CF in mid May - end of June. I also always wore light weight sleeping pants and night shirt. I can't imagine sleeping in the same clothes I would be walking in the next day - my skin needed a break as much as my feet did! Weight was my primary concern. My guilty pleasure, my feet get cold, so I usually wear WOOL socks while sleeping, even in the summer here (Hawaii). What can I say? ;)
 

JoEllen

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2017
2019
I'd like to hear from you.

I am struggling with whether to take or not take a sleeping bag. I know many people just take a liner, sleep with their clothes/jackets on, rely on a blanket at the albergues, etc. I'd kind of settled on that approach and then read a thread where a number of women said they would never walk without a bag or blanket of some sort. Now I'm thinking of carrying the extra pound or two just to ensure comfort and a good night's sleep.

So, women in my age group (I'm 65) who don't take a bag - how do you stay warm and comfortable at night? Any regrets to not taking one?

Thanks for your input.

Sharry
I've walked when I was 65 and 67. The first time was May/June and I did take a summer weight sleeping bag (55 degrees F) and it weighed about a pound. Second time was Sep/Oct, and I carried a down blanket, which weighed a bit less. I wouldn't go without one or the other. There were times on each trip when it was warm enough that I could have done without, but there were many times when I was cold and glad I had something. I get a little skeeved out using the albergue blankets, and they don't all have them. Both items packed down very small, so they didn't take much room in my bag.
 
D

Deleted member 86885

Guest
Good idea! I recently bought the Costco blanket. Have you added anything (velcro tabs or little snaps) to keep the blanket from sliding around in the liner or does it stay put okay?
you can sew it to the bottom inside of the liner and that works great!
 

Anthony Rocco

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Ignaciano, Aragones, Arle, Tolosana, Salvador, Primitivo, Madrid, Olvidado/Invierno (2020)
I'd like to hear from you.

I am struggling with whether to take or not take a sleeping bag. I know many people just take a liner, sleep with their clothes/jackets on, rely on a blanket at the albergues, etc. I'd kind of settled on that approach and then read a thread where a number of women said they would never walk without a bag or blanket of some sort. Now I'm thinking of carrying the extra pound or two just to ensure comfort and a good night's sleep.

So, women in my age group (I'm 65) who don't take a bag - how do you stay warm and comfortable at night? Any regrets to not taking one?

Thanks for your input.

Sharry
My wife is your age, we have walked 8 different caminos, and she has never hauled around a sleeping bag. But...to be clear...we do not walk in the cold months. If we did, we would no doubt have to carry lots more than we do. I carry 16 pounds (which includes water), she 13. That's tried and true for us after 8 caminos.
 

Marbe2

Active member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 SJPD to Burgos
2017 Leon to Santiago
Pamplona to Santiago Mar. 2018
Burgos - SCDC (Oct 18)
Thank you all! I do think I'm going to be happiest if I take something more than a liner. I like the idea of trying out the system at home. I'm a light sleeper and it even takes a while for me to warm up in bed at night here in my 60 degree house. I don't imagine myself being comfortable sleeping with too many clothes on. (It may be that I suffer from the Princess and the Pea syndrome!) So I'll start looking at options and figuring out what more I can ditch from my pack to compensate for the weight of the quilt or sleeping bag.

In March, I got to several albergues where they did not turn on the heat till someone got there. Peregrinos are less frequent atthat time, except perhaps on the last section. Some rooms the temperatures were in the fifties and took quite a while to warmup. And at night the heat went off. We slept in a 40 degree sleeping bags, fleece jackets, two long sleeve light weight shirts, long underwear and sweatpants to keep us comfortable. After walking for hours, my warm body temperature cools down quickly in a cold room!
So when you go, as others have stated, makes a big Difference!
 

frida1

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances April 11-May 11 2014
I carried a light bag on my first camino and a Costco down blanket on the second. Three caminos since then I haven’t carried anything beyond a silk liner. I get away with this, I suppose, because I don’t choose muni albergue or other places that don’t supply blankets. I’m 65, and I find my walks really enhanced by carrying as little as possible.
 

