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internet access

#1
In 2001 the internet access along the Camino was Ok in places and not so good in others. Any recent take on the availability of good cafe's or other sites?

I'd like to blog back to some friends while walking and wonder how challenging it's going to be. I especially remember being in a really small town and joking to the person running the hostel figuring there was no way I was going to find a cafe in that town only to discover that they did indeed have a very nice site about 2 blocks away! Another time when it's good not to assume your inclinations are correct!
 

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sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#2
Last year almost every second place had internet - either in the albergue or the cafe bar. In the albergues some a free with a time limit - and some you put a coin in the slot. Most of the cafe bars are either 'slot-machine' or pay at the bar.
You won't have a problem keeping your blog going or mailing home.
 

vinotinto

Active Member
#5
frmikeminn said:
Any recent take on the availability of good cafe's or other sites?
At the beginning of my trek (St. Jean), I noticed a number of coin-operated internet terminals, some of them encased in 80s-style video game cabinets with no exposed ports. Some albergues had one or two, others had none. In smaller towns, you might find one in a bar or cafe.

The cost varied - some were spendier than others - 1 euro for 15 minutes was probably average for those, although I saw better deals here and there. And on some, pop-ups were blocked, so I couldn't access my work email, which relies on a login/password authentication window. Hotmail worked fine, though.

As I went on, exposed computers (no cabinet) at bars and cafes became more common, although they tended to be coin operated as well. The bigger cities had internet cafes that were fairly inexpensive, with exposed computers that may or may not accept a USB drive or USB camera connection for photo/document access. I never tried the library thing, though - that angle seems worth exploring.

Galicia seemed to be hit and miss for connectivity, similar to the meseta. A lightning storm knocked out all internet access in Rabanal during my time there (at least in the bars), but I was able to get slow wireless access on a laptop in the monastery (it belonged to a volunteer). I found one internet cafe in Santiago, and I'm sure there are more.

In all, I was able to access the internet pretty much at will, with reasonable speed and at a bearable cost. Emails were a good way to supplement my journal - just make sure you set your email software to save sent emails... :arrow:
 

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EvaF

New Member
#6
We are trying to plan our 3rd Camino this summer and it seems all odds are against us right now. I've been following the thread on taking babies along and that part seems challenging but doable and rewarding (our daughter is 13 months). The other big challenge is that I am teaching an online course for a University in the U.S. I am required to sign on every 2 days minimum. I usually have to spend around 3 hours on to reply to student posts, check email, and etc. So I would need reliable access to the internet. It seems that there would be places but that time limits would be imposed? Any advice?
Thank you,
Eva
 
#7
bring a phone/tablet/netbook along with you so you don't have to rely on other people's equipment. wifi should be pretty easy to find but a computer you can use for a few hours at a time without causing problems would be more challenging. I too will have to work during my camino but I'm not too fussed about it.
 

EvaF

New Member
#8
Thank you vagabondette! We do have a tablet. We had issues signing in to the university's blackboard program but it looks like they may have ironed them out this month. I wish I was less "fussed" about it but between the work-work and the momma responsibilities I do find it challenging. My husband is nothing but supportive but at times our daughter is very specific about who she wants to meet her needs. LoL.
 
#9
EvaF said:
My husband is nothing but supportive but at times our daughter is very specific about who she wants to meet her needs. LoL.
lol...I definitely understand this. I spent the last 6 weeks of my best friend's pregnancy living with her, her husband and their 3-year old so I could help out with things while she was on bed rest. The 3-year old's screams of "noooooo!!!! not herrrrrrr!" still haunt me! ;)

I would do a test run with the tablet for a few weeks just to find out how it'll work for you. You'll probably want to also bring along a bluetooth keyboard if you'll be doing that much typing.
 
