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Torn Meniscus Experience

Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: September 24 - October 31 (2015); February/March (2019)
#1
A year ago I was diagnosed with a torn lateral meniscus on my left leg. At that time I received a cortisone shot and have been having no issues up until a couple weeks ago. I’ve been averaging over six miles walking a day. Apple Health tells me I’ve walked about 1300 miles so far this year. When training I walk a fifteen minute mile. In the past two weeks I’ve started experiencing pain again in the left knee. I’ve made an appointment with my knee doc to have a recheck. I’m expecting I’ll get another cortisone shot at that time and hope that that will suffice. Surgery is always an option and may be necessary at some point. I’ve been hoping to put it off. I have slowed my walking pace and lightened my training schedule for the time being.

Here are my questions, for those of you that did have your meniscus repaired, what was the result and how long was your recovery? I am walking my second Camino Frances this coming Feb and Mar. Where I’m leaning right now is to get the cortisone shot and see if the knee settles down. Honestly, up until a couple weeks ago it’s been good as gold.
 
Camino(s) past & future
This upcoming May 31st through July 1st approximately.
#2
A year ago I was diagnosed with a torn lateral meniscus on my left leg. At that time I received a cortisone shot and have been having no issues up until a couple weeks ago. I’ve been averaging over six miles walking a day. Apple Health tells me I’ve walked about 1300 miles so far this year. When training I walk a fifteen minute mile. In the past two weeks I’ve started experiencing pain again in the left knee. I’ve made an appointment with my knee doc to have a recheck. I’m expecting I’ll get another cortisone shot at that time and hope that that will suffice. Surgery is always an option and may be necessary at some point. I’ve been hoping to put it off. I have slowed my walking pace and lightened my training schedule for the time being.

Here are my questions, for those of you that did have your meniscus repaired, what was the result and how long was your recovery? I am walking my second Camino Frances this coming Feb and Mar. Where I’m leaning right now is to get the cortisone shot and see if the knee settles down. Honestly, up until a couple weeks ago it’s been good as gold.
I just got back from doing just over 200 miles on very sad knees and my amazing orthopedic surgeon made this happen for me. I am close to 80 and will get new knees and repairs to torn meniscus in January.
We did the cortisone but also about a month prior he also injected a gel - sorry but this old brain can’t recall what that was called.
I used knee braces and managed to ice up each evening. On his advice I took a couple of anti inflammatory pills each morning and evening.
Talk to your doctor and have him help you make the Camino work for you. I know my guy was great, very supportive and was happy to know that I was able to enjoy every step.
 
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
#3
I cannot answer your question directly. However, I too, am nursing both knees with minimal remaining menisci from decades of being morbidly obese. Currently, the challenge is to put off corrective surgery, including knee joint replacement as long as possible. Let me explain further...

So, my current health regimen includes vitamin and mineral supplements intended to aid joint health, PLUS a regular program of weight lifting exercise to strengthen surrounding muscles to better support both knees.

I continue to dither over this because of two factors: (1) I am still able to do Camino, albeit sometimes with on-the-fly adjustments to walking plans due to sustained pain; and (2) I am waiting for the coming stem-cell treatment revolution for replacing meniscus cartilage...read on...

As you may know, the meniscus cartilage does not regenerate. Once torn, then trimmed surgically, you only have whatever is left. That is where I am presently. At times, activities cause bone-on-bone contact because of the lack of sufficient meniscus tissue. This is very painful. It stopped my 2016 Camino from Madrid at Sarria, of all places...

A friend and former colleague who lives in Ft. Worth, Texas, had a new type of procedure last year. They harvested his stem cells, then processed them in an on-site laboratory, while he waited. Later that same day, they re-injected these same stem cells directly into his remaining meniscus cartilage, in both knees.

He reported feeling poorly for the first week or two. But, by one-month out, he could feel the improvement. By two months out, he was back to his hobby of 'power-lifting' obscene amounts of dead weight...go figure... To each his or her own. I would be chuffed to simply be able to walk 25 km daily without pain while on Camino.

The final caveat here, is that, at present, this innovative stem cell procedure is still considered
'experimental' by the insurance companies. Hence, they refuse to pay for it. The cost is into five-figures (more than USD 10,000) for both knees.

Our insurance companies here tend to hold most innovation in that status (calling it experimental and optional or elective) and refuse to pay for it, even though it is hugely less expensive than joint replacement surgery. It is part of their actuarial model. Remember, insurance carriers are a business. As a general statement, they do not profit by paying claims. Only once they can show a revenue stream that argues for providing this less expensive treatment option will they offer compensation for it.