Bagobev

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Lisbon to Santiago (2017)
I am laughing at the women that are calling themselves old in their 60s, I always thought old was 10 years older than my current age. Which is now 74. Lots of good ideas here for managing with or without a sleeping bag.
I enjoy being creative on the Camino instead of bringing everything I might need. My first Camino I brought a silk liner and one of the breathable emergency sleeping bags that inside is silver and on the outside is orange I think it was maybe 8 oz. I found I used it once.
My current system is to take a silk liner and use a blanket or two from the Albergue. I am one of these people that goes to bed cold and wakes up dripping with sweat many nights. So kicking off the blankets and a quick-drying silk liner works best for me.
I don't wear my clothes to bed like many of the people, not because it's uncomfortable, but because of the sweating issue. But this is my solution. I wear a thin tank top, silk boxer's and it I am chilly, wear my silky windbreaker (1.5 oz. Zpacks ). The windbreaker acts like a moisture barrier and keeps me extremely warm. Also dries fast.
One final word of advice. I don't understand the people that over think every small decision. Take what you think you need and if it's too heavy mail it to Ivar in Santiago. Or if you find you want more stop at one of the many outdoor stores along the Camino and buy something that you might only find in Spain. It's all part of the adventure.
Buen Camino
Glad to see that someone brought up the dreaded night sweats and at 67 I have had them for twenty years now and counting. On my autumn Portuguese camino I took a Mountain Equipment Coop light weight sleeping bag and at the time of purchase it was called the Intrepid, but is now renamed the Camino It is a very thin material on one side and a bit of lightweight padding on the other with the idea being you could put the most appropriate side up depending on the temperature that night. An interesting concept but for me the problem was not being able to crawl out of the bag fast enough when the night sweats hit. Next fall I will be on the French Camino and I have purchased a lightweight down blanket which weighs the same at my old bad did, mine is a Horizon Hound but there are many on the market at various price points. I always sleep in the next day's top and undies and when it is cool I am content to sleep on the paper sheet and just throw the blanket over me. If it is warm in the albergues i will just throw my very light weight sarong over me, really just for modesty. This same article will be my towel, coverup etc.

Just a note about packable down blankets, check the measurements before you purchase as some are really only meant as a throw and would not be long enough for most pilgrims.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
Just a note about packable down blankets, check the measurements before you purchase as some are really only meant as a throw and would not be long enough for most pilgrims.
My down blanket is seriously tiny - about 35" x 60", but gives me enough warmth when I tuck it inside my silk liner.
 

Delphinoula

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C. PdC 2018 Finisterre Muxía 2018
C.Franconia 2019 C.Algeciras Sevillia 2019
Swabian C. (2020)
Well not there jet age wise but are you colder in the night with getting older? I am a sleep twister so sleeping bags and liners end up every morning me untwisting and peeling me out of it. Best try it out at home in cool bedroom since most albergues are not heated. I had a fitted sheet against mites and a poncho liner.
 

backpack45

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Vezelay (2017, in progress); Primitivo & Norte; Geneva/LePuy; Arles; Portuguese; Francés + more
Actually, my sleeping bag weighs LESS than a pound--but is costly to get 800 pound down-filled, etc. I always take it; I don't always need it--but when I do, I am certainly glad I have it. I also like having my own equipment rather than albergue blankets, etc. I do almost all of my Camino walking on trails other than the Frances--where accommodations are often much farther apart--so I also consider my sleeping bag part of my emergency equipment in case for some reason we can't make it to the next town.
 

frida1

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances April 11-May 11 2014
I like your attitude, Easygoing. When I walked my first camino in 2014 (age 60) I decided to do it, and was gone within two weeks. True, I had something going on that initiated my wanting to be away, but after researching some online and buying the Brierley guide, I was pretty much winging it. Of course, I had issues along the way, I think everyone does. I made it, and now have the Portuguese, Arles and Via Francigena under my belt. I plan to do part of the Via de la Plata in April. Now it seems that people want to know EXACTLY what every day will consist of, every item they need to bring and on and on . . .

I was lucky I had someone in my town who showed me her kit before I left and that reinforced the idea that you need very, very little. I was one who took no more than I needed, and I used it all. One change of clothes and some practical outdoor layering is all that's necessary. It's not a wilderness, after all.
 

Walli Walker

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances '2009',Portuguese '2015', Ingles '2015', Fin and Muxia '2015'. Camino from Granada '2017'.
I didn’t take a sleeping bag last year on the Norte & Primitivo (June-July) and regretted it. I found myself booking private albergues as I was cold and knew that they would have blankets. The Municipal albergues in Galicia don’t have blankets.
 

