A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it

Advertisement

Luggage Transfer Correos

German Camino - Some advise

Camino Badges

evanlow

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances06
Primitivo07
Plata08
Norte12
Levante(14-15)
Vasco16
Mozarabe(16-17)
Madrid17
Portuguese18
Hi,

I have an opportunity to be in Germany Sep/Oct this year. Would like to spend 10-14 days walking. Done some research and there seem to be lots of routes. Here are some questions I hope those who had walked in Germany may be able to help me.

1. Routes - Was thinking either Rothenburg ODT-Speyer, the Mosel valley (Koblenz-Trier) or via Regia (which 2 weeks segment?). Also is it possible to walk to Frankfurt? You see where I am getting here... (I'm flying off from there). Alternatively, any other short recommended segments?
2. Credential? May have to get them in advance?
3. Anything else to watch out for (different from say a Camino in Spain/Portugal besides the language and country)?

Cheers...
 

Marc S.

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2012-2018 Frances, Norte, Salvador, Aragones, Portuguese, Via Regia, Elisabethpfad, Jakibspaad.
There are a lot of routes indeed in Germany. Of the three you mentioned, I have walked the Via Regia and I can thoroughly recommend it. Don't know if you came across it yet, but there is a German website about this route. You can also order credencial (ans also a guidebook) there. https://www.oekumenischer-pilgerweg.de/
I don't have a favorite segment on the Via Regia, it's all good, so starting from Gorlitz would be my advice.

Signposting on the Via Regia is perfect and there are a lot of accomodation options. Beware though that they are not permanently staffed and mostly run by volunteers & churches. This means that you have to phone them to inform them about your arrival - this can be done at the day of arrival. The other difference with walking in Spain is that you are not likely to meet a lot of fellow pilgrims (although the Via Regia is getting more popular lately).

Concerning walking to Frankfurt. Did you see this map ? http://www.deutsche-jakobswege.de/wege-uebersicht.html This means it is possible to walk from Vacha ('endpoint' of the Via Regia) to Frankfurt. I have not done this though. If you click on the map, it gives more specific information about the way from Vacha to Frankfurt.

I have also walked the Elisabethpfad, from Eisenacht to Marburg. There is also a path from Frankfurt to Marburg, so theoretically you could also walk from Eisenach via Marburg to Frankfurt (only have to walk in the 'wrong'direction the last bit) but I dont know how important finishing in Frankfurt is for you. Info about this route is on: https://www.elisabethpfad.de/home/ You can also order a credencial and guidebook from this site.

Oh well, the opportunities are endless for walking in Germany. Happy planning !
 

good_old_shoes

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('15)
Via Coloniensis ('16)
Trier-Nancy + Le Puy-Fisterra ('17)
Aragonés ('18)
The Via Coloniensis (from Cologne to Trier) is quite nice. You would start right at the Cologne cathedral (can even get your credential there) and then walk through hills and forests to Trier. It is about 240 kms if I recall correctly.

Even though there are few pilgrims walking that route, it is well signposted. Many pensions, churches ect. even created their own stamps despite the lack of pilgrims. You certainly feel the love for the pilgrim‘s path. Some hotels/pensions offer a pilgrim's discount.

Things to know for that route:
public transport is limited once you‘re out of the Cologne area, especially during school vacation time. For places to stay, call ahead a day or so to be sure it‘s open. There won‘t be many people walking, but if you‘re lucky you might meet a few (expect to walk all alone most of the time). Sometimes, at the churches, you can find phone numbers of locals who offer a stamp or a bed, worth to have a look. Also, speak to locals for shortcuts and places to stay, for example I spent a night at a home for the elderly, which was run by nuns, and not mentioned in the guide book. If you're into camping, might be worth to take a tent, Germany has lots of very nice, rather luxurious campgrounds. Carry snacks and water, the smaller villages often have no shops or bars (but locals are usually helpful and will fill up your water bottle).

Wherever you decide to walk,
Guten Weg!
 

Roland49

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2019 June/July/August
Hello evanlow,

was on the Via Regia 2 years ago from Naumburg via Eckartsberga to Erfurt, very nice region, very nice wine ;-).
Many Accomodations but somehow a little more pricey than the average Camino in Spain. The Region around Naumburg / Bad Sulza / Apolda is often mentioned as the Toskana of the East.

