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Relief for arthritic joint problems

BobM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances; Via Podensis; Via Francigena; Via Portugues; Via Francigena del Sud; Jakobsweg.
#1
For those who have arthritic joint problems and are concerned about completing their camino, you might want to consider glucosamine sulphate tablets.

Google for more info, or look at Wikipadia. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glucosamine Wikipedia seems to be fairly objective, altho I am not a qualified health professional.

Glucosamine sulphate is a potential stomach irritant, so it is important to take the daily dose with a meal.

Hope this is helpful.

Bob M
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
#2
BobM, u seem to be very interested in health-related issues, may be the person to ask this: what type of diet do u keep in ur Caminos (bkfast/lunch/dinner/snacks, please be as specific as u can :!: Thanks. Best, xm 8)
 

BobM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances; Via Podensis; Via Francigena; Via Portugues; Via Francigena del Sud; Jakobsweg.
#3
Diet depends on conditions

Most of my treks have been at high altitudes (3000m+), so my diet reflects the needs at altitude (cold, avoiding mountain sickness, and exertion). So the diet is high in fluids and carbohydrates. Generally the specifics depend on what is available locally.

B'fast might be porridge (if available), heaps of bread, sugared tea, eggs (if available). I try to make this a large carbo meal.

Lunch might be soup, lentils, bread, fruit (if available), tea.

Dinner (another big meal) might be soup, lentils, meat, vegetables, maybe some dessert, tea. Protein intake (muscle rebuilding) is important at this meal because one has the luxury of time to prepare a meat dish. And Nepali chickens need plenty of tenderising!

During the day I snack on glucose candies brought from home. Nuts and dried fruit would be better, but the candies are less bulky.

I also drink sufficient amounts of water so that urination is fairly frequent and is of a pale straw colour. Dark urine is a sign of insufficient water intake.

Hope this is helpful. It's by no means a rigid diet and certainly not the only "correct" one. I have to go with what is available in remote mountain areas. Which is totally different from urbanised areas where well-stocked shops allow better planning.

Regards

Bob M
 

BobM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances; Via Podensis; Via Francigena; Via Portugues; Via Francigena del Sud; Jakobsweg.
#4
More on Glucosamine

I forgot to mention that the proposed mechanism for glucosamine is cartilage rebuilding, which requires time. It is not a pain-killer like the various anti-inflammatories.

For this reason, glucosamine supplements would need to be started well in advance of a walk. Glucosamine is probably useless to treat a joint pain that has already become a problem. In the latter case, anti-inflammatories are probably needed to give short term relief.

Regards

Bob M
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
#5
B'fast...heaps of bread...Lunch might be soup, lentils, bread, fruit... Dinner ...soup, lentils, meat, vegetables, maybe some dessert...drink sufficient amounts of water...
Thanks, sounds like we've been eating similar things. I can only eat/drink a banana for bkfast + a glass of H2O + yougurt, for some reason. Drink as much water as poss when I walk. Lunch/dinner, like u. I love to eat lentil soup during the Caminos, so easily available, and so tastily prepared.


...snack on glucose candies brought from home.

What about (oatmeal, etc) "health bars?"

Best,

xm 8)
 

BobM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances; Via Podensis; Via Francigena; Via Portugues; Via Francigena del Sud; Jakobsweg.
#6
xm said:
What about (oatmeal, etc) "health bars?"xm 8)
They are also great choices and excellent if they can be bought along the way. I hope to do that on my camino in May and dump the candies.

I love bananas! They are also a wonderfully complete nutritional package in a compact form. You can get most (all?) of your daily potassium from bananas.

There are two aspects to diet - the most important is obviously meeting the body's needs - but the psychological aspect is also important for motivational reasons if conditions are difficult or the body is complaining.

So, snacks should be enjoyable little luxuries as well as fuel :D .

Hope this is useful.

Bob M
 

omar504

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016,2017,2018
#8
I too have been taking glucosamine but don't forget to add fish oil too as they work together.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
#10
In an albergue located somewhere along the Road I remember feeling great leaving my tired feet summerged for approx 1/2 hr. in a large container full of cold H2O + vinegar :D
 
#11
xm & others dealing with this issue, I read somewhere (can't remember where tho) that you need to combine Glucosamine Condroitin w/MSM to get maximum benefits from taking glucosamine. Based on my personal experience, I got relief within days of starting to take this stuff, even though all the information about it says it takes weeks.

dg
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
#12
Glucosamine Condroitin w/MSM to get maximum benefits from taking glucosamine.
dg, r we talking about tabs? Best, xm PS: when I really really need energies on the Caminos, I drink 2-3 coca-colas, and am off like a rocket! The only prob is sleeping at night :roll:
 
#15
well, let's just say I'm going to try it & see how I react to it. :) Can't walk the Camino & not have a cafe con leche! :shock:

AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA...TWO MORE SLEEPS!!!!!!!!!!!

