A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it

Advertisement

Luggage Transfer Correos

Porto to Santiago April 2019 observations

Camino T-shirt

tjb1013

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2017
My partner and I completed the Camino Portugues in April 2019. Some observations:

We started out from Porto with two short days along the coast, then crossed over to the central at Vila do Conde.

General:

* The Portuguese in April had far fewer pilgrims than the Camino Frances at peak (my other experience). This was good and bad, in my opinion: The 'bad' was that there were fewer of the pilgrim-to-pilgrim interchanges that are the best part of the Camino (IMO). The 'good' was that it was less like a Pilgrim Highway and there seemed to be more opportunities for authentic interchanges with local people not in the Camino service industry.

* The coastal portion from Porto to Vila do Conde was gorgeous, but not at all Camino-like. We live on the ocean in the US, so it was a pretty easy choice to go inland. The route across to São Pedro de Rates was picturesque, but on narrow roadways and the Portuguese drivers there won the award for least likely to be concerned about the centimeters between their cars and waddling pilgrims.

Specific:

Great places to stay:

* Albergue De Peregrinos Casa Da Fernanda in Vitorino dos Piães, Portugal. What the Camino is all about. Very fortunate that Fernanda made room for us that night.
* Albergue Quinta do Caminho in Pedreira, Portugal. We stayed in a private room, but the bunkhouse looked great, too. Inexpensively luxurious ($40 USD or so).

Fine places to stay:

* Casa Velha in Aldeia Nova, Portugal. Unassuming! Clean, quiet, great hospitality.
* Santa Clara Municipal, Vila do Conde. A beautiful muni. There was a great market in the adjoining square on the Friday we were there, so we cooked in the kitchen.
* Albergue de Peregrinos São Pedro de Rates, Portugal. Clean, well-run by an association (Free Masons, I think), older facility. A couple of nearby restaurants are good.
* O Refuxio de la Jerezana, Redondela, Spain. Very nice, municipal-like facility owned privately. Very nice showers outside the building (including one with disabled access), like-new clean. Serves dinner on a terrace.
* Habitaciones Casa Alicia, Pontevedre, Spain. Old-school hostel, very clean, shared shower and bath. Pontevedre was the surprise of the trip - a great little city.
* Hotel Payro, Milladoiro, Spain. Superb value, sparkling clean, run by a family that cares about its business. A nice place to stay after an especially long walking day before Santiago.

Places I wouldn't stay again:

* Hotel Parque, O Porriño, Spain. Shabby and somewhat inhospitable. If in O Porriño again, I'd try Malosera hosteleria just down the street. We had a great cafe breakfast there, and it looked like it would have been a great place to stay.

Really good coffee in unexpected spot:

* Cafe Cunha Nunes, Codeçal, Portugal.

Weather

Forecast was steady rain for most of the time in Portugal, but it turned out to be intermittent light showers. Never put the poncho on, but the rain jacket was on most of the way. Stopped for breakfast and laundry for the worst of it one day, and that was enough time to avoid it. (Fernanda's husband, Jacinto, had promised short showers followed by fine weather, and that's the way it tuned out.)

I didn't bring a sleeping bag, but my partner took my lightweight one with her. Good choice! I don't get cold often, but it was very, very cold in São Pedro de Rates and the Hotel Parque.

I wore Hoka One One Tor Ultra Hi WP boots, but was blistered pretty badly again, which I am now attributing to the heat generated within the waterproof liner on long days. If I do another Camino, I'm going to go with a non-waterproof shoe like the Hoka Speedgoat 3 trail runner or the Atra Lone Peak 4 mid mesh. I ended up walking in my Keen Newport sandals for the last half of the walk, and past the big uphill crossing north of Bandeira, that worked out OK.
 
Last edited:

Viggen

Vigo
Camino(s) past & future
CF June 2015
CP June 2017
Del Norte, Finisterre / Muxia Oct 2017
VDLP 2018
VF, SBP to Rome 2019
Thanks, these observations are always helpful.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Cam Frances SJPDP to Santiago ('17): Finisterre ('17); Muxia ('17): Camino Portuguese ('19)
My partner and I completed the Camino Portugues in April 2019. Some observations:

We started out from Porto with two short days along the coast, then crossed over to the central at Vila do Conde.

