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La Coruña to Finisterre?

Is there a route/path? Or, is it just a case of following roads.

I was planning a night trek, but I'm mapless and guideless and want to enjoy the beauty of the countryside anyway. Don't expect to find any cheap accommodation, but would be nice if there was a path to follow instead of all Tarmac.

Thanks.
 
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sillydoll

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
There is a route from Coruna - it meets up with the one from Ferrol to Santiago and then to Finisterre. There is a lovely albergue in Bruma.
You can download the Camino Ingles Guide from the CSJ of UK website (it includes the route from Coruna).
 

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Thank you very much.

I've met many people walking Camino Norte who, like myself, see more logic in following the coast all the way to Finisterre before walking inland to the 'true' final destination. I had just assumed there was a route to follow until I tried to find it!

Weather luck is with me once more, so I'll try another day making cash in La Coruña before heading into some of the most enchanting countryside I have ever known. Really looking forward to this stretch. I'm going to take it very, very, very slowly.

e2a; Ah! I'm trying to avoid going via Santiago. Guess I'll be making my own route.
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
There doesn't appear to be one path or road that follows the coast from A Coruña although there is a small road that goes to the north of Muxia but it peters out when it joins a complimentary road going east to west. If you pick up a map at the tourist office you'll see that there is an AC road (not coastal) from A Coruña to Dumbria and then to Cee/Corcubion - only 9kms from Fistera. There appear to be many small places along the way.
The coast is very jaggered and you would have to walk around a number of Rias so it should be very beautiful.
 

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Hi,

Thanks again. The very lovely, helpful people in the tourist info office were very helpful and lovely. There is no coastal path, but there are many paths to follow. I leave with a map and list of pensions (a pamphlet called 'Galicia, Costa da Morte, un mar de vida'. I only have sufficient funds for essentials like tobacco and wine, no beds, or food for me. I intend to sleep in church porches and farmers sheds eating what I find en-route (have fishing rod, will fish). I will check out cheap pension options for anyone else interested in walking the Camino de LostPhotographer - the wobbly route to Santiago de Compostela.

Looking forward to this. A rediscovery of Camino's true adventure. It's going to rain. I'm going to get wet. I may go hungry, but it is going to be beautiful. Slightly inland from the coast at times. Rough route:

Arteixo
A Laracha
Carballo
Coristanco
Cabana de Bergantiños
Vimanzo
Muxia
Fisterra
Santiago

Then back to Oviedo to try the route to Lugo.
 
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For anyone interested...

So glad I did this. I found paradise and I'm going to rent a place there for the winter. 6 months of wet seascape paintings :)

Plenty of footpaths of varying states. They were either neglected to the point of non-existing, or incredibly well maintained. Fair bit of Tarmac walking also. Found it difficult to find footpaths in some places. In one village the locals were so darn proud of their new road they were insisting I didn't want to walk the footpath because the road was much better.

Anyone wanting to know where the most beautiful short hike I have yet to come across in Spain, try Googling Laxe to Camelle. PR-G 114 route. Absolutely lump in the throat beautiful at every turn. Incredibly diverse for such a short walk (about 14KM). Along with sweet juicy blackberries I was picking apricots, peaches and apples staright from the tree. Sweetcorn, pumpkin and green stuff (with farmers permission). Fish from sea and river.

Hardcore pilgrimiging and the true spirit of camino is fun when you know you have cash in your pocket for a daily menu and bed when you need it. When you wake on a beach with an almighty hangover from an almighty, through the night fiesta, cashless and with just 2 cigarettes left it doesn't quite have the same appeal. So, I walked the shortes possible route to Santiago to make a bit of cash.

Should be a proper camino route IMO. It's got all the stone crosses and crazy barking dogs and stuff. Does a proper camino need anything else? Am I missing the point?

Possibly also worth mentioning that I have found Camino Norte and my off-route excursion to be the most revealing about the real history of caminos.
 

Thornley

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances x 2 , Norte x 2 , Le Puy x 3 , Portuguese x 2,
Mont St Michel , Primitivo .
I think the way you approach this beautiful area is wonderful.
I find that too many rush home after completing Francis /Finasterre
Very soon we will go " north" after Finasterre to Muxia and then onwards to La Coruna/Ferrol. Bus back or just another week on the Inglese to Santiago.
From Australia its better to take a two month holiday and enjoy.
Enjoy your Caminos Lost Photographer,
David
 

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