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Yet another sleeping bag question!

Lucyev

Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances July 22nd (2020)
I’m planning the CF, SJPdP to Santiago staring early September, hopefully finishing in Finisterre or Muxia mid to end October. I hate being too hot or too cold!

I’m debating the eternal liner or lightweight sleeping bag question. I’m expecting it to be probably hot at the start, but much colder towards the end.

I’m even debating taking both, or is that total over kill?

I do have a light weight camping blanket I could take with a liner, but I’m not sure if this would annoy me, as I can’t imagine it would stay in place.

Can anyone recommend any inexpensive, very compressible, very lightweight sleeping bags I can look at? I tend to prefer the non mummy type and I’m UK based.

Thanks in anticipation.
 
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jeanineonthecamino

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances 2021, 2022
I needed both in June/July. Keep them as lightweight and compressible as possible. If you have both - you are covered for hot and cooler weather.

If you have a blanket - you can put it inside your liner to help keep it more in place.
 

trecile

Moderator
Staff member
Past OR future Camino
PAST - Francés, Norte, Salvador, Portuguese
I do have a light weight camping blanket I could take with a liner, but I’m not sure if this would annoy me, as I can’t imagine it would stay in place.
I put my tiny down blanket inside my silk sleep sack. I have ties on the blanket to keep it in place, or you could sew on snaps. Just make sure that they are fairly heavy duty - I tried some lightweight snaps and they didn't hold. Don't use Velcro because it can snag on the delicate silk.
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2022 CF
I’m planning the CF, SJPdP to Santiago staring early September, hopefully finishing in Finisterre or Muxia mid to end October. I hate being too hot or too cold!

I’m debating the eternal liner or lightweight sleeping bag question. I’m expecting it to be probably hot at the start, but much colder towards the end.

I’m even debating taking both, or is that total over kill?

I do have a light weight camping blanket I could take with a liner, but I’m not sure if this would annoy me, as I can’t imagine it would stay in place.

Can anyone recommend any inexpensive, very compressible, very lightweight sleeping bags I can look at? I tend to prefer the non mummy type and I’m UK based.

Thanks in anticipation.
I would try Decathlon. I bought a very reasonably priced sleeping bag (600g) years ago from Gapyear.com but unfortunately at the moment their site is off-line…
 

Pintohoo

Member
Past OR future Camino
Portugal, France
I’m planning the CF, SJPdP to Santiago staring early September, hopefully finishing in Finisterre or Muxia mid to end October. I hate being too hot or too cold!

I’m debating the eternal liner or lightweight sleeping bag question. I’m expecting it to be probably hot at the start, but much colder towards the end.

I’m even debating taking both, or is that total over kill?

I do have a light weight camping blanket I could take with a liner, but I’m not sure if this would annoy me, as I can’t imagine it would stay in place.

Can anyone recommend any inexpensive, very compressible, very lightweight sleeping bags I can look at? I tend to prefer the non mummy type and I’m UK based.

Thanks in anticipation.
For 3 years- I’ve slept in my boat in Burgundy on a bunk - all year - cabin temp in winter down to zero- summer- up to 35

Every night - in a rectangular bag opened up into a quilt

I lay on half and have half over me- in the hot nights- you just lie on top.

There’s no reason why a light down bag about 550 gram to? 800 gram bag would not work perfectly - the same. If in doubt - go for a reputable brand (I’ll probably go Sea to Summit for walking) - just make sure it’s big enough to lie on and pull around you. Works for me every night- my boat one is a cheapie and too heavy to walk with
 
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Airfix

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
French 2019
Portuguese 2021 Central
2022 Coastal
Agree with above Decathlon is good, but not that many stores in UK. You could try Go Outdoors, wide range in our local store.
I'd go for the "best" you can afford in terms of weight, compressibility and warmth. Unfortunately, these features come at a cost. Also, compressibility usually only applies to mummy bags in UK, not your preferred design.
I finally settled on a Berghaus Intrepid 700g, can't remember exact price, (£40ish?) but I'm sure it's more now.
Good luck.
 

Pintohoo

Member
Past OR future Camino
Portugal, France
It’s a down filled quilt. Very light, very compact and warm as you need it to be. But it’s not free. About $200 AUD. Worth every cent.
View attachment 121972 View attachment 121973 View attachment 121974
Gosh - probably the best I’ve seen so far - very light, very versatile- bit more than 200 bucks on this site

 
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2017 Camino Frances,
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Shinobi42

Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino de la Costa from Irun to Nueva 2018
Camino de la Costa from Nueva to Muxia (2020)
I used the MT500 from Decathlon, but had to replace the compression bag for a better one. It worked also for sleeping outside under my tarp at the beach several times on my Camino del Norte.
 
