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Camino del Norte guidebook recommendations

Lucy Smev

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte (September-October 2015)
Hi there,
This is my first post so I hope I'm posting in the correct section!
I'm planning on starting the Camino del Norte from Irun on 28th September and so far I'm finding the amount (and variability!) of information online a little overwhelming so I'd like to purchase a guidebook to help me start planning the route and places to stop. Can anyone suggest a good guidebook? I've read that the Cicerone version is not particularly useful, but I'd be interested to hear what information people have used when actually on the camino.
Any advice would be much appreciated.
Thanks :)
 

Marc S.

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Since 2012: CF, CdN, CP, Salvador, Aragones, Via Regia, Elisabethpfad, Jakobsweg NRW, Jakibspaad.
I walked the Norte last year, using the Cicerone guide. I guess a lot depends on what you expect from a guidebook. The Cicerone guide was usefull enough for me as the maps were okay for me, the listing of accomodation and albergues rather complete, and the route descriptions okay most of the time. Layout could have been much more compact though, and I like a guidebook that fits in my pocket (the Cicerone one doesn't). Waymarking on the Norte is usually good, so you can walk with just the eroski app. Personally, I prefer walking with a guidebook (as I prefer to have my phone switched off while walking). If I were to walk the Norte again I would use the German Rother guide book, but I think it is only available in German (do you read German ?)
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
If you can read Spanish, Editorial Buen Camino has a good guide. If you read German then get the Rother guide. But seriously, the Eroski site will give you all you need, if you can manage a bit of Spanish. Just be sure to check the dates the albergues close on that route as many are only open during the middle of summer.
 
S

Satírico

Guest
Hi there,
This is my first post so I hope I'm posting in the correct section!
I'm planning on starting the Camino del Norte from Irun on 28th September and so far I'm finding the amount (and variability!) of information online a little overwhelming so I'd like to purchase a guidebook to help me start planning the route and places to stop. Can anyone suggest a good guidebook? I've read that the Cicerone version is not particularly useful, but I'd be interested to hear what information people have used when actually on the camino.
Any advice would be much appreciated.
Thanks :)

Dear Lucy,

I've invested in the Cicerone - it covers all the northern paths - and it seems very detailed and quite compact. I only worry about getting a bit lost once inside a large town or city, the maps provided are more decorative than anything else. The multilingual glossary and guidance on distances (some very long days!) are sure to be helpful.

Hope that helps a bit.
 

Lucy Smev

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte (September-October 2015)
Wow, thanks to everyone for all their comments. This is really useful. I've downloaded the Eroski app and it's extremely useful, I only wonder whether I might need wifi to access it when I'm there and I'm not planning on being connected to the internet, but it's still really useful for planning purposes. I can read a little Spanish so I was thinking that I could purchase a Spanish guidebook and see how I get on. I think the main thing troubling me at the moment is that some of the albergues may be closed when I'm doing the route so accommodation may get tricky at times and I might need to find other options. I would like to carry a tent but this is just not feasible in terms of weight and space so I guess I'll just have to see how I get on! Thanks again for all the comments :)
 

Walking Viking

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
El Camino de Santiago del Norte (2015)
Hi there,
This is my first post so I hope I'm posting in the correct section!
I'm planning on starting the Camino del Norte from Irun on 28th September and so far I'm finding the amount (and variability!) of information online a little overwhelming so I'd like to purchase a guidebook to help me start planning the route and places to stop. Can anyone suggest a good guidebook? I've read that the Cicerone version is not particularly useful, but I'd be interested to hear what information people have used when actually on the camino.
Any advice would be much appreciated.
Thanks :)

Lucy,

I walked the del Norte from Irun to Santiago April 28 to June 3, this year. It was my first camino. As you said, there is a lot of info on the caminos out there. This forum is very good as a reference point for asking questions and getting advice. The only issue is the information here comes from a very big group of pilgrims with a very big difference in experience, and that sometimes can be overwhelming as well. In a previous post on this forum, I listed some of the lessons I learned from my own camino. I will list some of them for you.

1). Before I left for Spain, I went to my local AT&T cellphone office and had them connect my cell phone to the Spanish phone system (voice, data, text $30 per month). I had internet, voice and text whenever my phone was on. I did this primarily because I planned to walk alone as much as possible.

2). I used the stages of the del Norte from the gronze.com website to establish my itinery for overnights/rest days and day/dates on the camino. The gronze.com website lists albergues, hotels and pensions available at almost all the towns, cities and villages, but for some reason does not list all of them. I'm guessing it' s a pay for posting issue. If my plans changed, I could make adjustments to my hotel/albergue/pension while on the camino at rest stops. Almost every bar, restaurant and pension had WiFi (pronounced Whiffee in Spain). All you have to do is ask if they have WiFi, and then ask for the access code. Most were posted somewhere in the facility. Also, the gronze.com stages show the distances between towns and also at the bottom of the stage page, there is a vertical profile indicating the ups and downs.

3). The del Norte is very challenging during the first 8 stages due to the steep ups and downs, especially the downs! By the time I arrived in Guernika, end of Stage 5, there were injured pilgrims everywhere, a lot of them coming and going to/from the La Farmacias. Tendonitis, blisters, feet and knee issues, etc. I was no exception. I suffered from blisters, blood blisters and muscle issues (campartment syndrome with shin muscles). My initial damage, blisters, was incurred on Stage 1, Irun - San Sebastian. Everybody I met or walked with had Compeed, Vaseline and Ibuprofen tablets. I will add that I trained for six months before I left. During the last two months of training, I had a full backpack, had broke in two pairs of footwear, and hiked 9.5 miles (15 km) every morning. In Guernika one night (end of Stage 5) I was in a pension with about 6 other pilgrims eating dinner in the common area and asked them all if they thought that there was any way to prepare for the del Norte. Without exception, we all agreed that the answer was NO! Some were first timers, others had lots of hiking experience, some had had walked other caminos. We all had the "camino limp".