Something more to mention: the Mosel-Camino from Koblenz to Trier. Looks very interesting and the Mosel-Region is one one the most beautiful landscapes you can imagine.
 

Felipe

Veteran Member
I walked part of the Munich jakobsweg some years ago, and it was great. This webpage also give info about all jacobean routes in Germany.
Last year I was "touristing" in the Rhine Valley, and discovered jacobean signposts.:) True, it is basically going from one tourist spot to another...but the views are amazing.
And, for an almost too perfect landscape, there is the jacobean route in Tirol, in Austria.
Once you decide on the route, you will probably discover, some place to ask for the credential (and eventually get it posted to you, if you have an address in Germany). Hey, some towns are promoting a route (from Munich to Tirol) where you can actually print out your credential.
Libraries will have entire sections dedicated to hiking -it s a national passion. Guides, detailed maps, you name it. Most info is in German; better get used to it. :p
On the other side, I have not seen many pilgrims...
 

evanlow

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances06
Primitivo07
Plata08
Norte12
Levante(14-15)
Vasco16
Mozarabe(16-17)
Madrid17
Portuguese18
Thank you everyone for the ideas...

Kind of like the one from Cologne (cathedral and credenza too!). Frankfurt option was just a stab in the dark since the via Regia kind of officially stop in Vacha. Wouldn't want to try to engage a huge city while walking...

The Via Coloniensis (from Cologne to Trier) is quite nice. You would start right at the Cologne cathedral (can even get your credential there) and then walk through hills and forests to Trier. It is about 240 kms if I recall correctly.
Now time to hit the books as they say; for the planning...
 

scruffy1

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Holy Year from Pamplona 2010, SJPP 2011, Lisbon 2012, Le Puy 2013, Vezelay (partial watch this space!) 2014; 2015 Toulouse-Puenta la Reina (Arles)
Just returned from a non-Camino visit to Germany. The better half had a conference in Magenza so we had some days before to meander about. Found ourselves in the Moselle valley here59098
Marienburg, where I found this:59099
Next day she dropped me off at Marienburg and I walked for 2 glorious days down to Bernkastel-Kues while she was in Magenza. This Camino is well marked though as usual I somewhat did the expected walkabout, climbing up and over and down vineyards is fun maybe twice - switched over and followed the Moselle afterwards. Oops, our Jewish Magenza is what the rest of the world calls Mainz
PS The scenery is breath-taking the towns and villages picturesque hard to do a straight walk all the time stopping to admire and take photographs.
 

Jesso

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances - SJPDP to Muxia - (2016)
de Madrid (2018)
Norte + Primitivo (start 24 June 2019)
One important consideration when planning for a Camino in Germany (Jakob’s Weg) is language and your ability to communicate in German. Big cities are fine, in my experience. There’ll always be someone who can help you out. It’s the smaller towns and tiny villages that you will find more challenging. Last year I lived in a town about 4 kms from Jakob’s Weg near Wurzburg. The village that the Camino passes through by there is tiny. All of the information at the church is in German, this is also true at the accommodation. I had to Google Translate everything! This will be the case most of the way. I’m sure you can always find someone who speaks English and can help you out, perhaps call ahead to the next accommodation and reserve it for you.

The language barrier didn’t deter me from wanting to walk and extended section of Jakob’s Weg, it was the weather (too close to winter!) that did.

Also important information to know: as a generalisation, everything is closed on Sundays in Germany. In bigger cities you will find things open, but as the towns get smaller, you’ll find just bakeries or an odd cafe open. In villages, everything will be closed.

Germany is a stunning country. Picturesque like @scruffy1 says.

After all that, you may have great knowledge of the German language and it will be of no concern! 🙂
 

Jodean

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
22 Sept. to 21 Oct. 2015, Pamplona to Santiago
6-23.04 Porto to Santiago 2018
17.09-30.09 CF 2018
Sporting stores in Germany, like Globetrotters, have a lot of books detailing the Jakobsweg through parts of Germany. Those should be available online too but you might have to look at Amazon.de instead of com. The book I have details the route from Fulda to Frankfurt and then on to Mainz. Frankfurt was quite the gathering point for pilgrims as there are several churches here that are part of the route. St. Leonhards (closed right now) Deutsche Orden on the Sachsenhausen side of Frankfurt, St. Jakobs in Niederrad and St. Justinus in Frankfurt Höchst.

