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Camino Primitivo

Juda_hikes

New Member
Past OR future Camino
July 2018 - Camino Frances
July 2020 - Camino del Norte combined with Camino Primitivo
Hi, is anyone doing the Camino Primitivo and how is the situation? Is it open? Are there albuerges within doable walking distances etc.
 
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Past OR future Camino
2019
I read a post put up yesterday on a camino group on Reddit. Here is the text copied and pasted:

Hi Everybody,

I've started Primitivo on 1 Aug and hate to say it but all the albergues are full and booked few days ahead. I got stuck finding bed on the stage after Salas, couldn't book anything, even trying three days ahead and hoping to find some floor to sleep in the meantime. That includes more expensive objects.

It was little too much for me as this was my first Camino - I think some pilgrims who had the same issue stayed on the way and are hoping for bed when they walk into albergues. I rang or e-mailed basically everything on Camino Ninja - no success.

Maybe this is some temporary traffic, but if you're going, be prepare for a lot uncertainty. Some people yesterday were booking all albergues on their way ahead, almost to Santiago. I didn't find it to be a lot of fun to travel this way, I know some of peregrinos resigned also - I can see some familiar faces on bus station back.

I'm not saying don't go - it's just my perspective and valuable information I believe. If you thinking tent right now - prepare some warm clothes - Asturia is really cold in the nights right now.

Only two days but many great people - I don't regret one moment. Buen Camino!

Ps. Maybe someone more experienced who's on the way right now will comment and give some more info.

Here is the link:
https://www.reddit.com/r/CaminoDeSantiago/comments/oxahsk
 

LTfit

Veteran Member
My friend Ton and Ria who run Albergue Ponte Ferreira 27 km after Lugo are saying that the Primitivo is just crazy at the moment. They are booked out until I don't know when.

I'm also a member of many Facebook Camino groups including one about the Primitivo and everyone is saying the same. Book, book, book! That's the only way to go. I did the same in June when I walked the Salvador and Primitivo not because there were many pilgrims, there wasn't, but because so many albergues were still closed.

I personally would walk a different Camino if heading out now. September looks to be a busy month too!
 

simeon

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
SJPDP LosArcos 09\14 Tricastella SDDC 0515 Porto SDDC 1015 LosArcos Burgos 1016 Burgos Leon 0917
Back mysel two weeks now from le puy to cahors. Booking ahead was a must. I was blessed and had a friend who spoke french and did it for me. Doing it through English was a bit of a nightmare. I know it seems odd booking all the accommodation beforehand bit at least it wasn't a bed race. It does mean that you are stuck with the stages you decide on despite how you feel, but at least you know you have your bed and can take your time there are pros and cons to it.
 
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Thomas1962

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2010/2011/2012/2013: Madrid -Salvador -Primitivo 2014: EPW 2015: Amsterdam - SdC
My friend Ton and Ria who run Albergue Ponte Ferreira 27 km after Lugo are saying that the Primitivo is just crazy at the moment. They are booked out until I don't know when.

I'm also a member of many Facebook Camino groups including one about the Primitivo and everyone is saying the same. Book, book, book! That's the only way to go. I did the same in June when I walked the Salvador and Primitivo not because there were many pilgrims, there wasn't, but because so many albergues were still closed.

