Where past pilgrims share, and future pilgrims learn


A donation to the forum removes advertising!
  1. New here?
    We have accumulated over 10 years of Camino Questions and Answers.
    Please Sign Up and plan your camino with us. Buen Camino! Ivar
  2. Are you a lurker?
    Interested in getting a daily email with the latest forum post? Get it here.

70L Backpack Too Big?

Discussion in 'Equipment Questions' started by Gina, Mar 5, 2007.

  1. Gina

    Gina New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2007
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi All!

    I've thoroughly enjoyed reading all of your helpful comments on this forum. Here's my dilemma:

    I've been overwhelmed by the backpacks and trying to decide what size, brand, etc.

    I'm planning on walking the Camino Frances this April/early May and can't decide what size backpack to get. Is a 70L backpack too large? (I'm female, 5'6", 145 pounds, have no intentions whatsoever of camping out) Should I try for a 50L backpack instead? Will that give me room for everything I need plus my sleeping bag?

    Plus, has anyone tried Russi or REI backpacks? I'm interested in the Aarn backpacks, but find them too expensive.

    Thanks for your advice! :lol:
    Gina

    A Donation to the forum removes advertising.
  2. omar504

    omar504 New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2006
    Messages:
    623
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    melbourne australia
    After picking myself off the floor I wouls suggest that 70l is WAY too big-don't forget that the bigger the pack the more weight (apart from the super duper expensive ones). Mine was very small but adequate with the sleeping bag being the bulkiest. Other items were 2 pairs undies, 2 t shirts,pair trousers,camera, 2 pairs socks and not much else.The 10% rule is worth thinking about-don't carry more than 10% of your weight so in your case about 14lbs-about 6kgs which is what I took (I'm 65kgs).I made a mistake by not getting a pack with hip straps so all the weight was on my shoulders-painful after a while.
  3. mika

    mika New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2006
    Messages:
    25
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Finland
    I had a 70 l backpack on my first Camino - just enough for all the stuff I needed. I'm taking the same one on my next Camino, too, and it'll be almost full.

    The 10 percent rule is worth thinking about - in the sense that why and how and for whom and by who has that rule been written. Otherwise - I suggest you use your own jugdement.

    Now there's a word of wisdom.
  4. omar504

    omar504 New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2006
    Messages:
    623
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    melbourne australia
    Good point about the 10% 'rule'-I think it's just supposed to be a guide as to what is feasible to carry over long distances but I would add that the smaller the pack the less trouble it will be in travelling to and from the camino-mine was small enough to put in the over head storage in the plane-which was a bonus. Others have also said that you tend to fill up the available space.
  5. Paulus

    Paulus Member

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2005
    Messages:
    225
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Dutchman living in La Rue Perrin/Chastellux (Franc
    Camino(s) past & future:
    Frances (May 2005), Norte (May 2006), Vezelay (2007).
    Gina,

    Simple: don't take a 70L !! Taking a 50 or 40L forces you to think about what you are taken with you...........


    Paul
  6. Wannes

    Wannes New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2006
    Messages:
    53
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Antwerp Belgium
    yeah 70L is waaayy to big
  7. Magnara

    Magnara Member Donating Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2006
    Messages:
    189
    Likes Received:
    22
    I had a 35 litre bag, including my sleeping bag the whole thing weighed a bit under 6 kg. I'm 59 and personally weighed at the start 74 kg, at the end 68. It was very comfortable. I started with about 9kg and gave away or sent on everything non- essential right down to nail clippers. Amazing how much you can live without if it makes your pack lighter . Half way up a mountain you'll be very thankful.
    Magnara
  8. papajohn

    papajohn New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2005
    Messages:
    70
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Jacksonville, FL.
    Hi Gina,
    My wife and I carried REI UL45 packs in Oct of 06. I think that they serverdus extremely well. They were very light weight, durable and most importantly very comfortable. I suggest that you look at the published equipment lists and follow them. We did and had everything we needed. The pack comes in med and large, so I would get it fitted for you. Ultreya John
  9. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    Hmm - great thing about a large backpack like that, there's room for the kitchen sink, also, you being the size you are, if the refugio is full you can sleep in it.