#10
How practical is it, really, to bring along a tablet or a laptop? I will admit to being supercnnected at me, with a laptop, an iPad, a Kindle... But I wondered about what the hiking conditions would do to sensitive electronics. I do plan to bring my unlocked iPhone 4S but I don't expect to be really able to do any serious writing or blogging from it.
 

sulu

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Ronces-SdC (03-04/10);Oporto-SdC (10/2011); VdlP via Portugal 03/04 2012/2013;Part Invierno 2012; Toulouse to Sarrance 2012; Ingles to Muxia June 2013 Cami Catala and Aragones 2014; El Salvador & Primitivo 2014; Camino de Madrid 2016; Levante 2015,2017
#11
How practical is it, really, to bring along a tablet or a laptop? I will admit to being supercnnected at me, with a laptop, an iPad, a Kindle... But I wondered about what the hiking conditions would do to sensitive electronics. I do plan to bring my unlocked iPhone 4S but I don't expect to be really able to do any serious writing or blogging from it.
Personaly I wouldn't bother. I did the Frances in 2010 and found I could access the internet fairly regularly, but it was March! On the VdlP this year I found that nearly all small towns have libraries with free access, you just have to compete with the local children! It is usually either the library or he Casa de la Cultura. But, in 2010, I met a Korean (very small) woman, in Santiago, who had carried a large video camera, a laptop and, God knows what else in the way of electronic equipment, she had obviously been doing a documentary. It is surprising what people can carry if they are determined :)
 
#12
BoldenMD said:
How practical is it, really, to bring along a tablet or a laptop? I will admit to being supercnnected at me, with a laptop, an iPad, a Kindle... But I wondered about what the hiking conditions would do to sensitive electronics. I do plan to bring my unlocked iPhone 4S but I don't expect to be really able to do any serious writing or blogging from it.
Sometimes it's not about practicality but rather necessity. If it's not necessary to do serious writing while on the camino, I would not bring a laptop as your iphone will be able to do pretty much everything. However, some people will be required to have better access than a smart phone will allow.

Personally, I'm doing my best to NOT bring my laptop but I might not have a choice. It'll all come down to whether or not my friend comes to meet me after the camino. If she does, I'll have her bring my laptop. If she doesn't I'll have to carry it on the camino as I'll need it for my extended after-trip. I'm not really worried about it being damaged. I travel with my electronics all the time and just take some standard precautions. It's one reason I use netbooks (aside from size) as they only cost about $300 so if I kill it while traveling it isn't as much of a tragedy for me as it was for my friend when a glass of wine got spilled on his brand new $2k macbook.
 
#13
I just returned from the Camino. For the first time in my life, I traveled with a Smart Phone in order to keep in touch with the family back in the US. I had free wi-fi in more than half of the albergues. I'd say that there were fewer than half a dozen evenings that I did not have easy access to my email communication. I wonder what the pilgrims of five hundred years ago would think of that?!
 

Pieces

Veteran Member
#14
I find that one of the main attractions on my caminos is the rare pleasure of being unplugged. I really don't need to be online every day, if something important happens people have my number, as for the rest, I can't even be bothered to log in even if there is a free and available computer....

actually this is a general thing with me when i travel...
 

KiwiNomad06

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy-Santiago(2008) Cluny-Conques+prt CF(2012)
#15
I was interested by how quickly some things had changed in the four years between my walks on the Camino Frances, from 2008 to 2012. Now, wifi is readily available in most towns/villages along the Camino Frances (but by contrast was nearly non-existent between Cluny and Le Puy in France.) But the thing that amazed me the most this year was how common it was to see people hauling out an iPad to take photos/ write a blog with, as these are not really 'lightweight' in a walker's pack. The photos they were taking were not only 'instantly' able to be shared, but they also had very high resolution and detail.
Margaret
 
#16
Pieces wrote
I can't even be bothered to log in even if there is a free and available computer....

actually this is a general thing with me when i travel..
To each his or her own, why even bother by logging in to this forum to express your increasingly divisive and isolated view?

Margaret, in another four years the iPad type of tablets will get lighter; the photographic and video resolution will get sharper; the battery will last longer; wifi on the Camino will be even more prevalent and cheaper; nearly all overseas Camino walkers will carry and use either a tablet and/or a smartphone; but there will still be the odd anti-tech geek on this forum
 

dazzamac

Active Member
#17
BoldenMD said:
How practical is it, really, to bring along a tablet or a laptop?
It is as practical as you make it. While you should aim for 10kg as the maximum total weight, how you you make up those 10 kilos is entirely up to you. I brought 3kg of camera and related equipment with me, sacrificing other non-essentials instead. That said, my primary motivation for walking the first time was photography.

