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Question regarding funding of Albergues

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(2012) Le Puy/CF (2015) Portugues (2017) Norte (2018) CF (2019) VDLP?
During my morning walk today as I was thinking about my next camino on the Via de la Plata a question came to me. I have no idea of the answer and was hoping some of my fellow pilgrims may know the answer. I know the VDLP has limited services and few pilgrims and I wondered where I should stay when we can walk again. I would assume that there will be albergue casualties on all caminos especially private and donativos. Has the Spanish government offered financial assistance to private albergues or donativos? I would assume, BUT I DO NOT KNOW, that private and donativos would potentially have higher overhead due to mortgages and albergues higher still due to the fact that some offer more amenities than donativos or municipal albergues. My assumption also is that municipal albergues and Xuntas may have lower overhead because the town or state owns the land on the albergue and can offer more assistance to public albergues to weather the storm. It would make good business sense if they did to facilitate more pilgrims staying and spending money in their towns. I usually stay in municipals and donativos as much as possible as I like them and I am on a budget. But if I have to spend a little more to help a private albergue or donativo in need I would certainly do that. Are my assumptions correct? Any insight would be appreciated.
 

Pelegrin

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo June 2013
SJPP - Logroño June 2014
Ingles July2016
I think there is not an specific help from the central government to private acommodation on the different Caminos.
Only Xunta de Galicia owns albergues.That is not the case of the other Juntas (Andalucia, Extremadura and Castilla y León)
 
Last edited:

FooteK

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP to SdC, 2013; Lourdes to SdC, 2015; ??? to SdC (2020)
During my morning walk today as I was thinking about my next camino on the Via de la Plata a question came to me. I have no idea of the answer and was hoping some of my fellow pilgrims may know the answer. I know the VDLP has limited services and few pilgrims and I wondered where I should stay when we can walk again. I would assume that there will be albergue casualties on all caminos especially private and donativos. Has the Spanish government offered financial assistance to private albergues or donativos? I would assume, BUT I DO NOT KNOW, that private and donativos would potentially have higher overhead due to mortgages and albergues higher still due to the fact that some offer more amenities than donativos or municipal albergues. My assumption also is that municipal albergues and Xuntas may have lower overhead because the town or state owns the land on the albergue and can offer more assistance to public albergues to weather the storm. It would make good business sense if they did to facilitate more pilgrims staying and spending money in their towns. I usually stay in municipals and donativos as much as possible as I like them and I am on a budget. But if I have to spend a little more to help a private albergue or donativo in need I would certainly do that. Are my assumptions correct? Any insight would be appreciated.
This post made me think of another, perhaps related, question.

When the Caminos "reopen", and let's just use the CF for an example, we are expecting it to look very different as far as accommodations. I have been participating in the discussion about camping along the Camino, so that is just one change that may be in the making.

If we assume that some albergues will be closing, and most, if not all, will be changing their configuration to comply with new rules of distancing and sanitation, are we going to need a whole new set of guidebooks for the CF in 2021? Is the Brierly no longer going to have accurate information? How will we be able to "plan" our day's journey, not really knowing what is ahead on the path? Could we find ourselves heading for a town, only to discover too late, that the albergue that is supposed to be there no longer is, and the next town is several hours away?

Our journeys have never been filled with certainty, and adapting to the unexpected is what makes the pilgrim experience such an adventure. I hope that as some albergues close, new ones will spring up to take their place. But will the next Holy Year be only for the brave???
 
Last edited:

OzAnnie

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
'CP, Frances,Norte,Salv/prim;Le puy, Inglés, CDM, Invierno, Fin/Mux, Vdlp 2019>Táb/ Prt Levante 2020
During my morning walk today as I was thinking about my next camino on the Via de la Plata a question came to me. I have no idea of the answer and was hoping some of my fellow pilgrims may know the answer. I know the VDLP has limited services and few pilgrims and I wondered where I should stay when we can walk again. I would assume that there will be albergue casualties on all caminos especially private and donativos. Has the Spanish government offered financial assistance to private albergues or donativos? I would assume, BUT I DO NOT KNOW, that private and donativos would potentially have higher overhead due to mortgages and albergues higher still due to the fact that some offer more amenities than donativos or municipal albergues. My assumption also is that municipal albergues and Xuntas may have lower overhead because the town or state owns the land on the albergue and can offer more assistance to public albergues to weather the storm. It would make good business sense if they did to facilitate more pilgrims staying and spending money in their towns. I usually stay in municipals and donativos as much as possible as I like them and I am on a budget. But if I have to spend a little more to help a private albergue or donativo in need I would certainly do that. Are my assumptions correct? Any insight would be appreciated.

