A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it

Advertisement

Luggage Transfer Correos

Women's Backpack: Mountainsmith 'Scream'

Camino Badges

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
I was visiting with a friend a couple of days ago who is an avid backpacker. She had just finished a 127 mile section in Oregon of the Pacific Crest Trail. I have known Terri since college, and she and I have done some (platonic) backpacking trips together, as well as mountaineering on some of Washington's tallest mountains.

Anyway, for this last trip she was using a Mountainsmith Scream 50 WSD (which I found out stands for Women Specific Design). Terri was enthusiastically complimentary of the pack, so I thought I'd post about it here for those who are looking at backpack purchases. I did some online research about the Scream 50 and I liked what I saw, and heard enough about it to think this might be a good pack to add to one's list of considerations.

Oh, and it is front opening, too. And it weighs in at just over 2 pounds/ 0.9 kg. And I've seen it listed for sale at prices as low as $119.00 usd.

I found a YouTube about the backpack, so take a look if interested :)

 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking.
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
What a great sense of humor you have, David! I've seen samples of your wit before on a few other threads, too!😂
 
Last edited:

Magwood

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
See signature line for links to daily posts to blogs from many caminos
Thanks @davebugg for this info. I have only used a pack with “ventilated trampoline suspended mesh backpanel”, and I really like that my back stays fairly dry with this system. Do you have any words of wisdom that might tempt me to try a pack without this ventilation system? I would very much appreciate your advice.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking.
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
I too, have only used ventilated trampoline back packs and never have the soaked back I see on other pilgrims when stopping at cafes for a break.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
I was visiting with a friend a couple of days ago who is an avid backpacker. She had just finished a 127 mile section in Oregon of the Pacific Crest Trail. I have known Terri since college, and she and I have done some (platonic) backpacking trips together, as well as mountaineering on some of Washington's tallest mountains.

Anyway, for this last trip she was using a Mountainsmith Scream 50 WSD (which I found out stands for Women Specific Design). Terri was enthusiastically complimentary of the pack, so I thought I'd post about it here for those who are looking at backpack purchases. I did some online research about the Scream 50 and I liked what I saw, and heard enough about it to think this might be a good pack to add to one's list of considerations.

Oh, and it is front opening, too. And it weighs in at just over 2 pounds/ 0.9 kg. And I've seen it listed for sale at prices as low as $119.00 usd.

I found a YouTube about the backpack, so take a look if interested :)

According to the Mountainsmith product information page it weighs 2 lb, 10 oz /1.2 kg

 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
According to the Mountainsmith product information page it weighs 2 lb, 10 oz /1.2 kg

That is true. . the information that is stated on the product page says it is 2 pounds 10 oz.

Terri gave me the weight of her backpack, which she said weighed 2 pounds and 6 ounces out-of-the-box, and she made some mods by removing excess strap material and an internal pocket which decreased the weight a few ounces further to 2 pounds 3 ounces. Sorry for the confusion, my bad.

Frequently, the manufacturers stated weight on a product will be off; that is why I always measure the weight myself. The mods that Terri made are simple to do if someone wishes to shave off a few more ounces from a new backpack.
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
Thanks @davebugg for this info. I have only used a pack with “ventilated trampoline suspended mesh backpanel”, and I really like that my back stays fairly dry with this system. Do you have any words of wisdom that might tempt me to try a pack without this ventilation system? I would very much appreciate your advice.
:) My only thought is to use what works well for you.

If I am doing physical labor, I will sweat. Digging fence posts, hoeing a garden, cutting wood, working out on a treadmill for cardio or the TRX straps for upper body. . . . Even without wearing a backpack, the back of my shirt will get wet with sweat :)

The primary goal of a proper implementation of back panel ventilation is NOT to keep a person's back dry, it is to keep puddles of sweat from 'pooling' against the back. A poor implementation of back panel ventilation will allow sweat to 'pool'. This 'pooling' is exemplified by large rivulets of sweat running down the back and into the shorts or pants.

I have used and tested a large variety of brands and models of backpacks - including zPacks and Ospreys - but the sad fact for me is that when I am under load, my back gets soaked with sweat. Irrespective of the back panel being a trampoline mesh style, like that of my Stratos 24 that I use for training day hikes, or the open mesh pad on my Gossamer Gear Mariposa, my back will get wet. IF the back panel material is designed to promote ventilation so that sweat pooling is avoided - regardless of style - it works equally well for me.