    Noooooo - small as poss. Weigh it. Wear it with things in it. If in store get them to fill it with boots and a sleeping bag to simulate - then wear it for a while. Has to allow for fitting in just t-shirt and also all wrapped against the weather and going uphill and downhill ... but do weigh it! You may find another bag just the same but 1-2 lbs lighter- and that counts.
    Also, pilgrim, if you are thinking about that size bag you already have tooooooooo long a packing list! Spread it all out on the floor, if you don't really need it, don't take it. Spain has shops you know!
  10. Magnara

    Magnara Member Donating Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2006
    Messages:
    189
    Likes Received:
    22
    Just to add another thing - I sing the praises of AARN packs every time I can. You can look them up on the internet, although I did in the end buy mine in a shop. Mine was an AARN Featherlight Freedom. I would also add the word fantastic to the name! Your pack is a good thing to spend time getting right for you, it makes a huge difference to your camino. If you would like my final packing list, feel freee to email me directly.
  11. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    These AArnpacks seem interesting, though they appear difficult to get out of quickly, being front and rear linked - too complicated for me and I don't carry that much weight anyway (to need a weight-distribution pack like that), but ... I looked on the net and they are 280US$ - that's ...errmmm... about £140 sterling, Crikey! Well beyond the level that I live at I'm afraid.
  12. raven14601

    raven14601 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2007
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    I got interested in the AARN backpacks after reading opinions on this site. I checked their website and found the bargain basement, they have Featherlite Freedom packs listed for $145.00 US. So I just bought one and will compare it to the Marmot pack I bought a couple of weeks ago.
  13. santos

    santos New Member

    Joined:
    May 13, 2006
    Messages:
    89
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    montreal-Canada-
    i pack up today and WOW 40lb on my back :S
    i know my food is the problem but i cant leave it cuz i need at the food iv got in my bag :S if i dont have my food ill die whit in 3 days so i need my oat meal energy bars and my protein :Sif i dont have does each day im not goin to b able to walk or move :x
    and 1 of my walking poles is staying home cuz no place for the seconde one and how they r in my bag it hurts my back so only 1 pole coming the trip whit me!
    the rest is 3 pair of pants 4 t-shrits 4 underwear 4 socks 1cam 1 soap 2 butt paper 1 sun glass 2 1l bottles 1 rain poncho 1 sleeping bag my backpack is 2 bag that hook on each other! and what i have on me
    if you think im forgeting stuff plz tell me im leaving in 2 weeks!
    i need help to down sieze my bag!
  14. fiddletree

    fiddletree New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2007
    Messages:
    119
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Aosta, Italy
    take fewer pants and shirts. Are you bringing food for the whole time with you, or something? You can buy food in spain, it seems like there are often towns every couple of kilometers
  15. santos

    santos New Member

    Joined:
    May 13, 2006
    Messages:
    89
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    montreal-Canada-
    iv got heath problem i need to eat alot of protein
    it powder protein -cereals-and trail mix heath bars
    all stuff ill have to bring cuz i dont wanna look for it in spain and $$$ more
    if i need a fix if i feel weak i got 5 min max to get something in my system or ill get very very sick and ill not be able to walk anymore!
    do you know how you feel after kimo therapy or radiation therapy? i feel like that whit in 5 min of not eating!so very important food!
    im weak alot of ppl say ill never be able to do this!
    but guess what !nothing is goin to stop me not even cancer !
    iv got the will to do it and GOD will give the force to walk all the way to santiago wit my food! 8)

    good bless me !
    even if he tortured me whit life and death!
  16. fiddletree

    fiddletree New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2007
    Messages:
    119
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Aosta, Italy
    ah, understand that. I too have health problems where I have to eat loads of protein... I'm currently trying to figure out lightweight protein things I can take with me so I don't have problems.

