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Roughly how long does it take to walk from Le Puy to Santiag

TravellingSonn

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances 2008, Le Puy route (TBC)
Hi all,

I'm thinking of walking from Le Puy to Santiago in September 2012.

I'm curious to know, how long it will take to walk this distance? I'm thinking around 2 and 1/2 months. Or should I allow more time?

Appreciate your time and replies.

Buen camino to you all.
Sonia
:)
 
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KiwiNomad06

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Le Puy-Santiago(2008) Cluny-Conques+prt CF(2012)
I took slightly more than two and a half months- 83 days including some rest days- but other people who walk faster might do it in two months or so...
Margaret
 
We did it in sixty-one days from 25 April to 25 June 2008, with two days off in Conques and Leon in Spain. Our main reasons to slow up were a cold, blisters, and rainy wet weather across Navarra and La Rioja provinces that year. We did allow eight days for a fudge factor before flying home, which we enjoyed in Santiago and P :arrow: aris.
 

TravellingSonn

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances 2008, Le Puy route (TBC)
Wow, there are some impressive timeframes here. Thanks all!

By the looks of things, 3 months is ample time.

Lastly, I'm curious to know what boots you guys used? I'm not a fan of Scarpa boots they gave me numerous blisters on my last walk.

Thanks again.

Sonia
:)
 
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KiwiNomad06

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Le Puy-Santiago(2008) Cluny-Conques+prt CF(2012)
TravellingSonn said:
Lastly, I'm curious to know what boots you guys used? I'm not a fan of Scarpa boots they gave me numerous blisters on my last walk.Sonia:)
I wore a Merrell walking shoe rather than a boot, and found it adequate. The trail isn't very rugged anywhere though it can be muddy in places. I only got blisters once and that was after my feet got drenched for three days.
Margaret
 

Kitsambler

Jakobsweg Junkie
Year of past OR future Camino
Le Puy 2010-11, Prague 2012, Nuremberg 2013, Einsiedeln 2015, Geneva 2017-19
I used Vasque Wasatch boots both years; with Superfeet insoles last time and with custom orthotics next time. I found the rough stoniness of the Le Puy - Conques section, and the pavement walking later, really needed a stiff sole and good cushioning.
 

letendre

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Le Puy-SJPDP-Santiago (2010), Stevenson (2011), SJPDP-Santiago (2012), Le Puy-SJPDP (2013)
Arles-Somport-Santiago (2014) ourense-santiago (2015)
TravellingSonn said:
Hi all,

I'm thinking of walking from Le Puy to Santiago in September 2012.

I'm curious to know, how long it will take to walk this distance? I'm thinking around 2 and 1/2 months. Or should I allow more time?

Appreciate your time and replies.

Buen camino to you all.
Sonia
:)
My wife and I walked for 65 days. You can read our hiking written in broken English on my blog
http://alaquarelle.wordpress.com/category/saint-james/
or in french on another blog
http://carnets-de-croquis.blogspot.com/ ... ompostelle
 
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grayland

Moderator
Staff member
Year of past OR future Camino
Yes
TravellingSonn said:
My brother (who's in the army) recommended I purchased a pair of Merrell Chameleon 3 mid boots. But I wonder if these boots would be any good for the Le Puy/Santiago route?

I am not a fan of Merrell any longer. Two Caminos in different (and expensive models) Merrell.
Both cases rapid wear on heel and sole and almost non-existant waterproof even tho they were advertised as Gore-tex.
Switched to Keen now and very happy with waterproof even in heavy rain and deep puddles.
 

ranthr

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
C Frances 2005, 2007
Le Puy en Velay -SdC 2009
Via de la Plata 2011
gr 653 from Oloron to Puente la Reina 2012
Gr65 from le Puy to Figeac 2013
Irun to Santander 2013
Porto to SdC 2014
Astorga to SdC 2015
Hello!
Went from Le puy 15.08.09, from Roncesvalles 20.09 and arrived in Santiago 20.10.09. one restday in Burgos after a very long day the day before. Could have walked the French part in longer stages but had booked places to stay ahead.
Have never used boots on my four caminoes, but anclehigh goretex joggers. Walking the Via de la Plata this spring I sometimes envied people with boots because of the wading through water but this was not a problem on the le Puy route or the camino Frances. If it is a heavy rain, you get wet whatever shoes you wear. Randi
 

Kulinarykila

New Member
I took 11 weeks I found the Le Puy route tough and the spanish route easy. For boots I wore merrell moabs and I felt the vibram soles were too thin I felt every pebble under my feet. I got no blisters though I used a combo silk sock liner and wool.
 

Kulinarykila

New Member
I took 11 weeks I found the Le Puy route tough and the spanish route easy. For boots I wore merrell moabs and I felt the vibram soles were too thin I felt every pebble under my feet. I got no blisters though I used a combo silk sock liner and wool.
 