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Pintohoo

Member
Past OR future Camino
Portugal, France
I used the MT500 from Decathlon, but had to replace the compression bag for a better one. It worked also for sleeping outside under my tarp at the beach several times on my Camino del Norte.
I have a question for all ---

I've noticed that many people suggest a quilt or a bag and putting it 'inside' a liner


??????? why inside?

the people who make liners make them to go 'inside' the bags - NOT outside -- the whole point of a liner is so you don't dirty the bag and the liner is easy to wash -

so, what am I missing here please - why is everyone doing exactly the opposite of how the manufacturers design the things?


thanks
 
Past OR future Camino
Inglese 2021
I have a question for all ---

I've noticed that many people suggest a quilt or a bag and putting it 'inside' a liner


??????? why inside?

the people who make liners make them to go 'inside' the bags - NOT outside -- the whole point of a liner is so you don't dirty the bag and the liner is easy to wash -

so, what am I missing here please - why is everyone doing exactly the opposite of how the manufacturers design the things?


thanks
If you put the quilt inside the liner it will not slip off of you and on to the floor at night. I'll be using a down quilt with a silk liner and they are both surprisingly slippery. I don't even need to move and the quilt slides right off the liner sometimes.
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Past OR future Camino
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
I have a question for all ---

I've noticed that many people suggest a quilt or a bag and putting it 'inside' a liner


??????? why inside?

the people who make liners make them to go 'inside' the bags - NOT outside -- the whole point of a liner is so you don't dirty the bag and the liner is easy to wash -

so, what am I missing here please - why is everyone doing exactly the opposite of how the manufacturers design the things?

I read the suggestion on the forum (I think by @trecile) of putting the quilt inside the liner, after struggling with keeping the quilt from slipping off, and after abandoning sleeping bags because of temperature regulation problems. This solution works perfectly for me. If I'm hot, I push the quilt off my body, to the side, so that I only have the silk liner over me, if I'm cold I pull the quilt over my body and snuggle into it. It does not fall to the ground, it does not get lost in the bed, it is always right there where I need it.
 

Pintohoo

Member
Past OR future Camino
Portugal, France
I read the suggestion on the forum (I think by @trecile) of putting the quilt inside the liner, after struggling with keeping the quilt from slipping off, and after abandoning sleeping bags because of temperature regulation problems. This solution works perfectly for me. If I'm hot, I push the quilt off my body, to the side, so that I only have the silk liner over me, if I'm cold I pull the quilt over my body and snuggle into it. It does not fall to the ground, it does not get lost in the bed, it is always right there where I need it.

One thing that I noticed is that some of the quilts I've been looking at for walking - so, light weight down - come with a variety of ways of keeping the quilt on a sleeping mat (I can't remember which ones and which mats - I've got several saved up in my shopping list on amazon). Of course - that doesn't help if you're using a slippery quilt on a bed - but, the way I sleep on my boat is that I lay on half of the quilt (a rectangular bag opened up) and I sleep on a skippers bunk against the wall of my boat- I have the hinge side of the bag to the wall - so, the quilt can't possibly fall onto the floor - unless I too, fall onto the floor) - it works for me - but, my boat quilt isn't slippery - when I buy one for walking - I'll try it on the boat - if I end up on the floor in the middle of the night - I'll let everyone know :)
 
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MichelleElynHogan

Veteran Member
I’m planning the CF, SJPdP to Santiago staring early September, hopefully finishing in Finisterre or Muxia mid to end October. I hate being too hot or too cold!

I’m debating the eternal liner or lightweight sleeping bag question. I’m expecting it to be probably hot at the start, but much colder towards the end.

I’m even debating taking both, or is that total over kill?

I do have a light weight camping blanket I could take with a liner, but I’m not sure if this would annoy me, as I can’t imagine it would stay in place.

Can anyone recommend any inexpensive, very compressible, very lightweight sleeping bags I can look at? I tend to prefer the non mummy type and I’m UK based.

Thanks in anticipation.
How big is your microfibre towel? Mine is big enough that it has been used as a blanket. Though a silk liner has other attributes. The weight cost for a liner is what, 4 to 6 ounces?

If it were me, I would take a sleeping bag, no more than 1 lb, the liner and you need a towel anyway.

Check what Vango and Decathalon have, talk with their online chat folks requiring a bag of no more than 1 lb. In the USA, they have a maker that offers an incredible bag but at an incredible price, even on sale their full system costs more than US$400. But it is so small and warm, and versatile. It is called ZenBivy. I will say no more.
 

Stroller

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Norte (2015), Frances (2016)
Try Snugpac relatively cheap, UK supplier, can be found used and then cleaned, and have worked well for me walking in late August/September/October. Not the lightest possible but not heavy.
 
Past OR future Camino
2019
I’m planning the CF, SJPdP to Santiago staring early September, hopefully finishing in Finisterre or Muxia mid to end October. I hate being too hot or too cold!

I’m debating the eternal liner or lightweight sleeping bag question. I’m expecting it to be probably hot at the start, but much colder towards the end.

I’m even debating taking both, or is that total over kill?

I do have a light weight camping blanket I could take with a liner, but I’m not sure if this would annoy me, as I can’t imagine it would stay in place.

