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How-to guide to the Le Puy route

2020 Camino Guides

andycohn

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF (12-15); Muxia (15); Portuguese, Primitivo (17); Norte, Ingles, VF partial (18), Le Puy (19)
My wife and I just returned from doing the Le Puy route in France. We loved it, but it was much different from the Spanish caminos. Before we went, I couldn't find any one source that described the route in general, accommodations, food, internal transportation, making reservations, etc. -- all the little things that are useful to know before setting out -- so I wrote something up when we returned. It's not a step by step guide, or a bunch of recommendations, but more of a logistics guide to how to do the route. Beyond a general introduction to the route itself and a description of the terrain, here's the topics covered:

Route-finding
Guidebooks
Accommodations
Food
Winging it or making reservations
Your fellow travelers, the social thing, and the language barrier.
Money
Lunch stops, rest days, and potty breaks
Baggage and personal transport
Getting from place to place and to your start and end points
When to go.

It is attached, if anyone is interested. If you read it, all comments, suggestions, corrections, disagreements, and further questions are welcome.

Ultreia!

(After I wrote this, Chloe Rose's post and previous guidebook dated August, 17, 2016 popped up under "Older Threads on this Topic." I hadn't seen it before, and it's very nicely done).
 

Attachments

Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
September/October 2015 CF; October 2017 PC from Porto; Camino Ingles October 2019; Le Puy (2020)
My wife and I just returned from doing the Le Puy route in France. We loved it, but it was much different from the Spanish caminos. Before we went, I couldn't find any one source that described the route in general, accommodations, food, internal transportation, making reservations, etc. -- all the little things that are useful to know before setting out -- so I wrote something up when we returned. It's not a step by step guide, or a bunch of recommendations, but more of a logistics guide to how to do the route. Beyond a general introduction to the route itself and a description of the terrain, here's the topics covered:

Route-finding
Guidebooks
Accommodations
Food
Winging it or making reservations
Your fellow travelers, the social thing, and the language barrier.
Money
Lunch stops, rest days, and potty breaks
Baggage and personal transport
Getting from place to place and to your start and end points
When to go.

It is attached, if anyone is interested. If you read it, all comments, suggestions, corrections, disagreements, and further questions are welcome.

Ultreia!

(After I wrote this, Chloe Rose's post and previous guidebook dated August, 17, 2016 popped up under "Older Threads on this Topic." I hadn't seen it before, and it's very nicely done).
Thank you! This couldn’t have been more timely. I’m just starting to consider the Le Puy route for my next Camino.
 

Kitsambler

Jakobsweg Junkie
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy 2010-11, Prague 2012, Nuremberg 2013, Einsiedeln 2015, Geneva 2017-19
Nice piece! You've answered many of the questions that prospective Le Puy walkers ask repeatedly on this forum.
Route-finding
I used the IPhiGenie app this year, the paid version which has detail down to the 166m scale. Absolutely invaluable and covers all the GR routes in France. Especially useful when, as you suggest, checking alternative routes for "cutting the corners" of those walk-around-three-sides-of-the-square sections.
 

Felice

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP to Santiago Sept 2014
I agree with almost everything that you have written, Andy. My only disagreement is over bed bugs! We woke in our gîte in Saugues to find the b*****s in our beds and under our pillows.

I walked the route in 3 stretches - Le Puy to Conques with my daughter last Sept, then Conques to Moissac in May this year and Moissac to SJPP in Sept, both times on my own. My French is more than adequate for practical purposes, but I can only hold a disjointed conversation. And therein lies my problem. For the first week this Sept, there were no Anglophone walkers and it was tough. At some evening meals, people would graciously speak slowly and clearly, to help me take part, but at other times, I was rapidly excluded and would end up eating my meal in silence, trying to pick out a word here and there - something which is hard when you are tired and hungry. On those occasions I would much rather have had a meal in a restaurant and read a book.

If your French is poor, I would advise you to think carefully before you walk on your own. Can you take the lack of conversation?
 

andycohn

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF (12-15); Muxia (15); Portuguese, Primitivo (17); Norte, Ingles, VF partial (18), Le Puy (19)
I agree with almost everything that you have written, Andy. My only disagreement is over bed bugs! We woke in our gîte in Saugues to find the b*****s in our beds and under our pillows.