General:

* The Portuguese in April had far fewer pilgrims than the Camino Frances at peak (my other experience). This was good and bad, in my opinion: The 'bad' was that there were fewer of the pilgrim-to-pilgrim interchanges that are the best part of the Camino (IMO). The 'good' was that it was less like a Pilgrim Highway and there seemed to be more opportunities for authentic interchanges with local people not in the Camino service industry.

* The coastal portion from Porto to Vila do Conde was gorgeous, but not at all Camino-like. We live on the ocean in the US, so it was a pretty easy choice to go inland. The route across to São Pedro de Rates was picturesque, but on narrow roadways and the Portuguese drivers there won the award for least likely to be concerned about the centimeters between their cars and waddling pilgrims.

Specific:

Great places to stay:

* Albergue De Peregrinos Casa Da Fernanda in Vitorino dos Piães, Portugal. What the Camino is all about. Very fortunate that Fernanda made room for us that night.
* Albergue Quinta do Caminho in Pedreira, Portugal. We stayed in a private room, but the bunkhouse looked great, too. Inexpensively luxurious ($40 USD or so).

Fine places to stay:

* Casa Velha in Aldeia Nova, Portugal. Unassuming! Clean, quiet, great hospitality.
* Santa Clara Municipal, Vila do Conde. A beautiful muni. There was a great market in the adjoining square on the Friday we were there, so we cooked in the kitchen.
* Albergue de Peregrinos São Pedro de Rates, Portugal. Clean, well-run by an association (Free Masons, I think), older facility. A couple of nearby restaurants are good.
* O Refuxio de la Jerezana, Redondela, Spain. Very nice, municipal-like facility owned privately. Very nice showers outside the building (including one with disabled access), like-new clean. Serves dinner on a terrace.
* Habitaciones Casa Alicia, Pontevedre, Spain. Old-school hostel, very clean, shared shower and bath. Pontevedre was the surprise of the trip - a great little city.
* Hotel Payro, Milladoiro, Spain. Superb value, sparkling clean, run by a family that cares about its business. A nice place to stay after an especially long walking day before Santiago.

Places I wouldn't stay again:

* Hotel Parque, O Porriño, Spain. Shabby and somewhat inhospitable. If in O Porriño again, I'd try Malosera hosteleria just down the street. We had a great cafe breakfast there, and it looked like it would have been a great place to stay.

Really good coffee in unexpected spot:

* Cafe Cunha Nunes, Codeçal, Portugal.

Weather

Forecast was steady rain for most of the time in Portugal, but it turned out to be intermittent light showers. Never put the poncho on, but the rain jacket was on most of the way. Stopped for breakfast and laundry for the worst of it one day, and that was enough time to avoid it. (Fernanda's husband, Jacinto, had promised short showers followed by fine weather, and that's the way it tuned out.)

I didn't bring a sleeping bag, but my partner took my lightweight one with her. Good choice! I don't get cold often, but it was very, very cold in São Pedro de Rates and the Hotel Parque.

I wore Hoka One One Tor Ultra Hi WP boots, but was blistered pretty badly again, which I am now attributing to the heat generated within there waterproof liner on long days. If I do another Camino, I'm going to go with a non-waterproof shoe like the Hoka Speedgoat 3 trail runner or the Atra Lone Peak 4 mid mesh. I ended up walking in my Keen Newport sandals for the last half of the walk, and past the big uphill crossing north of Bandeira, that worked out OK.
Great specifics shared along your way. Thanks for your impressions! Approaching a place for the night, with a solid recommendation, is reassuring.
 

Mera

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino France, Camino del Norte, Camino de Madrid
Camino Porto, Camino Primitivo
My partner and I completed the Camino Portugues in April 2019. Some observations:

We started out from Porto with two short days along the coast, then crossed over to the central at Vila do Conde.

General:

* The Portuguese in April had far fewer pilgrims than the Camino Frances at peak (my other experience). This was good and bad, in my opinion: The 'bad' was that there were fewer of the pilgrim-to-pilgrim interchanges that are the best part of the Camino (IMO). The 'good' was that it was less like a Pilgrim Highway and there seemed to be more opportunities for authentic interchanges with local people not in the Camino service industry.