I had the exact experience in 2005 when I had to get my bariatric lap band installed. It cost me my Porsche Carrera to pay for it. But, things are things. It was well worth it to finally be able to control my obesity. Since then I have. YEs, I am still a big guy. But I weigh 45 kilos less than I did at my heaviest.

Ironically, 18 months after I paid handsomely for all of my then "elective surgery," insurance carriers started to pay for the lap band procedure, because it saved them money over other more expensive procedures and treatments for conditions resulting from continued obesity. Only when the actuaries can make a business case for doing "B" instead of "A" will they voluntarily make that change.

So, as regards my knees and meniscus replacement, I remain patient and hopeful. I wish you all well.

Hope this helps the dialog.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
#4
Hi Tom - Ouch! I had a motorcycle accident when I was young (should rename them donor cycles!). Usual thing of a car pulling out and me taking my bike over the top.
Thing is, one of the traumas was that my right knee got ripped apart .. they stuffed it all together again and I could start learning to walk again a few weeks later. I was registered disabled for about eight years but tore the card up and forgot about it (the card, not the knee ;) ).
.
So - to the point .... I am 70 now and that right knee really causes some fairly serious pain problems, one of which is from the sixties cobbling together of the lateral meniscus as well as other ripped apart bits.

Cannot be healed of course, only pain killers can help and I refuse to take strong ones - but! a few years back I found a knee support made by an American company, McDavid - they have a type that is not only truly supportive but have aeroplane grade aluminium hinges either side - this ensures that the knee can only track in a certain way, a wonderful design that really works so much better than general supportive models - and this has been utterly brilliant for me .. the two models specific to this damage are the MD422 and the MD429X - on the 422 the hinges are too far forward for me, rubbing exactly where I don't want pressure on the inside, but the 429X is perfect, hinges set back and fully adjustable for tension.

I am not saying that these will help you, but I would be really surprised, considering my own trauma, if they don't.

Here the MD422

md_422_kneebracedualdiskhinges.jpg


and here the 429X - you will see that the hinges are set further back - perfect for me.

md_429x_kneebracepolycentrichingescrossstraps.jpg

Here the American website - https://www.mcdavidusa.com/product-type/sportmed/knee?___SID=U

I hope that this helps. Oh, and if you do try this (go for the 429X) don't wear it all the time, only when walking and needing it - not in bed and so on, you don't want to weaken muscles!.

Buen Camino.
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2015, Camino Portugues 2017, Camino Finisterre 2017, Le Puy Route (Sept. 2018)
#5
A year ago I was diagnosed with a torn lateral meniscus on my left leg. At that time I received a cortisone shot and have been having no issues up until a couple weeks ago. I’ve been averaging over six miles walking a day. Apple Health tells me I’ve walked about 1300 miles so far this year. When training I walk a fifteen minute mile. In the past two weeks I’ve started experiencing pain again in the left knee. I’ve made an appointment with my knee doc to have a recheck. I’m expecting I’ll get another cortisone shot at that time and hope that that will suffice. Surgery is always an option and may be necessary at some point. I’ve been hoping to put it off. I have slowed my walking pace and lightened my training schedule for the time being.

Here are my questions, for those of you that did have your meniscus repaired, what was the result and how long was your recovery? I am walking my second Camino Frances this coming Feb and Mar. Where I’m leaning right now is to get the cortisone shot and see if the knee settles down. Honestly, up until a couple weeks ago it’s been good as gold.
I had an arthroscope to repair a torn meniscus about ten years ago. In the last few year the same knee has developed osteoarthritis which gives me pain at times and I don’t have a lot of flexibility in the knee. I have walked the Camino Frances in 2015 and the Camino Portugues in 2017 with no problems. I always wear one of those compression knee supports and use walking poles. About a year before I started my last Camino I was diagnosed with a torn meniscus in my right knee. The orthopaedic surgeon stated that they don’t recommend surgery anymore because it causes to osteoarthritis in the future. I had lubricating gel injected into both knees about two months before I started my last Camino. So I had two buggered knees but no problems. I’m planning on walking from Le Puy to Pamplona next year. I’ll eventually have to have knee replacements.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: September 24 - October 31 (2015); February/March (2019)
#6
I had an arthroscope to repair a torn meniscus about ten years ago. In the last few year the same knee has developed osteoarthritis which gives me pain at times and I don’t have a lot of flexibility in the knee. I have walked the Camino Frances in 2015 and the Camino Portugues in 2017 with no problems. I always wear one of those compression knee supports and use walking poles. About a year before I started my last Camino I was diagnosed with a torn meniscus in my right knee. The orthopaedic surgeon stated that they don’t recommend surgery anymore because it causes to osteoarthritis in the future. I had lubricating gel injected into both knees about two months before I started my last Camino. So I had two buggered knees but no problems. I’m planning on walking from Le Puy to Pamplona next year. I’ll eventually have to have knee replacements.
Thanks for this info. I’ll have to ask about the lubricating gel. What I’ve read is that surgery is necessary if the torn meniscus is causing your knee to lock, but that surgery won’t necessarily eliminate the pain from a torn meniscus. Did you find that to be the case?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2015, Camino Portugues 2017, Camino Finisterre 2017, Le Puy Route (Sept. 2018)
#7
Thanks for this info. I’ll have to ask about the lubricating gel. What I’ve read is that surgery is necessary if the torn meniscus is causing your knee to lock, but that surgery won’t necessarily eliminate the pain from a torn meniscus. Did you find that to be the case?
I was pain free for a couple few years but I still had limited flexibility and osteoarthritis developed and so did the pain. The orthopaedic surgeon said that the gel is recommended instead of surgery for as long as you can until a knee replacement is necessary. Well that was his opinion. Another surgeon will probably have a different opinion. The gel wasn’t 100% successful. It’s supposed to last up to 12 months and it’s quite expensive.
 
