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Camino Inglés

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Beautiful path, this first stage from Ferrol to Pontedeume, just a lot of asphalt and of course the corresponding noise of the cars. But especially the beginning of the path leads through shady deciduous forests along the Ria. And in between there are small, nice villages and lots of animals (cows, pigs, chickens, ducks, geese, cats and dogs). And of course there are always pilgrims in between, most of them hiking in pairs or groups. The weather is wonderful, now I'm walking past a rushing stream. The only stupid thing is that it's better to book in advance because the hostels are fully booked and the worry remains that the pilgrim hostels will also be full if you don't constantly walk almost past the other pilgrims, which is not very sociable...
 
Beautiful path, this first stage from Ferrol to Pontedeume, just a lot of asphalt and of course the corresponding noise of the cars. But especially the beginning of the path leads through shady deciduous forests along the Ria. And in between there are small, nice villages and lots of animals (cows, pigs, chickens, ducks, geese, cats and dogs). And of course there are always pilgrims in between, most of them hiking in pairs or groups. The weather is wonderful, now I'm walking past a rushing stream. The only stupid thing is that it's better to book in advance because the hostels are fully booked and the worry remains that the pilgrim hostels will also be full if you don't constantly walk almost past the other pilgrims, which is not very sociable...
Have you contacted hostels directly? Or are you using booking.com or similar? Those agencies do not have all the reservations in a hostel allocated to them, only some.
Additionally, you have a balancing act - sociable or practical! I hope it works out for you.
 
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I'm pretty desperate. In Pontedeume no hostel is open before 4:30 p.m. and no one can tell me yet whether there is a bed available. I don't think I'll ever go on a pilgrimage again without reserving the rooms before. After a pilgrimage of over 30 km, I'm just tired and unfortunately I have no patience to wait forever. It‘s angry. And even all the people in the speak only Spainish.
 
I'm pretty desperate. In Pontedeume no hostel is open before 4:30 p.m. and no one can tell me yet whether there is a bed available. I don't think I'll ever go on a pilgrimage again without reserving the rooms before. After a pilgrimage of over 30 km, I'm just tired and unfortunately I have no patience to wait forever. It‘s angry. And even all the people in the speak only Spainish.
Please excuse the whining. Of course, I realize that I am solely responsible if no one can offer me a free room here. I'll wait now, see what's possible at 4:30 p.m.
 
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@Wolfinho , try Hospedaje Norte. San Agustin 26, 15600 Puentedeume.
They're booked out on Booking.com, but don't list all of their rooms. It's a slim chance, but really close to the centre. You go into the bar downstairs. Sorry, they don't speak German or English, but I made do with google translate.
The information centre ( in the tower,,) are super helpful and speak a little english, not sure about German.
 
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That thought had crossed my mind but it seems odd to complain that people are speaking their own national languages rather than one's own.
Yep, I get that but here in Germany ( where the OP lives) many people in the hospitality industry speak English as a minimum. As does the OP...
And when you're tired, your tired.
 
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It is not always correct to assume a given language based on where the member lives. I find according to how it was possible to fill in information on the forum page I am from Ireland, not true. I live in Ireland, true. The issue of language is tricky, on a few levels.
 
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It is not always correct to assume a given language based on where the member lives. I find according to how it was possible to fill in information on the forum page I am from Ireland, not true. I live in Ireland, true. The issue of language is tricky, on a few levels.
Fair comment, as I live in Germany but am a Kiwi. But my comment was relating to the fact that people in the Hospitality industry here often also speak English as a minimum. It’s not unusual in Europe as a whole. As someone who find’s learning another language incredibly hard, I’m often astonished at how many Europeans can make themselves understood in 3 or more language’s. And exceedingly grateful that English is one of them .
 
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just a lot of asphalt and of course the corresponding noise of the cars.
I read somewhere that there's a deviation path which has been proposed that would pass by the coastline aiming to avoid pilgrims to walk by the national road from Fene to Pontedeume.
 
Thank you all for your good tips and for your criticism of my last posts. Of course I don't expect Spaniards to speak English, I didn't even mention German. I only hoped that in a hostel with a lot of international customers, there is anybody, who apels a little German. But maybe it was also my problem, because I spoke to the people in („broken“) Spanish instead of straight away in English.And don't worry, as a Brazilian I understand enough English to be able to communicate even if I live in Germany. It's all good, I was just totally exhausted earlier and sad that no one in the two hostels could or would tell me, if anything would be free later, when they reopened after the siesta. But I must have said that wrong. In the meantime I found a room in a hotel, of course more expensive than in a hostel, but I was able to get in straight away. I will never complain about anything in this forum again, after all, I am a guest in Spain. Now I'm looking forward to tomorrow and the pilgrimage to Betanzos. I'll definitely leave early enough to get there before siesta, especially since there are hardly any rooms there that can be booked in advance. But it will work. Buen Camino everyone!
 