I personally would walk a different Camino if heading out now. September looks to be a busy month too!
Thanks LTfit for spreading the word.
At this moment I have the feeling that the situation is indeed even beyond booking ahead. My advice at this moment is: just don't go any more this august-holiday month, or at least stay on other smaller camino's out there and enter Galicia only next month.
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
Hi, is anyone doing the Camino Primitivo and how is the situation? Is it open? Are there albuerges within doable walking distances etc.
I see you have walked before. I do not know your time frame or your financial situation or the Covid Camino situation in France. But my I suggest walking the VIa Podiensis or also communly known as the Le Puy camino It is a beautiful camino I do not know the Gite situation or what is open or closed because of Covid. It could be a great alternative to the Primitivo. It is solitary, beautiful, can be challenging especially for an old guy like me. I mentioned finances because it is more expensive than any of the Spanish routes. But you will have the most memorable dinners in the gites and many offer pretty special breakfast also. I don't speak a word of French and when I walked a barely encountered any English speaking people. I do not know if Gronze.com is keeping up with Gite openings and closing like they are doing in Spain. There are some excellent guidebooks and I am sure lots of information regarding this route on line. When I walked most pilgrims were retired like myself and most were French. Some Germans too. It is a much different experience as there are no camino "families" and people tend to walk alone or with the people they came with. That is not to say that the people were not warm and friendly. I think many enjoy the experience as a really nice hike. I am not sure about this description it was my impression only.I just had a pretty mediocre guide from Michelin which was barely of use but I survived and loved the experience.
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
There are many other routes all over Spain with very few pilgrims, the Levante, Lana and Mozárabe just to name a few.
Those are all good choices and one day I hope to walk them. But if he is leaving soon he could fry out there during this time of year don't you think? I am starting in Sevilla but I am waiting until October 15 to walk. The idea of walking in summer to me sounds miserable and quite possibly dangerous.
 
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LTfit

Veteran Member
Those are all good choices and one day I hope to walk them. But if he is leaving soon he could fry out there during this time of year don't you think? I am starting in Sevilla but I am waiting until October 15 to walk. The idea of walking in summer to me sounds miserable and quite possibly dangerous.
It really depends on how one deals with the heat. I've walked both the Vía de la Plata and the Levante in the summer. The Mozárabe from Granada I did late September and although still quite warm much better than in July.
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
It really depends on how one deals with the heat. I've walked both the Vía de la Plata and the Levante in the summer. The Mozárabe from Granada I did late September and although still quite warm much better than in July.
Exactly right about that. My considerations are my age, 67, and for me the intolerable heat that would make me miserable. I would much rather walk through rain, sleet, high winds, snow and sub freezing weather than walk in extreme heat. No precaution is 100% foolproof in extreme weather but Spain does not get super cold weather and outside of a few high mountainous regions where precaution and pre planning and common sense is needed the cold is no where near the enemy that extreme heat is. Besides the dangers of extreme heat and the misery it personally causes me, the possibility of contracting melanoma (which can occur in sun exposure in winter also) is far greater even with precautions taken. Bottom line is we are all different and I leave those southern Caminos to you and others who don't mind walking in the summer. I was thinking of the Levante next and again will wait until October or March to do it. Buen Camino pilgrim
 

LTfit

Veteran Member
Exactly right about that. My considerations are my age, 67, and for me the intolerable heat that would make me miserable. I would much rather walk through rain, sleet, high winds, snow and sub freezing weather than walk in extreme heat. No precaution is 100% foolproof in extreme weather but Spain does not get super cold weather and outside of a few high mountainous regions where precaution and pre planning and common sense is needed the cold is no where near the enemy that extreme heat is. Besides the dangers of extreme heat and the misery it personally causes me, the possibility of contracting melanoma (which can occur in sun exposure in winter also) is far greater even with precautions taken. Bottom line is we are all different and I leave those southern Caminos to you and others who don't mind walking in the summer. I was thinking of the Levante next and again will wait until October or March to do it. Buen Camino pilgrim
At 65, I'm no spring chicken 🐔😉.

October is wonderful IMHO, I was up around Zamora then onto the Sanabres one year arriving in Santiago on November 3rd. I remember townspeople offering me bags of chestnuts and roasting then in Puebla de Sanabria. The rains began the day after I arrived in Santiago and didn't let up!
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
At 65, I'm no spring chicken 🐔😉.

October is wonderful IMHO, I was up around Zamora then onto the Sanabres one year arriving in Santiago on November 3rd. I remember townspeople offering me bags of chestnuts and roasting then in Puebla de Sanabria. The rains began the day after I arrived in Santiago and didn't let up!
Well, old timer maybe we will meet on of these days. I will start on October 14 so I don't think I will be in Santiago until early December. No need to rush these things as you know. I want to try a late winter early spring camino one of these days soon, like I mentioned before.
 