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
#8
Gee, with all the 'tin men' and 'tin ladies' out there, perhaps we should have a permanent, separate "knee issues" forum thread in the resource section. We can swap stories and constructive suggestions there.

Ivar, y'all listening?
 
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
#9
Hi Tom - Ouch! I had a motorcycle accident when I was young (should rename them donor cycles!). Usual thing of a car pulling out and me taking my bike over the top.
Thing is, one of the traumas was that my right knee got ripped apart .. they stuffed it all together again and I could start learning to walk again a few weeks later. I was registered disabled for about eight years but tore the card up and forgot about it (the card, not the knee ;) ).
.
So - to the point .... I am 70 now and that right knee really causes some fairly serious pain problems, one of which is from the sixties cobbling together of the lateral meniscus as well as other ripped apart bits.

Cannot be healed of course, only pain killers can help and I refuse to take strong ones - but! a few years back I found a knee support made by an American company, McDavid - they have a type that is not only truly supportive but have aeroplane grade aluminium hinges either side - this ensures that the knee can only track in a certain way, a wonderful design that really works so much better than general supportive models - and this has been utterly brilliant for me .. the two models specific to this damage are the MD422 and the MD429X - on the 422 the hinges are too far forward for me, rubbing exactly where I don't want pressure on the inside, but the 429X is perfect, hinges set back and fully adjustable for tension.

I am not saying that these will help you, but I would be really surprised, considering my own trauma, if they don't.

Here the MD422

View attachment 45975


and here the 429X - you will see that the hinges are set further back - perfect for me.

View attachment 45976

Here the American website - https://www.mcdavidusa.com/product-type/sportmed/knee?___SID=U

I hope that this helps. Oh, and if you do try this (go for the 429X) don't wear it all the time, only when walking and needing it - not in bed and so on, you don't want to weaken muscles!.

Buen Camino.
I have bookmarked theses pages for future reference. Thank you for the assist.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: September 24 - October 31 (2015); February/March (2019)
#10
Gee, with all the 'tin men' and 'tin ladies' out there, perhaps we should have a permanent, separate "knee issues" forum thread in the resource section. We can swap stories and constructive suggestions there.

Ivar, y'all listening?
Good point. I couldn’t find a category that exactly fit my post.
 

Marbe2

Active member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 SJPD to Burgos
2017 Leon to Santiago
Pamplona to Santiago Mar. 2018
Burgos - SCDC (Oct 18)
#11
Tom, I have had 5 surgeries for meniscus repairs, two on one knee and three on the other.... recovery time was never the same. I really advise you to discuss this with your surgeon. We can all tell you our experience, and even new innovative methods...which I read with upmost interest. :)Ultimately, however,your surgeon and perhaps a physical therapist you might want to work with, might be better equipped to advise you given your trauma history and in light of your current MRI results/ CATscans/X-ray results. Best Wishes for a healthy Camino!
 
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Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
#12
Oh, I AM following the science...very closely. Fortunately, I live in South Florida. The proliferation of specialists in orthopaedic surgery and corrective measures knows no bounds.

I am trying to avoid an artificial joint replacement. Instead, I am in favor of keeping my original bits, but making them like new...if that is possible.

So, I continue to limp along while on Camino and maintain my patience...
 

