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2018 edition Camino Guides

peregrina2000

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Staff member
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Donating Member
#1
Just came across an article describing the Camino Castellano-Aragonés, which is really a gem, especially if you like small towns with lots of things to see, solitude, stunning scenery, and Romanesque (I'm thinking of you @VNwalking ;))

http://www.heraldo.es/noticias/arag...ago-que-pasa-por-moncayo-1210682-2261087.html

I walked this route in 2016, and I have to say it is really one of my favorites. The detour through the Cañon de Río Lobos to enjoy the gorge as well as the romanesque church was a high point, as was a day in the city of Soria. Soria is a town no one knows about but has a lot to see and do and a fabulous ambiente.

It's 300 km from Gallur to where it merges with the Francés in Burgos (actually you need a little dip on the Lana and/or San Olav) but you could easily start in Zaragoza (would add two days). Or if you like starting on the coast, you could do what Annie and I did and walk the Ruta del Ebro till Zaragoza and then on to the Castellano-Aragonés.

https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/my-camino-castellano-aragonés-2016.42195/

Don't take my word for it, @alansykes raves about it too! Buen camino, Laurie

p.s. This is one camino for which a GPS is, IMO, necessary.
 

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Kiwi-family

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Astorga to Santiago (2012); Baztan, Voie de la Nive, Frances to Leon, Salvador, Primitivo, Fisterra and back (2014); Oxfam Trailwalkers NZ (2015); Portuguese from Porto (June 2015); Via de la Plata/Sanabres (May/June 2016)
#2
Under your name is written Moderator, Staff Member and Donating Member. Is there some way of adding “Chief Inspirer”? (“Temptress” sounds more poetic but I don’t like the negative connotations)
 

Rick of Rick and Peg

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2015
#3

Rick of Rick and Peg

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2015
#4
I used waypoint data from a GPS file available on one of the sites I listed above to create this list of links where each link is to photographs on Flickr.com that were taken nearby each of the waypoints. It didn't turn out as well as I expected but now you should be able to identify the wildflowers along the way.
 

Stivandrer

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
I´ve got Camino plans until 2042,
- or till I fall flat on my face, whichever comes first !!
#5
Under your name is written Moderator, Staff Member and Donating Member. Is there some way of adding “Chief Inspirer”? (“Temptress” sounds more poetic but I don’t like the negative connotations)
" Master Planner!" !?
 

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pelerine

Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte, Primitivo, Plata, Salvador Torres
#6
Thank you, peregrina! And thank you, rick! I am copying all your info into my invierno planning doc for maybe 2020 (will be 80 by then and still be able to do it??? Se Deus quiser!)

As to an addition to your titles, peregrina, “Inspirer” as suggested by the kiwi family, but without the “chief” is fine; I like it better than Stivandrer’s Master Planner, since we do the actual planning of our caminos ourselves....
 
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Dan the Man

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances August 23,2015
#7
Just came across an article describing the Camino Castellano-Aragonés, which is really a gem, especially if you like small towns with lots of things to see, solitude, stunning scenery, and Romanesque (I'm thinking of you @VNwalking ;))

http://www.heraldo.es/noticias/arag...ago-que-pasa-por-moncayo-1210682-2261087.html

I walked this route in 2016, and I have to say it is really one of my favorites. The detour through the Cañon de Río Lobos to enjoy the gorge as well as the romanesque church was a high point, as was a day in the city of Soria. Soria is a town no one knows about but has a lot to see and do and a fabulous ambiente.

It's 300 km from Gallur to where it merges with the Francés in Burgos (actually you need a little dip on the Lana and/or San Olav) but you could easily start in Zaragoza (would add two days). Or if you like starting on the coast, you could do what Annie and I did and walk the Ruta del Ebro till Zaragoza and then on to the Castellano-Aragonés.

https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/my-camino-castellano-aragonés-2016.42195/

Don't take my word for it, @alansykes raves about it too! Buen camino, Laurie

p.s. This is one camino for which a GPS is, IMO, necessary.