    Good luck!!
  17. Trudy

    Trudy Member

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2005
    Messages:
    270
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    Portland, Victoria, Australia
    Camino(s) past & future:
    (2006) Roncesvalles to Leon (2007) Leon to Compostela
    Packing and Clothes

    Hi Santos,

    You can certainly cut back on clothes. Given that you'll be wearing one full set of clothes, you'll only need to take 2 pairs of pants; 2 t shirts; 2 sets underwear; 2 pairs of socks. And 1 roll of toilet paper will be enough. That's my view anyway, and your pack should be a bit lighter.

    Buen Camino.
  18. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    Have you thought of making pemmican? Dried beef strips, after being boiled in beef fat. Also, Spanish sausage (actually just about all European sausage) is 100% meat (less a bit for spices) - doesn't go off, you can keep plenty with you ... you will need a sharp knife.

    Humans are interesting aren't they. You see some people who have a physical problem and they get fat instead of fit and become lounge lizards. Their disability can become the centre of their lives. Others do exactly the opposite, they look at life and just, well, go for it! - well done guys (non gender specific), and good luck out there. I really do hope to meet you (look out for my white camper with PilgrimSupplies logos ..
    I'll be on the Camino Frances from March 15-16th ... but who knows where ..
  19. sillydoll

    sillydoll Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2004
    Messages:
    6,461
    Likes Received:
    298
    Location:
    ZA
    Camino(s) past & future:
    2002: 2004: 2006 VF: 2007: 2009: 2011 X 2: 2013 May:
    Protein on the camino

    You don't have to eat meat to get your protein requirements on the camino. Consider nuts (plentiful - especially almonds) and seeds which are easy to carry and nibble on as you walk. Cheese and yogurt are also a good source of protein.
    The billions of cows, pigs, chickens and other domesticated animals that provide more than one-third of humanity’s protein intake are causing massive environmental damage. The livestock industry is said to be responsible for more harmful greenhouse gasses than the entire global transportation sector!
    So - do your bit for the envirnoment - chew a nut instead of cud!
  20. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    Sausage doesn't go off. Nuts are ghastly things, I loathe them. Cheese goes rubbery and horrid in hot weather within a short time. Yoghurt? Backpack? Hot weather? I don't think so.

    Yes, husbanding animals takes up approx' 11 times the land that would produce the same nutrition in vegetable crops - but humans aren't about logic (unless they are Asperger sufferers). Also, 'fat of the land' has meaning - there are nutrients in meat and fish that cannot be obtained elsewhere - yes, I know about the veggie response ... I disagree with it. Animals farting does cause a lot of free gases but vegetable crops cause the same amount when decaying, and also from processing fecal matter after ingestion by humans.
    It is all very well leaping onto bandwagons and feeling good about oneself but it is really necessary to objectively look at the whole thing.
    - For instance, it is commonly said that the Amazon rain-forest is ' the lungs of the world'. This is untrue. The Amazon rain-forest is only some 80,000 years old and the planet seemed to have survived without it before but it is not the lungs as, although it does produce a lot of oxygen, as it is a rain-forest the forest floor holds all the decaying vegetable matter and this produces much more carbon dioxide. The Amazon rain-forest is a nett producer of carbon dioxide, not oxygen.

    Industry is the cause of the problems that we could be having but we do nothing about that as we like our synthetic lifestyles.

    If we really took the care of this world seriously none of us would drive a vehicle (nor use a high-tech produced bicycle), nor wear synthetic materials, nor use batteries, mobile phones, - the list goes on for ever. But we do. Because we always make the problem 'over there' not on our doorstep. So please do not do this 1970's nonsense about helping the planet as it is always by getting 'those people over there' to do something.
    The problem is 7 billion people instead of the number this planet can support, which is about 2.5 billion max. The overpopulation and industry necessary to support it is where the problem lies.