4). This is the most important item. Buy a good set of adjustable trekking poles and learn how to use them correctly (length and straps)! I had a set with me but did not know how to use them properly and was stumbling along like a newborn pony. They got stowed in my backpack. During Stage 14 I walked with a very experienced trekking guide who showed me the correct way to use my "sticks". From that point on it was a totally different camino. My wounds healed fully in three days. I could move at twice the speed with about half the effort. Hills, mud bogs and slippery trails were no problem. In the Miraz albergue I met a pilgrim from Germany who had 3-4 big blisters on both feet. Hed had white sewing thread and Compeed covering the bottom of both feet. He said he was on his way home because he couldn't take the pain anymore. I asked him if he had sticks. He said no. I suggested he get some and showed him how I used mine. I saw him next in Sobrado outside the monastary, walking with sticks. He said he was much better and thanked me for showing him how to use them. As he left, I noticed he was not using the straps correctly and mentioned it to him. He asked how to use them. I showed him how to put his hands through the loops from the bottom and then grip the handles. Well off he went, using the sticks correctly. The next time I saw him was in Pilgrim City in Santiago, a great big smile all over his face. He'd finished his camino. He couldn't thank me enough. It was one pilgrim helping another pilgrim, just as I'd been shown.

5). I had packed my backpack for any contingency such as rain and cold; tent, tarp, inflatable sleeping bag cushion, rain jacket/pants, etc. After a week and no rain I sent tent, tarp and cushion home. A week later the cold weather clothes went home. I lightened my pack by about 6-7 lbs. my experience at that point told me I was going to get a bed every night (not a lot of pilgrims on the Norte in Aptil/May). I am planning my next camino, Portuguese, and will do things a little different, but go same time of year as I don't do hot very well. No tent gear, lighter clothes but more of them for weight (layering) and take my lightweight Marmot rain jacket and pants. I bought the Brierly guide for the Portuguese but will still use gronze.com to check on current data.

I hope this helps a little. There is more, but that is mostly preference items. I haven't seen the Brierly Guide for the del Norte, but if it is like the Portuguese, I would buy it.

The camino del Norte is waymarked fairly well, but in some provinces the direction indication changes 180 degrees so I would research that. After Ribadeo, it is almost impossible to get lost and the direction indication is as it should be, at least in my humble opinion.

I stayed at a few hotels/pensions along the way and would recommend them if you would like. One in particular that I liked and went back to after my camino (and spent three days there while I explored that city) was the Hotel Santa Cruz. The owner/manager's name is Henri. He is a very hard working, guest oriented knowledgeable young man. He has walked the del Norte and made several recommendations to me that worked out very well. The hotel has a restaurant/bar and is on the camino. You can see the bronze scallop shells in the sidewalk just outside the door.

I also got into the habit of visiting the Tourist Information Office first thing after checking into the albergue/hotel/pension at every layover. I needed to find out where the camino was and where it went as I left town. In some places (La Caridad), the scallop shells, signs and trail markers just disapear. During daylight, I would use the info from the tourist office to find the camino and follow it for a bit the night before leaving town. This camino is not like the Frances until Arzua. There are times when you are alone and don't have large groups of pilgrims to follow

And lastly, I would download the ALSA bus app and probably the one for booking.com as well.

Buen camino.

WV
 
Last edited:

Lucy Smev

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte (September-October 2015)
Lucy,

I walked the del Norte from Irun to Santiago April 28 to June 3, this year. It was my first camino. As you said, there is a lot of info on the caminos out there. This forum is very good as a reference point for asking questions and getting advice. The only issue is the information here comes from a very big group of pilgrims with a very big difference in experience, and that sometimes can be overwhelming as well. In a previous post on this forum, I listed some of the lessons I learned from my own camino. I will list some of them for you.

1). Before I left for Spain, I went to my local AT&T cellphone office and had them connect my cell phone to the Spanish phone system (voice, data, text $30 per month). I had internet, voice and text whenever my phone was on. I did this primarily because I planned to walk alone as much as possible.

2). I used the stages of the del Norte from the gronze.com website to establish my itinery for overnights/rest days and day/dates on the camino. The gronze.com website lists albergues, hotels and pensions available at almost all the towns, cities and villages, but for some reason does not list all of them. I'm guessing it' s a pay for posting issue. If my plans changed, I could make adjustments to my hotel/albergue/pension while on the camino at rest stops. Almost every bar, restaurant and pension had WiFi (pronounced Whiffee in Spain). All you have to do is ask if they have WiFi, and then ask for the access code. Most were posted somewhere in the facility. Also, the gronze.com stages show the distances between towns and also at the bottom of the stage page, there is a vertical profile indicating the ups and downs.

3). The del Norte is very challenging during the first 8 stages due to the steep ups and downs, especially the downs! By the time I arrived in Guernika, end of Stage 5, there were injured pilgrims everywhere, a lot of them coming and going to/from the La Farmacias. Tendonitis, blisters, feet and knee issues, etc. I was no exception. I suffered from blisters, blood blisters and muscle issues (campartment syndrome with shin muscles). My initial damage, blisters, was incurred on Stage 1, Irun - San Sebastian. Everybody I met or walked with had Compeed, Vaseline and Ibuprofen tablets. I will add that I trained for six months before I left. During the last two months of training, I had a full backpack, had broke in two pairs of footwear, and hiked 9.5 miles (15 km) every morning. In Guernika one night (end of Stage 5) I was in a pension with about 6 other pilgrims eating dinner in the common area and asked them all if they thought that there was any way to prepare for the del Norte. Without exception, we all agreed that the answer was NO! Some were first timers, others had lots of hiking experience, some had had walked other caminos. We all had the "camino limp".

4). This is the most important item. Buy a good set of adjustable trekking poles and learn how to use them correctly (length and straps)! I had a set with me but did not know how to use them properly and was stumbling along like a newborn pony. They got stowed in my backpack. During Stage 14 I walked with a very experienced trekking guide who showed me the correct way to use my "sticks". From that point on it was a totally different camino. My wounds healed fully in three days. I could move at twice the speed with about half the effort. Hills, mud bogs and slippery trails were no problem. In the Miraz albergue I met a pilgrim from Germany who had 3-4 big blisters on both feet. Hed had white sewing thread and Compeed covering the bottom of both feet. He said he was on his way home because he couldn't take the pain anymore. I asked him if he had sticks. He said no. I suggested he get some and showed him how I used mine. I saw him next in Sobrado outside the monastary, walking with sticks. He said he was much better and thanked me for showing him how to use them. As he left, I noticed he was not using the straps correctly and mentioned it to him. He asked how to use them. I showed him how to put his hands through the loops from the bottom and then grip the handles. Well off he went, using the sticks correctly. The next time I saw him was in Pilgrim City in Santiago, a great big smile all over his face. He'd finished his camino. He couldn't thank me enough. It was one pilgrim helping another pilgrim, just as I'd been shown.