* The coastal portion from Porto to Vila do Conde was gorgeous, but not at all Camino-like. We live on the ocean in the US, so it was a pretty easy choice to go inland. The route across to São Pedro de Rates was picturesque, but on narrow roadways and the Portuguese drivers there won the award for least likely to be concerned about the centimeters between their cars and waddling pilgrims.

Specific:

Great places to stay:

* Albergue De Peregrinos Casa Da Fernanda in Vitorino dos Piães, Portugal. What the Camino is all about. Very fortunate that Fernanda made room for us that night.
* Albergue Quinta do Caminho in Pedreira, Portugal. We stayed in a private room, but the bunkhouse looked great, too. Inexpensively luxurious ($40 USD or so).

Fine places to stay:

* Casa Velha in Aldeia Nova, Portugal. Unassuming! Clean, quiet, great hospitality.
* Santa Clara Municipal, Vila do Conde. A beautiful muni. There was a great market in the adjoining square on the Friday we were there, so we cooked in the kitchen.
* Albergue de Peregrinos São Pedro de Rates, Portugal. Clean, well-run by an association (Free Masons, I think), older facility. A couple of nearby restaurants are good.
* O Refuxio de la Jerezana, Redondela, Spain. Very nice, municipal-like facility owned privately. Very nice showers outside the building (including one with disabled access), like-new clean. Serves dinner on a terrace.
* Habitaciones Casa Alicia, Pontevedre, Spain. Old-school hostel, very clean, shared shower and bath. Pontevedre was the surprise of the trip - a great little city.
* Hotel Payro, Milladoiro, Spain. Superb value, sparkling clean, run by a family that cares about its business. A nice place to stay after an especially long walking day before Santiago.

Places I wouldn't stay again:

* Hotel Parque, O Porriño, Spain. Shabby and somewhat inhospitable. If in O Porriño again, I'd try Malosera hosteleria just down the street. We had a great cafe breakfast there, and it looked like it would have been a great place to stay.

Really good coffee in unexpected spot:

* Cafe Cunha Nunes, Codeçal, Portugal.

Weather

Forecast was steady rain for most of the time in Portugal, but it turned out to be intermittent light showers. Never put the poncho on, but the rain jacket was on most of the way. Stopped for breakfast and laundry for the worst of it one day, and that was enough time to avoid it. (Fernanda's husband, Jacinto, had promised short showers followed by fine weather, and that's the way it tuned out.)

I didn't bring a sleeping bag, but my partner took my lightweight one with her. Good choice! I don't get cold often, but it was very, very cold in São Pedro de Rates and the Hotel Parque.

I wore Hoka One One Tor Ultra Hi WP boots, but was blistered pretty badly again, which I am now attributing to the heat generated within there waterproof liner on long days. If I do another Camino, I'm going to go with a non-waterproof shoe like the Hoka Speedgoat 3 trail runner or the Atra Lone Peak 4 mid mesh. I ended up walking in my Keen Newport sandals for the last half of the walk, and past the big uphill crossing north of Bandeira, that worked out OK.
I am walking the Porto right now. Will be arriving in Vigo tomorrow. My experience is that the "official Camino" is not thoughtfully arranged. It takes you off the beautiful quiet trails by the sea. I relied on my own instinct and the map to create my own Camino. For example this beautiful route is not on official Camino.
 

Attachments

formysons

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Roncesvalles - Santiago 2009; Portuguese, Ingles, Finesterre and Muxia - 2019.
My partner and I completed the Camino Portugues in April 2019. Some observations:

We started out from Porto with two short days along the coast, then crossed over to the central at Vila do Conde.

General:

* The Portuguese in April had far fewer pilgrims than the Camino Frances at peak (my other experience). This was good and bad, in my opinion: The 'bad' was that there were fewer of the pilgrim-to-pilgrim interchanges that are the best part of the Camino (IMO). The 'good' was that it was less like a Pilgrim Highway and there seemed to be more opportunities for authentic interchanges with local people not in the Camino service industry.

* The coastal portion from Porto to Vila do Conde was gorgeous, but not at all Camino-like. We live on the ocean in the US, so it was a pretty easy choice to go inland. The route across to São Pedro de Rates was picturesque, but on narrow roadways and the Portuguese drivers there won the award for least likely to be concerned about the centimeters between their cars and waddling pilgrims.