I am VERY VERY interested in doing this route
Does it start in Burgos?
Is there a map of it?

I have done the Francés twice and this part looks AMAZING!!!!!!
 

IngridF

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
2012, 2015 ,2017
#8
Just came across an article describing the Camino Castellano-Aragonés, which is really a gem, especially if you like small towns with lots of things to see, solitude, stunning scenery, and Romanesque (I'm thinking of you @VNwalking ;))

http://www.heraldo.es/noticias/arag...ago-que-pasa-por-moncayo-1210682-2261087.html

I walked this route in 2016, and I have to say it is really one of my favorites. The detour through the Cañon de Río Lobos to enjoy the gorge as well as the romanesque church was a high point, as was a day in the city of Soria. Soria is a town no one knows about but has a lot to see and do and a fabulous ambiente.

It's 300 km from Gallur to where it merges with the Francés in Burgos (actually you need a little dip on the Lana and/or San Olav) but you could easily start in Zaragoza (would add two days). Or if you like starting on the coast, you could do what Annie and I did and walk the Ruta del Ebro till Zaragoza and then on to the Castellano-Aragonés.

https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/my-camino-castellano-aragonés-2016.42195/

Don't take my word for it, @alansykes raves about it too! Buen camino, Laurie

p.s. This is one camino for which a GPS is, IMO, necessary.
Oh my goodness Laurie, what are you doing to me... darn, I really must learn how to speak Spanish... not just caminolingo... yikes...Hugs Ingrid
 

VNwalking

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2014, 2015)
St Olav/Francés (2016)
Baztanés/Francés (2017)
Ingles (July 2018)
#9
I hear you and appreciate the kind thought! If the little jaunt from Santo Domingo de Silos to Burgos is anything to go on..........

But, gee Laurie...as if I need more places to want to walk??
I just went back and read your posts, and Alan's, and it sure does look zipideedooda gorgeous! Look at all those amazing cloisters, and a canyon with a church in the middle of it thrown in for good measure.

So I now have 2 dream ideas:
A Vasco Interior/Olvidado/Invierno combo,
And a Castellano-Aragonés(starting from Soria)/Frances/Salvador/Primativo combo.
 

LTfit

Veteran Member
Donating Member
#10
The Cañón de Río Lobos is indeed lovely, I walked it several times last year when I was staying in the small town of San Leonardo It is actually on this Camino.
But don't go in the winter! The province of Soria is known to be the coldest province of Spain. A trivia tidbit: the film Dr Zivago was filmed near Moncayo and not in Russia.
 

Rick of Rick and Peg

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2015
#11
I am VERY VERY interested in doing this route
Does it start in Burgos?
Is there a map of it?
This webpage has a bunch of links to GPX files for the Camino Castellano-Aragonés (at least for the part in Soria province):

One of them is this one:

I mapped that using gpsvisualizer.com and the results can be viewed for a short time at:

If the map cannot be found it can be recreated by entering the URL of the gpx file into the box titled "Or provide the URL of static data on the Web:"at the webpage http://www.gpsvisualizer.com/map_input and then clicking the "Draw the map" button. Note that gpsvisualizer.com gives you an awful lot of ways at looking at the map.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
Donating Member
#12
The Cañón de Río Lobos is indeed lovely, I walked it several times last year when I was staying in the small town of San Leonardo It is actually on this Camino.
You probably know this, Lee, but just for anyone who might want to walk this route and who would like to walk through the canyon -- only the second half of the walk through the gorge is on the Camino. If you take the camino leaving San Leonardo, you will not see the most beautiful part of the canyon nor the romanesque church nestled against some huge cliffs.

Compare my wikiloc tracks with Alan's

https://www.wikiloc.com/wikiloc/view.do?id=14144925

https://www.wikiloc.com/wikiloc/view.do?id=11249311

The two paths meet up at the Bridge of Siete Ojos, but at that point I had already gone through the real canyon beauty.

So that means that a little creativity is required. I was lucky and got a ride to the trailhead with the friend of your friend! The taxi driver I had spoken with ahead of time had a family emergency and was unable to take me. I had really good luck!