Whatever you bring, be prepared in case you lose or have it stolen. While theft is rare along the Camino, it does happen and high-value items like laptops and cameras are easy and profitable targets. So back-up files and as Vagabondette has suggested bring a cheaper laptop, one that you won't mind as much having to replace should anything happen it.
 

dazzamac

Active Member
#18
As a word of caution, I found the following on the PC world site:

Q. How can I secure my notebook at public Wi-Fi hotspots?
A. Since public hotspots generally don't use encryption, you should assume that anyone can see your Internet traffic unless you take precautions.

Make sure it's a legitimate hotspot: Nefarious types have been known to set up pirate routers with familiar SSID names like "wayport" or "t-mobile," and then use them to capture unsuspecting users' log-on information and other private data.
Verify that your PC's software firewall is turned on, and that Windows' file-sharing feature is off; it's off by default in Windows XP with Service Pack 2. To check this setting, open Control Panel and choose Windows Firewall (you may have to click Security Center first in XP or Security in Vista). In XP, select the Exceptions tab, and look in the Programs and Services to make sure "File and Printer Sharing" is unchecked. In Vista, click Change settings, then select the Exceptions tab and follow the instructions for XP.
Never send bank passwords, credit card numbers, confidential e-mail, or other sensitive data unless you're sure you're on a secure site: Look for the lock icon in the bottom-right corner of your browser, as well as a URL in the address bar that begins with https. Such sites build in their own encryption.
Always turn your Wi-Fi radio off when you're not at a hotspot: Hackers can use it to create peer-to-peer Wi-Fi connections with your computer and access it directly.
I'd suggest that anyone thinking of bringing a wifi enabled device should research how to make their device secure.
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
#19
Like a Rolex watch, an iPad will draw attention. I can visualize a wolf pack following someone who has displayed an iPad, just waiting for a chance to acquire it! An actual internet connection for an iPad will be rare. In the WiFi spots, it will work well. While I did not find many albergues with WiFi, bars, restaurants, and hostales regularly have it. Most of the time you will have to ask for the contrasena to sign in. An advantage of an iPhone is that you can carry it in an accessible pocket and check for WiFi at every coffee stop. An iPad in a pack will be much less accessible. Except for the screen size and keypad, the iPad is less convenient than an iPhone, and everyone has an iPhone, or similar device, so it is not really a magnet for crime.
 

sulu

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Ronces-SdC (03-04/10);Oporto-SdC (10/2011); VdlP via Portugal 03/04 2012/2013;Part Invierno 2012; Toulouse to Sarrance 2012; Ingles to Muxia June 2013 Cami Catala and Aragones 2014; El Salvador & Primitivo 2014; Camino de Madrid 2016; Levante 2015,2017
#20
To each his or her own, why even bother by logging in to this forum to express your increasingly divisive and isolated view?
Precisely, to each his own :?
I suspect that there are quite a few of us who log onto this forum who don't find a need to be carrying technology with us. The camino is a very personal thing, many of us are fortunate that we do not have the necessity to be constantly wired up, it does not take away our right to express an opinion :)
 
#21
falcon269 said:
Like a Rolex watch, an iPad will draw attention. I can visualize a wolf pack following someone who has displayed an iPad, just waiting for a chance to acquire it! An actual internet connection for an iPad will be rare. In the WiFi spots, it will work well. While I did not find many albergues with WiFi, bars, restaurants, and hostales regularly have it. Most of the time you will have to ask for the contrasena to sign in. An advantage of an iPhone is that you can carry it in an accessible pocket and check for WiFi at every coffee stop. An iPad in a pack will be much less accessible. Except for the screen size and keypad, the iPad is less convenient than an iPhone, and everyone has an iPhone, or similar device, so it is not really a magnet for crime.
I would agree with this. My friend has an iPad and whenever he pulls it out, the street kids just flock around him. These are the same street kids who regularly steal things like iphones and other quick to take technologies. iPads draw too much attention as they're still novel. A netbook draws much less attention, particularly if you junk it up. Mine is covered in stickers that I've picked up along the way which makes it look like an old POS and people don't even glance twice at it.
 