Can anyone recommend any inexpensive, very compressible, very lightweight sleeping bags I can look at? I tend to prefer the non mummy type and I’m UK based.

Thanks in anticipation.

Hi Lucy
I have walked in April, May. June, July. September and October and I have always found a liner to be plenty warm enough. Having said that I do not really feel the cold. My walk that finished in the last week in October was probably the nicest temperature wise. Hope this helps.
Buen Camino
Vince
 

trecile

Moderator
Staff member
Past OR future Camino
PAST - Francés, Norte, Salvador, Portuguese
I have a question for all ---

I've noticed that many people suggest a quilt or a bag and putting it 'inside' a liner


??????? why inside?

the people who make liners make them to go 'inside' the bags - NOT outside -- the whole point of a liner is so you don't dirty the bag and the liner is easy to wash -

so, what am I missing here please - why is everyone doing exactly the opposite of how the manufacturers design the things?


thanks
In albergues on the Camino people use silk liners instead of sleeping bags. In other words the liner becomes the sleeping bag, so it is used differently than it would be on a camping trip.
 

CaminoKatie

New Member
Past OR future Camino
September 2022
I’m planning the CF, SJPdP to Santiago staring early September, hopefully finishing in Finisterre or Muxia mid to end October. I hate being too hot or too cold!

I’m debating the eternal liner or lightweight sleeping bag question. I’m expecting it to be probably hot at the start, but much colder towards the end.

I’m even debating taking both, or is that total over kill?

I do have a light weight camping blanket I could take with a liner, but I’m not sure if this would annoy me, as I can’t imagine it would stay in place.

Can anyone recommend any inexpensive, very compressible, very lightweight sleeping bags I can look at? I tend to prefer the non mummy type and I’m UK based.

Thanks in anticipation.
I'm planning on the CF the same time as you(!), and have researched my brains out re: what to sleep in? I too can't handle being too hot or (especially) too cold, and finally yesterday came up with a plan. I'm going to use a "Friendly Swede" microfiber sleeping bag liner (to me much nicer/cozier than silk or polyester) with a zipper (for ease of getting in and out of in the middle of the night without disturbing my bunk mate), along with a Horizon Hound down blanket. The bag liner weighs 1 lb, 1.6 oz and the blanket weighs 1 lb, 1 oz, for a total of 2 lbs, 2.6 oz... heavier than I'd like, but the peace of mind they'll bring me will be worth it (she says from the comfort of her living room couch... haha). I plan on sewing ties to the corners of each to keep the blanket from slipping off me in the middle of the night. Plan B might involve opting for a "Friendly Swede" polyester sleeping bag liner, which only weighs 9.17 oz... 8.43(!) ounces less than the microfiber one... most likely worth the trade off in fabrics. To be determined. : )
 
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JordonOzero

New Member
Past OR future Camino
CF x 3
My Therma-a-Rest down quilt (suggested good down to 0c) has loops down both sides. It is designed to be part of a sleep system using a sleeping pad and a pad cover with straps so all three pieces stay together. However, for a cooler Camino You could easily put some straps on a travel liner to keep the quilt in place while outside the liner. I’m sure for many, having the quilt inside the liner is a better/easier working solution but I don’t like any constriction (read claustrophobia) so outside the liner is a better option for me.
 

Linda P

Anxiously awaiting my first Camino
Past OR future Camino
Camino de Frances (2022)
I’m planning the CF, SJPdP to Santiago staring early September, hopefully finishing in Finisterre or Muxia mid to end October. I hate being too hot or too cold!

I’m debating the eternal liner or lightweight sleeping bag question. I’m expecting it to be probably hot at the start, but much colder towards the end.

I’m even debating taking both, or is that total over kill?

I do have a light weight camping blanket I could take with a liner, but I’m not sure if this would annoy me, as I can’t imagine it would stay in place.

Can anyone recommend any inexpensive, very compressible, very lightweight sleeping bags I can look at? I tend to prefer the non mummy type and I’m UK based.

Thanks in anticipation.
I will be walking at the same time with friends and I've concocted my own sleeping system very economically. I'm from the US, so got the liner on Amazon and the down throw at Costco. I cut it down to the size I wanted, then sewed the liner into the throw on the top and right side so it wouldn't slide out. I've kept the left side and bottom open so I can sleep with only the liner on me if it's warm. It did take a little effort, but for me I think it's the right solution. I also have the My Pillow Roll&Go Anywhere, which tucks into the liner on the top. Total weight is 20.75 oz, just a little over a pound, so works for me.
Lots of great suggestions here ... you'll find what's right for you!
 

