What is the difference between training for, and walking the Camino de Santiago?

Training for the Camino de Santiago
Training for the Camino de Santiago

The question was:

I guess it’s pretty obvious, but it just occurred to me today that we will be walking day after day after day! So far we have been doing a walk each weekend (usually limited to about 12km because of other commitments) and it’s been easy-peasy. Today we did 16km and 6 year old said at the end of it, “That was my best walk ever. (pause) Because I didn’t grizzle at all.” Interestingly, she has only rarely complained, but she really did not fuss at all today; she just bounced along and at the halfway mark even asked to carry the 8yo’s backpack (an effort which lasted about 100m!!!!).

BUT this evening everyone felt a bit tired. That extra 4km made a discernible difference (and we want to be doing even longer distances some days – and climbing mountains!!). I’m trying to imagine whether it gets easier to walk further each day or whether you just get sorer and sorer! The optimist in me says you end up easily walking 30km in a day. The realist suggests you slowly get worn down.

What’s your experience?

Read this interesting conversation on the difference between training for, and walking the Camino de Santiago here.

Can I just wing it?

The question was:

I’ve wanted to hike el camino for many years but every time I begin to research, I get overwhelmed with all the information I find. If I just arrive in Irun, can I start hiking without much prior research? I have a hard time wanting to read about the route. I just want to walk it. I speak fluent Spanish and I’m not shy to ask my way around. I also already have the CSJ guides for the entire ruta del norte.
Any simple suggestions or bare basic things that I shouldn’t forget or must do before I come?

Read the good advice on walking the Camino with no or little planning.