5). I had packed my backpack for any contingency such as rain and cold; tent, tarp, inflatable sleeping bag cushion, rain jacket/pants, etc. After a week and no rain I sent tent, tarp and cushion home. A week later the cold weather clothes went home. I lightened my pack by about 6-7 lbs. my experience at that point told me I was going to get a bed every night (not a lot of pilgrims on the Norte in Aptil/May). I am planning my next camino, Portuguese, and will do things a little different, but go same time of year as I don't do hot very well. No tent gear, lighter clothes but more of them for weight (layering) and take my lightweight Marmot rain jacket and pants. I bought the Brierly guide for the Portuguese but will still use gronze.com to check on current data.

I hope this helps a little. There is more, but that is mostly preference items. I haven't seen the Brierly Guide for the del Norte, but if it is like the Portuguese, I would buy it.

The camino del Norte is waymarked fairly well, but in some provinces the direction indication changes 180 degrees so I would research that. After Ribadeo, it is almost impossible to get lost and the direction indication is as it should be, at least in my humble opinion.

I stayed at a few hotels/pensions along the way and would recommend them if you would like. One in particular that I liked and went back to after my camino (and spent three days there while I explored that city) was the Hotel Santa Cruz. The owner/manager's name is Henri. He is a very hard working, guest oriented knowledgeable young man. He has walked the del Norte and made several recommendations to me that worked out very well. The hotel has a restaurant/bar and is on the camino. You can see the bronze scallop shells in the sidewalk just outside the door.

I also got into the habit of visiting the Tourist Information Office first thing after checking into the albergue/hotel/pension at every layover. I needed to find out where the camino was and where it went as I left town. In some places (La Caridad), the scallop shells, signs and trail markers just disapear. During daylight, I would use the info from the tourist office to find the camino and follow it for a bit the night before leaving town. This camino is not like the Frances until Arzua. There are times when you are alone and don't have large groups of pilgrims to follow

And lastly, I would download the ALSA bus app and probably the one for booking.com as well.

Buen camino.

WV

Thank you for the advice, Walking Viking! I've been using the gronze.com website and it seems to be really informative. Some hotel/pension recommendations would be much appreciated, thank you. I'm planning on staying in a few hotels/pensions, mainly because some of the albergues will be closed at the time of year that I'm starting the camino, and also because I'd like some space for myself at times! I like the idea of being alone on the trail, and as you advise, it will be a good idea to know where you are going each morning because there might not be groups of pilgrims to follow :)
 

Walking Viking

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
El Camino de Santiago del Norte (2015)
Thank you for the advice, Walking Viking! I've been using the gronze.com website and it seems to be really informative. Some hotel/pension recommendations would be much appreciated, thank you. I'm planning on staying in a few hotels/pensions, mainly because some of the albergues will be closed at the time of year that I'm starting the camino, and also because I'd like some space for myself at times! I like the idea of being alone on the trail, and as you advise, it will be a good idea to know where you are going each morning because there might not be groups of pilgrims to follow :)
Lucy,

When on my camino (del Norte, April 28- June 3 this year) I decided to plan a rest day about once a week to give my body a chance to heal and repair any injuries which occured during the stages. Here is a partial list of hotels/albergues/pensions where I stayed:


San Sebastian - Urban House (pension)
Zarautz - Gran Camping Zarautz (private albergue)
Deba- Alber. de Peregr. Geltoki (muni albergue)
Markina- Alb. de Peregr. Convento del Carmin (albergue)
Bilbao- Pension Bilbao (pension)
Portugalete- Pension Buenavista (pension)
Castro Urdiales- Pension La Marina (pension)
Laredo- Hotel Cortijo (hotel)
Guemes- Alb. La Cabana del Abuelo Peuto (priv albergue)
Santander- Hospedaje Cervantes (pension)
Santillana del Mar- Hotel Anexo los Infantes (hotel)
Comillas- Hotel Esmeralda (hotel)
Columbres- El Cantu Alb. Rural (priv albergue)
Llanes- Albergue La Estacion (priv albergue)
Ribadesella- Hotel Derli Sella (hotel)
La Isla- Alb. De Peregr. De La Isla (albergue)
Villaviciosa- Hostel El Congresso (hotel)
Gijon- Pension Plaza (pension)
Aviles- Pension La Fruta (pension)
Soto de Luina- Hostal Paulino (pension)
Cadavedo- H R Casa Roja (hotel)
Otur- Hotel Gran Consuelo (hotel)
Ribadeo- Hotel Santa Cruz (hotel)
Lourenza- Alb. De Lourenza (albergue)
Gonton- Alb. De Gonton (albergue)
Miraz- Alb. De Peregr. de Miraz (albergue)
Sobrado de Monxes- Monas Sta Maria de Sobrado (albergue)
Arzua- Alb Don Quijote (albergue)
Pedrouzo- Pension Podrouzo (pension)

As you can see, there is quite a mix of hotels, albergues and pensions. One thing I will say is to NOT miss a stay at the albergue in Guemes. This place is the true essence of what an albergue should be.

Also, I have left out the hotels where I stayed two nights for my "rest days". They were a bit expensive, but for me, it was worth the money. The list is a little bit different from my original plan, making changes as situations changed during my camino, i.e.: I had planned to go from Vilalba (rest day hotel) to Baamonde, and then next day, from Baamonde to Sobrado. However, the owner/manager of the hotel in Ribadeo, Henri, suggested I go from Vilalba to Miraz, overnight at the albergue, and then go from Miraz to Sobrado, all of which I did. This plan turned an 18.6 km stage and a 41.2 km stage into a 34.3 km stage and a 25 km stage. It worked out perfectly. The Santa Cruz owner grew up in Santiago, has lived in Ribadeo for some time and has walked, and is very familiar with, the camino del Norte. I would highly recommend the Hotel Santa Cruz in Ribadeo. The rooms are cheap (€25), neat and clean. They have a nice bar/restaurant and the camino is just outside of the door. You can see the bronze scallop shells in the concrete sidewalk from the restaurant.

I hope this info helps. Like you, I wanted to have a bed and room to myself every 6-8 stages. That really helped to facilitate healing of my feet and legs, plus I could casually walk around and check out some of the local restaurants, museums and bars, which was quite handy in Bilbao where I went to the Guggenhiem Museum. But remember that a plan is just that, a plan. About 80% of my plan worked out as written. The best part of my plan was that I could change it as necessary because I had a lot of time scheduled in at the end if in fact I needed to change it, which I did.