Specific:

Great places to stay:

* Albergue De Peregrinos Casa Da Fernanda in Vitorino dos Piães, Portugal. What the Camino is all about. Very fortunate that Fernanda made room for us that night.
* Albergue Quinta do Caminho in Pedreira, Portugal. We stayed in a private room, but the bunkhouse looked great, too. Inexpensively luxurious ($40 USD or so).

Fine places to stay:

* Casa Velha in Aldeia Nova, Portugal. Unassuming! Clean, quiet, great hospitality.
* Santa Clara Municipal, Vila do Conde. A beautiful muni. There was a great market in the adjoining square on the Friday we were there, so we cooked in the kitchen.
* Albergue de Peregrinos São Pedro de Rates, Portugal. Clean, well-run by an association (Free Masons, I think), older facility. A couple of nearby restaurants are good.
* O Refuxio de la Jerezana, Redondela, Spain. Very nice, municipal-like facility owned privately. Very nice showers outside the building (including one with disabled access), like-new clean. Serves dinner on a terrace.
* Habitaciones Casa Alicia, Pontevedre, Spain. Old-school hostel, very clean, shared shower and bath. Pontevedre was the surprise of the trip - a great little city.
* Hotel Payro, Milladoiro, Spain. Superb value, sparkling clean, run by a family that cares about its business. A nice place to stay after an especially long walking day before Santiago.

Places I wouldn't stay again:

* Hotel Parque, O Porriño, Spain. Shabby and somewhat inhospitable. If in O Porriño again, I'd try Malosera hosteleria just down the street. We had a great cafe breakfast there, and it looked like it would have been a great place to stay.

Really good coffee in unexpected spot:

* Cafe Cunha Nunes, Codeçal, Portugal.

Weather

Forecast was steady rain for most of the time in Portugal, but it turned out to be intermittent light showers. Never put the poncho on, but the rain jacket was on most of the way. Stopped for breakfast and laundry for the worst of it one day, and that was enough time to avoid it. (Fernanda's husband, Jacinto, had promised short showers followed by fine weather, and that's the way it tuned out.)

I didn't bring a sleeping bag, but my partner took my lightweight one with her. Good choice! I don't get cold often, but it was very, very cold in São Pedro de Rates and the Hotel Parque.

I wore Hoka One One Tor Ultra Hi WP boots, but was blistered pretty badly again, which I am now attributing to the heat generated within there waterproof liner on long days. If I do another Camino, I'm going to go with a non-waterproof shoe like the Hoka Speedgoat 3 trail runner or the Atra Lone Peak 4 mid mesh. I ended up walking in my Keen Newport sandals for the last half of the walk, and past the big uphill crossing north of Bandeira, that worked out OK.
This is great info, which I will definitely use when walking the Porto to SdC in August.
 

formysons

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Roncesvalles - Santiago 2009; Portuguese, Ingles, Finesterre and Muxia - 2019.
I am walking the Porto right now. Will be arriving in Vigo tomorrow. My experience is that the "official Camino" is not thoughtfully arranged. It takes you off the beautiful quiet trails by the sea. I relied on my own instinct and the map to create my own Camino. For example this beautiful route is not on official Camino.
Which map did you use ?
 

John H.

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF - 2017
CP Central - 2017
CP Coastal - 2018
CF - [hopefully again someday]

Mera

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino France, Camino del Norte, Camino de Madrid
Camino Porto, Camino Primitivo
Which map did you use ?
I use Buen Camino and Google Map both. If I see white roads that are not deadend and near the sea, I take it. It's difficult to get lost on Camino Porto.
 

Mera

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino France, Camino del Norte, Camino de Madrid
Camino Porto, Camino Primitivo
This is great info, which I will definitely use when walking the Porto to SdC in August.
It is going to be very hot here in August. It is already very hot. Please consider getting a hiking umbrella. It weighs only half pound but keeps you about 10 degrees cooler. Good for rain and sun both. You can stick it into the hiking pole slot in the front of your backpack and tie it with couple of hooks, etc you can use it hand free. Also great sun protection.
 

Stellaluna

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Coast to Coast (2015)
Frances (July 2016)
It is going to be very hot here in August. It is already very hot. Please consider getting a hiking umbrella. It weighs only half pound but keeps you about 10 degrees cooler. Good for rain and sun both. You can stick it into the hiking pole slot in the front of your backpack and tie it with couple of hooks, etc you can use it hand free. Also great sun protection.
Any suggestions of brands?
 