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Pintohoo

Member
Past OR future Camino
Portugal, France
I bought a synthetic 55 degree Puffle Adventure Quilt that converts to a sleeping bag and has drawstrings at top and bottom. https://sierramadreresearch.com/products/puffle-55-adventure-blanket So far, at home, I love the Puffle. I chose the synthetic over down due to cost. I am doing the Camino Portuguez Coastal in May from Porto to Santiago.

weight is good, temp ok -- there's a LOT of advantages of synthetic over down. Down is great - until it gets wet - then - oh dear, not so great.
 

nidarosa

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Inglés 2009+2017, Francés 2012+2018, Astorga-Santiago repeatedly
I cut it down to the size I wanted, then sewed the liner into the throw on the top and right side so it wouldn't slide out.
I have ties on the blanket to keep it in place, or you could sew on snaps.
Just had a brainwave and made a similar, but less permanent arrangement: I have cut a BD down throw in two equal pieces, took one of them, sewed buttons to each bottom end, put it inside a silk liner with a zip, then matched up the throw and liner with the button at each bottom corner, and put an elastic band around the liner covered button ... yes, the throw will be on the inside but no sewing was required apart from a few stitches for the button. If it gets hot, I can just remove the elastic bands, pull the throw out and use the liner on its own. Elastic bands can be replaced as necessary.

Edit: I got carried away and put a button at one top corner as well, and fastened it to the liner on the opposite side of the zip. Hah! It's going nowhere now unless I take it off!
Also, I can easily change my silk liner if need be. 385g for the lot, less than my S2S Traveller1 - and on my next walk I know I will need a liner/bag for 2 nights out of many, so I don't have to take the expensive Tr1 and have to keep it compressed for weeks. Feeling v pleased with self.
 
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erith long

Member
Past OR future Camino
Camin0 Frances (2004, 2008), Camino Portugues (2010), Camino del Norte (2012) Via de la Plata planing April92014), CaminoiPortugues (2015.)
I have bought a cheap envelope type sleeping bag in a Charity Shop,{i live in the UK}. i took my time. and took all the stiches that keep the lining an stuffing together, undid a small part of the zipper seam, pulled out all the batting or stuffing, sew the small aperture back again, and voila!!! I have an amazing light weight sleeping bag, and cheap too.
I have been using this for years, and I am still very happy with it/
 

BillW

New Member
Past OR future Camino
2022
Thanks for the thread. I'm struggling with similar questions.

I'm leaving from Le Puy August 16, and hope to make it to Finisterre/Muxia by November 1.

- It will be hot in August and early September so carrying a blanket seems a little crazy to me but when we get into the October, I'm thinking cool nights might be more problematic.

- I get cold easily so I usually sleep with a couple of blankets at home.

- I hate tight mummy-life sleeping bags.

Three strategies I've been thinking of:

1) Liner with a down blanket. (Based on this thread, this seems common. Love the idea of putting the blanket inside the liner.)

Or...

2) Two liners. I haven't heard anyone else comment on this. I was thinking this may be a little be lighter.

Or...

3) One liner, then buy something along the way if I need it. (I'm trying not to "pack my fears" although, I must admit, its against my nature. I'd rather have every contingency covered before I leave, but everyone says "the Camino provides" so I suspect some faith is necessary. ;))

Your thoughts and advice appreciated.

- Bill.
 
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PJThomasJP

New Member
Past OR future Camino
2019 Salvador y Primitivo
2022 Olvidado y Invierno
I’m planning the CF, SJPdP to Santiago staring early September, hopefully finishing in Finisterre or Muxia mid to end October. I hate being too hot or too cold!

I’m debating the eternal liner or lightweight sleeping bag question. I’m expecting it to be probably hot at the start, but much colder towards the end.

I’m even debating taking both, or is that total over kill?

I do have a light weight camping blanket I could take with a liner, but I’m not sure if this would annoy me, as I can’t imagine it would stay in place.

Can anyone recommend any inexpensive, very compressible, very lightweight sleeping bags I can look at? I tend to prefer the non mummy type and I’m UK based.

Thanks in anticipation.
Hi Lucy, This is what I use. It's 500 gms. https://www.amazon.com.au/gp/product/B07BLHBV5F/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&th=1
 

Lucyev

Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances July 22nd (2020)
Thanks for the thread. I'm struggling with similar questions.

I'm leaving from Le Puy August 16, and hope to make it to Finisterre/Muxia by November 1.

- It will be hot in August and early September so carrying a blanket seems a little crazy to me but when we get into the October, I'm thinking cool nights might be more problematic.

- I get cold easily so I usually sleep with a couple of blankets at home.

- I hate tight mummy-life sleeping bags.

Three strategies I've been thinking of:

1) Liner with a down blanket. (Based on this thread, this seems common. Love the idea of putting the blanket inside the liner.)

Or...

2) Two liners. I haven't heard anyone else comment on this. I was thinking this may be a little be lighter.

Or...

3) One liner, then buy something along the way if I need it. (I'm trying not to "pack my fears" although, I must admit, its against my nature. I'd rather have every contingency covered before I leave, but everyone says "the Camino provides" so I suspect some faith is necessary. ;))

Your thoughts and advice appreciated.

- Bill.
I just googled that route Bill, impressive! I wonder if our paths will cross?

