A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it

Advertisement

Camino Forum Donation

Camping Stove

Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Portuguese (2018)
Couple of vegan Americans headed to one of the more isolated and under serviced Caminos this year. No worries - we plan on camping. What are our best European options for backpacking stove & fuel?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Portuguese (2018)
Campinggaz, okay - I assume that is the fuel. Will it be compatible with our US stove? I would prefer to do the initial buy from a sporting goods store so we know they are compatible. Our first big city is Milan. Recommendations?
 

Tincatinker

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Lots ;0)
It's a make of stove as well. Google will take you to a world of opportunities. Grumpy old cynics like me would always assume that the interconnectors will be incompatible. If it were not so we would all only need one charger and one cable. You might have fun getting a stove on an airplane anyway, even in the hold, if there are fuel traces left.

I'm sure you have read the various threads on the constraints on camping in Spain so I'll just wish you a Buen camino.
 

jungleboy

Nick
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (Spring '17)
Primitivo (Spring '18)
Madrid (April '19)
Decathlon seems like a good bet. They have 11 stores in Milan. Select Milano from the drop down list on this page to get store locations.
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Portuguese (2018)
It's a make of stove as well. Google will take you to a world of opportunities. Grumpy old cynics like me would always assume that the interconnectors will be incompatible. If it were not so we would all only need one charger and one cable. You might have fun getting a stove on an airplane anyway, even in the hold, if there are fuel traces left.

I'm sure you have read the various threads on the constraints on camping in Spain so I'll just wish you a Buen camino.
"Grumpy old cynics" rule!
 

Kitsambler

Jakobsweg Junkie
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy 2010-11, Prague 2012, Nuremberg 2013, Einsiedeln 2015, Geneva 2017-18
Campingaz wil be propane-canister stoves. Alcohol stoves are another option - alcohol fuel is readily available in Europe.
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
Campinggaz, okay - I assume that is the fuel. Will it be compatible with our US stove? I would prefer to do the initial buy from a sporting goods store so we know they are compatible. Our first big city is Milan. Recommendations?
Most of the stoves in the US use a different connection method than do European stove canisters. However, in the bigger cities along the Camino, some of the Sporting goods stores, like Decathlon, will carry a small selection of US compatible canisters. OR purchase a stove when you arrive and then you'll have no problem finding canisters in even smaller towns with general goods.
 

RENSHAW

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2003 CF Roncesvalles to Santiago
2/4 weeks every year on CF reaching Burgos or Leon. Hospitalero San Anton June 2016.
CAMPINGGAS - The modern ones detach from the fuel cell and have an ignition button. - it is stored in a plastic holder. The fuel cell is self sealing - they come in different sizes, make sure they are modern self sealing. Do not try to travel with fuel cells - the distinctive blue cans are available a most larger Camino towns.
 

alaskadiver

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017-Camino Primitivo
April 2019-Camino de Invierno
we had no problems finding the isobutane canister for our American stove in the local Decathlon store. The tiny backpacking stoves sold at places like REI that require isobutane canisters are also sold In Europe. No difference in connections. We use the Snowpeak and MSR brands.
 

RENSHAW

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2003 CF Roncesvalles to Santiago
2/4 weeks every year on CF reaching Burgos or Leon. Hospitalero San Anton June 2016.
You did me a favour Shston - I've been meaning to get it out for a clean for ages.BOB0602 001.JPGBOB0602 002.JPGBOB0602 003.JPG
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
If walking through Asturias do be aware of the rules regarding camping, fires (including stoves) etc. There are a number of threads which cover this which IMO are essential reading both as help and, where needed, warnings of the local laws.
 

lthrnck55

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Sept/Oct 2014

Camino Frances Sept/Oct/Nov 2019 ( Hopefully )

Attachments

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
Good post, and exactly the issue when the most common backpacking stoves from the US try to find a fuel canister with the right connection. Stoves that use pierceable-type fuel canisters are the most common European stoves, while the most popular US stoves use a screw-on style connector. Screw on canisters can be found, but it less frequently outside of a city. Not so much with the pierce-style.
 

cd667

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
It's happening next year!
They're all rather bulky. And to be honest, I abhor a countryside full of little empty gas canisters.