RRat

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning 2017
I'd like to hear from you.

I am struggling with whether to take or not take a sleeping bag. I know many people just take a liner, sleep with their clothes/jackets on, rely on a blanket at the albergues, etc. I'd kind of settled on that approach and then read a thread where a number of women said they would never walk without a bag or blanket of some sort. Now I'm thinking of carrying the extra pound or two just to ensure comfort and a good night's sleep.

So, women in my age group (I'm 65) who don't take a bag - how do you stay warm and comfortable at night? Any regrets to not taking one?

Thanks for your input.

Sharry
While still at home, turn off the heat to your home. Sleep in a liner, next night in a cheap $30 sleeping bag. You will have your answer.
 

Attachments

Aysen Mustafa

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
I plan on walking the Camino April 2018.
I walked the CF for the first time when I was 60 (in May 2018) and I took a very lightweight sea to summit down bag and was glad I did.
 

Sharry

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2020)
Actually, my sleeping bag weighs LESS than a pound--but is costly to get 800 pound down-filled, etc. I always take it; I don't always need it--but when I do, I am certainly glad I have it. I also like having my own equipment rather than albergue blankets, etc. I do almost all of my Camino walking on trails other than the Frances--where accommodations are often much farther apart--so I also consider my sleeping bag part of my emergency equipment in case for some reason we can't make it to the next town.
Hello backpack45. What brand and model do you have?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2017
Primitivo 2018
Finisterre/Muxía 2018
Norte 2019
I'd like to hear from you.

I am struggling with whether to take or not take a sleeping bag. I know many people just take a liner, sleep with their clothes/jackets on, rely on a blanket at the albergues, etc. I'd kind of settled on that approach and then read a thread where a number of women said they would never walk without a bag or blanket of some sort. Now I'm thinking of carrying the extra pound or two just to ensure comfort and a good night's sleep.

So, women in my age group (I'm 65) who don't take a bag - how do you stay warm and comfortable at night? Any regrets to not taking one?

Thanks for your input.

Sharry
I have no regrets to only carrying a sleeping bag liner. I am a very warm and restless sleeper and the liner has worked well. As previously mentioned it really depends on when you are walking and if you get hot or cold at night. I have only walked in March/April/ May or September and the weather was warm. On the very occasional cold night I would sleep in a merino top and leggings. My main consideration is pack weight and so I choose lightweight layers that can be worn separately or together.
Good luck and buen camino
 
Camino(s) past & future
Norte (2017-18)
Portugues (2015)
Frances (2014)
Replying to Patty Bode, whose post I don't see here for some reason, but was in the auto-generated email from Ivar's system: "I did not carry a sleeping bag. I walked for 40-days from St. Jean Pied de Port late May 19, 2019-to Santiago-Finisterre-Muxia June 29, 2019. After showering at end of day I wore leggins, long sleeved silk t-shirt and knee-length sleeveless black dress over that silk t-shirt. Then I wore my fleece jacket over that. I wore it to dinner, walked around town and wore it to bed. Every Albuquerque had blankets except for one. I did not use a liner either. I tend to be very cold, but I was fine on Camino with the clothing I just mentioned. I recommend not carrying a sleeping bag or anything else not a necessity. I am 60 years old."
Our last Camino, the Norte, I accidentally ended up with an "evening-hours and sleep dress." It was comfy. But...having to change from that to walking clothes in the morning took extra time that I really needed to devote to taping and getting going. I am intending to revert to the prior system (dine and sleep in tomorrow's clean clothes) for our next walk. Also, please don't hate me, I'm thinking of setting my watch to go "ding" at 0530. In fervent hope that there will be a place I can tape the ball of the foot and the heel at that hour! I say this, but it's really important that newbies reading will remember that Your Mileage May Vary with all of our various recommendations.
Buen camino to all!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Norte and Frances Sept 6 - Oct 11, 2016
I'd like to hear from you.

I am struggling with whether to take or not take a sleeping bag. I know many people just take a liner, sleep with their clothes/jackets on, rely on a blanket at the albergues, etc. I'd kind of settled on that approach and then read a thread where a number of women said they would never walk without a bag or blanket of some sort. Now I'm thinking of carrying the extra pound or two just to ensure comfort and a good night's sleep.

So, women in my age group (I'm 65) who don't take a bag - how do you stay warm and comfortable at night? Any regrets to not taking one?