I walked the route in 3 stretches - Le Puy to Conques with my daughter last Sept, then Conques to Moissac in May this year and Moissac to SJPP in Sept, both times on my own. My French is more than adequate for practical purposes, but I can only hold a disjointed conversation. And therein lies my problem. For the first week this Sept, there were no Anglophone walkers and it was tough. At some evening meals, people would graciously speak slowly and clearly, to help me take part, but at other times, I was rapidly excluded and would end up eating my meal in silence, trying to pick out a word here and there - something which is hard when you are tired and hungry. On those occasions I would much rather have had a meal in a restaurant and read a book.

If your French is poor, I would advise you to think carefully before you walk on your own. Can you take the lack of conversation?
What can I say? Doo-doo happens, and bedbugs, too, no matter where you are. But still, the French were much more proactive about them than the Spanish, and unlike in Spain, we met up with no one who had a begbug problem.

Agree with you on the language barrier. My French seems to be about the level of yours, and we also found it the hardest the first week. Seemed like only French in the beginning, then more English speakers after that. However, we were with some friends for the first two weeks, so we didn't feel completely alone, and when they left to go back to work, we started meeting more Americans and other English speakers.
 
Last edited:

MikeJS

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francis (2011), Norte (12), VdlP (16). Sureste/Invierno (17). Olvidado/San Salvador/Primitivo (19)
My wife and I just returned from doing the Le Puy route in France. We loved it, but it was much different from the Spanish caminos. Before we went, I couldn't find any one source that described the route in general, accommodations, food, internal transportation, making reservations, etc. -- all the little things that are useful to know before setting out -- so I wrote something up when we returned. It's not a step by step guide, or a bunch of recommendations, but more of a logistics guide to how to do the route. Beyond a general introduction to the route itself and a description of the terrain, here's the topics covered:

Route-finding
Guidebooks
Accommodations
Food
Winging it or making reservations
Your fellow travelers, the social thing, and the language barrier.
Money
Lunch stops, rest days, and potty breaks
Baggage and personal transport
Getting from place to place and to your start and end points
When to go.

It is attached, if anyone is interested. If you read it, all comments, suggestions, corrections, disagreements, and further questions are welcome.

Ultreia!

(After I wrote this, Chloe Rose's post and previous guidebook dated August, 17, 2016 popped up under "Older Threads on this Topic." I hadn't seen it before, and it's very nicely done).
Great info. However, I do not recognise your rather disparaging remarks about the food and hosts in Spain. I have never met a surly host in all of my caminos, and in fact have mostly found my spanish hosts to be very helpful. I have had some rather simple meals but then for 8 euros inc wine why would I expect better?
 

Hansel

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances and Fisterre (2018,08) ,Camino Primitivo, and Fisterre,(2019,04)
My wife and I just returned from doing the Le Puy route in France. We loved it, but it was much different from the Spanish caminos. Before we went, I couldn't find any one source that described the route in general, accommodations, food, internal transportation, making reservations, etc. -- all the little things that are useful to know before setting out -- so I wrote something up when we returned. It's not a step by step guide, or a bunch of recommendations, but more of a logistics guide to how to do the route. Beyond a general introduction to the route itself and a description of the terrain, here's the topics covered:

Route-finding
Guidebooks
Accommodations
Food
Winging it or making reservations
Your fellow travelers, the social thing, and the language barrier.
Money
Lunch stops, rest days, and potty breaks
Baggage and personal transport
Getting from place to place and to your start and end points
When to go.

It is attached, if anyone is interested. If you read it, all comments, suggestions, corrections, disagreements, and further questions are welcome.

Ultreia!

(After I wrote this, Chloe Rose's post and previous guidebook dated August, 17, 2016 popped up under "Older Threads on this Topic." I hadn't seen it before, and it's very nicely done).
Good read Andy, I was walking in Portugal about the same time as you and your wife were walking in France, I started at Azambuja, and walked to Tui, so I still have the Portuguese to finish, but I'm very tempted to head to Le Puy instead, but most likely it will be as well, :)
Bill
 

Hansel

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances and Fisterre (2018,08) ,Camino Primitivo, and Fisterre,(2019,04)
I agree with almost everything that you have written, Andy. My only disagreement is over bed bugs! We woke in our gîte in Saugues to find the b*****s in our beds and under our pillows.