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@Wolfinho ( or anyone else who knows), I'm curious. As a Brazilian, wouldn't it be easier to speak to them in Portuguese? Many years ago I lived in London with a very mixed group - 2 Brazilians, a Spainard, a Costa Rican and an Italian - (who could speak Spanish). They all seemed to be able to understand each other, with of course the occasional pause in the conversation to clarify the meaning of a particular word. I personally walked the Inglès with a Portuguese couple and they spoke Portuguese to all Spaniards on the trail. I appreciate that there are differences between Brazilian Portuguese and that currently spoken in Portugal but surely it's not major?
Just curious
 
@Wolfinho ( or anyone else who knows), I'm curious. As a Brazilian, wouldn't it be easier to speak to them in Portuguese? Many years ago I lived in London with a very mixed group - 2 Brazilians, a Spainard, a Costa Rican and an Italian - (who could speak Spanish). They all seemed to be able to understand each other, with of course the occasional pause in the conversation to clarify the meaning of a particular word. I personally walked the Inglès with a Portuguese couple and they spoke Portuguese to all Spaniards on the trail. I appreciate that there are differences between Brazilian Portuguese and that currently spoken in Portugal but surely it's not major?
Just curious
That was what annoyed me a bit. She acted like she didn't understand me and kept asking questions, even though she certainly understood my mix of Brazilian Portuguese and Spanish (at least I could understand her, even if she didn't answer what I asked). But she could have simply tell me, that she wouldn't answer any questions during the siesta, which would have been fine. And to be honest, I didn't feel like having long discussions anymore because I was completely exhausted. But of course the hospitaderos can't do anything about that...!
 
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My rooms are all booked on the Inglés this week as my better half would not be impressed otherwise 😜.

Mostly booked directly by internet or calling direct. A couple through Booking.com.

I'm sorry that your first day was so tough, but glad that you got sorted.

I'll look forward to your next post ☺️
 
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Beautiful path, this first stage from Ferrol to Pontedeume, just a lot of asphalt and of course the corresponding noise of the cars. But especially the beginning of the path leads through shady deciduous forests along the Ria. And in between there are small, nice villages and lots of animals (cows, pigs, chickens, ducks, geese, cats and dogs). And of course there are always pilgrims in between, most of them hiking in pairs or groups. The weather is wonderful, now I'm walking past a rushing stream. The only stupid thing is that it's better to book in advance because the hostels are fully booked and the worry remains that the pilgrim hostels will also be full if you don't constantly walk almost past the other pilgrims, which is not very sociable...
You should be well on the path already, it is just after 08.00 with you.
Reading your first post again, what jumps out is "the only stupid thing is..." I did not see it as stupid.
I chose to book ahead on the Ingles. Just a fact. Not a recommendation for anyone else. Your experience will perhaps show you why I did that. Knowing my own limits, I could not risk the stress you lived with yesterday. I used a range of resources to help me select the accommodation, from Gronze to other forum members and a guide book issued by the St James' Confraternity based in the UK. It was such a relief to know that at the end of the day's walking there would be a space to lay me down! All my reservations were made by phone directly with the hostal. The only one I regret was not choosing Hotel Canaima. Instead I chose the place across the road. We had a lovely room, but we only found pilgrim company in Hotel Canaima when we crossed a very busy road in the pours of rain to go for dinner, and meet up with pilgrims we knew were eating there at that time. I wish you better luck today and onwards. Look out for the mysterious wood a few days ahead! End of October is the most appropriate time for that day! 😁
 
I intend to walk the Ingles in October. Have done my planning with Gronze and since I cannot manage 30 km stages, I will be staying in albergues in between the stops suggested by guides. Will not book ahead - if an albergue is full I can always have a taxi take me to an accommodation with an available room.
As to language, I used to be fluent in Brazilian Portuguese. Nowadays in Spain when I try to communicate, out comes, quite unintentionally, Portunhol - leftover Portuguese with bits of Spanish I have learned - works beautifully.

Keep posting, little Wolf! Most interesting for me in preparation for my camino next month! Bom camino and bon courage!
 
I intend to walk the Ingles in October. Have done my planning with Gronze and since I cannot manage 30 km stages, I will be staying in albergues in between the stops suggested by guides. Will not book ahead - if an albergue is full I can always have a taxi take me to an accommodation with an available room.
As to language, I used to be fluent in Brazilian Portuguese. Nowadays in Spain when I try to communicate, out comes, quite unintentionally, Portunhol - leftover Portuguese with bits of Spanish I have learned - works beautifully.

Keep posting, little Wolf! Most interesting for me in preparation for my camino next month! Bom camino and bon courage!
Thank you for all your friendly words! Today was absolutely beautiful: the path from Pontedeume to Betanzos full of inspiring nature through the forest with birdsong, okay sometimes there was noise from the highway in between, great running weather, a quiet moment on the beach in A Ponte de Porco at low tide, little nice villages and a nice albergue in Betanzos with a friendly hospitadera and a nice pilgrim who immediately offered me his lower bed as an old man, all the others were occupied...
 