    So let us not be smug. The only time that Jesus is shown as being irritable is when he comes up against the smug and the certain. Anyone who really cared about this world would not FLY to Spain to go on a walking holiday - even if they do call it a pilgrimage.

    So, for a person who seems to need protein at all times I say go for sausage/pemmican . But I was not being exlusive there - and any high protein food that is dense, easily sourceable in the small shops along the way, and doesn't go off.
  21. Magnara

    Magnara Member Donating Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2006
    Messages:
    189
    Likes Received:
    22
    Spain is a meat based diet, so you will easily find loads of meat in every menu del dia , in every village, every grocers shop. Everywhere offers chorizo (sausage), and even your bocadillo (bread roll) as a staple lunch food is usually cheese and ham. Milk is always available, and cheese. Menu del dia usually offers yogurt as a dessert. Finding protein is so easy and cheap in Spain.
    Another thought, what about protein powder in a tin , the sort of thing body builders use? It might be a bit heavy to start with, but it would reduce and might be a useful protein addition.
  22. sillydoll

    sillydoll Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2004
    Messages:
    6,461
    Likes Received:
    298
    Location:
    ZA
    Camino(s) past & future:
    2002: 2004: 2006 VF: 2007: 2009: 2011 X 2: 2013 May:
    Protein sources

    Hello Br David,
    Its always heartening to find a kinderd spirit and your passionate interest in carbon emissions and the amazon basin is admirable. (Many people just don't care).
    As I don't think that this is the forum for a debate on those subjects I am sending you a couple of links to those subjects which I know you will find most informative.

    http://www.fao.org - The United Fations, FAO (Food and Agriculture Organisation) You should read the report "Livestocks Long Shadow"

    The Amazon Institute http://www.aldhu.com l

    The Worldwatch Institute - http://www.worldwatch.org

    "Compassion, in which all ethics must take root, can only attain its full breadth and depth if it embraces all living creatures and does not limit itself to mankind." Albert Schweitzer

    Pilgrim blessings,
  23. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    Agree, thank you - and I'm sure that you are right.
  24. santos

    santos New Member

    Joined:
    May 13, 2006
    Messages:
    89
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    montreal-Canada-
    thanx for all the info about meat nuts and... ill be ok whit my powder proteins!even if it tast bad!
    i can eat each 5 min a full meal and cant gain an oz or pounds :S
    sometimes i wish i was 175lb like i was b4 gettin sick it hard to gain 40lb :S and looking young :S like yesterday when to the store and the guy at the cash ask me for ID :O (im 31years young)so the guy look atthe ID and sayed thats not you!you cant be 31!im 10 year old then him and could belive it !! :? :roll:
    forever young :roll:
  25. Luco

    Luco New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2006
    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Victoria, Canada
    I used a 25 litre backpack, which worked really well for me on the longer days of walking

    the towns are close enough to each other that you never have to worry about carrying food, and if you have an ultralite sleeping bag then that won't use much space either.
  26. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    Strange - Santos, what's the name of your illness?
  27. BobM

    BobM Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2007
    Messages:
    556
    Likes Received:
    26
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    I will be using a 35L pack, carrying about 8.5kg

    70L seems a lot, but it depends on your previous experience, stamia etc etc. I have trekked with small Nepalese porters for weeks who have each carried 90kg day after day using only a head-strap (actually much safer in case of a fall). So it all depends....

    Anyway FWIW, my approach to packing for the Camino Frances (I start on May 17) was to do a trial packing to see just how much stuff I "thought I might need", then start a ruthless cull, than do a couple of trial walks of 20 km and cull some more. At the moment I am down to 8.5kg, which includes 1.7kg of camera gear - about which I am agonising. I think I still have too much weight, so more has to go.

    When buying a pack, waist support of the load is pretty essential for long walks, so you should buy from a shop who can fit one properly to your body size. Also, outside pockets for quick access to water bottle(s) is a good idea. Chest straps also make life easier, but I am not sure exactly why, because they are not load-bearing.

    Hope this helps.

