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From Vila Nova de Arousa to Santiago or Padron/Herbon?

koilife

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016); Portugues w/ son #3 (2020)
When taking the boat ride from Vila Nova de Arousa to Pontecesures, do most people carry on all the way to Santiago in that one day (26K), or stop in Padron/Herbon, or somewhere in between?

[And, yes, I recognize the "it depends" nature of the question (timing and length of the boat ride, weather, companions, ambition, schedule constraints, etc.).]
 

Theatregal

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
So far...
2012 ~ 2019
We stopped in Padron, staying at the Albergue Pensión Flavia and had a wonderful day and evening there. It's a pretty town with some interesting things to see. Really enjoyed visiting the house / museum of the poet Rosalia de Castro. If you visit the Iglesia Santiago de Padrón, you can see the Pedron - which legend says is the stone used to moor the stone boat carrying the body of St. James. There is a lovely walk up stone steps to the Santiaguiño do Monte - a place where St. James is said to have preached. It was Padrón pepper harvesting time so we had the best peppers at dinner!!

We had time, so stayed the next night about half way to Santiago in Faramello at the Albergue la Calabeza, which gave a nice relaxed day into Santiago for the final day of this beautiful camino.
 

jsalt

Jill
Camino(s) past & future
Portugués, Francés, LePuy, Rota Vicentina, Norte, Madrid, C2C, Salvador, Primitivo, Aragonés, Inglés
Padron. Twice. The second time the boat changed its sailing time the day before, from 10am to 7am. So we walked into Padron at about 10am. They originally had the small boat scheduled, but had to change to the much bigger boat to meet the demand, and the much bigger boat had to sail at high tide, so it couldn’t leave any later than 7am. We were staying about 2 or 3kms away, so we had to leg it to the harbour in the dark to get there by 6.45am.
 

koilife

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016); Portugues w/ son #3 (2020)
Padron. Twice. The second time the boat changed its sailing time the day before, from 10am to 7am. So we walked into Padron at about 10am. They originally had the small boat scheduled, but had to change to the much bigger boat to meet the demand, and the much bigger boat had to sail at high tide, so it couldn’t leave any later than 7am. We were staying about 2 or 3kms away, so we had to leg it to the harbour in the dark to get there by 6.45am.
It seems like a lot of time (almost a rest day) right at the edge of Santiago. What was there about Padron that commended it to you (twice) as a stop as opposed to pushing on towards/into Santiago?
 
We haven’t done it yet, but are planning to get to Santiago the same day the boat arrives in Pontecesures - to fit in the walk to Muxia in our available time. There are frequent buses from Padron and the other towns on the route ( Monbus), as a back up in case the ferry runs late that day. However, that does disqualify the compostela if a person wants it.
 

koilife

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016); Portugues w/ son #3 (2020)
We haven’t done it yet, but are planning to get to Santiago the same day the boat arrives in Pontecesures - to fit in the walk to Muxia in our available time. There are frequent buses from Padron and the other towns on the route ( Monbus), as a back up in case the ferry runs late that day. However, that does disqualify the compostela if a person wants it.
I have plenty of time either way, so no reason to bus or forego the Compostela.
 

Kiwi-family

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Past: (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2018)-Frances, Baztan, San Salvador, Primitivo, Fisterra,VdlP, Madrid
A detour to Herbon is highly recommended
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
When taking the boat ride from Vila Nova de Arousa to Pontecesures, do most people carry on all the way to Santiago in that one day (26K), or stop in Padron/Herbon, or somewhere in between?