I walked the route in 3 stretches - Le Puy to Conques with my daughter last Sept, then Conques to Moissac in May this year and Moissac to SJPP in Sept, both times on my own. My French is more than adequate for practical purposes, but I can only hold a disjointed conversation. And therein lies my problem. For the first week this Sept, there were no Anglophone walkers and it was tough. At some evening meals, people would graciously speak slowly and clearly, to help me take part, but at other times, I was rapidly excluded and would end up eating my meal in silence, trying to pick out a word here and there - something which is hard when you are tired and hungry. On those occasions I would much rather have had a meal in a restaurant and read a book.

If your French is poor, I would advise you to think carefully before you walk on your own. Can you take the lack of conversation?
Hi Felice,
I am looking at walking from Le Puy in two or three stints like you did, I maybe need to talk my daughter into walking with me, being Billy no mates at dinner is no fun, thanks for adding your reply,
How was the weather, in May and September ?
Bill
 

Kitsambler

Jakobsweg Junkie
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy 2010-11, Prague 2012, Nuremberg 2013, Einsiedeln 2015, Geneva 2017-19
If your French is poor, I would advise you to think carefully before you walk on your own. Can you take the lack of conversation?
My French is poorer than yours, yet I've managed to walk solo in France for five years. About a quarter of the MMDD lodging listings indicate English spoken there. The English speakers (that would be the Swiss, the Germans, the Dutch ... everyone but the French) seek these out, so they fill up fast. If walking during the high-season months of May and September, it pays to book by email weeks in advance.
 

billmclaughlin

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP/Burgos 2012; Le Puy/SJPP 2013; Aumont Aubrac/Aire sur l'Adour 2014; Burgos/Santiago 2016.
Thanks for this brilliant writeup! Laughed out loud a few times.

Notes:
I found the Miam Miam Dodo app easier to work with than you. Definitely found the way to get a list of accommodations in just one town or section of the route.
Never had a problem finding a store open when I needed it, but I may just buy ahead by nature so I’m less likely to be caught short.
Agree about Conques: it’s the SJPP of France.
I also visited Rocamadour from Figeac and I’m surprised the the walk was 4 km. Maybe because it felt like a walk in the park after a half-day’s rest and terrain was the easiest.

Thanks again.
Bill
 

HelenRose

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Walked Frances in 2017 including to Fisterre and Muxia. Planning for 2019 beginning in Lourdes.
Read your information with great interest as currently planning our next Camino walk, after walking the Frances twice. Thank you for making it available to all.
 

Gary Maddock-Greene

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portuges Coastal (2019)
Camino de Le Puy (2020)
A great read Andy. Thanks for your insight. We're looking to walk the Le Puy route next year having done the Camino Portugues this year.
 

lindam

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Via de La Plata, Portuguese, Camino Ingles, Fisterra, Muxia, Catalan and Aragones, Norte
Thank you, andycohn, for writing this very informative report. It provides much food for thought. I have always shied away from walking Caminos outside the Iberian peninsula. I now have many reasons to reconsider walking the Le Puy route.
 

KJFSophie

My Way, With Joy !
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2014 & 2015 ),Via San Francesco, Italy (2017 )Camino Portugese (2018 )Camino Ingles(
My wife and I just returned from doing the Le Puy route in France. We loved it, but it was much different from the Spanish caminos. Before we went, I couldn't find any one source that described the route in general, accommodations, food, internal transportation, making reservations, etc. -- all the little things that are useful to know before setting out -- so I wrote something up when we returned. It's not a step by step guide, or a bunch of recommendations, but more of a logistics guide to how to do the route. Beyond a general introduction to the route itself and a description of the terrain, here's the topics covered:

Route-finding
Guidebooks
Accommodations
Food
Winging it or making reservations
Your fellow travelers, the social thing, and the language barrier.
Money
Lunch stops, rest days, and potty breaks
Baggage and personal transport
Getting from place to place and to your start and end points
When to go.

It is attached, if anyone is interested. If you read it, all comments, suggestions, corrections, disagreements, and further questions are welcome.

Ultreia!