    Bob M
  28. Gina

    Gina New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2007
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
    I appreciate all of the good advice.

    I found a 40L backpack I liked today, but it looked awfully small. I plan on starting from SJPP in early to mid April, and will be carrying a jacket with a zip out lining in case it gets cold. I'm not worried about the weight, but I'm worried that bulk-wise, 40L won't be large enough. Any ideas?
  29. BobM

    BobM Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2007
    Messages:
    556
    Likes Received:
    26
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    Do a trial packing to judge pack size needed

    I you are unsure if the 40L pack will be big enough, do a trial packing with all the stuff you would like to take on the camino.

    For the trial, you can use common home items to estimate volume. For example, count how many times your stuff will fill a plastic bucket of known volume. Or stuff everything into a big garbage bag and estimate the volume (scrunch it up into a rough cube and measure the sides, then convert to litres, googling for the conversion factor from cubic centimeters or inches to litres). Or stuff a suitcase and measure that. Lateral thinking!

    You don't have to be really precise. The first trial will quickly show if a 40L pack will do the job.

    Whatever you buy, make sure that the shop guy or gal knows how to properly adjust it for you to get the load on the hips - unless you are quite experienced backpacking. A good pack should have an adjustment that allows the harness to be adjusted for the length of the wearer's back.

    Personally, I would only buy a pack from "adventure-type" retailers whose staff actually spend time in the outdoors using the gear.

    Bob M
  30. spursfan

    spursfan Member

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2006
    Messages:
    275
    Likes Received:
    2
    Gina - my guess is that 40L should be enough, as long as you go for lightweight gear - though I'm not sure that you need to worry too much about the cold - mornings might start chilly but once the sun arrives you're more likely to be too warm than too cold - better to go for thermal underwear and a windproof/waterproof jacket rather than a fleece for instance at your time of year

    And, to BobM, 8.5 kg is just crazy - unless you're planning to make a movie, 1.7kg of camera gear is particularly over the top; you should be able to get it down to 5-6kg including liquid - much easier to carry and fewer things to keep track of along the way
  31. Wannes

    Wannes New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2006
    Messages:
    53
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Antwerp Belgium
    of course less is better, but i found that 8kg works fine (i weigh 75kg).

    Next camino i'm gonna do (Del Norte probably) i'll be bringing about 2kg of camera-gear as well (DSLR, 3 batteries, 3 lenses, tripod)....that's gonna be painfull :(
    But no-one ever said creating art was easy ;)
  32. Minkey

    Minkey New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2006
    Messages:
    582
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    London
    I managed last year with a 30ish lt rucksack. Normally I'd go on the safe side with a 50 lt job, then use the compression straps to make it smaller.
  33. kiwirich

    kiwirich New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2007
    Messages:
    28
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    New Zealand
    hey gina, my fiance is about your size and uses a 50liter pack, its a perfect size for her anyway, has extra room for anything she might pick up along the way, iv just gota fight her bout taking the hair straightener out is all :wink:
  34. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    Here's a good tip - Another method of estimating 'litreage' is to do what Archimedes did with that gold crown. Put all items onto a chair or low table next to your bath. Get into the bath and carefully fill to the top with water, then even more carefully add all the items you will be taking with you. The bath will overflow. When it has stopped overflowing stand up, pull out the plug and dry your self in the bath, remembering to shout 'Eureka' - or is it 'Ultreiya!'? (don't want to add any more water over the side, that would be silly). Then get out and use a cloth or sponge to collect up all the spilt water into a large bowl or, in your 50 litre case, dustbin. Then, when this is all done, you can decant what you've gathered into a measuring jug and - Hey Presto! - you know exactly how many volume litres capacity you need - now what could be more simple?