:shock: :shock: :shock: :shock: :shock: :shock: :shock: :shock:

dg
 

omar504

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016,2017,2018
#16
XM
Fish oil is supposed to help relieve joint pain and inflammation. Some brands have Glucosamine with fish oil.
 

BobM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances; Via Podensis; Via Francigena; Via Portugues; Via Francigena del Sud; Jakobsweg.
#17
Cold water works

xm said:
I remember feeling great leaving my tired feet summerged for approx 1/2 hr. in a large container full of cold H2O + vinegar
The cold water probably works for the reasons given for ice treatments on this website: http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/ ... ekey=18347

I did a quick Google for vinegar, and found a few references, but nothing especially informative re pain. But cold water and vinegar is certainly a traditional remedy.

Hope this helps.

Bob M

18 sleeps to go!
 

BobM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances; Via Podensis; Via Francigena; Via Portugues; Via Francigena del Sud; Jakobsweg.
#19
Cold water and vinegar

Vinegar is basically dilute acetic acid. Maybe it's role is to kill off any fungi or infections that might exacerbate a foot injury.

Regards

Bob M
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
#20
Vinegar ...kill off any fungi or infections ...

:lol: Am sure the smell along would do it...great stuff for tired feet, + cold water. Best, xm 8)
 

BobM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances; Via Podensis; Via Francigena; Via Portugues; Via Francigena del Sud; Jakobsweg.
#21
Cold water - a miracle for tired feet!

xm said:
great stuff for tired feet, + cold water)
I have just logged in after a 30km walk on paved roads and concrete paths with my full load. Walking on hard surfaces is murder for me and one achilles tendon complained quite a bit. Not to mention one thigh muscle (body or gait asymmetry is a curse).

So I tried xm's water treatment for 15min after arriving home. It's a miracle! :D Feet happy, tendons happy (so far - tomorrow after a sleep will be the proof).

I guess my question is - what does one do in a refugio? Presumably buckets don't exist for feet soakers. :?:

BTW, I can't stress enough the desirability of "work hardening" walks under load - at least for folk like me who are no longer beardless youths :(

Regards

Bob M

17 sleeps to go!
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
#22
what does one do in a refugio? Presumably buckets don't exist for feet soakers.
Come to think of it, I've only done this once in an albergue...But at least we know about the wonders of H2O + vinegar (now corroborated by BobM ( :idea: :!: ), for tired feet, and find alternatives where buckets don't exist.

...can't stress enough the desirability of "work hardening" walks under load...
Your're so right, BobM, and I know I should be doing more of it. Reading comments like this, though, convinces me to do more "hardening walks."

Best, xm 8)
 

marktqm

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2006)
#23
Not a lot of opportunity for feet soaking in the refugios I've been to, but there are some refugios located beside or very near streams where it is pure bliss to do some feet dangling by the riverside while watching the world go by, like Zubiri, Casa Paderborn Pamplona, Najera, Portomarin (depends on the season) and the best of the lot, Ribadiso do Baixo.

Mark
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
#24
Good point about the rivers, Mark. There's a super nice fountain inside the albergue in Logroño used for feet soaking. Best, xm 8)
 

Jupp

New Member
#26
BobM said:
For those who have arthritic joint problems and are concerned about completing their camino, you might want to consider glucosamine sulphate tablets.

From my own experience, I can confirm that glucosamine helps. Had light problems during a few months with knee joints and last august before beginning the CF and according to doctors advice I started with Glucadol tablets. (1500mg Glucosamine)
After a few days, I noticed improvement and made the Camino during five weeks without any problems.
Jupp.
 
#27
joint pain help

cider vinegar... not sure about transporting it along your camino but if you get the chance drink it...very good in apple juice, you can pretend it's cider
Tumeric - can add to food or capsules - very good for inflamation
Hot creams - tiger balm style, arnica, bee stings etc
Garlic - used topically if you and fellow pilgrims can bare it
And if your're lucky to find me along the way i have some special cream and tonic made from a very special grandmother plant that should never be smoked...it unlocks arthritic joints like magic.
Be sure if you are using any hot cream to make sure you don't plunge those areas under a cold shower or in a cold stream...it's very importnat generally to keep these joints warm all the time. Keep them covered in the rain.
You can also bash and sting your joints with stinging nettles - sounds ridiculous but it really works and is better than nurofen...however again not if it is raining or cold.

xxxx
 
#28
Feet

I remember being able to soak my feet almost everywhere. Longrono and Astorga had fountains, Molinaseca, Cazadilla, Rabanal (among others) had a bunch of wash tubs. We probably used wash tubs for foot tubs in most places. I remember the hospitalero in Molinaseca pouring vinegar in the water, can't remember if it helped the paid, but probably improved the general condition of my feet. Many of the refugios had vinegar (or salt).

Liz
 
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