tyrrek

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-SdC (4-5/2011), Ferrol-SdC (9/2011), Pamplona-SdC (3-4/2012), Camino Finisterre (10/2012), Ourense-SdC (5/2014)
#22
NaKwendaSafari said:
Pieces wrote
I can't even be bothered to log in even if there is a free and available computer....

actually this is a general thing with me when i travel..
To each his or her own, why even bother by logging in to this forum to express your increasingly divisive and isolated view?
Am I reading this right? Isn't this forum all about sharing their views and experiences? Anyone who finds the use or non-use of computers (of all things) on the Camino as divisive and isolating doesn't really get it, in my opinion. Buen Camino! :?
 

sulu

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Ronces-SdC (03-04/10);Oporto-SdC (10/2011); VdlP via Portugal 03/04 2012/2013;Part Invierno 2012; Toulouse to Sarrance 2012; Ingles to Muxia June 2013 Cami Catala and Aragones 2014; El Salvador & Primitivo 2014; Camino de Madrid 2016; Levante 2015,2017
#23
NaKwendaSafari wrote:
Pieces wrote
I can't even be bothered to log in even if there is a free and available computer....

actually this is a general thing with me when i travel..

To each his or her own, why even bother by logging in to this forum to express your increasingly divisive and isolated view?

Am I reading this right? Isn't this forum all about sharing their views and experiences? Anyone who finds the use or non-use of computers (of all things) on the Camino as divisive and isolating doesn't really get it, in my opinion
I'm with you there Tyrrek, and with Pieces.
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
#24
why even bother by logging in to this forum to express your increasingly divisive and isolated view?
I cannot find that in any of Pieces' contributions. Do you have a specific example or complaint? Your statement is quite harsh if it is based solely on your general opinion. Your own words four years ago
You are sorely needed on this soapbox, too often this forum is unfortunately dominated by those intent on bragging about the way a "proper pilgrim" should do a pilgrimage.
Do you think now that Pieces should walk a "connected" pilgrimage so she is not isolated?
 
#25
Oy... It's always amazing to me what people get judgmental about. Everyone has opinions, that's a fact of life. And, I believe, stating those opinions is fine, as long as you do it respectfully and don't harp on it (which can be difficult and is something I know I have a problem with). But this whole "real pilgrim" thing is ridiculous. I get so sick of reading statements by people who are saying "if you do this, you're not a real pilgrim", "if you carry this, it's going to ruin your camino", "if you don't do this, you won't have a great experience". UGH! Quit with the judging!! What do you care how someone walks, what they do/don't carry or how connected they are/aren't? As long as they're not forcing YOU to do what they're doing it just shouldn't matter to you and it certainly shouldn't matter enough that you feel you need to insult the person. Telling anyone that if they don't do things the way you do them they'll have a worse experience than you had is just arrogant and offensive and man is it getting old. It happens from both camps and, IMO, people should just quit it. I'm certain that at least some of it is miscommunication/misinterpretation but there's enough of it going on that it's bothersome and I'm pretty sure almost everyone is guilty to some extent.

/rant
 

ArkBuilder

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Going on my first pilgrimage 9 SEP 14
#26
I just returned from the Camino. For the first time in my life, I traveled with a Smart Phone in order to keep in touch with the family back in the US. I had free wi-fi in more than half of the albergues. I'd say that there were fewer than half a dozen evenings that I did not have easy access to my email communication. I wonder what the pilgrims of five hundred years ago would think of that?!
Bikergal, what brand of Smart Phone did you take with you?

Six [6] months ago I purchased a Samsung Galaxy S 4 [ for 0.96 cents from Sam's Club ] and checked with Sprint. Sounds like if I do nothing, I can use the phone but it will be rather pricey.

If I get it "unlocked" [ which I will ] I can stop at Madrid-Barajas' Terminal T / Boarding area C at Chrystal Media Shop [CMS] and purchase a SIM card for use in Spain and France.