[And, yes, I recognize the "it depends" nature of the question (timing and length of the boat ride, weather, companions, ambition, schedule constraints, etc.).]
I suppose every camino leaves you with a few “I wish I had....” and I think that the hat museum in Sao Joao da Madeira and a detour to the monastery at Herbón would be my two for the Caminho Portugués. I assume you have seen all the descriptions, and the response by @Kiwi-family is the typical one given by people who have been there. A few kms off route, but it looks like the perfect place to spend your last night on the caminho.
 

jsalt

Jill
Camino(s) past & future
Portugués, Francés, LePuy, Rota Vicentina, Norte, Madrid, C2C, Salvador, Primitivo, Aragonés, Inglés
It seems like a lot of time (almost a rest day) right at the edge of Santiago. What was there about Padron that commended it to you (twice) as a stop as opposed to pushing on towards/into Santiago?
The first time the (small) boat left about 2pm, so I booked a bed in Padron to be sure of getting one (it was June). The second time I was leading a group of 12, so we had all our beds (and the boat) booked already. From Padron we stayed the next night at Albergue Milladoiro. We could then arrive in Santiago the next morning fresh and relaxed.
 

TatiLie

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portugues Variante Espiritual July 2019
Finisterre next!
We were taking it slowly so we stopped in Padrón, and was so most of people we saw around. A few ones were going to stop in Teo. There was just one Italian in the group next to us who was doing all the way to Santiago that same day. He did look like an athlete, though.
 

jsalt

Jill
Camino(s) past & future
Portugués, Francés, LePuy, Rota Vicentina, Norte, Madrid, C2C, Salvador, Primitivo, Aragonés, Inglés
One of the best things to do on the whole of the Camino Portugués (and few people actually do it), is in Padrón, and that is to climb Monte Santiaguino. The access steps are across the bridge, to the right, and immediately on the left. Not far from the municipal albergue. The cross at the top of the hill is on the front cover of Brierley. This is supposedly the very start of St James’s ministry in Iberia. It’s very peaceful up there, just sit and contemplate your camino, before arriving in Santiago next day.
 

koilife

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016); Portugues w/ son #3 (2020)
I suppose every camino leaves you with a few “I wish I had....” and I think that the hat museum in Sao Joao da Madeira and a detour to the monastery at Herbón would be my two for the Caminho Portugués. I assume you have seen all the descriptions, and the response by @Kiwi-family is the typical one given by people who have been there. A few kms off route, but it looks like the perfect place to spend your last night on the caminho.
But I want it all, and I want it now! ;)

If we don't go onto Santiago, we're definitely staying at the monastery. Right now I'm just juggling where I make up a day so we can still walk to Finisterre. My preference is three days in Santiago rather than two, which means I either give up a day in Lisbon, or the day trip to Braga, or I put in a few longer days to pick up an extra day en route.

I also have rest/tourism days in Tomar, Coimbra, and Porto, but I'm not inclined to cut into those.
 

koilife

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016); Portugues w/ son #3 (2020)
One of the best things to do on the whole of the Camino Portugués (and few people actually do it), is in Padrón, and that is to climb Monte Santiaguino. The access steps are across the bridge, to the right, and immediately on the left. Not far from the municipal albergue. The cross at the top of the hill is on the front cover of Brierley. This is supposedly the very start of St James’s ministry in Iberia. It’s very peaceful up there, just sit and contemplate your camino, before arriving in Santiago next day.
That sounds absolutely wonderful, especially if coupled with an evening at Herbon.
 

koilife

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016); Portugues w/ son #3 (2020)
He did look like an athlete, though.
I surely don't look the part.

I'm less racehorse and more burro (my sons might substitute a related word). But, my prior experience is that I have an irrepressible urge to finish. My first camino, we put down about 30 miles (49 km) to arrive that evening, and my second we put down just over 20 miles (33 km). Hence my sons' likelihood to substitute a word other than "burro".
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
But I want it all, and I want it now! ;)

If we don't go onto Santiago, we're definitely staying at the monastery. Right now I'm just juggling where I make up a day so we can still walk to Finisterre. My preference is three days in Santiago rather than two, which means I either give up a day in Lisbon, or the day trip to Braga, or I put in a few longer days to pick up an extra day en route.