For those who have only ever used a trampoline-mesh style back panel, you may find that if you tried a flat style open mesh panel, or a 'sculpted' style open weave back panel, that it would work equally well and open up more backpack options from different manufacturers.

More than just sweat reduction, I think the main factor which determines a successful implementation of a pack's back-panel, is whether the panel reduces or eliminates 'chafing' to the back. A lot of folks are unaware - until it happens to them - how debilitating this kind of skin injury can be as it pertains to the ability to continue carrying a backpack. Chafing to the back from a backpack, is akin to blistering on the feet from shoes.

Adequate ventilation is one factor that helps; but undue pressure points on the back, the 'texture' or abrasiveness of the back panel's material as it slightly moves against the back, the panel retaining moisture - and therefore bacteria -, are also factors.

Because each person has unique thresholds of sweat production, and no singular system of a backpack back-panel implementation will be equal for everyone, the initial sentence to my reply is my best advice :)
 
Last edited:

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking.
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
I need to learn to read though - I thought you had seen the pic before on other threads out of the forum - hhmm .. oh dear, time for my siesta I think :rolleyes:
Nope...I have just noticed your awesome humor before. Along with being a Camino Angel, it's a nice attribute to have.☺
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
:) My only thought is to use what works well for you.

If I am doing physical labor, I will sweat. Digging fence posts, hoeing a garden, cutting wood, working out on a treadmill for cardio or the TRX straps for upper body. . . . Even without wearing a backpack, the back of my shirt will get wet with sweat :)

The primary goal of a proper implementation of back panel ventilation is NOT to keep a person's back dry, it is to keep puddles of sweat from 'pooling' against the back. A poor implementation of back panel ventilation will allow sweat to 'pool'. This 'pooling' is exemplified by large rivulets of sweat running down the back and into the shorts or pants.

I have used and tested a large variety of brands and models of backpacks - including zPacks and Ospreys - but the sad fact for me is that when I am under load, my back gets soaked with sweat. Irrespective of the back panel being a trampoline mesh style, like that of my Stratos 24 that I use for training day hikes, or the open mesh pad on my Gossamer Gear Mariposa, my back will get wet. IF the back panel material is designed to promote ventilation so that sweat pooling is avoided - regardless of style - it works equally well for me.

For those who have only ever used a trampoline-mesh style back panel, you may find that if you tried a flat style open mesh panel, or a 'sculpted' style open weave back panel, that it would work equally well and open up more backpack options from different manufacturers.

More than just sweat reduction, I think the main factor which determines a successful implementation of a pack's back-panel, is whether the panel reduces or eliminates 'chafing' to the back. A lot of folks are unaware - until it happens to them - how debilitating this kind of skin injury can be as it pertains to the ability to continue carrying a backpack. Chafing to the back from a backpack, is akin to blistering on the feet from shoes.

Adequate ventilation is one factor that helps; but undue pressure points on the back, the 'texture' or abrasiveness of the back panel's material as it slightly moves against the back, the panel retaining moisture - and therefore bacteria -, are also factors.

Because each person has unique thresholds of sweat production, and no singular system of a backpack back-panel implementation will be equal for everyone, the initial sentence to my reply is my best advice :)
I took a chance on a non-trampoline back style pack this year - the Gossamer Gear Ranger 35 - and I can report that after about 800 km it is very comfortable. Yes, if it's hot I do get sweaty, but non unbearably so, and I don't think that it's worse than with my trampoline style backpack. I haven't however, had to use it on any really hot days - like 95F/35C
 

Magwood

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
See signature line for links to daily posts to blogs from many caminos
Thanks Dave, I guess I have to take the plunge and try it for myself.
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
Thanks Dave, I guess I have to take the plunge and try it for myself.
If the backpack interests you, it never hurts to give it a look-see. :)

I am hopeful that folks know I am not making a specific recommendation, but just want to put the information that this backpack exists. This is especially true because a lot of folks want a good backpack which incorporates front loading capabilities, and there are not a large number of choices.

For any guys interested, the Mountainsmith Scream backpack is also available for men.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking.
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
My latest trailer - no sweat on back!!!! not a Scream, I have named it the 'S-Cargo' (escargo, geddit??).:D :D :D ;)

View attachment 59389

Whole thing folds flat in about three minutes and goes into a bag (though I usually pack it better! - thus -

View attachment 59390
I love your new Essscargo! Once again, David, your humor shines.😉
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
Are the tires in that bag?