Buen Camino

WV
 

Marc S.

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Since 2012: CF, CdN, CP, Salvador, Aragones, Via Regia, Elisabethpfad, Jakobsweg NRW, Jakibspaad.
May I just recommend the Albergue Aves de Paso in Pendueles, a small really nice donativo albergue with communal meals. And I agree that the Guemes albergue is not to missed when walking the Norte. In Villaviciosa I really enjoyed staying in Hotel Carlos 1, really good value for money (20e incl breakfast for pilgrims) in a beautifully decorated old hotel and very friendly staff.
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
Hola Lucy.
I would suggest that you purchase the CSJ guides to the Norte, 'Los Camino del Norte A Ruta de la Costa' - 1 and 2. They are full of information and directions as well as light to carry. You can then write in any info from cicerone and gronze that you feel you need. We also could write in notes about our day, special photos etc in addition to our brief diary notes. If you are not needing any of the variations given it is also easy to cut them out and so lighten your load, even if it is only by a few pages.
 

Lucy Smev

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte (September-October 2015)
Hola Lucy.
I would suggest that you purchase the CSJ guides to the Norte, 'Los Camino del Norte A Ruta de la Costa' - 1 and 2. They are full of information and directions as well as light to carry. You can then write in any info from cicerone and gronze that you feel you need. We also could write in notes about our day, special photos etc in addition to our brief diary notes. If you are not needing any of the variations given it is also easy to cut them out and so lighten your load, even if it is only by a few pages.

Hola Tia Valeria,
Thank you so much for the suggestion of purchasing the CSJ guides- that's really quite nice that you suggested these as I've just found them online. It seems like a serendipitous coincidence so I'm going to purchase these and then add my own notes as you also suggest :)
 

spursfan

Veteran Member
The CSJ guides are great value as well, at only £5 or so each - they contain the most detailed notes regarding the Norte route - in fact I tore out and threw away used pages as I went along - I kept the Cicerone guide intact as I really valued their detailed maps - the only thing I added was some pages of Google maps searches of bigger towns so that I could find where the supermercados were from their addresses
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portuguese "2014" from Tui to Santiago
Camino Norte "April 2016"
Was the Hotel Santa Cruz that you liked in Oviedo?

Thanks

Lucy,

I walked the del Norte from Irun to Santiago April 28 to June 3, this year. It was my first camino. As you said, there is a lot of info on the caminos out there. This forum is very good as a reference point for asking questions and getting advice. The only issue is the information here comes from a very big group of pilgrims with a very big difference in experience, and that sometimes can be overwhelming as well. In a previous post on this forum, I listed some of the lessons I learned from my own camino. I will list some of them for you.

1). Before I left for Spain, I went to my local AT&T cellphone office and had them connect my cell phone to the Spanish phone system (voice, data, text $30 per month). I had internet, voice and text whenever my phone was on. I did this primarily because I planned to walk alone as much as possible.

2). I used the stages of the del Norte from the gronze.com website to establish my itinery for overnights/rest days and day/dates on the camino. The gronze.com website lists albergues, hotels and pensions available at almost all the towns, cities and villages, but for some reason does not list all of them. I'm guessing it' s a pay for posting issue. If my plans changed, I could make adjustments to my hotel/albergue/pension while on the camino at rest stops. Almost every bar, restaurant and pension had WiFi (pronounced Whiffee in Spain). All you have to do is ask if they have WiFi, and then ask for the access code. Most were posted somewhere in the facility. Also, the gronze.com stages show the distances between towns and also at the bottom of the stage page, there is a vertical profile indicating the ups and downs.

3). The del Norte is very challenging during the first 8 stages due to the steep ups and downs, especially the downs! By the time I arrived in Guernika, end of Stage 5, there were injured pilgrims everywhere, a lot of them coming and going to/from the La Farmacias. Tendonitis, blisters, feet and knee issues, etc. I was no exception. I suffered from blisters, blood blisters and muscle issues (campartment syndrome with shin muscles). My initial damage, blisters, was incurred on Stage 1, Irun - San Sebastian. Everybody I met or walked with had Compeed, Vaseline and Ibuprofen tablets. I will add that I trained for six months before I left. During the last two months of training, I had a full backpack, had broke in two pairs of footwear, and hiked 9.5 miles (15 km) every morning. In Guernika one night (end of Stage 5) I was in a pension with about 6 other pilgrims eating dinner in the common area and asked them all if they thought that there was any way to prepare for the del Norte. Without exception, we all agreed that the answer was NO! Some were first timers, others had lots of hiking experience, some had had walked other caminos. We all had the "camino limp".

4). This is the most important item. Buy a good set of adjustable trekking poles and learn how to use them correctly (length and straps)! I had a set with me but did not know how to use them properly and was stumbling along like a newborn pony. They got stowed in my backpack. During Stage 14 I walked with a very experienced trekking guide who showed me the correct way to use my "sticks". From that point on it was a totally different camino. My wounds healed fully in three days. I could move at twice the speed with about half the effort. Hills, mud bogs and slippery trails were no problem. In the Miraz albergue I met a pilgrim from Germany who had 3-4 big blisters on both feet. Hed had white sewing thread and Compeed covering the bottom of both feet. He said he was on his way home because he couldn't take the pain anymore. I asked him if he had sticks. He said no. I suggested he get some and showed him how I used mine. I saw him next in Sobrado outside the monastary, walking with sticks. He said he was much better and thanked me for showing him how to use them. As he left, I noticed he was not using the straps correctly and mentioned it to him. He asked how to use them. I showed him how to put his hands through the loops from the bottom and then grip the handles. Well off he went, using the sticks correctly. The next time I saw him was in Pilgrim City in Santiago, a great big smile all over his face. He'd finished his camino. He couldn't thank me enough. It was one pilgrim helping another pilgrim, just as I'd been shown.

5). I had packed my backpack for any contingency such as rain and cold; tent, tarp, inflatable sleeping bag cushion, rain jacket/pants, etc. After a week and no rain I sent tent, tarp and cushion home. A week later the cold weather clothes went home. I lightened my pack by about 6-7 lbs. my experience at that point told me I was going to get a bed every night (not a lot of pilgrims on the Norte in Aptil/May). I am planning my next camino, Portuguese, and will do things a little different, but go same time of year as I don't do hot very well. No tent gear, lighter clothes but more of them for weight (layering) and take my lightweight Marmot rain jacket and pants. I bought the Brierly guide for the Portuguese but will still use gronze.com to check on current data.