Last month walked the route from St. Leonhards to S. Justinus which was 17km. You can make it shorter and more pleasant by taking the ferry across the river from Schwannheim to Höchst. There has always been a ferry here, so imagine the pilgrims did this too. The bridge they have you use is rather ugly and takes you out in a really roundabout way.

You could probably just walk along the Rhine as most of the churches have stamps and are part of the routes. I think there is a Friends of the Camino/Jakobsweg website where you can contact people to see if they have space for you to sleep. Otherwise you would need to stay in pensions or hostels.

I live in Frankfurt, so let me know if you need more info about this area.
 

evanlow

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances06
Primitivo07
Plata08
Norte12
Levante(14-15)
Vasco16
Mozarabe(16-17)
Madrid17
Portuguese18
Good stuff.

I think I am gravitating towards the 8 days Mosel Valley Jakobsweg. Both the Rhine and the Mosel looks good but somehow something is pulling me towards Trier. I had been there and I like it a lot, would be a good end point for me.
 

Marc S.

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2012-2018 Frances, Norte, Salvador, Aragones, Portuguese, Via Regia, Elisabethpfad, Jakibspaad.
I think I am gravitating towards the 8 days Mosel Valley Jakobsweg.
Something to look forward to ! But still plenty of time to change your mind (a couple of times...) :)
 

good_old_shoes

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('15)
Via Coloniensis ('16)
Trier-Nancy + Le Puy-Fisterra ('17)
Aragonés ('18)
The Mosel valley is really beautiful. Not a bad choice. Personally I walked the via Coloniensis to Trier, and then only afterwards followed the Mosel valley into Luxembourg and France, so don't know much about pilgrim's infrastructure on the German part of it - but it's very touristic in general, so accommodation, food ect. shouldn't be a problem, unless you're walking in deep winter maybe ;-)
 

Kos

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
non yet
I can recommend to join the FB group "Jakobsweg Begeisterte" (=Camino Enthusiasts). They are very active and could help you even if you post in English.
If you need help in Trier, please contact me, I have family there.
 

Kitsambler

Jakobsweg Junkie
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy 2010-11, Prague 2012, Nuremberg 2013, Einsiedeln 2015, Geneva 2017-18
Germans love to walk, the country is absolutely criss-crossed with marked Jakobsweg routes, and there are guides available in local bookstores for almost all of them (https://www.conrad-stein-verlag.de/buecher-shop/mosel-camino/). Daily costs are higher than on the Camino Frances in Spain, but you will be getting a private room with private bath, clean sheets, an enormous breakfast, and a restaurant on the ground floor. I really enjoyed my walks on the Jakobsweg across Bavaria.

Thinking about your wanting to walk into Frankfurt: remember the extensive suburbs and industrial areas surrounding most large cities. That's not fun walking or a good use of your time! Rather, exploit the local S-bahn light rail network to get into the older and more scenic central, older parts of town.
 
Thread starter OLDER threads on this topic Forum Replies Date
Kevin considine Europe 11
S Europe 6
trecile Europe 2
Bernice M Europe 0
FooteK Europe 3

Book your lodging here

Get e-mail updates from Casa Ivar (Forum + Forum Store content)




Advertisement

Booking.com

Most downloaded Resources

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store

Casa Ivar Newsletter

Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 15 1.5%
  • February

    Votes: 5 0.5%
  • March

    Votes: 41 4.0%
  • April

    Votes: 155 15.0%
  • May

    Votes: 259 25.0%
  • June

    Votes: 80 7.7%
  • July

    Votes: 21 2.0%
  • August

    Votes: 20 1.9%
  • September

    Votes: 297 28.7%
  • October

    Votes: 124 12.0%
  • November

    Votes: 12 1.2%
  • December

    Votes: 5 0.5%
Top