(After I wrote this, Chloe Rose's post and previous guidebook dated August, 17, 2016 popped up under "Older Threads on this Topic." I hadn't seen it before, and it's very nicely done).
MERCI ! I love this and welcome your honest, well written, passionate post.
I am considering ( well, more than considering ) Geneva to LePuy for Sept of 2020, then LePuy to StJPP 2021. Though your write up doesn't directly speak to my closer trek from Geneva, it more or less confirms some of my impressions through research for France in general. I thank you.
Ultreia!
 
Camino(s) past & future
September/October 2015 CF; October 2017 PC from Porto; Camino Ingles October 2019; Le Puy (2020)
My wife and I just returned from doing the Le Puy route in France. We loved it, but it was much different from the Spanish caminos. Before we went, I couldn't find any one source that described the route in general, accommodations, food, internal transportation, making reservations, etc. -- all the little things that are useful to know before setting out -- so I wrote something up when we returned. It's not a step by step guide, or a bunch of recommendations, but more of a logistics guide to how to do the route. Beyond a general introduction to the route itself and a description of the terrain, here's the topics covered:

Route-finding
Guidebooks
Accommodations
Food
Winging it or making reservations
Your fellow travelers, the social thing, and the language barrier.
Money
Lunch stops, rest days, and potty breaks
Baggage and personal transport
Getting from place to place and to your start and end points
When to go.

It is attached, if anyone is interested. If you read it, all comments, suggestions, corrections, disagreements, and further questions are welcome.

Ultreia!

(After I wrote this, Chloe Rose's post and previous guidebook dated August, 17, 2016 popped up under "Older Threads on this Topic." I hadn't seen it before, and it's very nicely done).
Your guide is very, very helpful, but as I begin to dream of walking the Le Puy route, one question is niggling in the back of my mind. As background, I'm 77 and have walked the Frances, Portuguese and (just this fall) Ingles Camino, as well as out to Finisterre twice. And last year I walked the Wainwright Coast to Coast walk in northern England. I do fine with climbs and descents (there were plenty of those on the Ingles), and as long as I have my walking poles and keep my distance daily between 15 to 20 km, leaning toward the lesser number, I do fine. My problem is a phobia with "edges", or paths so steep as to require "scrambling". After the C2C walk, I vowed never again to put myself in that sort of situation, which leads to a panic attack. So my question is whether the difficulty of the Le Puy route involves either walking along edges or scrambling. If not, I'm all in. I love France and would rejoice in the chance to spend weeks there walking, eating French food, using the French that I know, and meeting other pilgrims, French and otherwise.
 

andycohn

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF (12-15); Muxia (15); Portuguese, Primitivo (17); Norte, Ingles, VF partial (18), Le Puy (19)
Your guide is very, very helpful, but as I begin to dream of walking the Le Puy route, one question is niggling in the back of my mind. As background, I'm 77 and have walked the Frances, Portuguese and (just this fall) Ingles Camino, as well as out to Finisterre twice. And last year I walked the Wainwright Coast to Coast walk in northern England. I do fine with climbs and descents (there were plenty of those on the Ingles), and as long as I have my walking poles and keep my distance daily between 15 to 20 km, leaning toward the lesser number, I do fine. My problem is a phobia with "edges", or paths so steep as to require "scrambling". After the C2C walk, I vowed never again to put myself in that sort of situation, which leads to a panic attack. So my question is whether the difficulty of the Le Puy route involves either walking along edges or scrambling. If not, I'm all in. I love France and would rejoice in the chance to spend weeks there walking, eating French food, using the French that I know, and meeting other pilgrims, French and otherwise.
Don’t worry! If you’ve done the Coast to Coast (we did it in the spring ourselves) the Le Puy route will not present any challenges. There is nothing remotely like Striding Edge, or any place where you’re on a path so steep as to require scrambling. There are plenty of sections, especially in the first 10 days or so, where the trail is steep and rocky (more so than the caminos you mention in Spain), but nothing that presents any kind of unusual challenge, or is scary, or that approaches technical climbing. Nor will the climbing be as sustained as were those first few days through the Lake Country. Basically, you’ll recognize it more like a Spanish / Portuguese camino than you will the Coast to Coast. Just expect a few sections like the climb through the woods out of Ponte de Lima on the Portuguese, or the descent into Roncesvalles on the Frances.
 