I hope this helps a little. There is more, but that is mostly preference items. I haven't seen the Brierly Guide for the del Norte, but if it is like the Portuguese, I would buy it.

The camino del Norte is waymarked fairly well, but in some provinces the direction indication changes 180 degrees so I would research that. After Ribadeo, it is almost impossible to get lost and the direction indication is as it should be, at least in my humble opinion.

I stayed at a few hotels/pensions along the way and would recommend them if you would like. One in particular that I liked and went back to after my camino (and spent three days there while I explored that city) was the Hotel Santa Cruz. The owner/manager's name is Henri. He is a very hard working, guest oriented knowledgeable young man. He has walked the del Norte and made several recommendations to me that worked out very well. The hotel has a restaurant/bar and is on the camino. You can see the bronze scallop shells in the sidewalk just outside the door.

I also got into the habit of visiting the Tourist Information Office first thing after checking into the albergue/hotel/pension at every layover. I needed to find out where the camino was and where it went as I left town. In some places (La Caridad), the scallop shells, signs and trail markers just disapear. During daylight, I would use the info from the tourist office to find the camino and follow it for a bit the night before leaving town. This camino is not like the Frances until Arzua. There are times when you are alone and don't have large groups of pilgrims to follow

And lastly, I would download the ALSA bus app and probably the one for booking.com as well.

Buen camino.

WV
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portuguese "2014" from Tui to Santiago
Camino Norte "April 2016"
Was the Hotel Santa Cruz that you liked in Oviedo?

Thanks

I've read on a bit further and found where you suggested the Hotel Santa Cruz, so please disregard my question. However, I do have another question for you. We are not planning on staying in many albergues, only some that supply the bedding as we don't want to carry the extra weight since mostly we will be staying in pensions, hotels etc. Can you tell me if the albergue in Guemes supplies bedding? Thanks,

Jacquie
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
I've read on a bit further and found where you suggested the Hotel Santa Cruz, so please disregard my question. However, I do have another question for you. We are not planning on staying in many albergues, only some that supply the bedding as we don't want to carry the extra weight since mostly we will be staying in pensions, hotels etc. Can you tell me if the albergue in Guemes supplies bedding? Thanks,

Jacquie
Guemes is the last place that would supply bedding. It's a rather basic place. 3 level bunkbed or capming style beds in crowded little cabbins. And the mattrese in the bunks are not "real" mattresses but peices of foam that have been covered in material. Plus, with so many pilgims to feed the volonteers would not be able to do so much laundry. Their garlic soup, fried eggs and salad for lunch is fantastic though, and the grounds lovely for a nap in the yard.
 

Walking Viking

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
El Camino de Santiago del Norte (2015)
I've read on a bit further and found where you suggested the Hotel Santa Cruz, so please disregard my question. However, I do have another question for you. We are not planning on staying in many albergues, only some that supply the bedding as we don't want to carry the extra weight since mostly we will be staying in pensions, hotels etc. Can you tell me if the albergue in Guemes supplies bedding? Thanks,

Jacquie
Jacquie,

All of the albergues on the list, which I posted, had necessary bedding; bed, pillow and most had bottom sheets (disposable). I made a habit of sleeping on or in my sleeping bag, except in one muni albergue (Estacion de Feve in Llanes) they would not allow sleeping bags on their beds to prevent spreading of any insect infestations.

The albergue in Guemes, La Cabana del Abuelo Peuto, is what every other albergue on the camino want's to be! This is a privately owned facility that is dedicated to pilgrims on the camino. They receive no funding from the government or church. They have beds for up to 70 people, everything provided: beds, blankets, pillows, showers, quiet areas, communal dining, reading and meditation rooms and a library. Everywhere you go the sitting areas have wonderfully beautiful scenery.

On arrival, the greeters help you take off your gear, give you a glass of water, sign you in, show you to your room (my room had 11 beds in it). Each room has it's own bathroom. Pilgrims were provided lunch and dinner on arrival day as well as a breakfast before leaving next morning. The atmosphere within the whole facility is nothing but amazing. Do not miss a stay at this place, it is world renouned for albergues. Of all the albergues on my camino, this place was my favorite. The cost? A donation! Whatever you want to give.

My only regret was that I didn't spend a few days there. I've included a few photos for reference.

Buen Camino,

WV
 

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Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portuguese "2014" from Tui to Santiago
Camino Norte "April 2016"
Guemes is the last place that would supply bedding. It's a rather basic place. 3 level bunkbed or capming style beds in crowded little cabbins. And the mattrese in the bunks are not "real" mattresses but peices of foam that have been covered in material. Plus, with so many pilgims to feed the volonteers would not be able to do so much laundry. Their garlic soup, fried eggs and salad for lunch is fantastic though, and the grounds lovely for a nap in the yard.

Thanks for the info. I figured as much. But sounds like we could stop for a lunch and enjoy the atmosphere. It's just not worth carrying the extra bedding on our backs for a night or two in an albergue.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portuguese "2014" from Tui to Santiago
Camino Norte "April 2016"
Jacquie,

All of the albergues on the list, which I posted, had necessary bedding; bed, pillow and most had bottom sheets (disposable). I made a habit of sleeping on or in my sleeping bag, except in one muni albergue (Estacion de Feve in Llanes) they would not allow sleeping bags on their beds to prevent spreading of any insect infestations.

The albergue in Guemes, La Cabana del Abuelo Peuto, is what every other albergue on the camino want's to be! This is a privately owned facility that is dedicated to pilgrims on the camino. They receive no funding from the government or church. They have beds for up to 70 people, everything provided: beds, blankets, pillows, showers, quiet areas, communal dining, reading and meditation rooms and a library. Everywhere you go the sitting areas have wonderfully beautiful scenery.

On arrival, the greeters help you take off your gear, give you a glass of water, sign you in, show you to your room (my room had 11 beds in it). Each room has it's own bathroom. Pilgrims were provided lunch and dinner on arrival day as well as a breakfast before leaving next morning. The atmosphere within the whole facility is nothing but amazing. Do not miss a stay at this place, it is world renouned for albergues. Of all the albergues on my camino, this place was my favorite. The cost? A donation! Whatever you want to give.