I love my Trangia. Obtaining fuel is easy, they pack small, and they are supremely reliable. Plus, you can put out a runaway fire with water. Brilliant!
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
They're all rather bulky. And to be honest, I abhor a countryside full of little empty gas canisters.

I love my Trangia. Obtaining fuel is easy, they pack small, and they are supremely reliable. Plus, you can put out a runaway fire with water. Brilliant!
My canister stove fits inside my mug, which, together with my spork, make up my cooking gear... not bulky one bit :) As to a countryside filled with gas canisters, I collapse mine (a tiny tool to do that) and pack mine out. Never saw a mess on any trails I've been on, except at a trailhead with trash cans overflowing. I'd love to see a picture of canisters filling the countryside :)

Additionally, many US Forest areas and National Wilderness areas prohibit alcohol based stoves (and wood burners, too) during late spring and summer dry seasons when open fires are banned. Stoves are required to have an on and off valve.

I've used alcohol stoves, and they work well, but they do have their own inherent limits and problems. ;)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Portuguese (2018)
Here is the stove I will be taking on my Camino. Bring a good size aluminum mug to boil water for tea/coffee/freeze dried food and find some loose twigs laying around and you are all set!

https://www.amazon.com/Bushcraft-Essentials-FBA_BCE-001-Bushbox-Outdoor/dp/B00CMQJW0E/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1517932387&sr=8-1&keywords=bushbox+stove
We call that stove type a NATO stove - love it - and is truly a 90% solution. But not good for cooking a pot of lentils & rice.
 

lthrnck55

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Sept/Oct 2014

Camino Frances Sept/Oct/Nov 2019 ( Hopefully )
We call that stove type a NATO stove - love it - and is truly a 90% solution. But not good for cooking a pot of lentils & rice.
Obviously only a partial solution. But with a change in fuel source and a little ingenuity with supporting peripheral rocks, you might be surprised with what you could accomplish,

Here is an alternative fuel source. You would just need to buy the alcohol at a Farmacia or sporting good store.

https://www.amazon.com/Trangia-Spirit-Burner-with-Screwcap/dp/B000AR7970/ref=pd_rhf_dp_s_cp_0_2?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B000AR7970&pd_rd_r=Z6XJTQ3J8NV3BD3BWVYW&pd_rd_w=Iqe3h&pd_rd_wg=1JVS1&psc=1&refRID=Z6XJTQ3J8NV3BD3BWVYW
 

cd667

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
It's happening next year!
As to a countryside filled with gas canisters, I collapse mine (a tiny tool to do that) and pack mine out. Never saw a mess on any trails I've been on, except at a trailhead with trash cans overflowing. I'd love to see a picture of canisters filling the countryside :)
You are very good, and respect for taking your rubbish home. If I ever meet you, I will give you a little badge. ;)

However, if we ALL buy things that are not reusable, the wildernesses we go out to enjoy are spoiled by the rubbish people leave behind. Gas canisters are exactly the sort of thing people leave behind when they move on. And don't even get me started about seas full of plastic waste, and how it's killing most of our marine life. This is all because people want to buy gadgets like the next great camping stove. I've been using my little Trangia since.... never mind. It would outlast me, there is nothing to wear out apart from a gasket every few years.

And if you haven't seen pristine countryside littered with rubbish, well you've never been to the Peak District, where I live!
 