Camino(s) past & future
September/October 2015 CF; October 2017 PC from Porto; Camino Ingles October 2019; Le Puy (2020)
Don’t worry! If you’ve done the Coast to Coast (we did it in the spring ourselves) the Le Puy route will not present any challenges. There is nothing remotely like Striding Edge, or any place where you’re on a path so steep as to require scrambling. There are plenty of sections, especially in the first 10 days or so, where the trail is steep and rocky (more so than the caminos you mention in Spain), but nothing that presents any kind of unusual challenge, or is scary, or that approaches technical climbing. Nor will the climbing be as sustained as were those first few days through the Lake Country. Basically, you’ll recognize it more like a Spanish / Portuguese camino than you will the Coast to Coast. Just expect a few sections like the climb through the woods out of Ponte de Lima on the Portuguese, or the descent into Roncesvalles on the Frances.
Thank you so much! Do you think it's safe for someone my age to do alone? I walked the Frances solo in 2015, but I had a companion on the Coast to Coast (10 years younger than me). I could never have done that on my own. There were places where my walking companion took my hand and helped me up treacherous spots. When I say safe, I'm referring to the walking/climbing part of it. I'd very much like to walk solo again.
 

andycohn

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF (12-15); Muxia (15); Portuguese, Primitivo (17); Norte, Ingles, VF partial (18), Le Puy (19)
Don’t worry! If you’ve done the Coast to Coast (we did it in the spring ourselves) the Le Puy route will not present any challenges. There is nothing remotely like Striding Edge, or any place where you’re on a path so steep as to require scrambling. There are plenty of sections, especially in the first 10 days or so, where the trail is steep and rocky (more so than the caminos you mention in Spain), but nothing that presents any kind of unusual challenge, or is scary, or that approaches technical climbing. Nor will the climbing be as sustained as were those first few days through the Lake Country. Basically, you’ll recognize it more like a Spanish / Portuguese camino than you will the Coast to Coast. Just expect a few sections like the climb through the woods out of Ponte de Lima on the Portuguese, or the descent into Roncesvalles on the Frances.
Of course, I have no personal experience of being a woman and walking alone, but we certainly saw (and talked with) plenty of women walking alone, and none ever expressed any fear. Crime in rural France, certainly violent crime of any sort, seems a non-issue. I’ve occasionally read posts on the Camino Forum of women being hassled in Spain, but have not read similar posts about France. Since the whole experience in France feels more personal than in Spain (a broad generalization, I know) I actually think you'd find a lot of support in Frances for what you’re doing. Depending on when you go, of course, you’ll find less people on the trail, especially compared to the Frances or Portuguese. More like the Ingles, but more rural overall.
 
Camino(s) past & future
September/October 2015 CF; October 2017 PC from Porto; Camino Ingles October 2019; Le Puy (2020)
Of course, I have no personal experience of being a woman and walking alone, but we certainly saw (and talked with) plenty of women walking alone, and none ever expressed any fear. Crime in rural France, certainly violent crime of any sort, seems a non-issue. I’ve occasionally read posts on the Camino Forum of women being hassled in Spain, but have not read similar posts about France. Since the whole experience in France feels more personal than in Spain (a broad generalization, I know) I actually think you'd find a lot of support in Frances for what you’re doing. Depending on when you go, of course, you’ll find less people on the trail, especially compared to the Frances or Portuguese. More like the Ingles, but more rural overall.
It's not crime that I was referring to when I asked about being safe. I'm not at all concerned about that. I'm talking about the terrain. For example, on the walk to Finisterre last month, I had to cross a narrow log bridge with no railing, over a rushing stream. I was terrified and didn't think I could do it, because of my phobia, when another pilgrim came up behind me, put her hands on my backpack and told me that she wouldn't let me fall, allowing me to cross the bridge. I want to avoid that kind of situation, if at all possible. Crossing countless rushing streams on rocks on the Coast to Coast wasn't a problem, but on places where the trail was too steep to use my hiking poles, I was afraid of falling backwards. Does that make sense? I'm not proud of my fears, but there they are. Again, I can handle steep ascents and descents, as long as they are manageable with my hiking poles. Thank you so much for considering my concerns.
 