Not a "techie" so I am not comfortable with the latest technology [ actually, the older I get the more of a "technophobe" I become ] and hope they can provide some instruction at CMS.

Do you have any directions / instructions / how to get the phone working after I get the SIM card? I understand that my phone number will be changed during the use of this SIM card.

Thanks! Are you a "bikergal" from motorcycles OR bicycles? I own a Harley Fatboy Lo which is why I ask.

First time pilgrim.

Thanks again,

Noah
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances May -June 2014
#27
Hey Noah, Once you have Sprint's ok to unlock the phone, they will send you a code and set of instructions on how to unlock the phone. On my phone (t-mobile) the process is completed after the new SIM card is placed in the phone. It's a matter of keying in a set of numbers specific to your phone. Some companies will not unlock a phone for a period of after you initially sign up with their service. Also, with my t-mobile phone it took a little time, and a couple of emails back and forth to get the unlock codes and the instructions. I tell you this in case it's the same with Sprint, that it doesn't happen instantaneously. Pennie
 

ArkBuilder

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Going on my first pilgrimage 9 SEP 14
#28
Hey Noah, Once you have Sprint's ok to unlock the phone, they will send you a code and set of instructions on how to unlock the phone. On my phone (t-mobile) the process is completed after the new SIM card is placed in the phone. It's a matter of keying in a set of numbers specific to your phone. Some companies will not unlock a phone for a period of after you initially sign up with their service. Also, with my t-mobile phone it took a little time, and a couple of emails back and forth to get the unlock codes and the instructions. I tell you this in case it's the same with Sprint, that it doesn't happen instantaneously. Pennie
Thank you Pennie! I stopped by my local Sprint store and the young man there is astonishingly bright and helpful. I've been consulting with him since I initially purchased the phone [ see if this jibes with your experience ].

He, at first, said I could just go over and start using it. I asked if this wouldn't be a bit expensive and asked about the "locked / un-locked" phone situation as well as a SIM card. He immediately jumped to this scenario to help me with and stated that I could call Sprint Worldwide Services [ even gave me the number, bless his heart ] just before I left and they could un-lock my phone right there while on the phone with them.

I then chatted with a couple of different techs at Sprint Worldwide Services and they both related the same. "Buy a SIM card once I arrive in Madrid".

I also checked with folks here about where to buy a SIM card, not having done so before in Madrid [ was there in 2000 and Valencia ]. I googled these services as well as Madrid-Barajas Airport which gave me the Crystal Media Shop [ Terminal T 4 and Boarding area C ] and I reviewed their website and it "seems like" they may have what I need. This route was also allegedly a less expensive way to go.

I also learned [ if I got this correctly ] that I would have a different phone number and would be under the auspices of the local Spain provider during my tenure on Camino Frances. Upon my return I would have to switch back to my SIM card for Sprint.

I hope its not too complicated as you describe. As mentioned, I am not a "techie" and abhor technology unless a "3 year old" can operate the device.

Thank you again for sharing your experience. Its good to know.

¡Ultreia!

Noah
.
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
Frances May -June 2014
#29
Thank you Pennie! I stopped by my local Sprint store and the young man there is astonishingly bright and helpful. I've been consulting with him since I initially purchased the phone [ see if this jibes with your experience ].

He, at first, said I could just go over and start using it. I asked if this wouldn't be a bit expensive and asked about the "locked / un-locked" phone situation as well as a SIM card. He immediately jumped to this scenario to help me with and stated that I could call Sprint Worldwide Services [ even gave me the number, bless his heart ] just before I left and they could un-lock my phone right there while on the phone with them.

I then chatted with a couple of different techs at Sprint Worldwide Services and they both related the same. "Buy a SIM card once I arrive in Madrid".

I also checked with folks here about where to buy a SIM card, not having done so before in Madrid [ was there in 2000 and Valencia ]. I googled these services as well as Madrid-Barajas Airport which gave me the Chrystal Media Shop [ Terminal T and Boarding area C ] and I reviewed their website and it "seems like" they may have what I need. This route was also allegedly a less expensive way to go.