Buen Camino,

Lucy
 
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good_old_shoes

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Francés ('15, '19)
Via Coloniensis ('16)
Trier-Nancy + Le Puy-Fisterra ('17)
Aragonés ('18)
@BillW in your case a very lightweight liner (silk for example) plus a lightweight rectangular sleeping bag might work. You can use the liner when it's really warm, add the opened sleeping bag as a blanket when it's a bit colder, and close the sleeping bag when it's cold. A silk liner weighs ~150g and a lightweight sleeping bag shouldn't have much more than 500g.

If you know you're a cold sleeper, bringing adequate gear is not "packing your fears" but a good idea.

August will likely be warm, so of course you could also start with just a liner and then buy a sleeping bag or blanket once it gets colder or if you realize it's too cold for you. For a cold sleeper, a liner only might or might not work in summer. If you haven't tried, it's difficult to know. It can be cold at night at higher altitude, even if it's 35°C at daytime. I was cold some nights in july even with a light sleeping bag... I'd never walk with a liner only, but that's just me.

And very nice route, by the way. Bon chemin and buen camino!
 

CarolamS

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2019
Hi @Lucyev you have some great replies. As a fellow UK resident I suggest you look at the Alpkit Cloud Cover it's a lightweight hydrophobic down blanket that stuffs into it's own pocket. Drawcords at each end and poppers down the sides give lots of usage options. I love mine and used it on Camino in September/October. Mostly I cinch the bottom and use a couple of poppers to create a footbox then leave the rest open. I also took a silk liner but ended up just using that as a pillow case. I still haven't decided whether to take the liner or not another time...probably not.
I also use my Cloud cover at home when it's a bit chilly and I want to be cosy on my sofa :)
Good luck with your decision making and
Buen Camino
 

howardd5

Active Member
I’m planning the CF, SJPdP to Santiago staring early September, hopefully finishing in Finisterre or Muxia mid to end October. I hate being too hot or too cold!

I’m debating the eternal liner or lightweight sleeping bag question. I’m expecting it to be probably hot at the start, but much colder towards the end.

I’m even debating taking both, or is that total over kill?

I do have a light weight camping blanket I could take with a liner, but I’m not sure if this would annoy me, as I can’t imagine it would stay in place.

Can anyone recommend any inexpensive, very compressible, very lightweight sleeping bags I can look at? I tend to prefer the non mummy type and I’m UK based.

Thanks in anticipation.
I’m in favor of lite weight down bag for sure . A light quilt sound good but I traveled with someone who had a quilt and in the morning was always be on the top of the mattress cover, remember there is no sheet and hundreds of pilgrim have slept on the mattress cover . It’s good to bring a large pillow case , you can even sow to the top of the bag
 

Lucyev

Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances July 22nd (2020)
Hi @Lucyev you have some great replies. As a fellow UK resident I suggest you look at the Alpkit Cloud Cover it's a lightweight hydrophobic down blanket that stuffs into it's own pocket. Drawcords at each end and poppers down the sides give lots of usage options. I love mine and used it on Camino in September/October. Mostly I cinch the bottom and use a couple of poppers to create a footbox then leave the rest open. I also took a silk liner but ended up just using that as a pillow case. I still haven't decided whether to take the liner or not another time...probably not.
I also use my Cloud cover at home when it's a bit chilly and I want to be cosy on my sofa :)
Good luck with your decision making and
Buen Camino
Thank you! I have not heard of this company but was impressed with the one you recommended. It looks fab, but it’s very £££!
 

CarolamS

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2019
Thank you! I have not heard of this company but was impressed with the one you recommended. It looks fab, but it’s very £££!
It isn't a cheap solution. I use mine a lot which justifies the investment a little more. Apart from at home it enabled me to risk buying a smaller lighter sleeping bag for camping knowing I could use my Cloud Cover too on colder nights. I also like that it is an ethical sustainable product that will last me a long time. (I do believe Alpkit are a company that tries to make good quality products that do the job well for a reasonable price.) As you've found from your responses to this thread there are a lot of solutions 😅 Best wishes and have a great Camino.
 
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GailGwyn

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
part Camino Frances (2013), Part Camino Norte (2014)Camino Frances (2019)Camino Portuguese (2020)
Hi @Lucyev you have some great replies. As a fellow UK resident I suggest you look at the Alpkit Cloud Cover it's a lightweight hydrophobic down blanket that stuffs into it's own pocket. Drawcords at each end and poppers down the sides give lots of usage options. I love mine and used it on Camino in September/October. Mostly I cinch the bottom and use a couple of poppers to create a footbox then leave the rest open. I also took a silk liner but ended up just using that as a pillow case. I still haven't decided whether to take the liner or not another time...probably not.
I also use my Cloud cover at home when it's a bit chilly and I want to be cosy on my sofa :)
Good luck with your decision making and
Buen Camino
I just bought one of these after reading recommendations on this site. Going to use it on my next Camino in a few weeks time.
 