I also have rest/tourism days in Tomar, Coimbra, and Porto, but I'm not inclined to cut into those.
Ok, here are some unsolicited reverberations to your post. As your dear son Joel so well knows, I love giving unsolicited advice. But the good thing is that I don’t care one whit whether you follow it, it is just FWIW.

How many days are you going to take to walk to Finisterre. My bet is that you will find it quite to your liking to do it in three days, especially if you go the first day to the lovely albergue in Vilaserio. If you have planned 4, that will open up a day.

Lisbon is already pretty tight for you, IMO, in fact, I would probably give up Sintra and stay in Lisbon for your entire stay.

How are you going to work the day trip to Braga? It is a pretty little city, but i don’t think it stands out above Tomar or Coimbra. If the purpose is to go either to the Bom Jesus or the Mateus mansion/winery, those are both out of town and will require some travel planning that might make a day trip complicated.

Days in Tomar, Coimbra, and Porto are great ideas, IMO.

Are you going to spend time in Santiago when you arrive from Padrón or when you return from Finisterre? I personally, and others may vehemently disagree, find that after one full day in Santiago I am feeling bummed and post partum. I think that is not an uncommon feeling for people who have been walking a long time and are trying to accept the reality that they cannot walk anymore. I know I’ve spent a lot more time there than you, and if you are feeling like you will be up to full blown tourist mode, you can surely fill all of those days. The one absolutely not to be missed spot, aside from the Cathedral and the square, of course, is the Portico da Gloria. A visit there might take some planning.

So there you have it. Since I have obsessively thought about my own camino 2020 for so long, it’s time to turn my energy to other people’s. FWIW. Abraços from Laurie
 

koilife

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016); Portugues w/ son #3 (2020)
Ok, here are some unsolicited reverberations to your post. As your dear son Joel so well knows, I love giving unsolicited advice. But the good thing is that I don’t care one whit whether you follow it, it is just FWIW.
And yet he lights up like a Christmas tree at the memory! Compared to my unsolicited advice to him, yours was as if from the lips of God.
How many days are you going to take to walk to Finisterre. My bet is that you will find it quite to your liking to do it in three days, especially if you go the first day to the lovely albergue in Vilaserio. If you have planned 4, that will open up a day.
Three days, and I won't cut into my final stay at Hotel Alen do Mar (always my second reservation after locking flights).
Lisbon is already pretty tight for you, IMO, in fact, I would probably give up Sintra and stay in Lisbon for your entire stay.
Sintra is big on Bennet's desires (who knew the Moorish castle would attract a 16 year-old boy who grew up on Tolkien and Pirates of the Caribbean:rolleyes:). Part of my dilemma is that I tacked on an extra day so I could still have three full days in Lisbon plus a fourth full day in Sintra.
How are you going to work the day trip to Braga? It is a pretty little city, but i don’t think it stands out above Tomar or Coimbra. If the purpose is to go either to the Bom Jesus or the Mateus mansion/winery, those are both out of town and will require some travel planning that might make a day trip complicated.
I was planning to day trip from Porto on the first and last trains of the day, and then taxi/uber to get to Bom Jesus, walk to Sameiro, and taxi/uber back into town. I would likely visit the music shop suggested by @Albertinho in quest for a Portuguese guitar for Kaleb. I am not familiar with Mateus.
Days in Tomar, Coimbra, and Porto are great ideas, IMO.
Of course that's your opinion. Where do you think I got them from originally? 😉
Are you going to spend time in Santiago when you arrive from Padrón or when you return from Finisterre? I personally, and others may vehemently disagree, find that after one full day in Santiago I am feeling bummed and post partum. I think that is not an uncommon feeling for people who have been walking a long time and are trying to accept the reality that they cannot walk anymore. I know I’ve spent a lot more time there than you, and if you are feeling like you will be up to full blown tourist mode, you can surely fill all of those days. The one absolutely not to be missed spot, aside from the Cathedral and the square, of course, is the Portico da Gloria. A visit there might take some planning.
I actually like to putter around. Attend Pilgrim's Mass and pray at the crypt, plus Confession and daily Mass in English. Get compostelas. Visit museums. Stay out late. Get up late. See La Tuna. Shop for friends and family back home. Stash shopping at Ivars so I don't have to carry it to Finisterre. Hang out and meet people we've seen along the way. Celebratory dinner at Abastos 2.0. Two days feels rushed for this, and three feels right. Four would definitely be too much.
So there you have it. Since I have obsessively thought about my own camino 2020 for so long, it’s time to turn my energy to other people’s. FWIW. Abraços from Laurie
Muitos abraços em troca!
 