You could walk and avoid the car/taxi by spending a day to walk from San Leonardo to Ucero but Ucero is still 5 or 6 km from the trailhead and its accommodations are very seasonal.

But I would definitely recommend that if you are going to walk this remote solitary camino, do not miss the Cañon!
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
Donating Member
#13
I am VERY VERY interested in doing this route
Does it start in Burgos?
Is there a map of it?

I have done the Francés twice and this part looks AMAZING!!!!!!
Hi, Dan,
I posted my GPS tracks on wikiloc.com. If you go to the site and search using the "users" search function, and put in my name, peregrina2000, you will find all the tracks I recorded.

This camino actually ends in Burgos. A convenient starting place would be Zaragoza. That would involve two days walking on the Ruta del Ebro, and then going off onto the Castellano-Aragonés at Gallur. Technically, this camino ends at Santo Domingo de Silos, where it merges with the Ruta de la Lana and then takes you into Burgos with two days walking. So it is a bit of a patched together route, but all very seamless.

Mundicamino has a decent schematic map of many of Spain's caminos, and you can click on the route you want to see to have it highlighted.

Good luck planning, you will need to be prepared to stay in private accommodations because there are only a few albergues. But there are lots of clean, cheap accommodation options. Buen camino, Laurie
 

jprogers

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (half of) 2005
Camino Portuguese 2007
Camino Norte 2009
Camino Ingles 2011
Camino Vasco del Interior Tunnel route 2013
#14
Thank you for posting about this walk. In late sep 2018 I will have 10 days to spend in Spain and I was thinking of either doing a short Camino or spending some time in Zaragoza. Now I can plan to combine both.
 

PEI_Heather

Canadian Member :)
Camino(s) past & future
2016 - Voie de la Nive
2012, 2016 - Frances
2013 - Portuguese
2012, 2013 - Finesterre & Muxia
#15
Under your name is written Moderator, Staff Member and Donating Member. Is there some way of adding “Chief Inspirer”? (“Temptress” sounds more poetic but I don’t like the negative connotations)
'Tempta Extraordinare'?!
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Francés
De la plata
#19
Just came across an article describing the Camino Castellano-Aragonés, which is really a gem, especially if you like small towns with lots of things to see, solitude, stunning scenery, and Romanesque (I'm thinking of you @VNwalking ;))

http://www.heraldo.es/noticias/arag...ago-que-pasa-por-moncayo-1210682-2261087.html

I walked this route in 2016, and I have to say it is really one of my favorites. The detour through the Cañon de Río Lobos to enjoy the gorge as well as the romanesque church was a high point, as was a day in the city of Soria. Soria is a town no one knows about but has a lot to see and do and a fabulous ambiente.

It's 300 km from Gallur to where it merges with the Francés in Burgos (actually you need a little dip on the Lana and/or San Olav) but you could easily start in Zaragoza (would add two days). Or if you like starting on the coast, you could do what Annie and I did and walk the Ruta del Ebro till Zaragoza and then on to the Castellano-Aragonés.

https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/my-camino-castellano-aragonés-2016.42195/

Don't take my word for it, @alansykes raves about it too! Buen camino, Laurie

p.s. This is one camino for which a GPS is, IMO, necessary.
Thanks it sounds great. IMO?
 

oursonpolaire

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002, Toulouse/Aragon 2005, Cami S Jaume/Aragon 2007/9, Mont Saint Michel/Norte/Vadiniense 2011, Norte/Primitivo 2013, Norte/Primitivo 2014. Norte 2015, Cami S Jaume/Castellano-Aragonese 2016
#20
As one of the relatively small fraternity which has done this Camino, I would underline the usefulness of a GPS-- I did not have one and two very long and miserable days could have been made merry with a GPS. Places I had never really heard of (Soria and Tarazona) were absolute gems. I would also suggest that a pilgrim on this route have passable Spanish. Hopefully one of you will be able to update the CSJ profile on this route (https://www.csj.org.uk/planning-you...o/routes-in-spain/castellano-aragones-camino/).
 

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