My only regret was that I didn't spend a few days there. I've included a few photos for reference.

Buen Camino,

WV
Thank you for all that. So there must be at least two albergues in Guemes that are talked about. This one sounds lovely. I have copied your accommodation list and will be incorporating it into our "spreadsheet". We are trying to get a list of recommended places. We are thinking of just carrying a silk liner with us.
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
Thanks for the info. I figured as much. But sounds like we could stop for a lunch and enjoy the atmosphere. It's just not worth carrying the extra bedding on our backs for a night or two in an albergue.
Well, lunch is not for purchase only. They do offer ot to those staying over night who arrive whole the staff is having lunch. So I would not bank on it.
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
Thank you for all that. So there must be at least two albergues in Guemes that are talked about. This one sounds lovely. I have copied your accommodation list and will be incorporating it into our "spreadsheet". We are trying to get a list of recommended places. We are thinking of just carrying a silk liner with us.
No. There is one, and it's the Abuelo something or other. A mattress, pillow, amd bottom sheet is not what I would consoder bedding. It's what every albergue offers. By bedding I mean extra sheet and iseally b'duvet or blanket of some sort to cover yourself with. Just check the Eroski site for details.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portuguese "2014" from Tui to Santiago
Camino Norte "April 2016"
No. There is one, and it's the Abuelo something or other. A mattress, pillow, amd bottom sheet is not what I would consoder bedding. It's what every albergue offers. By bedding I mean extra sheet and iseally b'duvet or blanket of some sort to cover yourself with. Just check the Eroski site for details.
I guess I'm confused as Walking Viking said that there were blankets supplied at Guemes. That's why I though this must be a different Albergue.
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
I guess I'm confused as Walking Viking said that there were blankets supplied at Guemes. That's why I though this must be a different Albergue.
She said mattress, bottom sheet and pillow. And that is what every albergue does offer, she' right. And frankly, would you really want direct contact with a blanket that has been used by pilgrims for years without wver being cleaned?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portuguese "2014" from Tui to Santiago
Camino Norte "April 2016"
She said mattress, bottom sheet and pillow. And that is what every albergue does offer, she' right. And frankly, would you really want direct contact with a blanket that has been used by pilgrims for years without wver being cleaned?

Here is the direct quote of what she wrote...

"They have beds for up to 70 people, everything provided: beds, blankets, pillows, showers, quiet areas, communal dining, reading and meditation rooms and alibrary."

This is why I was confused. Regardless, I hear ya on the blankets. Guess I was just hoping for a way to stay there without carting a sleeping bag on my bag for a month. Thanks for you info.
 

Walking Viking

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
El Camino de Santiago del Norte (2015)
image.jpg image.jpg
Here is the direct quote of what she wrote...

"They have beds for up to 70 people, everything provided: beds, blankets, pillows, showers, quiet areas, communal dining, reading and meditation rooms and alibrary."

This is why I was confused. Regardless, I hear ya on the blankets. Guess I was just hoping for a way to stay there without carting a sleeping bag on my bag for a month. Thanks for you info.

Jaquie,

The albergue at Guemes is the cleanest and neatest albergue I visited on my camino. There is a laundry on site that was continually in use by the staff while I was there. They provide a coin operated washer near the laundry, with soap and dryer for the pilgrims, which I used to clean and dry all of my gear except the t shirt and shorts I wore while doing my laundry.

The writer above must have the albergue at Guemes confused with some other place. Here are two pictures which show the room I was in, my assigned bed (under the far window with albergue provided blue blanket) with mattress, mattress cover, blanket and pillow. On the shelves, at the foot of my bed, you can see stacks of blankets (clean blankets) for use by pilgrims. Also, I carried a sleeping bag liner/sleep sack to sleep in on the nights when it was not to cold. You can see that on my bed as well. The liner is a combination silk and cotton fabric. It has a big pocket at the head end for inserting a pillow (also shown). If you travel with a sleep sack and visit all of the albergues that I listed, you will not need a sleeping bag or other "bedding". They all had blankets and pillows and most provided disposable bottom sheets. The albergue at the church in Markina was not heated and it was cool to cold at night so I used the liner and sleeping bag. The same at the albergue/refugio at the Monastery in Sobrado de Monxes.

If Guemes is going to be your only albergue overnight, then a sleep sack/bag liner will be all you need.

Also, I'm a he, not a she.

Buen Camino.

Walking Viking
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
We must have been asigned the same room and bed since I can see the same table in the middle and loo at the foot of the bed. But no blankets last fall. As you can see, these are not "rea" mattresses but pieces of foam. But as long as someone is not carrying a sleeping bag of any kind, liner or thicker, I would hope this is a non issue as I would not want to see people not using anything between themselves and the mattress cover, which is not disposible, and blankets.
 

Irmavet

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portogues - june 2014
Camino del Norte - september 2015
Hello!
I'll walk soon Norte and I'm looking for a good guide book. Last year, for the Portoguese, I had the John Brierley only map-guide and I loved it! Only maps and necessary infos about hostels and albergues. Very light and useful!
There is something like this for Norte? I need only maps, I don't want a big book with too much inside.
many thanks
Irma
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2020? Looks like.... nowhere! 😁
Hi Irma,
If you are taking a phone with you you could download the App from Eroski
http://caminodesantiago.consumer.es/los-caminos-de-santiago/del-norte/

Also, Mundicamino has maps of each 'etapas'...
http://www.mundicamino.com/rutas.cfm?id=37

Useful for additional info. on albergues :
http://www.gronze.com/camino-de-santiago/caminos/guia-del-camino-del-norte
And this website I just found: http://www.caminonorte.es/seccion.6.php

I have only just ordered guide books from the CSJ so can't tell you yet what they're like!
 
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Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
We walked the Norte in May and June this year. We used the Cicerone guide and thought it was good - we did not need anything else.
 

Walking Viking

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
El Camino de Santiago del Norte (2015)
QUOTE="Lucy Smev, post: 336809, member: 48902"]Hola Tia Valeria,
Thank you so much for the suggestion of purchasing the CSJ guides- that's really quite nice that you suggested these as I've just found them online. It seems like a serendipitous coincidence so I'm going to purchase these and then add my own notes as you also suggest :)[/QUOTE]

Lucy,

You will experience many more "serendipitous coincidences" the deeper you get into the camino realm. Places, people, scenery, architecture, the trail, etc. They all have an atmosphere of synchronicity. My first day arriving into Spain and I began to experience it. Two days later on my first stage from Irun to San Sebastian it happened again. The experience caused me to approach my camino with a totally open mind and in a state of awareness.