koilife

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016); Portugues w/ son #3 (2020)
I suppose my other option, of course, is to drop the walk to Finisterre and use the extra time along the Portugues. Those three days are my safety factor in case we get delayed along the way due to injury or illness (like those three days in Tineo, LOL!), but with some extra time built into the caminho itself, I can still adjust if needed. I'm not sure if I'll ever get back along the Caminho Portugues, so perhaps better to use the extra days soaking in the wonder of Portugal.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
I am not familiar with Mateus.
I guess you are too young to have used empty Mateus bottles to drip candles in your late teens. Along with Lancers bottles they were de rigeur in my college dorm. And I think they are both rosé wines, but I don’t remember ever drinking rosé wine! (The drinking age in the US was 18 when I was in college, so there was no illegal behavior going on). Mateus does have a beautiful estate, a bit pricey to visit and kind of off the beaten path. And now that I am checking it precisely I see that it is close to Vila Real, NOT Braga, so so much for that suggestion!

I like the idea of having those Finisterre days as “insurance,” that’s always what I try to do. That gives you a lot of flexibility, so maybe this is one of those many camino decisions that will unfold and make sense as you are actually walking. You’ve got the contingencies down pat!
 

koilife

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016); Portugues w/ son #3 (2020)
(The drinking age in the US was 18 when I was in college, so there was no illegal behavior going on).
A good thing, given your profession!
maybe this is one of those many camino decisions that will unfold and make sense as you are actually walking.
That's always the case. All the planning now helps me to manage reality as it presents itself.
 

alipilgrim

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Listed in my signature
Last May I walked about 14 km to the town of A Picarana, and found a very inexpensive but perfectly acceptable hotel on the main road. This left about 16.8k's to walk the next day into Santiago.
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
It seems like a lot of time (almost a rest day) right at the edge of Santiago. What was there about Padron that commended it to you (twice) as a stop as opposed to pushing on towards/into Santiago?
Padron is really central to the tales of Saint James in Iberia. It is here that he is said to have had his mission when he lived and it is here that the boat with his remains is said to have fetched up after his martyrdom. If you have any interest in Saint James (and it is his relics that are, at least in theory, the reason that people walk to Santiago), then seeing these locations might be of interest.

As well, Padron is known for the peppers (or pimientos) that bear the name of the town. They really should be tried when one is in Galicia, and what better place to try them than where they originate? Just beware, eating them is like playing roulette. Every once in a while you may find one that is a bit hotter than the rest.
 