Thanks for your input.

Sharry
I did the Norte in Sept/Oct and was fine with a liner except twice so slept in my clothes and was ok. However does depend and which Camino and time of year
 

swilcox

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Norte (2019)
I'd like to hear from you.

I am struggling with whether to take or not take a sleeping bag. I know many people just take a liner, sleep with their clothes/jackets on, rely on a blanket at the albergues, etc. I'd kind of settled on that approach and then read a thread where a number of women said they would never walk without a bag or blanket of some sort. Now I'm thinking of carrying the extra pound or two just to ensure comfort and a good night's sleep.

So, women in my age group (I'm 65) who don't take a bag - how do you stay warm and comfortable at night? Any regrets to not taking one?

Thanks for your input.

Sharry
Only one night did I have to wear my down jacket to bed in September and October. The sleeping back liner worked just fine. All the albergues had extra blankets.
Q
 

Mar Oregon

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Hoping to walk in 2020
I'd like to hear from you.

I am struggling with whether to take or not take a sleeping bag. I know many people just take a liner, sleep with their clothes/jackets on, rely on a blanket at the albergues, etc. I'd kind of settled on that approach and then read a thread where a number of women said they would never walk without a bag or blanket of some sort. Now I'm thinking of carrying the extra pound or two just to ensure comfort and a good night's sleep.

So, women in my age group (I'm 65) who don't take a bag - how do you stay warm and comfortable at night? Any regrets to not taking one?

Thanks for your input.

Sharry
Hi Sherry,
I have not yet walked the Camino but I’m planning my trip for September. I am 64 so thot I might offer my 2 cents. I will have a sleeping bag liner as well as a lightweight blanket called the Cocoon CoolMax Blanket purchased on line. It measures 70” x 55” and weights around 12 ounces. It is soft, slightly stretchy, breathable and cozy. Thinking it can be put inside the bag liner to keep it in place. It would also serve as a curtain, evening shawl or a wrap on a cold plain or train. Since this will be my first Camino I am basing my choices on the opinions of more seasoned pilgrims.
I am trusting the collective wisdom which says 1) you can buy everything you need along the Camino and 2) most albergues provide blankets. Otherwise if it’s really cold I’ll be sleeping in multiple layers of clothes and my puffy coat. Remember, age ain’t nothing but a number.
Buen Camino
 

lisac

Camino Closner
Camino(s) past & future
Frances SJPP-SDC (2017), Frances SJPP-Logrono (2018), Portuguese Porto-SDC (May 2020)
Thank you all! I do think I'm going to be happiest if I take something more than a liner. I like the idea of trying out the system at home. I'm a light sleeper and it even takes a while for me to warm up in bed at night here in my 60 degree house. I don't imagine myself being comfortable sleeping with too many clothes on. (It may be that I suffer from the Princess and the Pea syndrome!) So I'll start looking at options and figuring out what more I can ditch from my pack to compensate for the weight of the quilt or sleeping bag.
I'll add that having my sleeping bag made me feel cozy and at home each night! It was a familiar and welcome place to crawl into at the end of a long day.
 

jmaltais

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2020)
Ok, I can only speak for me. We're all so different, feel things differently. I loathe being cold, so much so I migrated from New Zealand to Queensland, Australia so I could be warmer. You could say I'm a climate migrant, lol. I have only walked in the heat of summer. I have walked the Camino Português twice & once Lisbon to Fatima. I only take a cotton liner, have not got cold at night so far. Before I walked any Caminos though I spent a few weeks hiking in Italy in the heat of summer, & I did buy & carry a sleeping bag. That sleeping bag has never been taken out of it's bag five years later! I might need it one day, I guess.
Oh, I'll be 70 this year - I don't think age has anything to do with it. Only you can decide.
I think for many people over a certain age, circulation slows down and they feel the cold more. Even though I am 72, I run warm but that's just me. It is a valid isssue.
 

drderome

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (‘19)
I'd like to hear from you.

I am struggling with whether to take or not take a sleeping bag. I know many people just take a liner, sleep with their clothes/jackets on, rely on a blanket at the albergues, etc. I'd kind of settled on that approach and then read a thread where a number of women said they would never walk without a bag or blanket of some sort. Now I'm thinking of carrying the extra pound or two just to ensure comfort and a good night's sleep.