    Also - don't forget that the French weights and measures system, introduced during their revolution, is an integrated logical system (which is why it is so dull). So one litre of water will weigh one kilo - and therefore one cubic metre of water will weigh 1000 kilos - and so on .. errmm, one calorie is the energy expended to raise the temperature of water by one degree centigrade - is that relevant? no

    Anyway - carry a litre of water in each side pocket of your backpack and you add 2 kilos - which is 4,4lbs !! so pack light now because you will need the water ... (just in case you find a bath and want to measure the volume of something else, for instance)

    - your items filling a 50 litre sack only weigh 50 kilos if they are of the same density as water, which most won't be - unless you can squeeze really hard of course .......
  35. Chev.Jerry

    Chev.Jerry New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Messages:
    72
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Dallas, Texas USA
    70 L Backpack to big

    My wife and I each carried “Lookout” backpacks from REI. Mine was 44 liters (2700 ccs) and hers was 41 liters (2500 ccs).

    Her carry weight was 15 pounds with 2 lbs 12 oz being the pack. Mine was 22 lbs with 2 lb 14 oz in the pack, and her pillow.

    They worked great. Outside pockets for water and food and several different compartments for easy loading and access. The weight is distributed to the shoulders and hips. I think they cost about $ 80. US, each.

    Pack light. Pack lighter. Try what you have at home. See what you can do without. Our sleep sacks were the bigest items.
  36. spursfan

    spursfan Member

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2006
    Messages:
    275
    Likes Received:
    2
    As usual, my contrary view to all these people that seem to like adding to their burden by carrying too much weight

    I'm aiming to walk in April/May with a 17L pack with a weight of just over 8 pounds (3.5 kg) to which I'll add between 1 and 2 litres of water depending on temperature and distances between water sources
  37. sillydoll

    sillydoll Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2004
    Messages:
    6,461
    Likes Received:
    298
    Location:
    ZA
    Camino(s) past & future:
    2002: 2004: 2006 VF: 2007: 2009: 2011 X 2: 2013 May:
    Backpack

    Wow- that is traveling light!
    I thought I was good with a 30L pack that weighs only 650gr, and a total weight of 5,5kg. Please tell us what you have in your backpack!
  38. spursfan

    spursfan Member

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2006
    Messages:
    275
    Likes Received:
    2
    Pack (Salomon Raid Revo 20) 425g

    Shorts (North Face)
    Underpants (Icebreaker 200)
    T-shirt x2 (Lowe Alpine dryflo, Icebreaker Tech T lite)
    Socks x2
    Towel (Lifeventure soft fibre large)
    Sleeping bag liner silk (Cocoon)
    Rain cover for pack
    Hat (Lowe Alpine Sahara)
    Rain trousers (Goretex pac-lite)
    Rain jacket (Goretex pac-lite)
    Silk balaclava
    Running gloves

    Sigg water bottles 0.6L x2
    Platypus 1L

    Possibly travel slippers

    That adds up to just over 2.5kg (with no liquid)

    Other stuff (including spare glasses, torch, liquid soap/shampoo, razor, compeed, plasters, toothpaste & brush, vaseline, nail clippers, few pills, comb, ear plugs) another 850g

    Odd pages from guidebook plus pilgrim's passport say another 250g
  39. sillydoll

    sillydoll Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2004
    Messages:
    6,461
    Likes Received:
    298
    Location:
    ZA
    Camino(s) past & future:
    2002: 2004: 2006 VF: 2007: 2009: 2011 X 2: 2013 May:
    Summer Backpack

    That is a really good man's summer packing list.

    I have only walked in spring/summer and mine isn't too different except for:

    2 pairs of shorts
    1 long trousers
    1 long sleeve shirt (actually a black thermal vest)
    1 lightweight (175gr) fleece jacket
    2 bikini tops
    2 underpants
    1 pair Crocs sandals

    That probably makes up the other 2kg.

    Of course a winter backpack would need more/heavier clothing.
  40. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    Verr nice, both really neat lists - though I don't see the corkscrew!

    And it does creep up, you'll carry daily food and so on ... but that really is the way to go!
    respect!
  41. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    Verr nice, both really neat lists - though I don't see the corkscrew!