Although I am not a religious person, I have had life changing spiritual experiences in the past, as well as on The Way. I had read that the camino will give you what you need, not what you want. I was very sceptical at first but became a believer.

In a previous post I told the story (one of many) of how just outside the small town of Serdio I was sitting on the side of the road addressing the issue of changing bloody bandages on my feet and toes after having had lunch at a small bar. I had walked for about 30 seconds and sat down next to a ditch. As I was sitting there, changing my bandages and getting out my pain pills, I sensed a person coming closer. The thought of "just how much pain is enough" was going through my mind and I was trying to decide wheher or not to quit and go home. About then, the person came up to where I was sitting and stopped. I looked up and said hello to a man who was standing there. He asaid his name was David and asked how I was doing. I told him what I was doing, gave him my name and said that I would be a while, and said " have a buen camino". He said "I will wait till you are done and walk with you for a while". I thanked him, finished my wound dressings and down the road we went, he gliding along like he was on ice skates, me hobbling along like an old man with very bad feet. After speaking for a while, he asked if I had ever tried using trekking poles. One thing led to another, and by midday I had taken my poles out, recieved instruction from him and was starting to feel better about walking. Three days later, after giving me training on hiking and poles, we went different ways, he to the Primitivo and me on the Norte. I had healed up. No more bandages or pain pills. I was hiking The Way fully healed, with trekking poles, and truly enjoying it for the first time. For me, one of many "serendipitous coincidences" on my journey. It will happen to you.

Buen Camino,

Walking Viking


David
image.jpg
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portuguese "2014" from Tui to Santiago
Camino Norte "April 2016"
View attachment 20728 View attachment 20727

Jaquie,

The albergue at Guemes is the cleanest and neatest albergue I visited on my camino. There is a laundry on site that was continually in use by the staff while I was there. They provide a coin operated washer near the laundry, with soap and dryer for the pilgrims, which I used to clean and dry all of my gear except the t shirt and shorts I wore while doing my laundry.

The writer above must have the albergue at Guemes confused with some other place. Here are two pictures which show the room I was in, my assigned bed (under the far window with albergue provided blue blanket) with mattress, mattress cover, blanket and pillow. On the shelves, at the foot of my bed, you can see stacks of blankets (clean blankets) for use by pilgrims. Also, I carried a sleeping bag liner/sleep sack to sleep in on the nights when it was not to cold. You can see that on my bed as well. The liner is a combination silk and cotton fabric. It has a big pocket at the head end for inserting a pillow (also shown). If you travel with a sleep sack and visit all of the albergues that I listed, you will not need a sleeping bag or other "bedding". They all had blankets and pillows and most provided disposable bottom sheets. The albergue at the church in Markina was not heated and it was cool to cold at night so I used the liner and sleeping bag. The same at the albergue/refugio at the Monastery in Sobrado de Monxes.

If Guemes is going to be your only albergue overnight, then a sleep sack/bag liner will be all you need.

Also, I'm a he, not a she.

Buen Camino.

Walking Viking

Thanks for the clarification on the albergue "Mr." WV (sorry for the confusion). It certainly sounds amazing. We will be carrying a silk liner for sleeping just cuz. But we will for sure visit the albergue that you refer too.
 

Roger Fleury

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Del Norte June 2018
Lucy,

I walked the del Norte from Irun to Santiago April 28 to June 3, this year. It was my first camino. As you said, there is a lot of info on the caminos out there. This forum is very good as a reference point for asking questions and getting advice. The only issue is the information here comes from a very big group of pilgrims with a very big difference in experience, and that sometimes can be overwhelming as well. In a previous post on this forum, I listed some of the lessons I learned from my own camino. I will list some of them for you.

1). Before I left for Spain, I went to my local AT&T cellphone office and had them connect my cell phone to the Spanish phone system (voice, data, text $30 per month). I had internet, voice and text whenever my phone was on. I did this primarily because I planned to walk alone as much as possible.

2). I used the stages of the del Norte from the gronze.com website to establish my itinery for overnights/rest days and day/dates on the camino. The gronze.com website lists albergues, hotels and pensions available at almost all the towns, cities and villages, but for some reason does not list all of them. I'm guessing it' s a pay for posting issue. If my plans changed, I could make adjustments to my hotel/albergue/pension while on the camino at rest stops. Almost every bar, restaurant and pension had WiFi (pronounced Whiffee in Spain). All you have to do is ask if they have WiFi, and then ask for the access code. Most were posted somewhere in the facility. Also, the gronze.com stages show the distances between towns and also at the bottom of the stage page, there is a vertical profile indicating the ups and downs.

3). The del Norte is very challenging during the first 8 stages due to the steep ups and downs, especially the downs! By the time I arrived in Guernika, end of Stage 5, there were injured pilgrims everywhere, a lot of them coming and going to/from the La Farmacias. Tendonitis, blisters, feet and knee issues, etc. I was no exception. I suffered from blisters, blood blisters and muscle issues (campartment syndrome with shin muscles). My initial damage, blisters, was incurred on Stage 1, Irun - San Sebastian. Everybody I met or walked with had Compeed, Vaseline and Ibuprofen tablets. I will add that I trained for six months before I left. During the last two months of training, I had a full backpack, had broke in two pairs of footwear, and hiked 9.5 miles (15 km) every morning. In Guernika one night (end of Stage 5) I was in a pension with about 6 other pilgrims eating dinner in the common area and asked them all if they thought that there was any way to prepare for the del Norte. Without exception, we all agreed that the answer was NO! Some were first timers, others had lots of hiking experience, some had had walked other caminos. We all had the "camino limp".