Zsoka

New Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
Hello! I came home today from my first Camino, which was fantastic :), so I brought some photos and videos. In the past two weeks, I’ve walked the Primitivo from Oviedo to Santiago, and for the sake of completeness, I walked then first to Muxia and from there to Fisterra.

I had a basic idea beforehand about my stages so did some bookings, but then a series of replannings happened with new bookings and cancellations, and finally lots of spontaneous walkings with huge distances per day due to the albergue saturation, which added extra excitement to my days, bit of a stress and lots of phone calls - Spanish keywords mixed in English where you could only guess what the other person on line was saying due to the lack of language skills. (I don't speak Spanish, they rarely speak English.)
Situations that sometimes seemed really really hopeless were then somehow fortunately always saved by another pilgrim. Camino provides, they say. In the albergues, 30% of the beds are free to use/book, which in practice looks like this: one person gets a bunk bed, typically the lower part, and a full bed is usually left empty between 2 beds. In a desperate situation, if someone asks the albergue to let somebody else sleep in his or her bed (meaning on the top of the bunk bed), they agree. That’s how I got some place to stay twice on my way, and others went the same way. In principle, accommodations are not checked by official institutions, but if there is a covid situation, there is inherently trouble because of not following the 30% rules. I also lost a prebooked accommodation (and won some extra miles) because an albergue had to close completely with immediate effect due to a positive covid test within the staff.

But most importantly, the Primitivo is beautiful! 🤩 Especially before Lugo, or to be maybe more precise: in Asturias, so the first half when the way goes between the mountains and we walk over the clouds practically every day with a fantastic views. True rumors are true that this part is not the easiest, a lot of ups, a lot of downs, a lot of consistent ups and downs, but the environment is worth every step and elevation gain, so I highly recommend it to anyone who loves nature, mountains, hiking, quiet countryside, villages and a it's a definite advantage not to be afraid of cows :) 🌄🐮
The weather was perfect in mid-August (7 - 21 Aug), 16-18 C degrees in the early mornings, over 20 around noon, a very very sunny afternoon with completely no rain in those two weeks. After a major sunburn, I was walking in long leggings and a long-sleeved merino top every day from day five, a sweater as an extra (which is good if windproof) was only needed for a short time in very early departures. I always wear trail runners when hiking, and the terrain here does not necessarily require hiking boots neither, if otherwise the ankles are working fine. Thicker soles, on the other hand, can come in handy because of the often stony terrain. I think hiking sticks here are definitely recommended, they are a big help, and if someone starts before 7:30 in the morning, a headlamp is also useful.

We could have been a little more than a dozen people in one wave moving relatively identically, many Spanish people, many from Italy and ones from other places (Denmark, Slovenia, Belgium, US, Portugal, Germany, Hungary). The majority arrived solo, a small group and a few couples showed up at times, but in any case no one could feel lonely, everyone soon became familiar to one and other, and with whom one exchanged only a word, it was also very good to meet at times. Like me, there were others for whom this was their first Camino, and even more of those for whom it was not even the second Camino including those for whom this Primitivo was already the third Primitivo. Many people walked this way as a variant of the Norte, so we also met those who had been walking for a month. The age range is completely mixed. The "100s", meaning the pilgrims who complete the last 100 km, appeared in Lugo, so the number of people increased, and from Melide, where the Primitivo merges with the Frances, the participants have changed radically including people who walked with a light plastic bag instead of a backpack. Here the atmosphere turned into a bit of a school class trip, and that was when I started walking in the afternoons as well, this is something that only a handful of pilgrims does.

For me, seeing the ocean instead of Santiago gave me the real arrival experience, it was fantastic to face the huge blueness of the water after the lots and lots of green. 🔵 Muxía is tiny, charming, calming, Fisterra is bustling and a little crowded, but sitting on the rocks behind the lighthouse is kind of majestic. When two guys behind me gave a live background music to the view, the whole situation became amazingly touching and emotional, especially since I had my farewell over there.