KJFSophie

My Way, With Joy !
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2014 & 2015 ),Via San Francesco, Italy (2017 )Camino Portugese (2018 )Camino Ingles(
Thank you so much! Do you think it's safe for someone my age to do alone? I walked the Frances solo in 2015, but I had a companion on the Coast to Coast (10 years younger than me). I could never have done that on my own. There were places where my walking companion took my hand and helped me up treacherous spots. When I say safe, I'm referring to the walking/climbing part of it. I'd very much like to walk solo again.
Pretty sure I'm not going to let you walk alone...lol ( though I've no doubt you're capable! )
 

andycohn

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF (12-15); Muxia (15); Portuguese, Primitivo (17); Norte, Ingles, VF partial (18), Le Puy (19)
It's not crime that I was referring to when I asked about being safe. I'm not at all concerned about that. I'm talking about the terrain. For example, on the walk to Finisterre last month, I had to cross a narrow log bridge with no railing, over a rushing stream. I was terrified and didn't think I could do it, because of my phobia, when another pilgrim came up behind me, put her hands on my backpack and told me that she wouldn't let me fall, allowing me to cross the bridge. I want to avoid that kind of situation, if at all possible. Crossing countless rushing streams on rocks on the Coast to Coast wasn't a problem, but on places where the trail was too steep to use my hiking poles, I was afraid of falling backwards. Does that make sense? I'm not proud of my fears, but there they are. Again, I can handle steep ascents and descents, as long as they are manageable with my hiking poles. Thank you so much for considering my concerns.
I can’t remember any times on the trail where it was so steep that my wife and I couldn’t use hiking poles, or that we worried about falling over. They were just stiff uphill climbs, tiring sometimes but not dangerous. Nor do I rememmber crossing any narrow bridges over rushing (or any kind of) stream. There were bridges, and there were streams, but nothing that should induce fear at all. Of course, I’m not you and I know nothing of your experiences, so I can only talk about what my wife and I experienced.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
Your guide is very, very helpful, but as I begin to dream of walking the Le Puy route, one question is niggling in the back of my mind. As background, I'm 77 and have walked the Frances, Portuguese and (just this fall) Ingles Camino, as well as out to Finisterre twice. And last year I walked the Wainwright Coast to Coast walk in northern England. I do fine with climbs and descents (there were plenty of those on the Ingles), and as long as I have my walking poles and keep my distance daily between 15 to 20 km, leaning toward the lesser number, I do fine. My problem is a phobia with "edges", or paths so steep as to require "scrambling". After the C2C walk, I vowed never again to put myself in that sort of situation, which leads to a panic attack. So my question is whether the difficulty of the Le Puy route involves either walking along edges or scrambling. If not, I'm all in. I love France and would rejoice in the chance to spend weeks there walking, eating French food, using the French that I know, and meeting other pilgrims, French and otherwise.
Hello, Singingheart,
I walked Le Puy to Auvillar in June of 2018. I too, have a fear of being near ledges, heights, drop offs, etc. I recall none of those things on the beautiful Le Puy route. It has some rather difficult ups and downs, but no cliffs of any kind that I recall. I hear the route flattens out after Auvillar so don't imagine there would be concerns for the remainder of the way.
 
Camino(s) past & future
September/October 2015 CF; October 2017 PC from Porto; Camino Ingles October 2019; Le Puy (2020)
I can’t remember any times on the trail where it was so steep that my wife and I couldn’t use hiking poles, or that we worried about falling over. They were just stiff uphill climbs, tiring sometimes but not dangerous. Nor do I rememmber crossing any narrow bridges over rushing (or any kind of) stream. There were bridges, and there were streams, but nothing that should induce fear at all. Of course, I’m not you and I know nothing of your experiences, so I can only talk about what my wife and I experienced.
Many thanks. That sounds doable then.😊 Challenging but rewarding for having met the challenge. I do appreciate your input, and I
Hello, Singingheart,
I walked Le Puy to Auvillar in June of 2018. I too, have a fear of being near ledges, heights, drop offs, etc. I recall none of those things on the beautiful Le Puy route. It has some rather difficult ups and downs, but no cliffs of any kind that I recall. I hear the route flattens out after Auvillar so don't imagine there would be concerns for the remainder of the way.
I can't tell you how much that relieves me. Thank you so much!!!! I'm already in love with walking this route and would be crushed to be deterred by my fears. Part of the joy of walking Caminos for me is doing something that I would never have thought possible, especially at my age. It's incredibly empowering. Thank you again! Now I have to decide when to do it. I prefer autumn walks.
 

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