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Yesterday: Another beautiful pilgrimage day! We set off in the dark at 6:30 in the morning, first through the still-sleeping town, then in the pitch black through the forest steeply uphill (difficult without a flashlight, the path is well marked, but the signposts are sometimes difficult to find in the dark. At daybreak through forests and meadows, with beautiful views above Rest areas, 2 bars for late breakfast, friendly, stamps, delicious tortilla, quirky interior, nice seats outside. And after a long climb at the end, 1 km of road. But there were no problems with the accommodation, all worries for nothing, which Haberger opens only at 1:00 p.m., it was shortly before. A few others, Peter, were already waiting. A simple but very nice Haberger with two bedrooms with ten beds each on the ground floor and attic. Eight euros as usual, three euros washing machine and again three euros dryer, for those who need it. In the end, some pilgrims were turned away because the hostel was full. Relaxed chilling in the afternoon on the meadow in the sun.
 
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Our Atmospheric H30 poncho offers lightness and waterproofness. Easily compressible and made with our Waterproof fabric, its heat-sealed interior seams guarantee its waterproofness. Includes carrying bag.

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Sorry, yesterday my way was vom Betanzos to Hospital de Bruma in Camino Inglés
 
Hi @Wolfinho , glad you so easily got a bed for the night, and weren't one of those turned away. I find it interesting that the trail is still so full, despite it already being the middle of September.
It's the last place that it will be so tight, no need for more pre-,dawn starts! Enjoy!
 
€2,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
Another beautiful path from Hospital de Bruma to Siqueiro. We set off again in the dark at 6:30 a.m., walked on mostly asphalt paths through fields and forests, and after two hours we found the first, sweetly decorated bar and the first long-awaited hot coffee. Magical daybreak with sunrise and fog over the meadows. Another nice bar later. Otherwise no public drinking taps or fountains!! Then towards the end, after crossing under the motorway and an alternative route, 700m parallel to the motorway, a small little-used asphalt road with constant ups and downs in the blazing sun for about 3km before the last kilometer of the path led back into a beautiful, shady forest path and continued to Siqueiro. There were several private hostels there, the second one still had beds available, €18 per night, but including breakfast... Nicely furnished, spacious hostel, very central. In Siqueiro itself there is more life on the streets than in Hospital de Bruma, which only has 40 residents. Nice path along the river...
 
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Starting the last stage of the Way of St. James with sadness. Initially a bit of road, then on picturesque small dirt roads. Big disadvantage: no really relaxation, because there is always the loud noise of the motorway, which runs parallel to almost the entire stage in a distance of perhaps 200 m. I will see, what I can discovery at my last kilometers on Camino Ingles
 
Starting the last stage of the Way of St. James with sadness. Initially a bit of road, then on picturesque small dirt roads. Big disadvantage: no really relaxation, because there is always the loud noise of the motorway, which runs parallel to almost the entire stage in a distance of perhaps 200 m. I will see, what I can discovery at my last kilometers on Camino Ingles
This is part of it, and I hope you find the silver lining! Did you notice the Enchanted Wood? Do it again! You will be so much wiser the second time. Well done, enjoy Santiago. A sit down with some pilgrims, bread, cheese, chorizo, aceitunas, vino if that is your choice...oh! Such luxury! Safe trip home, and thanks for all your posts.
 
Thank you for the mental support. I'm at the finish line at Santiago Cathedral and now I'm in the queue to receive the Compostela. I am very happy. Buon Camino for everyone who is not on the way….
This is part of it, and I hope you find the silver lining! Did you notice the Enchanted Wood? Do it again! You will be so much wiser the second time. Well done, enjoy Santiago. A sit down with some pilgrims, bread, cheese, chorizo, aceitunas, vino if that is your choice...oh! Such luxury! Safe trip home, and thanks for all your posts.
Thank you for the mental support on my second St. James Way after the Camino Portugusa in June this year. I'm at the finish line at Santiago Cathedral and now I'm in the queue to receive the Compostela. I am very happy. Buon Camino for everyone who is not on the way….
 
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Today at the end of the trip we visit the Holy Mass in the cathedral. Last night there was no entry due to the crowds. You are not allowed to take a pilgrim backpack with you; there is a luggage storage room next to the church in a souvenir shop where you can leave the backpack for €3. This is also my farewell to the forum for this year. I would like to thank all the pilgrims for some good tips and wish everyone who is still on the way Buon Camino. My next route in spring will be from Valença via Santiago to Murxia and Finisterre.
 
I walked the camino ingles earlier this month, and had no trouble finding a bed at the albergues de peregrinos. In general, they open at 13:00, and while some of them do fill up over time, there's no problem finding a bed if you're there when they open. I slept in Neda, walked past Pontedeume (you've got to love that climb out of the village!) and stayed in Mino and at albergues in Presedo and Outeiro -- never a problem finding a bed, especially now that it's September with fewer pilgrims. Today, I completed the Carmelite route from Coimbra to Fatima.
 

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