So, women in my age group (I'm 65) who don't take a bag - how do you stay warm and comfortable at night? Any regrets to not taking one?

Thanks for your input.

Sharry
Howdy - I walked the CF starting in SJPDP on June 10 last year. It rained, snowed, sleeted, and hailed the first two days, but my liner was plenty bcs blankets were provided in the Pyrenees. After that, the heat wave hit, so all was good!
 

4 Eyes

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF from SJPP 14, VDLP from Seville 15, DN&P from Irun 16, Portuguese from Lisbon 17, CF from SJPP 18
Walked my first camino with a light weight bag. Found I did not need it. Gave it away. Walked 8 more without one. Now I try to bring things that serve more than one purpose, i.e. down jacket and thermal pants--serve as evening wear and sleeping clothes.
On your first, may be bring a bag or converted blanket as many have suggested and find out what you need. Testing at home is not quite the same.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
Howdy - I walked the CF starting in SJPDP on June 10 last year. It rained, snowed, sleeted, and hailed the first two days, but my liner was plenty bcs blankets were provided in the Pyrenees. After that, the heat wave hit, so all was good!
I thought that the albergue in Roncesvalles didn't supply blankets.
 

Ianinam

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2013 / CP 2018
Hospitalera at Roncesvalles:
2015/2016/2017/2018/2019/2020
I thought that the albergue in Roncesvalles didn't supply blankets.
You are right: there are no blankets in Roncesvalles. People who don't have a sleepingbag can buy a sleepingbag at the reception desk.
 

CWBuff

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
in Planning stage: Frances (SJPdP --> SdC) & Finisterre "2021" ... (GOD WILLING!)
Like others have said, it depends on the time of year.
Summer months, June, July, August, maybe not, but I'll tell you I about FROZE one year in mid June in Santo Domingo, so don't think just because it's summer you'll be warm.
Ok... somewhat on the side of the topic but here is another of my ACW Living History/Reenactment stories:
Gettysburg, PA. Anniversary Event (practically a MUST in the Hobby!) Those in the know, know- Jooly 1,2,3... translate very hot,humid and HOT!
You wind up sleeping in your undies on top of any cover you usually bring (BTW sleeping in the 'Buff' - pun intended and somewhat directed at a certain person who I just Know will make a comment 😋 - is not feasible as sometimes pesky tourists will unceremoniously open the fly of your tent and look in....👿 )...
Come July 2009.... and I thought I'm going to freeze to death! Winter sleeping bag,wool blanket and a quilt throw.. and it was still cold...
 

Moorwalker

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
The Saint's Way, Cornwall
I bit the bullet and bought a down quilt from Enlightened Equipment. It was expensive, but it is so comfortable in a range of temperatures and so lightweight, I never have to wonder whether I should carry it or not.
I love my Enlightened Equipment quilt. I have always hated sleeping bags, they make me feel constricted and claustrophobic. I made my own camping quilt a very long time ago before they became a Thing, then when I came across EE I bought one immediately. As you say, they are so light that it's pretty much a no-brainer about carrying one.
 

AbbyDee

Court Jester
Camino(s) past & future
In celebration of the 35th anniversary of my 25th year, I will begin my Camino in September 2017
I'd like to hear from you.

I am struggling with whether to take or not take a sleeping bag. I know many people just take a liner, sleep with their clothes/jackets on, rely on a blanket at the albergues, etc. I'd kind of settled on that approach and then read a thread where a number of women said they would never walk without a bag or blanket of some sort. Now I'm thinking of carrying the extra pound or two just to ensure comfort and a good night's sleep.

So, women in my age group (I'm 65) who don't take a bag - how do you stay warm and comfortable at night? Any regrets to not taking one?

Thanks for your input.

Sharry
I admit that I started out with an ultra light sleeping bag on my Camino in mid Sept of 2017. About 10 or so days later I left it in an albergue because I found it to be way too warm to use, and just used my sleeping bag liner. I was perfectly comfortable. Now, I was 60 years old that year and I "sleep hot" at the best of times. If you, like my husband, happen to be sensitive to the cold, then your experience will be quite different. I did have one or two "cool nights" along the way, but the albergues where I stayed had blankets for our use, so there was no problem. This what worked for me, and as they say "YMMV".

Happy Trails

Abby
 

JoEllen

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2017
2019
I'd like to hear from you.