Hi @lt56ny
Were you aware of the new section created on this forum by Ivar ..
to let us know of some places you may have stopped on the way and for information (details) to those in a position; to give a helping hand to places on the way.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
This post made me think of another, perhaps related, question.

When the Caminos "reopen", and let's just use the CF for an example, we are expecting it to look very different as far as accommodations. I have been participating in the discussion about camping along the Camino, so that is just one change that may be in the making.

If we assume that some albergues will be closing, and most, if not all, will be changing their configuration to comply with new rules of distancing and sanitation, are we going to need a who new set of guidebooks for the CF in 2021? Is the Brierly no longer going to have accurate information? How will we be able to "plan" our day's journey, not really knowing what is ahead on the path? Could we find ourselves heading for a town, only to discover too late, that the albergue that is supposed to be there no longer is, and the next town is several hours away?

Our journeys have never been filled with certainty, and adapting to the unexpected is what makes the pilgrim experience such an adventure. I hope that as some albergues close, new ones will spring up to take their place. But will the next Holy Year be only for the brave???
This is where apps and websites have an advantage over physical guidebooks. They can update information in real time. I would check out Gronze.com for more recent information.
 

Raggy

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2017, 2018, 2019
There are various operating models among the facilities that offer pilgrim accommodation along the Via de la Plata - some are church operated (e.g. Fuenterroble de la Salvatierra and Alcuéscar), some are privately owned and operated (e.g. Torre de Sabre in Cubo de la Tierra del Vino), some are owned by local government and leased to private management (e.g. Embalse de la Alcántara), some are municipal (e.g. Aldea de Cano). At first blush, I'd guess that the current crisis puts the private hotels and albergues in a particularly precarious situation - but with pressures on church and municipal budgets, there's no saying what might happen to those facilities too.

One thing is for sure, nobody ever operated an albergue on the Via de la Plata as a get rich quick scheme. The fallout from this crisis will shake a lot of businesses, but some of them will pull through in lean times, as they have before. I only hope that this doesn't accelerate the already extreme depopulation of some regions.
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(2012) Le Puy/CF (2015) Portugues (2017) Norte (2018) CF (2019) VDLP?
Hi @lt56ny
Were you aware of the new section created on this forum by Ivar ..
to let us know of some places you may have stopped on the way and for information (details) to those in a position; to give a helping hand to places on the way.
Yes I was aware of it. I just have no idea which albergues need help and which to pick there are so many. Pretty lame excuse.
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(2012) Le Puy/CF (2015) Portugues (2017) Norte (2018) CF (2019) VDLP?
There are various operating models among the facilities that offer pilgrim accommodation along the Via de la Plata - some are church operated (e.g. Fuenterroble de la Salvatierra and Alcuéscar), some are privately owned and operated (e.g. Torre de Sabre in Cubo de la Tierra del Vino), some are owned by local government and leased to private management (e.g. Embalse de la Alcántara), some are municipal (e.g. Aldea de Cano). At first blush, I'd guess that the current crisis puts the private hotels and albergues in a particularly precarious situation - but with pressures on church and municipal budgets, there's no saying what might happen to those facilities too.

One thing is for sure, nobody ever operated an albergue on the Via de la Plata as a get rich quick scheme. The fallout from this crisis will shake a lot of businesses, but some of them will pull through in lean times, as they have before. I only hope that this doesn't accelerate the already extreme depopulation of some regions.
I am sure you are right about no one ever opened an albergue to build an empire.
 

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