    And it does creep up, you'll carry daily food and so on ... but that really is the way to go!
    respect!
  42. sillydoll

    sillydoll Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2004
    Messages:
    6,461
    Likes Received:
    298
    Location:
    ZA
    Camino(s) past & future:
    2002: 2004: 2006 VF: 2007: 2009: 2011 X 2: 2013 May:
    Backpack

    Yeah - but you brothers don't need the bikini tops so you can carry the cork screw!
  43. spursfan

    spursfan Member

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2006
    Messages:
    275
    Likes Received:
    2
    I didn't include what I'm walking in

    Craghoppers Kiwi long trousers
    Icebreaker Tech-T & underpants
    North Face Cedar Mesa trail shoes
    Sorbothane Full-strike shock stopper insoles

    When walking, apart from liquid the only other food I carry is chocolate - and buy fruit when I stop for lunch
  44. Jupp

    Jupp New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2006
    Messages:
    29
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Belgium
    What about the DEUTER Futura 34SL, specially designed for women ? It's only 35 litres, but that should be enough. It's maybe a bit more expensive but very comfortable, rain cover, many compartiments....
    Jupp
  45. Ruth

    Ruth New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2006
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Northern California
    Backpack size answer and introduction

    Hello all!

    I have been reading all the wealth of information you have shared, and have not introduced myself until now.

    First, I want to thank all of you for being here and sharing so much. Just from reading many postings, I have felt confident and at ease around walking the Camino.

    There was a question about the size of backpacks, that made me jump in and finally introduce myself.

    I am a small boned woman, walking the Camino from the end of April to the end of May. I have tried different backpacks designed for women, and ended up choosing the Osprey Aura 50, because of the excellent construction and light weight. They do have a 35, that did not sit as well at the hips. It was too small and short. I also tried the REI versions for women and they were inferior, as far as comfort. The straps were in the wrong places and you could feel the weight much more than with this Osprey 50.

    This one has amazing solutions. I never thought I could carry weight as comfortably! What I have found over time, is that it is worth paying the extra money if you have really good technology as far as proportions, form and materials.

    It has more space than I need, but this allows me to distribute things very well as far as the balance for carrying the weight. The straps can be tightened so it packs thin and long.

    I still have room available, and with all my stuff in it (even things I may leave out in the end), it weighs 8 kilos. It has an easily accessible Camelback water pouch and a side passage for the water source, outer pockets for gloves, rain jacket, snacks, etc.

    For us, maybe the most important pieces, as far as comfort, are the shoes and the backpack. Worth choosing carefully and going for what feels really well integrated and comfortable.

    All the best for all of you. It will be great to cross paths in a month's time.

    Ruth
  46. ArturoDavid

    ArturoDavid New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2012
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hey Gina,

    I think a 50L would be more than enough. I like the Osprey packs myself. I think the most important thing is to have it fitted. I make sure I always have comfy hips and chest straps.

    So exciting! I will be starting my pilgimage from St Jean at the end of april myself.
  47. ArturoDavid

    ArturoDavid New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2012
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Just want to say Hi Ruth. We will be traveling the camino about the same time. End of April to end of May. Thought I would finally register and introduce myself as well as I have just been soaking up the knowledge. I am sure we will share a mile or two along the way :D

  48. ArturoDavid

    ArturoDavid New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2012
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    HI Ruth!

    Just thought I would say hi. We will be traveling the camino the same time. End of April to end of May. I also have just been soaking up the knowlegde as well and not introduced myself. We will probably share a mile or two. :D

    So excited!


  49. Sojourner47

    Sojourner47 Guest

  50. JohnnieWalker

    JohnnieWalker Nunca se camina solo

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2006
    Messages:
    3,266
    Likes Received:
    377
    Location:
    Santiago de Compostela
    I'm sure there will be lots of other Ruths walking when Arturo is!
Tags: backpack

Share This Page

This site is run by Ivar Rekve | Add your Camino to the Camino Calendar | Credentials (donativo) | Find us on Google+