Yes, they are 16" wheels and are on short quick-release stub axles. The drawbars separate into two sections and the lower sections fold back along the trailer .. trailer frame goes in, then wheels, then upper drawbars and waist belt .. bags go on my shoulders .. great for stepping onto public transport. (Brolly gets in the way though!).

All is aluminium except for the axle plates which are mild steel bolted onto the aluminium frame. Theme is blue as you can see ;) .

I had thought of putting up a post with photos to show how I made it, with explanation, so others who are interested can make their own - but don't know if the interest would be there.
 
Last edited:

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
My latest trailer - no sweat on back!!!! not a Scream, I have named it the 'S-Cargo' (escargo, geddit??).:D :D :D ;)


Whole thing folds flat in about three minutes and goes into a bag (though I usually pack it better! - thus -
That does it. . . I'm getting a Llama and dying its fur blue. Maybe the Llama can get its own cart. :p
 

Dani7

Stop wishing, start doing.
Camino(s) past & future
(2020) Camino Frances
I was visiting with a friend a couple of days ago who is an avid backpacker. She had just finished a 127 mile section in Oregon of the Pacific Crest Trail. I have known Terri since college, and she and I have done some (platonic) backpacking trips together, as well as mountaineering on some of Washington's tallest mountains.

Anyway, for this last trip she was using a Mountainsmith Scream 50 WSD (which I found out stands for Women Specific Design). Terri was enthusiastically complimentary of the pack, so I thought I'd post about it here for those who are looking at backpack purchases. I did some online research about the Scream 50 and I liked what I saw, and heard enough about it to think this might be a good pack to add to one's list of considerations.

Oh, and it is front opening, too. And it weighs in at just over 2 pounds/ 0.9 kg. And I've seen it listed for sale at prices as low as $119.00 usd.

I found a YouTube about the backpack, so take a look if interested :)

I so appreciate your postings regarding gear and products you have personally tested or like in this case, your friend. Thank you
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
The Scream is a very good looking pack (terrifying name though!) and I like the two vertical outer bag sections, but, re flat foam-pad backs like the Scream and tight mesh panel backs - although cool I always found that the mesh backs threw the pack too far away from the body making it unstable (for me), the weight thrown too far backwards away from my body so making me lean forwards. Also, a mesh back seemed to give the load space a sort of curve, making it difficult to pack it - but, again, maybe that is just me!

I do still have (and use) a backpack - (posting the trailer pics was only a "sweaty back" joke as the trailer is only for when I am on Camino with a big first aid kit and back-up supplies) - but my pack is also a padded foam-back, a 45+5L. Weighs just 1.06 kilos (2lbs 5 ozs), -
- but here is the thing, I used to use an Osprey but I find this one more comfortable as I can get it to adjust to my body shape, is the perfect size, fully adjustable, shower resistant but also has a bright orange integral rain cover, whistle, and with all the pockets and thingamies I want and is the tall narrow shape that I like but is a cheap Chinese make I found on Ebay and they are only £26 !! - 32 USD ? o_Oo_O

Surprisingly it is well made, very body adjustable and good material and quality zips and so on - makes me wonder if these companies also make the expensive brand name ones.

As I do with any pack I own, I cut off unneeded webbing on the straps - then sealed the cut edges with a flame .. adjust them all out as far as I will ever need then cut off the excess - sure, saves an ounce or two but also gets rid of all the useless flapping webbing ;) .

s-l1600 (1).jpgs-l1600.jpg
 
Last edited:

Book your lodging here

Get e-mail updates from Casa Ivar (Forum + Forum Store content)




Advertisement

Booking.com

Latest posts

Most downloaded Resources

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store

Casa Ivar Newsletter

Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 15 1.5%
  • February

    Votes: 5 0.5%
  • March

    Votes: 41 4.0%
  • April

    Votes: 155 15.0%
  • May

    Votes: 259 25.0%
  • June

    Votes: 80 7.7%
  • July

    Votes: 21 2.0%
  • August

    Votes: 20 1.9%
  • September

    Votes: 297 28.7%
  • October

    Votes: 124 12.0%
  • November

    Votes: 12 1.2%
  • December

    Votes: 5 0.5%
Top