koilife

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016); Portugues w/ son #3 (2020)
Padron is really central to the tales of Saint James in Iberia. It is here that he is said to have had his mission when he lived and it is here that the boat with his remains is said to have fetched up after his martyrdom. If you have any interest in Saint James (and it is his relics that are, at least in theory, the reason that people walk to Santiago), then seeing these locations might be of interest.
I walk to Santiago for far more than relics and traditions and theories. I walk for him to which they (and St. James himself) ultimately point, which makes everything else interesting, but not compelling.
As well, Padron is known for the peppers (or pimientos) that bear the name of the town. They really should be tried when one is in Galicia, and what better place to try them than where they originate? Just beware, eating them is like playing roulette. Every once in a while you may find one that is a bit hotter than the rest.
I love Padron peppers and will eat some there simply for the sake of saying I ate them in Padron, regardless of whether I pass through or stay. As I regularly eat hot chilies, I've never met a Padron I've considered more than mild. Likewise, I have no expectation of ever walking away from the roulette table as a winner . . .
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
I walk to Santiago for far more than relics and traditions and theories. I walk for him to which they (and St. James himself) ultimately point, which makes everything else interesting, but not compelling.
Ah then, but then why Santiago? Isn't what (or who, not sure of the correct pronoun) you are walking for present everywhere? I do recognize that for many (most) pilgrims it isn't the relics that are the inspiration to walk. That's why I wrote "theoretically". But they are certainly the reason that Santiago de Compostela became the pilgrim destination it is today.
 

koilife

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016); Portugues w/ son #3 (2020)
Ah then, but then why Santiago? Isn't what (or who, not sure of the correct pronoun) you are walking for present everywhere? I do recognize that for many (most) pilgrims it isn't the relics that are the inspiration to walk. That's why I wrote "theoretically". But they are certainly the reason that Santiago de Compostela became the pilgrim destination it is today.
As a Catholic, I believe that God is indeed everywhere; the challenge is in my attentiveness. The camino aids me in being attentive; it helps me to listen, to see, to taste God where I would usually miss him. As a Catholic, I also believe that my full and complete participation in the Mass and reception of the Eucharist enables me to receive more grace than any pilgrimage, no matter how long or difficult. The camino aids me to participate more completely. Thus, the journey and the destination (and everything that go with them) are merely means to a much greater end.

And, yes, there are other means within the Catholic tradition that can be just as effective, if not more so. I just happen to love Spain (and soon, Portugal), and hiking, and wine, and chocolate, and cafe con leche, and Padron peppers, and pulpo, and percebes, and . . . most especially, the chance to do this with my sons.
 
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Camino(s) past & future
None yet; perhaps the Portugese (2021?)
Ok, here are some unsolicited reverberations to your post.

Lisbon is already pretty tight for you, IMO, in fact, I would probably give up Sintra and stay in Lisbon for your entire stay....FWIW. Abraços from Laurie
I would second skipping Sintra. Probably I've "touristed" around Portugal now on 7 or 8 multi-day trips, and stayed near Lisbon for a month at a time and visited the city for a day or two each time, on 5 or 6 occasions, now that we have a base near Lisbon.

Sintra seems to me the least impressive of all the tourist sights I've seen. Highly hyped in all the guidebooks, and through the Lisbon tourist office, probably because it keeps you in the region an extra day. The castle has huge queues, one spends an inordinate part of the day either waiting for buses from one part of the town to another or getting to Sintra itself, and the restaurants are pricey and not very good, compared to what you can get in Lisbon.

There is so much to see in Lisbon, itself. On the other hand, the sights of Sintra are well-photographed in any good guidebook or even better, online, if you can find something that isn't trying to sell you tours! This is one of the best that I found; it's as much as you're likely to see in the typical day trip.


And another non-commercial source (regarding Portuguese Unesco sites)


Plus, in these times, one thing to perhaps consider is that Sintra is the "metacentre" of large-group tourism in the Lisbon area. If you want to avoid large crowds, it's not the best place to be.

Bom caminho, wherever you choose to wander!
 
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Sakamoto

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portuguese (Valença-Santiago) April'19
What is the current price of the ferry from Vilanova de Arousa to Pontecesures?
 

sulu

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
a few since 2010
What is the current price of the ferry from Vilanova de Arousa to Pontecesures?
I am fairly sure that Emilio, the hospitalero in Vilanova, told me that it is €20. My memory is bad and there were insufficient pilgrims at the beginning of July this year so I had to walk. Depending on when you plan to go the price may be immaterial!
Ultreia!
 


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