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Is Arles to Toulouse suitable for limbering up?

Best route when unfit?

  • Arles

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Bordeaux

    Votes: 1 100.0%
  • Le Puy

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    1

Starter

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Hoping to walk from Arles to Toulouse over a few weeks.
#1
Hello Team Arles Route,
We are presently looking into the best route to start the camino in France when we are both feeling a bit unfit. In truth, I used to walk about 5 miles a day until 10 weeks ago, and now feel out of shape from too much travelling and a winter bug. The idea of walking in the Pyrenees when time is tight seemed too daunting. We need to go in May. Is the Arles route suitable for someone who is happy to do 16km per day? We would aim to use this as a starter walk in view in doing a bigger one at the end of the summer.
Any advise or suggested alternative routes would be valued.
Many thanks for taking the time to read this post.
T
 

Starter

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Hoping to walk from Arles to Toulouse over a few weeks.
#3
Pamplona to Santiago is a reasonable way to build up. The Pyrenees are not all they are cracked up to be. :)
Thanks. We were aiming for the French routes at this time but if we decide to fly to Spain that sounds a fantastic build up route. T
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata.
#4
There is more infrastructure on the Le Puy so distances are more manageable than on the Arles. The Camino Francės in Spain is easier than either - and no-one has to start in St Jean Pied de Port and walk the Route Napoleon - Valcarlos is an easier option and the more historic route. Or start in Spain - the locals consider Roncesvalles the proper starting point and that is after the Pyrenees.

The other historic pilgrimage routes in France are the route from Vezelay and the route from Tours. Just be aware that walking in France is very different to walking the Camino Frances in Spain. I think this thread gives lots to think about, with opinions and comparisons of various routes.

If you just want to walk in France but are not wedded to one of the pilgrimage routes, This website might also give you some ideas.
 

Isca-camigo

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Various ones.
#5
I walked the Arles route up to Castre then jumped to Toulouse, I tried to keep my section less than 20km, I wanted to walk myself in and see how old injuries were doing. After Montpellier it starts to become hard once you pass St Guillem, the trails can be quite rugged so even 13km sections can take 6/7 hours. I think it is possible to walk stages of 16km or less, maybe the stage after Lodeve will be the problem, I had a 22km section looming but realised that by following the road from the Gite I was in ( lecrin and loselly) which was 2km out of town off the chemin that I could miss out 10km of walking, which seemed to my maps to be zig zagging on a mountain, if you look at my avatar, that is a picture of the plain Lodeve is on and the pointy looking mountain is the one I missed out- I think. The other problem section will be after St Gervais, there is a Departmental Gite about half way for the recommended stage,use it, it is about 2km off route.

My tips if you walk it are to get the miam miam dodo and the French Randonnee books, use tourist information offices and don't be afraid to use taxis, it is very difficult, in the group around me I was the only one walking the whole stages but I know several people had physical difficulties and it was nice to see a warm face in an evening. IMG_20140525_092056638.jpg That is the road I walked out of Lodeve, it was very quiet but it was a Sunday, it rejoined the chemin after 5km, if you followed the chemin you would have walked 15km by that point.
 
Last edited:
#7
Hello, @Starter. It is possible to walk a flat route between Arles and Toulouse if one goes via Carcassonne:

*Arles to Montpellier: follow le Chemin d'Arles

*Montpellier to Beziers: follow le voie domitia/le chemin de st Jacques

*Beziers via Carcassonne - Toulouse: walk alongside le Canal du Midi

In 2013 I followed this route in the opposite direction. It was mostly flat. The section between Montpellier and Beziers may still be a work in progress. It was so at the time I walked. Somebody I met in Beziers was acquainted with the people researching the route. It was a bit of an adventure between Beziers and St- Thibèry but I made it...


Cheers
Lovingkindness

My stages, 2013: Carcassonne - Montpellier

Carcassonne – Marseillette

Marseillette – Paraza

Paraza – Capestang

Capestang – Beziers

Beziers – St- Thibèry

St- Thibèry – Poussan

Poussan – Montpellier

ps If I remember rightly, between Beziers and Montpellier there were stretches of asphalt. There might be a GR route that is more pleasing. [edit]
 
Last edited:

Stephen B

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2014), Camino de Madrid (2017), Voie d'Arles (2018)
#8
There is more infrastructure on the Le Puy so distances are more manageable than on the Arles. The Camino Francės in Spain is easier than either - and no-one has to start in St Jean Pied de Port and walk the Route Napoleon - Valcarlos is an easier option and the more historic route. Or start in Spain - the locals consider Roncesvalles the proper starting point and that is after the Pyrenees.

The other historic pilgrimage routes in France are the route from Vezelay and the route from Tours. Just be aware that walking in France is very different to walking the Camino Frances in Spain. I think this thread gives lots to think about, with opinions and comparisons of various routes.

If you just want to walk in France but are not wedded to one of the pilgrimage routes, This website might also give you some ideas.

Hi Kanga, I am looking at walking the Arles route for late-March to mid-May 2018. I see you have done this route as well as Le Puy. Did you have a strong preference? And why? Any tips on what to expect weather-wise on either route? I did the Madrid Camino in spring 2017 and CF in spring 2014. Many thanks. Steve
 

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