Last edited:

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
You are very good, and respect for taking your rubbish home. If I ever meet you, I will give you a little badge. ;)

However, if we ALL buy things that are not reusable, the wildernesses we go out to enjoy are spoiled by the rubbish people leave behind. Gas canisters are exactly the sort of thing people leave behind when they move on. And don't even get me started about seas full of plastic waste, and how it's killing most of our marine life. This is all because people want to buy gadgets like the next great camping stove. I've been using my little Trangia since.... never mind. It would outlast me, there is nothing to wear out apart from a gasket every few years.

And if you haven't seen pristine countryside littered with rubbish, well you've never been to the Peak District, where I live!
And yet, here in the US, the primary wilderness ethic is to leave no trace behind, and most backpackers observe it. I'm not the exception, I'm just part of what is the norm. And if there happens to be a bit of rubbish on the trail or in wilderness campsites, backpackers and hikers here are quick to pick it up and take it with them. It is sad that such is not the case in your area. And in case you didn't know, gas canisters are recyclable and most companies like MSR use recycled content in their production. As to my stove, I've used it for thousands of miles of backpacking and it is still going strong.

Talking about the technical merits of a piece of gear is part of the normal discussion that pops up frequently on the forum, but chastising criticism with a heaping dose of moral superiority and condescension is not. You use whatever equipment you wish to use, others will do the same.
 

cd667

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
It's happening next year!
I apologise wholeheartedly for any moral superiority or condescension. I would never try to do such a thing.

Life is too short to argue about stoves. Choose what you like. But the Trangia is better, both from an environmental standpoint, not leaving so many empty canisters and compact footprint. I love mine. One year, when I was in my twenties, it provided most of my meals for about 30,000 miles of cycle touring (the year I spent six full months riding round Europe!). Add to that countless other trips.

Not bad for something that cost £10 at an army surplus shop!
 
Last edited:

HedaP

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances starting SJPdP Sept/Oct 2015, April/May 2017
Last year walked some time with a truly delightful young fellow doing the Camino Frances on a shoe string with a tent and carrying a guitar in his right hand. My conversational opener was “You must like music!”. Once while I was having a rest break he cooked his lunch. He found three smallish flat stones. He placed them on a large slab of stone. He built up a tiny fire of sticks and twigs and kindling. Lit it. Put a small saucepan on top and cooked his simple lunch from scratch. Keep in mind this was in very early spring and there was absolutely no risk of causing a bush fire. Because of living in rural AustralIa, this risk is the first thing I think of when anyone talks about open flames on the camino. No matter what stove you use, please be careful if walking in summer.:)
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
I apologise wholeheartedly for any moral superiority or condescension. I would never try to do such a thing.
Ok.

Life is too short to argue about stoves. Choose what you like. But the Trangia is better, both from an environmental standpoint, not leaving so many empty canisters and compact footprint. .....
I guess you really didn't mean your apology. :rolleyes:

:)There is nothing "better" about an alcohol stove, morally, environmentally, or otherwise. The fuel used is environmentally harmful. Alcohol stoves have been responsible for setting wildfires. The amount of fuel (plus the container that one needs to store the fuel) for a 7 day backpacking trip is heavier than the tiny stove that I use with its canister. And because you are morally opposed to plastic, according to your postings, then using a metal container for the fuel is even heavier than a plastic one. And is the fuel offered for sale in metal containers?

We could also talk about how inefficient an alcohol stove is, as can be seen in how long it takes to bring a liter of water to boil. More fuel, more environmental harm. Above 6,000 feet in a snow camp, I know which stove is going to be able to melt snow in sufficient quantity without gobbling up a ton of fuel and needing to wait forever doing so.

Each type of stove has its merits. Nobody's choice is morally superior.

I think that perhaps one of the moderators should close this thread. It has become far too contentious.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
As someone whose cooking gear on the Camino is limited to an electric coil, I never took a look at this thread till it was suggested that it might be going downhill. We haven’t had too many “gear food fights” lately, but maybe it’s cabin fever in a dreary winter. I will not close it yet but hope people can get back on track and play nice.
 

grayland

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Yes
As peregrina2000 reminds us above....arguments and insults over one's personal opinions of gear are very annoying to others who are interested in the topic.
Please take your discussion to Private Conversation so this thread can remain open to those who are interested in the subject.