I am struggling with whether to take or not take a sleeping bag. I know many people just take a liner, sleep with their clothes/jackets on, rely on a blanket at the albergues, etc. I'd kind of settled on that approach and then read a thread where a number of women said they would never walk without a bag or blanket of some sort. Now I'm thinking of carrying the extra pound or two just to ensure comfort and a good night's sleep.

So, women in my age group (I'm 65) who don't take a bag - how do you stay warm and comfortable at night? Any regrets to not taking one?

Thanks for your input.

Sharry
Hi Sharry....I am 68 years old and have walked the Camino twice. The first time, I took a very lightweight 55 degree Fahrenheit sleeping bag. Frankly, it was perfect. It packed down very small and was just the perfect weight for summer (2017 May-June). My second Camino I carried a down blanket. Very light and warm when needed, but it tended to slip off and I never felt the overall warmth of the sleeping bag. If I were to do it again, I would take my 55 degree sleeping bag.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
I carried a down blanket. Very light and warm when needed, but it tended to slip off and I never felt the overall warmth of the sleeping bag.
The secret of using a down quilt is to put it inside your silk liner, if you are using one.
 

easygoing

Camino Sharon
Camino(s) past & future
I have walked the Camino Francis 7 times, twice in 2017 and 2018. (2019)
I've walked the Camino every year both in spring and fall. The first time I was 68 and the last time I was 74. I carry all my own belongings and find the lighter the backpack the more comfortable I am. I carry a silk liner and use a blanket from the albergue and if it's really cold which is rare with all those people it's easy to find an extra second blanket not being used by all the people who carry sleeping bags. My silk liner is treated and has a hood so I don't really touch the blanket. I remember one night back before I was experienced enough to find a second blanket before the lights went out when I got cold and found that it's easier to put on my down jacket and my windbreaker for one night and not carry a sleeping bag for all the nights. I also have a problem waking up sweaty or should I say drenched in sweat and so a sleeping bag would be hard to dry the next day for me. Now if you're getting your luggage transported it doesn't matter what you bring but then again you're probably staying in hotels and they have lovely soft blankets and fluffy pillows. 😉😁🤭
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
I've walked the Camino every year both in spring and fall. The first time I was 68 and the last time I was 74. I carry all my own belongings and find the lighter the backpack the more comfortable I am. I carry a silk liner and use a blanket from the albergue and if it's really cold which is rare with all those people it's easy to find an extra second blanket not being used by all the people who carry sleeping bags. My silk liner is treated and has a hood so I don't really touch the blanket. I remember one night back before I was experienced enough to find a second blanket before the lights went out when I got cold and found that it's easier to put on my down jacket and my windbreaker for one night and not carry a sleeping bag for all the nights. I also have a problem waking up sweaty or should I say drenched in sweat and so a sleeping bag would be hard to dry the next day for me. Now if you're getting your luggage transported it doesn't matter what you bring but then again you're probably staying in hotels and they have lovely soft blankets and fluffy pillows. 😉😁🤭
Unfortunately, going forward fewer albergues will be supplying blankets 🙁
 

Mycroft

Active Member
Many years ago I invested in a very expensive very light (300 gr) down mummy sleeping bag (Yeti I think). It has a zipper down the side which opens up completely into a blanket. And you can open the zipper from the top as usual, but also from the bottom. So you can stick out your feet when they get too hot during the night....

I will be 80 next month but, as igailfh said, age does not come into it - only you can decide!
Let me know when you want to sell me your bag, Pelerine!
 

Mycroft

Active Member
Hi Sharry
I was 79!when I walked Camino last year. I only took a silk liner and I was fine. Now there was a few nights when it was cooler but there were extra blankets placed on my bed at the alburques. I was always fully dressed ready for the next day each night. I placed the blankets over my silk liner and was warm enough. My hubby took a light sleeping bag but very light. Buen Camino.
The other week I read the albergues won't provide blankets now--is that correct?
 

Thomas1962

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2010/2011/2012/2013: Madrid -Salvador -Primitivo 2014: EPW 2015: Amsterdam - SdC
The other week I read the albergues won't provide blankets now--is that correct?
According to the current corona rules every blanket needs to be washed after every use. For most albergues this will be not possible to do. So some albergues might still offer blankets (for an extra price) but I suppose most albergues will just not offer them any more. So it might be better not to expect blankets.
 

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