I also learned [ if I got this correctly ] that I would have a different phone number and would be under the auspices of the local Spain provider during my tenure on Camino Frances. Upon my return I would have to switch back to my SIM card for Sprint.

I hope its not too complicated as you describe. As mentioned, I am not a "techie" and abhor technology unless a "3 year old" can operate the device.

Thank you again for sharing your experience. Its good to know.

¡Ultreia!

Noah
.
Yes, I understood I could use my phone as is but that that would be considerably more expensive than getting the SIM card over there. With the new SIM card it is my understanding too that we will have new spanish phone numbers. We need to be sure that we keep track of our American SIM card and don't lose it on our trips. I saw on another post you asked if the apps we've already downloaded on our phones would still be there. If you get an answer to that question, I would sure appreciate it if you would let me know. I'm curious about that too. Also, if I learn anything during my trip about any of this (I leave next week) I'll let you know. Pennie
 

ArkBuilder

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Going on my first pilgrimage 9 SEP 14
#30
Yes, I understood I could use my phone as is but that that would be considerably more expensive than getting the SIM card over there. With the new SIM card it is my understanding too that we will have new spanish phone numbers. We need to be sure that we keep track of our American SIM card and don't lose it on our trips. I saw on another post you asked if the apps we've already downloaded on our phones would still be there. If you get an answer to that question, I would sure appreciate it if you would let me know. I'm curious about that too. Also, if I learn anything during my trip about any of this (I leave next week) I'll let you know. Pennie
Thanks Pennie.

I will let you know if I hear back on the subjects of keeping / losing downloads.

¡Buen Camino!

Noah

.
 

Bill_R

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
July and August (2014)
#31
I just returned from the Camino. For the first time in my life, I traveled with a Smart Phone in order to keep in touch with the family back in the US. I had free wi-fi in more than half of the albergues. I'd say that there were fewer than half a dozen evenings that I did not have easy access to my email communication. I wonder what the pilgrims of five hundred years ago would think of that?!
My sons and I are bringing our smart phones and I was wanting to post pix along the way on Face Book. How difficult was it to charge you phone and was the international data charges overwhelming?

Thanks,
Bill
 

ArkBuilder

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Going on my first pilgrimage 9 SEP 14
#32
My sons and I are bringing our smart phones and I was wanting to post pix along the way on Face Book. How difficult was it to charge you phone and was the international data charges overwhelming?

Thanks,
Bill
Hi Bill.

I am a newbie but I have a Samsung Galaxy S 4 and planning to turn off my cell phone except for once a day or every other day texting to a few that will update my progress to others. This will be using my cell phone battery for only a few minutes a day.

Someone suggested to turn off the data push on my cell phone [ right now a number of times a day I get data from a bunch of places; in Spain, I would want to "fetch" only certain data so I will keep my data feature turned off and use only public libraries and cafes to check send emails.

You will keep your phone charged for a great deal longer as well as keeping the very expensive data feature to a minimum..

Hope this helps.

Noah from Indiana [ leaving for Camino Frances 9 SEP 14 ].

...
 

Bill_R

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
July and August (2014)
#33
Thanks Noah, for the feed back.
PS we are midwesterners from St Louis and will be starting first of July so if I can help with questions, once we return, I would be happy.

Buen Camino
Bill
 

ArkBuilder

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Going on my first pilgrimage 9 SEP 14
#34
Thanks Noah, for the feed back.
PS we are midwesterners from St Louis and will be starting first of July so if I can help with questions, once we return, I would be happy.

Buen Camino
Bill
Wow Bill. July is way too hot for this old man [ turn 63 next week while I am riding my Harley on the Tail of The Dragon from Deals Gap, NC. ] which is why I chose mid-September to early November to do my Camino.

Yes, please. Let me know how your trip goes. I will be eager to hear back from you. My email address is on my personal page.

¡Buen Camino!

Noah
 

Bill_R

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
July and August (2014)
#35
Will do, and had to go when my sons could accompany me ( two at Mizzou, one grad looking for job)
 

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