TravellingSonn

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances 2008, Le Puy route (TBC)
For boots I wore merrell moabs and I felt the vibram soles were too thin I felt every pebble under my feet.

I purchased a pair of Merrell Moabs a few months back, very comfy, but decided they may not be sturdy enough for such a long distance. Hoping the Merrell Chameleon's will be better. Otherwise, I'll be up to my 3rd pair of boots...lol

Thanks all!

:)
 
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Donovan

Active Member
Hi Sonn, I walked this route last year with my daughter and we took 69 days to Santiago, then 4 days to Finisterre (highly recommended). We could have gone faster, but felt that our leisurely pace allowed us time to enjoy the lovely countryside, have picnic lunches and socialise in the gites and refuges. For us the timing was perfect.

Re boots – I walked in Moabs, and had previously walked other caminos in Chameleons. Shoes, not boots. I changed to Moabs because they are waterproof. Both are brilliantly comfortable. The Moabs are a lot lighter – I think the soles must be thinner because I did feel the stones underfoot on the French section. No big deal – no blisters, but I felt the stones quite a lot. I think highly of Merrell. Durability of the Moab seems good. After Le Puy to Finisterre last year they appear unmarked and I’m using the same shoes next year for the VdlP.
 

Kevin F. O*brien

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2002-2019 Via Podiensis, Camino Frances, Via de la plata, Camino del Norte, Camino Primitivo, etc.
Hi, in answer to your question about time used. It seems to take most people around nine weeks. With a rest day in St.Jean and Burgos we managed 64 days with relatively easy stages.
The boots discussion. Have always (since 2003) used Lowa Renegades. Good thick soles and very comfortable. Function well for winter and summer walking since they are relatively light.
Lowa have a website if you want to check.
September is a very good time to start but there will probably be a lot of rain in France. Try mid to late August if you can.
 

Kevin F. O*brien

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2002-2019 Via Podiensis, Camino Frances, Via de la plata, Camino del Norte, Camino Primitivo, etc.
Hi Falcon and thanks for many a good informative and interesting post. You are right about Lowa Renegades low and high. I use low in Spain and France and high in Norway (summer) to get extra ankle support. I don't want to make anything sound like a advertising plug but the fact is I've used these boots since 2003 and am very pleased with them. Walked a whole day in heavy rain in Galicia once and was the only one with dry feet when we arrived at the ref. They also grip well on snow and ice within reason. I rub them in with beeswax occasionally and give them a good clean when I get home. They have good thick soles for stony country and are not too heavy. Boots are a very personal thing, I know, but I thought they were worth a recommendation.

Best to you and thanks again for many a good posting.

Kevin
 

ikemiester

New Member
It took me 60 days to walk from Le Puy to Santiago. I left on 3 Sept. and arrived on 1 Nov. which is "All Saints Day" a High Holy Day and National Holiday in Spain. I went on to walk the "Eye of God" from Santiago to Muxia to Fisterra and back to Santiago which took another 10 days... Now it rained 8 outof those 10 days and was told that it is the rainy season in that part of Spain at that time of year. I had a couple of rest days and was averaging about 30 kilometers plus or minus by the time I had got to the Pyrenese Mountians....... As far as boots, I wore "Vasque GTX" Ultra Lites, along with "Super Feet" insoles and would highly reccomend them!!!! Very little break-in time was needed and they can be practically worn right out of the box. Very comfortable too. Both products are avaliable at REI. I was taken back a little when I had to pay 40.00 for the insoles but so very thankful that I did!! Especially when I had to walk the rocks and rubble in France. My feet never got tired or sore at all. Compared to what I had seen from the folks who wore KEENS and MERRILLS... blisters and comments like "the soles aren't rigid enough" "I feel the rocks thru them" I would bet my first born child on the "VASQUE BREEZE GTX" the ankle cut boot. I love them so much I bought another pair as soon as I got back home 2 weeks ago and they were on sale for 104.00 instead of 150.00 which they nrmally list for. even at 150.00 they are still well worth it. Save your money and don't get "Smart Wool" socks. I used basically 1 pair of the "DARN TOUGH" brand socks for the 1,200 walk and they show almost no wear at all !!! In my opinion, the boots, insoles, and socks were the perfect combo... Buen Camino...
 
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TravellingSonn

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances 2008, Le Puy route (TBC)
Hi guys,

Sorry for the late reply, better late than never hey? ;)

Once again, thank you all for taking the time to reply to my thread with your thoughts/opinions, much appreciated as always.

I still haven't decided on which boots I'll take. My biggest obstacle at the moment is foot tendonitis. It's been over a month since I was struck down with this awful injury which I cannot seem to get rid of! My training has ceased (excluding riding my exercise bike) and it's really affecting me at the moment. I'm doing this walk in memory of my late father who passed away from lung cancer last year and I'm also raising money for cancer research and this happens! I'm curious to know if anyone else has suffered from foot tendonitis. What are your healing techniques are? And how long did it hang around for?