Karl Oz

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
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RussB

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Still planning
I’m planning the CF, SJPdP to Santiago staring early September, hopefully finishing in Finisterre or Muxia mid to end October. I hate being too hot or too cold!

I’m debating the eternal liner or lightweight sleeping bag question. I’m expecting it to be probably hot at the start, but much colder towards the end.

I’m even debating taking both, or is that total over kill?

I do have a light weight camping blanket I could take with a liner, but I’m not sure if this would annoy me, as I can’t imagine it would stay in place.

Can anyone recommend any inexpensive, very compressible, very lightweight sleeping bags I can look at? I tend to prefer the non mummy type and I’m UK based.

Thanks in anticipation.
I have Snupak jungle bag, does the job and given the price I’m not too precious about it
 

Quietways

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances, Aragonés, Invierno - Winter 2021-22
Altus makes lightweight, very compressible 700 fill down bags - mine is the Altus Andes 400D and packs down to the size of an Naglene bottle. Takes up so little space and has kept me warm (almost warm ;) this Winter. Good chance you'll find it in some of the better outdoor shops in Spain.

Altus Sleeping Bags
 
Past OR future Camino
2017 Camino Frances,
2019 C. Portuguese (inland).
Is it sufficiently warm at altitude (eg. O Cebreiro) in Spring? A freezing night there in a silk liner back in 2012 is now my yardstick...
I couldn’t say Karl. I’ve used it in all seasons here, and in high altitudes but not in Winter. And it depends on your tolerance and how much you wear. It’s a trade off I guess; absolutely minimal weight, very compact and sufficiently warm in most situations. I did have a cheaper sleeping bag, which was OK, but heavier and double the volume in my backpack. I don’t use that anymore. It isn’t cheap, but for me it’s been a good solution. One thing for certain, it’ll beat your silk liner. I’ve taken it to MtKosciuszko several times and it’s been just right on those hikes.
 
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JordonOzero

New Member
Past OR future Camino
CF x 3
Thanks for the thread. I'm struggling with similar questions.

I'm leaving from Le Puy August 16, and hope to make it to Finisterre/Muxia by November 1.

- It will be hot in August and early September so carrying a blanket seems a little crazy to me but when we get into the October, I'm thinking cool nights might be more problematic.

- I get cold easily so I usually sleep with a couple of blankets at home.

- I hate tight mummy-life sleeping bags.

Three strategies I've been thinking of:

1) Liner with a down blanket. (Based on this thread, this seems common. Love the idea of putting the blanket inside the liner.)

Or...

2) Two liners. I haven't heard anyone else comment on this. I was thinking this may be a little be lighter.

Or...

3) One liner, then buy something along the way if I need it. (I'm trying not to "pack my fears" although, I must admit, its against my nature. I'd rather have every contingency covered before I leave, but everyone says "the Camino provides" so I suspect some faith is necessary. ;))

Your thoughts and advice appreciated.

- Bill.
5D34BE7E-6903-4A28-ACDD-66475B071A9E.jpeg
Have you considered a warmer liner? I use these when I’m cold camping. I don’t believe the number they provide however, the liner really is warm and helps a lot and it is barely mummy style (which I dislike too).
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino's Frances, Fisterre, Portuges. Over 180 day
I have walked the Frances and Portugues with a lightweight sleeping bag, with just a liner and a couple of times with no sleep system at all (July-August), just lie on top of the mattress. One thing I found was that there is no predicting what the weather will be like or how warm or cold an albergue will be. Sometimes (pre-covid) the rooms would be so hot and stuffy at night with upwards of 30 people in them that the thought of sleeping inside of any bag was unthinkable to me. There were times I actually woke up due to the heat and dank air and moved out to a common area with open windows and slept on the floor and once slept outside on top of a long wooden table in the garden of the albergue.
One option I have found to work pretty good is to carry two good sleeping bag liners. They are pretty warm and if I get colder I have the option of layering on the second liner. I would guess combined they weigh about the same as a lightweight bag, but for me a bit more versatile. The liners usually run about $15-$20 each. Made of synthetics. Faux silk fabric. Easy to wash when you get home, easy to put in their stuff sacks and also easy to inspect prior for bugs. They are about the size of a soda can in the stuff sacks.
 