4). This is the most important item. Buy a good set of adjustable trekking poles and learn how to use them correctly (length and straps)! I had a set with me but did not know how to use them properly and was stumbling along like a newborn pony. They got stowed in my backpack. During Stage 14 I walked with a very experienced trekking guide who showed me the correct way to use my "sticks". From that point on it was a totally different camino. My wounds healed fully in three days. I could move at twice the speed with about half the effort. Hills, mud bogs and slippery trails were no problem. In the Miraz albergue I met a pilgrim from Germany who had 3-4 big blisters on both feet. Hed had white sewing thread and Compeed covering the bottom of both feet. He said he was on his way home because he couldn't take the pain anymore. I asked him if he had sticks. He said no. I suggested he get some and showed him how I used mine. I saw him next in Sobrado outside the monastary, walking with sticks. He said he was much better and thanked me for showing him how to use them. As he left, I noticed he was not using the straps correctly and mentioned it to him. He asked how to use them. I showed him how to put his hands through the loops from the bottom and then grip the handles. Well off he went, using the sticks correctly. The next time I saw him was in Pilgrim City in Santiago, a great big smile all over his face. He'd finished his camino. He couldn't thank me enough. It was one pilgrim helping another pilgrim, just as I'd been shown.

5). I had packed my backpack for any contingency such as rain and cold; tent, tarp, inflatable sleeping bag cushion, rain jacket/pants, etc. After a week and no rain I sent tent, tarp and cushion home. A week later the cold weather clothes went home. I lightened my pack by about 6-7 lbs. my experience at that point told me I was going to get a bed every night (not a lot of pilgrims on the Norte in Aptil/May). I am planning my next camino, Portuguese, and will do things a little different, but go same time of year as I don't do hot very well. No tent gear, lighter clothes but more of them for weight (layering) and take my lightweight Marmot rain jacket and pants. I bought the Brierly guide for the Portuguese but will still use gronze.com to check on current data.

I hope this helps a little. There is more, but that is mostly preference items. I haven't seen the Brierly Guide for the del Norte, but if it is like the Portuguese, I would buy it.

The camino del Norte is waymarked fairly well, but in some provinces the direction indication changes 180 degrees so I would research that. After Ribadeo, it is almost impossible to get lost and the direction indication is as it should be, at least in my humble opinion.

I stayed at a few hotels/pensions along the way and would recommend them if you would like. One in particular that I liked and went back to after my camino (and spent three days there while I explored that city) was the Hotel Santa Cruz. The owner/manager's name is Henri. He is a very hard working, guest oriented knowledgeable young man. He has walked the del Norte and made several recommendations to me that worked out very well. The hotel has a restaurant/bar and is on the camino. You can see the bronze scallop shells in the sidewalk just outside the door.

I also got into the habit of visiting the Tourist Information Office first thing after checking into the albergue/hotel/pension at every layover. I needed to find out where the camino was and where it went as I left town. In some places (La Caridad), the scallop shells, signs and trail markers just disapear. During daylight, I would use the info from the tourist office to find the camino and follow it for a bit the night before leaving town. This camino is not like the Frances until Arzua. There are times when you are alone and don't have large groups of pilgrims to follow

And lastly, I would download the ALSA bus app and probably the one for booking.com as well.

Buen camino.

WV
Walking the Camino from La Caridad from the 8th of June 18.
Thank you for all the info's in this post.
Wanted to bring a small tent and ground mat..not any more.
Booked all my stops using Gronze.com ..some have emails some just phone numbers and no English or French so good time to practice your broken Spanish.
Where can I read on how to correctly use the walking sticks as this appear very important.
Can't connect to a Spanish operator from Australia .Where can I purchase a SIM card to mainly use data and SMS (don't plan to use as phone)?Any specific deal for tourists?
Cheers
Roger.
 

Scarlet Fez

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Frances Sept/Oct 2016
Camino Portuguese Oct 2017
Del Norde Start 2nd May 2018
I notice this is quite an old thread. I have taken on board the advise that Gronze.com is a great source of information. I don't want to be to reliant on my phone so is there a recent book publication that the wise and Del Norde experienced would recommend.
 

spursfan

Veteran Member
I notice this is quite an old thread. I have taken on board the advise that Gronze.com is a great source of information. I don't want to be to reliant on my phone so is there a recent book publication that the wise and Del Norde experienced would recommend.

I'm very impressed with the new Wise Pilgrim guide - maps, profile charts, hotel /hostal /albergue prices and phone numbers topped off with town plans showing the all-important grocery stores - and very light to carry
 

biarritzdon

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF&CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF&CP17, CdN18, CM18, CF18, LePuy19
Yes,
I notice this is quite an old thread. I have taken on board the advise that Gronze.com is a great source of information. I don't want to be to reliant on my phone so is there a recent book publication that the wise and Del Norde experienced would recommend.
Old threads can be very misleading. The recently published A Wise Pilgrim Guide to the Northern Camino which can be purchased at the Forum Store.
 

Scarlet Fez

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Frances Sept/Oct 2016
Camino Portuguese Oct 2017
Del Norde Start 2nd May 2018
Spurs and Don thanks for the suggestion. Will look to purchase copy ASAP.
Here's another 'what if' for you. I have friends that will be walking the Portuguese arriving at Santiago on about the 10th of May. Depending on a certain rugby match happening in Dublin this weekend I was considering flying into Santiago to greet them, spend a couple of days there then look into the options of using public transport to get to Irun to walk the Del Norde. Is this a touch ambitious and complicated especially for a non Spanish Speaker?
 

biarritzdon

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF&CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF&CP17, CdN18, CM18, CF18, LePuy19
Spurs and Don thanks for the suggestion. Will look to purchase copy ASAP.
Here's another 'what if' for you. I have friends that will be walking the Portuguese arriving at Santiago on about the 10th of May. Depending on a certain rugby match happening in Dublin this weekend I was considering flying into Santiago to greet them, spend a couple of days there then look into the options of using public transport to get to Irun to walk the Del Norde. Is this a touch ambitious and complicated especially for a non Spanish Speaker?

Your question is not very straight forward, so here a not so straight forward answer.
There is a overnight bus that runs daily from Santiago to San Sebastian every afternoon and arrives there early in the morning with a connection to Irun. It would give you a day to decompress from the long ride and allow you to get your bearings. It also stops in Bilbao which would give a chance to cut a few stages out of your Camino.
BTW I have tickets for the European Rugby Finals in Bilbao on the 11 & 12 May.
 

Scarlet Fez

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Frances Sept/Oct 2016
Camino Portuguese Oct 2017
Del Norde Start 2nd May 2018
Decisions, decisions. Firstly if Scarlets win then as much as I want to see my friends, that's a goner. Not sure if I can combine a Camino and a Scarlets Final?? As the game and what it stands for will deserve all the attention. Let me get this trip to Dublin out of the way this weekend and I'll know where I stand.
 

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