Thanks in advance
Sonia
:)
 

Lydia Gillen

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances 2007/8/9, 2011 , 2012/13/14. C.F 2015
Camino Portugues 2017,2018,2019
volunteering
Hi Sonia,

Really sorry to hear about your "foot tendonitis". I have suffered from Plantar tendonitis which affects the tendon that runs from the heal to the ball of the foot. Its first symptoms are heel pain, like someone is sticking a knife up under your heel. If you have got this I advise you to go to a physiotherapist who specialises in feet.

You will need custom made orthotics and do physiotherapy several times a day to stretch the muscles on the back of your leg. I also needed night splints (plaster casts up to my knees to wear in bed at night). But I think you have to be a pretty bad case to need these.

Don't waste time thinking it will go away without help. Healing is slow.

Best of luck and buen camino
Lydia
 

Kitsambler

Jakobsweg Junkie
Year of past OR future Camino
Le Puy 2010-11, Prague 2012, Nuremberg 2013, Einsiedeln 2015, Geneva 2017-19
I too suffered from agonizing plantar fasciitis during my Sep 2011 walk. After I returned home, my first errand was to get a referral to a podiatrist (doctor specializing in foot problems - the term may vary in your location). She fixed me up with custom orthotics which worked a dream.

You can Google for exercises to help this condition, and some also are shown on YouTube. But the real long term cure might be those orthotics.
 

grayland

Moderator
Staff member
Year of past OR future Camino
Yes
I am still confused as to the days needed from Le Puy to SJPP. I see many different times posted.
The distance is about the same as SJPP to Santiago...but while the CF is about 30 to 34 days most seem to talk about 37 to 40 for the Le Puy to SJPP.
Is there a reason why it takes longer over roughly the same distance?
 

KiwiNomad06

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Le Puy-Santiago(2008) Cluny-Conques+prt CF(2012)
grayland said:
Is there a reason why it takes longer over roughly the same distance?
You could do it in a very similar time to the SJPP-Santiago section if you wanted to, but there might be several reasons people tend to take a little longer:

- Some of the terrain at the beginning is very up-and-down, so people might tend to do less in terms of daily distances then.
-Gites are not as frequently spaced as the albergues in Spain, and sometimes you decide to walk less than you would prefer, as the alternative is to walk much more than you would like.
- Some gîtes will let you stay more than one night so it's easier to take 'rest days' in some places in France, to explore some of the interesting villages/towns, eg Conques, Moissac. I think people do tend to take more 'rest days' in France.
-If you walk at a 'busy' time, you tend to need to phone ahead to book a place in a gîte, so it's not so easy just to walk an extra few km to the next place if you feel like it.
Margaret
 
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grayland

Moderator
Staff member
Year of past OR future Camino
Yes
Thank yuu Margaret.
As usual, your explanation is very clear and I think I have now an understanding of the difference between the two routes.
 

haloranch

New Member
I did the Le Puy to Santiago walk in 54 days. 27 days from SJPP to Santiago. I could see where the first half might take longer given al lot of steep ascents and descents for the first week or so out of Le Puy. The other factor is that you might not be in as good shape at the beginning and this will tend to slow you down for the first half.
Haloranch
 
Year of past OR future Camino
Caminho Português da Costa (Fall 2018)
kaylfrazer said:
I'm very interested in this because I had Keen Voyageurs recommended to me, but I am walking later in the year so was looking into Targhee IIs for the "breathable/waterproof" lining. MEC [Mountain Equipment Co-op, in Canada] users commented on a significant lack of breathability though the waterproofing was great. They also commented on breaking down of the boot - having to return them after a couple of months. I wonder how you found them?

I tried on some New Balance MW978GT today and really liked them, though by the end of my time there the salesman [who is both a runner and a climber, and whose wife just returned from her 1st Camino] suggested I just use my Army combat boots, with the addition of Superfeet insoles! The price is right since I already have the boots and they are well broken in :D but I was looking at alternatives for the weight factor. Combat Boots = 70.4 oz, MW978GT = 17.8 oz. That's an additional 1-3/4 pounds on the end of each foot for many thousands of steps!
 

Kitsambler

Jakobsweg Junkie
Year of past OR future Camino
Le Puy 2010-11, Prague 2012, Nuremberg 2013, Einsiedeln 2015, Geneva 2017-19
Your army combat boots are so heavy because they are designed for infantrymen carrying a 90 pound load. Heaven forfend a pilgrim pack that weighs so much. But if price is your chief concern, the combat boots + Superfeet is a truly robust solution (think how muscly your calves will be by the end!!).

One factor is where (else) you plan to walk in them. Are you walking the Le Puy route in France as well? Or just SJPP-Santiago? Do you envision other walking/hiking in these? If walking from Le Puy, or you envision other trekking, then lean towards more robust footgear. If just SJPP-Santiago, then a lighter weight solution, especially in view of its extensive pavement sections.
 

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