Past OR future Camino
2017 Camino Frances,
2019 C. Portuguese (inland).
I have walked the Frances and Portugues with a lightweight sleeping bag, with just a liner and a couple of times with no sleep system at all (July-August), just lie on top of the mattress. One thing I found was that there is no predicting what the weather will be like or how warm or cold an albergue will be. Sometimes (pre-covid) the rooms would be so hot and stuffy at night with upwards of 30 people in them that the thought of sleeping inside of any bag was unthinkable to me. There were times I actually woke up due to the heat and dank air and moved out to a common area with open windows and slept on the floor and once slept outside on top of a long wooden table in the garden of the albergue.
One option I have found to work pretty good is to carry two good sleeping bag liners. They are pretty warm and if I get colder I have the option of layering on the second liner. I would guess combined they weigh about the same as a lightweight bag, but for me a bit more versatile. The liners usually run about $15-$20 each. Made of synthetics. Faux silk fabric. Easy to wash when you get home, easy to put in their stuff sacks and also easy to inspect prior for bugs. They are about the size of a soda can in the stuff sacks.
On the Camino Portuguese at the first Albergue outside Lisbon I ended up sleeping in my sleeping bag out in the yard on concrete. In the dorm it was too hard thanks to a very loud and constant snorer. It was a mild dry night in September, and I had a star filled sky as my ceiling. Surprisingly, I slept well. I’ve also slept on a wood bench in the common room of another Albergue, for the same reason. You do what you have to do. I reckon I could sleep anywhere now, after that experience. That’s why I always carry a light down-filled quilt.
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino's Frances, Fisterre, Portuges. Over 180 day
On the Camino Portuguese at the first Albergue outside Lisbon I ended up sleeping in my sleeping bag out in the yard on concrete. In the dorm it was too hard thanks to a very loud and constant snorer. It was a mild dry night in September, and I had a star filled sky as my ceiling. Surprisingly, I slept well. I’ve also slept on a wood bench in the common room of another Albergue, for the same reason. You do what you have to do. I reckon I could sleep anywhere now, after that experience. That’s why I always carry a light down-filled quilt.
When I was younger and wilderness backpacking with friends and later in the army the sleeping on the ground under the stars, in the back of a truck or vehicle etc became the norm. Sucked when it rained but on the cool clear nights like you described can be absolutely a joy. I found moving out of a smelly, hot albergue sleeping dorm style quarters for the night to be a blessing lol. A bonus the times there was a long table, bench or couch available, but even the hard tile floor near the kitchen was a heck of a lot better :D
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino's Frances, Fisterre, Portuges. Over 180 day
Thanks for the thread. I'm struggling with similar questions.

I'm leaving from Le Puy August 16, and hope to make it to Finisterre/Muxia by November 1.

- It will be hot in August and early September so carrying a blanket seems a little crazy to me but when we get into the October, I'm thinking cool nights might be more problematic.

- I get cold easily so I usually sleep with a couple of blankets at home.

- I hate tight mummy-life sleeping bags.

Three strategies I've been thinking of:

1) Liner with a down blanket. (Based on this thread, this seems common. Love the idea of putting the blanket inside the liner.)

Or...

2) Two liners. I haven't heard anyone else comment on this. I was thinking this may be a little be lighter.

Or...

3) One liner, then buy something along the way if I need it. (I'm trying not to "pack my fears" although, I must admit, its against my nature. I'd rather have every contingency covered before I leave, but everyone says "the Camino provides" so I suspect some faith is necessary. ;))

Your thoughts and advice appreciated.

- Bill.
Two liners may be a viable option that time of year. Each stores in a sack about the size of a soda can and I would guess a combined weight of about one pound. Around the weight of a backpacking summer sleeping bag, but the liners do offer a bit more versatility and are fairly inexpensive. No real investment lost if along the Way you decide one is enough and give away the other.
 
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BillW

New Member
Past OR future Camino
2022
Thanks everyone for all the help. I've decided to go with a camping quilt and liner.

Quilts are expensive, but I found this company (https://ugqoutdoor.com/top-quilts/outlaw-hybrid-quilt/ ) that custom makes one for you. You choose the warm level, the style and the colors. Total price without tax and shipping for my model was $244 (in the USA). It ships within 5 weeks or so. Since they are filled with down, the weight is low. I think mine came in at 17.9 ounces (just slightly over 1 pound).

Thanks, again for your help!
 

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Past OR future Camino
Most years since 2012. Hoping now for 2022.
Two liners may be a viable option
That's a good idea I don't remember seeing before. My own thinking for a May-June camino has moved to a single liner, supplemented by a tiny ((18" x 24") down blanket I made from the sleeves of a down jacket, and wearing the down vest (leftover after removal of the sleeves), supplemented by a merino sweater and a pashmina shawl. Those items give more versatility than the down blanket that I have, and will probably be just as warm.
 