Mera

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino France, Camino del Norte, Camino de Madrid
Camino Porto, Camino Primitivo
Gossamer Gear. There are two out there that I know of. This costs less, but built well. A Grrman brand you can order online.
 

Bob from L.A. !

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francis 2012, 2014, 2016. Camino Norte 2018. Many more to come in my future God willing !
Very well mapped out. Thank you
 

Dodger

Lone Walker, Camino Frances 2018
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2018
Intending Camino Portugese 2020
My partner and I completed the Camino Portugues in April 2019. Some observations:

We started out from Porto with two short days along the coast, then crossed over to the central at Vila do Conde.

General:

* The Portuguese in April had far fewer pilgrims than the Camino Frances at peak (my other experience). This was good and bad, in my opinion: The 'bad' was that there were fewer of the pilgrim-to-pilgrim interchanges that are the best part of the Camino (IMO). The 'good' was that it was less like a Pilgrim Highway and there seemed to be more opportunities for authentic interchanges with local people not in the Camino service industry.

* The coastal portion from Porto to Vila do Conde was gorgeous, but not at all Camino-like. We live on the ocean in the US, so it was a pretty easy choice to go inland. The route across to São Pedro de Rates was picturesque, but on narrow roadways and the Portuguese drivers there won the award for least likely to be concerned about the centimeters between their cars and waddling pilgrims.

Specific:

Great places to stay:

* Albergue De Peregrinos Casa Da Fernanda in Vitorino dos Piães, Portugal. What the Camino is all about. Very fortunate that Fernanda made room for us that night.
* Albergue Quinta do Caminho in Pedreira, Portugal. We stayed in a private room, but the bunkhouse looked great, too. Inexpensively luxurious ($40 USD or so).

Fine places to stay:

* Casa Velha in Aldeia Nova, Portugal. Unassuming! Clean, quiet, great hospitality.
* Santa Clara Municipal, Vila do Conde. A beautiful muni. There was a great market in the adjoining square on the Friday we were there, so we cooked in the kitchen.
* Albergue de Peregrinos São Pedro de Rates, Portugal. Clean, well-run by an association (Free Masons, I think), older facility. A couple of nearby restaurants are good.
* O Refuxio de la Jerezana, Redondela, Spain. Very nice, municipal-like facility owned privately. Very nice showers outside the building (including one with disabled access), like-new clean. Serves dinner on a terrace.
* Habitaciones Casa Alicia, Pontevedre, Spain. Old-school hostel, very clean, shared shower and bath. Pontevedre was the surprise of the trip - a great little city.
* Hotel Payro, Milladoiro, Spain. Superb value, sparkling clean, run by a family that cares about its business. A nice place to stay after an especially long walking day before Santiago.

Places I wouldn't stay again:

* Hotel Parque, O Porriño, Spain. Shabby and somewhat inhospitable. If in O Porriño again, I'd try Malosera hosteleria just down the street. We had a great cafe breakfast there, and it looked like it would have been a great place to stay.

Really good coffee in unexpected spot:

* Cafe Cunha Nunes, Codeçal, Portugal.

Weather

Forecast was steady rain for most of the time in Portugal, but it turned out to be intermittent light showers. Never put the poncho on, but the rain jacket was on most of the way. Stopped for breakfast and laundry for the worst of it one day, and that was enough time to avoid it. (Fernanda's husband, Jacinto, had promised short showers followed by fine weather, and that's the way it tuned out.)

I didn't bring a sleeping bag, but my partner took my lightweight one with her. Good choice! I don't get cold often, but it was very, very cold in São Pedro de Rates and the Hotel Parque.

I wore Hoka One One Tor Ultra Hi WP boots, but was blistered pretty badly again, which I am now attributing to the heat generated within the waterproof liner on long days. If I do another Camino, I'm going to go with a non-waterproof shoe like the Hoka Speedgoat 3 trail runner or the Atra Lone Peak 4 mid mesh. I ended up walking in my Keen Newport sandals for the last half of the walk, and past the big uphill crossing north of Bandeira, that worked out OK.
Thanks, good insight, planning a 2020 Portugues in May 🙏
 

formysons

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Roncesvalles - Santiago 2009; Portuguese, Ingles, Finesterre and Muxia - 2019.
My partner and I completed the Camino Portugues in April 2019. Some observations:

We started out from Porto with two short days along the coast, then crossed over to the central at Vila do Conde.

