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Dutch Camino?

Camino(s) past & future
CF (SJPdP to Santiago) March 15, 2018
#1
I have been approached about a Camino starting in the Netherlands and has anyone any information on it? I am looking for routes, Pilgrim Passport info, do they have Credentials? Seasons? Scallop path markers? Hostels?
Really truly I have no idea so all help or information on where to find it would be fantastic.

Thank you
 

Purky

The Dutch guy
Camino(s) past & future
Breathe properly.
Stay curious.
And walk a camino.
#2
Do you mean a Camino all the way to Spain starting in the Netherlands, or a Dutch Camino that stays in the Netherlands? Both are possible. Firstly there are many roads to Santiago (or to Rome, for that matter), and some pass through the Netherlands.
Secondly there are some 'ways of St. James', Jakobswegen or Jabikspaden in our country. Could you provide some more info? I could then easily find out for you, because I live in the Netherlands.
For the time being, I'll link some sites that might be of use:

- an overview of Camino's in Europe (not including Holland, for some reason...)
- all Dutch Camino's
- various info on European Camino's by country, including the Netherlands
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF (SJPdP to Santiago) March 15, 2018
#3
Thank you so much, initially one that stays in the Netherlands due to time constraints but ultimately the possibility for doing it to Santiago would be an amazing dream. I am hoping to be there this fall and hoping to do some if not all of it depending on how long it is there.
 
#4
There are no albergue-like accommodations, the cheapest option is to become a member of Vrienden op de Fiets for €8. You then get a book and map of people who offer room and breakfast for €20. I did this option a few times when I walked Part 1 of the Pilgrim's Path from Amsterdam - Den Bosch. I walked it on Sundays and when I got further south during a few long weekends. I haven't continued with Part 2 to Visé as I was spending more time traveling than walking!

Signage was good but I also had a guide with me (only available in Dutch). I enjoyed it but one never knows how the weather will be. Since I did it on weekends I could postpone if the weather was bad (it rains a lot!). That's why I spend most of my vacations walking in Spain:)
 

Purky

The Dutch guy
Camino(s) past & future
Breathe properly.
Stay curious.
And walk a camino.
#5
I am hoping to be there this fall and hoping to do some if not all of it depending on how long it is there.
There is a surprising number of different pilgrim ways in our small country, and they'll be around longer than our lifetime. So before I begin listing them all, some questions. Are you staying in the north or the south of the Netherlands? Will you walk with someone and if yes, do they speak/read Dutch (guidebooks are almost exclusively in Dutch)? How many days are you planning for your walk?
Regarding accommodation, no hostels to speak of as @LTfit rightly said. So the 'Vrienden op de fiets' (friends on a bike) is an excellent tip: anything else (B&B, hotels) is more expensive, unless you decide to bring a lightweight tent and use campsites.
Weather is usually very reasonable in the fall. Having said that, it still rains a bit here so come prepared with good rain gear. Regarding credentials, I'm not too sure that you will need one, but that might depend on the path you choose. If you want more specifics, don't hesitate to PM me.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF (SJPdP to Santiago) March 15, 2018
#6
Thank you so much, I will be travelling with a English speaking friend who has never been to Holland. I will be doing a bit of travelling before or after to Texel (my parents are came from there almost 60 years ago) but mainly it the Utrecht/Amsterdam area though I do want to go to Zeeland an my Grandfathers come from there. I can speak enough Dutch to get by but my reading (self taught) is pretty iffy. We are hoping to walk for up to 10 days but I think that depends on the weather. I can't tell you how much I appreciate this, thanks again.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF (SJPdP to Santiago) March 15, 2018
#7
There are no albergue-like accommodations, the cheapest option is to become a member of Vrienden op de Fiets for €8. You then get a book and map of people who offer room and breakfast for €20. I did this option a few times when I walked Part 1 of the Pilgrim's Path from Amsterdam - Den Bosch. I walked it on Sundays and when I got further south during a few long weekends. I haven't continued with Part 2 to Visé as I was spending more time traveling than walking!

Signage was good but I also had a guide with me (only available in Dutch). I enjoyed it but one never knows how the weather will be. Since I did it on weekends I could postpone if the weather was bad (it rains a lot!). That's why I spend most of my vacations walking in Spain:)
This is great info, I am trying to get information myself as well but my reading in Dutch is incredibly slow, especially if there is aa lot of information. I like the BnB type stay as then you can meet more people especially as the friend I am travelling with has never been to the Netherlands and is English speaking only.
 