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View attachment VID_20210810_084415.mp4
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jpflavin1

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
Hello! I came home today from my first Camino, which was fantastic :), so I brought some photos and videos. In the past two weeks, I’ve walked the Primitivo from Oviedo to Santiago, and for the sake of completeness, I walked then first to Muxia and from there to Fisterra.

I had a basic idea beforehand about my stages so did some bookings, but then a series of replannings happened with new bookings and cancellations, and finally lots of spontaneous walkings with huge distances per day due to the albergue saturation, which added extra excitement to my days, bit of a stress and lots of phone calls - Spanish keywords mixed in English where you could only guess what the other person on line was saying due to the lack of language skills. (I don't speak Spanish, they rarely speak English.)
Situations that sometimes seemed really really hopeless were then somehow fortunately always saved by another pilgrim. Camino provides, they say. In the albergues, 30% of the beds are free to use/book, which in practice looks like this: one person gets a bunk bed, typically the lower part, and a full bed is usually left empty between 2 beds. In a desperate situation, if someone asks the albergue to let somebody else sleep in his or her bed (meaning on the top of the bunk bed), they agree. That’s how I got some place to stay twice on my way, and others went the same way. In principle, accommodations are not checked by official institutions, but if there is a covid situation, there is inherently trouble because of not following the 30% rules. I also lost a prebooked accommodation (and won some extra miles) because an albergue had to close completely with immediate effect due to a positive covid test within the staff.

But most importantly, the Primitivo is beautiful! 🤩 Especially before Lugo, or to be maybe more precise: in Asturias, so the first half when the way goes between the mountains and we walk over the clouds practically every day with a fantastic views. True rumors are true that this part is not the easiest, a lot of ups, a lot of downs, a lot of consistent ups and downs, but the environment is worth every step and elevation gain, so I highly recommend it to anyone who loves nature, mountains, hiking, quiet countryside, villages and a it's a definite advantage not to be afraid of cows :) 🌄🐮
The weather was perfect in mid-August (7 - 21 Aug), 16-18 C degrees in the early mornings, over 20 around noon, a very very sunny afternoon with completely no rain in those two weeks. After a major sunburn, I was walking in long leggings and a long-sleeved merino top every day from day five, a sweater as an extra (which is good if windproof) was only needed for a short time in very early departures. I always wear trail runners when hiking, and the terrain here does not necessarily require hiking boots neither, if otherwise the ankles are working fine. Thicker soles, on the other hand, can come in handy because of the often stony terrain. I think hiking sticks here are definitely recommended, they are a big help, and if someone starts before 7:30 in the morning, a headlamp is also useful.

We could have been a little more than a dozen people in one wave moving relatively identically, many Spanish people, many from Italy and ones from other places (Denmark, Slovenia, Belgium, US, Portugal, Germany, Hungary). The majority arrived solo, a small group and a few couples showed up at times, but in any case no one could feel lonely, everyone soon became familiar to one and other, and with whom one exchanged only a word, it was also very good to meet at times. Like me, there were others for whom this was their first Camino, and even more of those for whom it was not even the second Camino including those for whom this Primitivo was already the third Primitivo. Many people walked this way as a variant of the Norte, so we also met those who had been walking for a month. The age range is completely mixed. The "100s", meaning the pilgrims who complete the last 100 km, appeared in Lugo, so the number of people increased, and from Melide, where the Primitivo merges with the Frances, the participants have changed radically including people who walked with a light plastic bag instead of a backpack. Here the atmosphere turned into a bit of a school class trip, and that was when I started walking in the afternoons as well, this is something that only a handful of pilgrims does.

For me, seeing the ocean instead of Santiago gave me the real arrival experience, it was fantastic to face the huge blueness of the water after the lots and lots of green. 🔵 Muxía is tiny, charming, calming, Fisterra is bustling and a little crowded, but sitting on the rocks behind the lighthouse is kind of majestic. When two guys behind me gave a live background music to the view, the whole situation became amazingly touching and emotional, especially since I had my farewell over there.

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Thanks for sharing. I need to get back on the Camino.
 

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