General:

* The Portuguese in April had far fewer pilgrims than the Camino Frances at peak (my other experience). This was good and bad, in my opinion: The 'bad' was that there were fewer of the pilgrim-to-pilgrim interchanges that are the best part of the Camino (IMO). The 'good' was that it was less like a Pilgrim Highway and there seemed to be more opportunities for authentic interchanges with local people not in the Camino service industry.

* The coastal portion from Porto to Vila do Conde was gorgeous, but not at all Camino-like. We live on the ocean in the US, so it was a pretty easy choice to go inland. The route across to São Pedro de Rates was picturesque, but on narrow roadways and the Portuguese drivers there won the award for least likely to be concerned about the centimeters between their cars and waddling pilgrims.

Specific:

Great places to stay:

* Albergue De Peregrinos Casa Da Fernanda in Vitorino dos Piães, Portugal. What the Camino is all about. Very fortunate that Fernanda made room for us that night.
* Albergue Quinta do Caminho in Pedreira, Portugal. We stayed in a private room, but the bunkhouse looked great, too. Inexpensively luxurious ($40 USD or so).

Fine places to stay:

* Casa Velha in Aldeia Nova, Portugal. Unassuming! Clean, quiet, great hospitality.
* Santa Clara Municipal, Vila do Conde. A beautiful muni. There was a great market in the adjoining square on the Friday we were there, so we cooked in the kitchen.
* Albergue de Peregrinos São Pedro de Rates, Portugal. Clean, well-run by an association (Free Masons, I think), older facility. A couple of nearby restaurants are good.
* O Refuxio de la Jerezana, Redondela, Spain. Very nice, municipal-like facility owned privately. Very nice showers outside the building (including one with disabled access), like-new clean. Serves dinner on a terrace.
* Habitaciones Casa Alicia, Pontevedre, Spain. Old-school hostel, very clean, shared shower and bath. Pontevedre was the surprise of the trip - a great little city.
* Hotel Payro, Milladoiro, Spain. Superb value, sparkling clean, run by a family that cares about its business. A nice place to stay after an especially long walking day before Santiago.

Places I wouldn't stay again:

* Hotel Parque, O Porriño, Spain. Shabby and somewhat inhospitable. If in O Porriño again, I'd try Malosera hosteleria just down the street. We had a great cafe breakfast there, and it looked like it would have been a great place to stay.

Really good coffee in unexpected spot:

* Cafe Cunha Nunes, Codeçal, Portugal.

Weather

Forecast was steady rain for most of the time in Portugal, but it turned out to be intermittent light showers. Never put the poncho on, but the rain jacket was on most of the way. Stopped for breakfast and laundry for the worst of it one day, and that was enough time to avoid it. (Fernanda's husband, Jacinto, had promised short showers followed by fine weather, and that's the way it tuned out.)

I didn't bring a sleeping bag, but my partner took my lightweight one with her. Good choice! I don't get cold often, but it was very, very cold in São Pedro de Rates and the Hotel Parque.

I wore Hoka One One Tor Ultra Hi WP boots, but was blistered pretty badly again, which I am now attributing to the heat generated within the waterproof liner on long days. If I do another Camino, I'm going to go with a non-waterproof shoe like the Hoka Speedgoat 3 trail runner or the Atra Lone Peak 4 mid mesh. I ended up walking in my Keen Newport sandals for the last half of the walk, and past the big uphill crossing north of Bandeira, that worked out OK.
Thank you tjb1013, very useful, I made notes for our walk in August. Again very informative, thank you.
 

Book your lodging here

Get e-mail updates from Casa Ivar (Forum + Forum Store content)




Advertisement

Booking.com

Most downloaded Resources

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store

Casa Ivar Newsletter

Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 15 1.3%
  • February

    Votes: 7 0.6%
  • March

    Votes: 46 4.1%
  • April

    Votes: 168 15.1%
  • May

    Votes: 270 24.2%
  • June

    Votes: 84 7.5%
  • July

    Votes: 22 2.0%
  • August

    Votes: 25 2.2%
  • September

    Votes: 321 28.8%
  • October

    Votes: 138 12.4%
  • November

    Votes: 14 1.3%
  • December

    Votes: 6 0.5%
Top