Purky

The Dutch guy
Camino(s) past & future
Breathe properly.
Stay curious.
And walk a camino.
#8
Ten days, that gives you a lot of possibilities. I am going to approach this practically and suggest the route from Millingen aan de Rijn to the south, Maastricht (262 km). I have a couple of reasons for this choice.
First, I walked it myself and found it very beautiful. It is the southern part of the Pieterpad, by far the most well known (and liked) long distance walking route in the Netherlands. It also more or less follows the direction of the Way of St. James Limburg (Jacobspad Limburg, 222,5 km). But the latter is less traveled, not as well waymarked and skips some gorgeous country-side bits. Plus stamps for a credential (which you can get) seem to be a hassle to get.
Which brings me to the second reason for my choice: accommodation. The Pieterpad is mainly so popular because it consists of easy 20 km (+/-) stages, beginning- and endpoints being very accessible with public transportation. And because it is so well known, plenty of choice for B&B's, hotels and campsites (the last with occasional lodges or caravans for rent).
Reason three: the south part of the Pieterpad has much more amenities than the north part. So less to worry about, less planning required and a lot more cafés, restaurants and the likes. Just walk and enjoy. I'll link some relevant sites for you to find out more. By the way, no credential needed.
Lastly, from Maastricht you can access the Via Mosana to connect you to the Via Monastica to get you underway from the Netherlands all the way to Santiago. A nice thought to dream about for later years.
Happy planning!

Way of St.James Limburg
Pieterpad site (+ halting-places - accommodation listings - guide)
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
CF (SJPdP to Santiago) March 15, 2018
#9
Ten days, that gives you a lot of possibilities. I am going to approach this practically and suggest the route from Millingen aan de Rijn to the south, Maastricht (262 km). I have a couple of reasons for this choice.
First, I walked it myself and found it very beautiful. It is the southern part of the Pieterpad, by far the most well known (and liked) long distance walking route in the Netherlands. It also more or less follows the direction of the Way of St. James Limburg (Jacobspad Limburg, 222,5 km). But the latter is less traveled, not as well waymarked and skips some gorgeous country-side bits. Plus stamps for a credential (which you can get) seem to be a hassle to get.
Which brings me to the second reason for my choice: accommodation. The Pieterpad is mainly so popular because it consists of easy 20 km (+/-) stages, beginning- and endpoints being very accessible with public transportation. And because it is so well known, plenty of choice for B&B's, hotels and campsites (the last with occasional lodges or caravans for rent).
Reason three: the south part of the Pieterpad has much more amenities than the north part. So less to worry about, less planning required and a lot more cafés, restaurants and the likes. Just walk and enjoy. I'll link some relevant sites for you to find out more. By the way, no credential needed.
Lastly, from Maastricht you can access the Via Mosana to connect you to the Via Monastica to get you underway from the Netherlands all the way to Santiago. A nice thought to dream about for later years.
Happy planning!

Way of St.James Limburg
Pieterpad site (+ halting-places - accommodation listings - guide)
Thank you, this is very interesting and I will spend more time on this the suggestions are much appreciated as well as the advice.
 

Alan Pearce

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Aragones 2008, del Norte 2009, VdlP 2011, Ingles 2014, Camino de Madri 2015, Frances 2017
#10
I have been approached about a Camino starting in the Netherlands and has anyone any information on it? I am looking for routes, Pilgrim Passport info, do they have Credentials? Seasons? Scallop path markers? Hostels?
Really truly I have no idea so all help or information on where to find it would be fantastic.

Thank you
When working in the Pilgrim Office in Compostela last year, I had the pleasure of meeting two Dutch couples who had walked from their homes in Holland. They measured their journey by GPS, and bought Distancias from the office stating that they had walked 2,774 KM! Their camino took them 4 months to complete.

Alan

Be brave. Life is joyous.
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata.
#11
On my first camino in 2001 my husband and I walked for an hour or so with a young man who had walked from his home in Holland. Apart from the distance he had come, what interested me was that he used two trekking sticks - something much more unusual then, and particularly in someone young. He showed me the proper way to use them, and for him they were an integral part of his stride. After his pause walking at our pace, he eventually said "goodbye" and headed rapidly off into the distance. At a very fast pace!

I've often thought of him, and his cheery talk. And the inspiration and kindness he showed to a very overweight middle aged woman and her forbearing husband!
 

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