Viva Terlingua

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Partial Frances (2018)
Full Frances 2022 (May-Jun)
Not exactly a response to the OPs question but I think close enough in subject matter to ask. I am going to try to avoid staying in albergues and rather stay in pensiones, hostals, and hotels. My reasons aren’t relevant to my question. I plan on carrying a sleep sack in case I need to stay in an albergue. Should I carry a sleeping bag as well?
 

jrviegas

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Portuguese
I have walked the Frances and Portugues with a lightweight sleeping bag, with just a liner and a couple of times with no sleep system at all (July-August), just lie on top of the mattress. One thing I found was that there is no predicting what the weather will be like or how warm or cold an albergue will be. Sometimes (pre-covid) the rooms would be so hot and stuffy at night with upwards of 30 people in them that the thought of sleeping inside of any bag was unthinkable to me. There were times I actually woke up due to the heat and dank air and moved out to a common area with open windows and slept on the floor and once slept outside on top of a long wooden table in the garden of the albergue.
One option I have found to work pretty good is to carry two good sleeping bag liners. They are pretty warm and if I get colder I have the option of layering on the second liner. I would guess combined they weigh about the same as a lightweight bag, but for me a bit more versatile. The liners usually run about $15-$20 each. Made of synthetics. Faux silk fabric. Easy to wash when you get home, easy to put in their stuff sacks and also easy to inspect prior for bugs. They are about the size of a soda can in the stuff sacks.
If I may ask, which liners have you used?
The ones I have found are quite expensive. Comparable to a sleeping bag.
Many thanks
 
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RJM

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino's Frances, Fisterre, Portuges. Over 180 day
If I may ask, which liners have you used?
The ones I have found are quite expensive. Comparable to a sleeping bag.
Many thanks
The pair I have I purchased off of ebay several years ago (see photo I found on the net). A brand I never saw before, and I think I paid about $8-$10 each back then. I would never pay more than $20 for one. That's just too much IMO for what is basically just an uninsulated cloth bag. Large pillow case lol.
images.jpeg
 

jrviegas

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Portuguese
The pair I have I purchased off of ebay several years ago (see photo I found on the net). A brand I never saw before, and I think I paid about $8-$10 each back then. I would never pay more than $20 for one. That's just too much IMO for what is basically just an uninsulated cloth bag. Large pillow case lol.
View attachment 123128
Thanks
 

jeanineonthecamino

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances 2021, 2022
Not exactly a response to the OPs question but I think close enough in subject matter to ask. I am going to try to avoid staying in albergues and rather stay in pensiones, hostals, and hotels. My reasons aren’t relevant to my question. I plan on carrying a sleep sack in case I need to stay in an albergue. Should I carry a sleeping bag as well?
I would say if you are planning to stay in privates - no - don't bother with the bag too! Worst case scenario - you stay in an albergue and are a bit on the cold side for a night. But not worth the weight for a "just in case" you might need to stay in an albergue. Now - if you were planning to stay in a mix of albergues and privates - my recommendation would be to carry both. As I stated above (probably without rereading all my posts haha) - it was unseasonably cold last June/July 2021... I needed a bag and didn't have one and was miserable my entire trip at night due to being cold and uncomfortable. (The rest of my trip was great though). But if you are planning to mostly be in privates - one night of discomfort won't ruin your entire trip - should you happen to HAVE to stay in an albergue and should you happen to NOT have a blanket. In that event - at least wear more layers!
 

Craig Bernthal

New Member
Past OR future Camino
May to July, 2014
Thanks for the thread. I'm struggling with similar questions.

I'm leaving from Le Puy August 16, and hope to make it to Finisterre/Muxia by November 1.

- It will be hot in August and early September so carrying a blanket seems a little crazy to me but when we get into the October, I'm thinking cool nights might be more problematic.

- I get cold easily so I usually sleep with a couple of blankets at home.

- I hate tight mummy-life sleeping bags.

Three strategies I've been thinking of:

1) Liner with a down blanket. (Based on this thread, this seems common. Love the idea of putting the blanket inside the liner.)

Or...

2) Two liners. I haven't heard anyone else comment on this. I was thinking this may be a little be lighter.

Or...

3) One liner, then buy something along the way if I need it. (I'm trying not to "pack my fears" although, I must admit, its against my nature. I'd rather have every contingency covered before I leave, but everyone says "the Camino provides" so I suspect some faith is necessary. ;))

Your thoughts and advice appreciated.

- Bill.
My friend and I are planning to leave Le Puy on August 23 and arrive in Muxia in time to fly back to California on November 16. I am asking myself the same questions you are. I would love not to have to pack a bag between Le Puy and SJPP. Will probably take an ultra light quilt though. No perfect solution.
 

BillW

New Member
Past OR future Camino
2022
My friend and I are planning to leave Le Puy on August 23 and arrive in Muxia in time to fly back to California on November 16. I am asking myself the same questions you are. I would love not to have to pack a bag between Le Puy and SJPP. Will probably take an ultra light quilt though. No perfect solution.

I'll be a little ahead of you, but maybe we'll cross paths.

If it helps, I settled on the following...

1) A light weight bag liner. I presume I'll use this on warmer evenings when bedding isn't available.

2) A light weight hiking quilt. I got one that weighs 17 ounces. I presume this will be plenty for cooler evenings, but if necessary, I can use the liner too.

I'm going to have my wife ship me a package to SJPP (new journal, new socks, etc.), so I thought maybe have her send the quilt then too. Ultimately I decided to carry it with me from Le Puy instead. I think I'll feel better having it with me for the first month. (I'm a cold sleeper, so I'd rather have a little too much than too little when it comes to sleeping.)
 
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