Thanks for your cooperation.
 

cd667

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
It's happening next year!
I am completely mystified as to why anyone took umbrage at anything. But that's fine. See you on the trail, maybe.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Portuguese (2018)
We are looking very hard at the Via Francigena di San Francesco, but may end up on our fallback the Portuguese. No decisions yet, my partner has a healing injury so we have time.
 

Becky 59

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances May 2018
My canister stove fits inside my mug, which, together with my spork, make up my cooking gear... not bulky one bit :) As to a countryside filled with gas canisters, I collapse mine (a tiny tool to do that) and pack mine out. Never saw a mess on any trails I've been on, except at a trailhead with trash cans overflowing. I'd love to see a picture of canisters filling the countryside :)

Additionally, many US Forest areas and National Wilderness areas prohibit alcohol based stoves (and wood burners, too) during late spring and summer dry seasons when open fires are banned. Stoves are required to have an on and off valve.

I've used alcohol stoves, and they work well, but they do have their own inherent limits and problems. ;)
What kind of stove is that? Or, how big is your mug?!:p
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
The mug is a titanium Toaks 600 ml https://www.toaksoutdoor.com/products/pot-600?variant=32251291590

The stove is a Kovea Supalite https://www.campsaver.com/kovea-supalite-titanium-stove.html?_iv_code=Y22-CMS-KOV0003&gclid=Cj0KCQjw1q3VBRCFARIsAPHJXrG4paOaW0MxnxBJQPfXrI8j3O69cnawZnD6Qmu4LsUYvsDGo1Ob69kaAiFMEALw_wcB

The canister of fuel I typically use is the MSR Isobutane 4 ounce size. It will last me a good ten days on the trail. All of my cooking and eating is done out of the mug :) https://www.amazon.com/Isopro-Canister-Fuel-4-Oz/dp/B00BN6UTQK/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&qid=1521233176&sr=8-6&keywords=msr+fuel+canister

Although this is not the stove (the Kovea is smaller) or canister of fuel I use, this is what it looks like packed into my mug.

1521233451082.png
 

MichelleElynHogan

Veteran Member
https://www.amazon.com/Bushcraft-Essentials-FBA_BCE-001-Bushbox-Outdoor/dp/B00CMQJW0E/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1517932387&sr=8-1&keywords=bushbox+stove[/QUOTE]

Great care must be taken with open flame. In Summer of 2016, no stoves or fires were allowed. And remember last Summer in Portugal? Far too many fires, lost of life, property. It may be wise to consider finding out the conditions where you will be walking. If they have an outright ban in place, traditional camp cooking will likely not be allowed.

Sorry for the bummer but better safe than sorry.
 

Becky 59

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances May 2018
@davebugg: I'm impressed, the picture is great. I'll be traveling with a 400ml titanium mug (a little smaller), and do the cooking in the alberges.
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
@davebugg: I'm impressed, the picture is great. I'll be traveling with a 400ml titanium mug (a little smaller), and do the cooking in the alberges.
Since it weighs about as much as a balloon full of air, why not? :)
 

OLDER threads on this topic


Book your lodging here

Booking.com



Advertisement

Booking.com

Latest posts

Most downloaded Resources

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store

Casa Ivar Newsletter

Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 12 1.3%
  • February

    Votes: 5 0.6%
  • March

    Votes: 40 4.5%
  • April

    Votes: 136 15.2%
  • May

    Votes: 222 24.8%
  • June

    Votes: 65 7.3%
  • July

    Votes: 17 1.9%
  • August

    Votes: 13 1.5%
  • September

    Votes: 260 29.1%
  • October

    Votes: 107 12.0%
  • November

    Votes: 12 1.3%
  • December

    Votes: 5 0.6%
Top