Phil W

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances to Melide, May-early July 2016,
Zamora Dec 2017 as Hospitalero
#13
I was unable to walk the Camino in 2017 following a fall that tore 3 quadriceps tendons lose from the kneecap. Tried physical therapy and a hinged brace similar to the McDaniel brace @David shared with us. Still was not strong enough to carry a pack, even a light one, I tried. Ended up having surgery to reattach the tendons to the kneecap and clip some torn meniscus at a facility that specializes in repairing sports injuries. I am almost 7 months post surgery with a strength test scheduled next week. I suspect good things. Now to just keep losing weight and exercising. I plan to walk a stretch in December for a few days before hospitalero'ing and then afterwards before returning home.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: September 24 - October 31 (2015); February/March (2019)
#14
I was unable to walk the Camino in 2017 following a fall that tore 3 quadriceps tendons lose from the kneecap. Tried physical therapy and a hinged brace similar to the McDaniel brace @David shared with us. Still was not strong enough to carry a pack, even a light one, I tried. Ended up having surgery to reattach the tendons to the kneecap and clip some torn meniscus at a facility that specializes in repairing sports injuries. I am almost 7 months post surgery with a strength test scheduled next week. I suspect good things. Now to just keep losing weight and exercising. I plan to walk a stretch in December for a few days before hospitalero'ing and then afterwards before returning home.
I suffered a full rupture of my right quadriceps tendon in 2011. I had the repair surgery a week after the accident. It was a long road back from that injury, but when I walked in 2015 the right leg was great. It’s as good as gold now. Now if I could just get the left knee to the same place.
 

Phil W

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances to Melide, May-early July 2016,
Zamora Dec 2017 as Hospitalero
#15
Glad you had a full recovery on the right knee. I'm hoping for the same. Hang in there on the left knee. For me aging has become somewhat painful, guess it is reminding me of all those exciting things I did while a bit younger.
Phil
 

DevereUx

Devereaux
Camino(s) past & future
Fall 2018
#16
Ive twice had miniscus surgery. Twice I was back running marathons within 6-9 months. Never had the shot. Wanted it clean. BUT...I did a lengthy search for the "best" surgeon. THat included asking nipumerous physicians and nurses for the "best".
 

martin1ws

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Somport to Finisterre Jul-Aug 2018
#17
...
I am trying to avoid an artificial joint replacement. Instead, I am in favor of keeping my original bits, but making them like new...if that is possible.
...
Could you explain a little bit more why you want to avoid an artificial joint replacement?
Would you want to avoid a hip replacement as long as possible as well ... or is a knee joint replacement especially difficult?
 
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
#18
Replacing a natural joint, any joint, with an artificial one, no matter how good, is a one-way street. You cannot revert back to the natural joint if you are not satisfied. So, logically, one wants to retain as many of the original parts for as long as medically possible. This concept applies to any joint, knee, hip, elbow, ankle.. any joint for which a viable replacement exists.

Note: I am NOT saying 'no - never' to joint replacement. I am only advocating delaying the irreversible surgery until and unless one is convinced that this is the sole way to retain quality of life or to prevent loss of movement. This point of no-return is different for every person and every medical scenario.

I have come to realize as I age, as gracefully as possible I might add, that quality of life is very important to maintaining a healthy outlook on each new day. In that context, maintaining independence, mobility and the ability to do what interests you is paramount.

In my PERSONAL situation, my joints are fine. It is solely the menisci in my knees that are worn out, trimmed to the maximum and reduced to nil effectiveness. This was caused by some 20 years of living as a morbidly obese person.

In 2005 I had a bariatric lap band installed to finally get some control over my weight issues. It helped, but is only a tool. I continue to struggle with a very low metabolism and relative inactivity. So, while I am dealing with the weight as a never-ending struggle, the damage to my knees was already done.

Again, in MY situation, I am trying to delay knee joint replacement, in favor of the emerging newer forms of treatment that might restore my natural joint to fuller performance. If it is not viable for me, then I will opt for joint replacement, but only when there is no other choice.

If and when the choice comes to getting new knees or forget about doing another Camino, I will assess my extant age, health and interests, still preferring to keep my original pieces as long as possible.

Hope this helps the dialog.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: September 24 - October 31 (2015); February/March (2019)
#19
I appreciate all the responses to this post. Fortunately, I’m not at the point where I’m pondering a knee replacement. I’ve still got most of my cartilage. For me, if it got to the point where I couldn’t walk distances due to bone-on-bone pain, I’d get the knee replacement. In general though, I’m not keen to go under the knife. My sense is that it’d be better to hang on to whatever meniscus I have rather than have it trimmed away. My knee is not locking up. If it were I’d get the surgery. Due to extensive walking, it has gotten inflamed and angry though. What I am finding is that it is responding to relative rest, ice and ibuprofen. That leads me to believe that it will respond well to another cortisone shot. Keeping my fingers crossed.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2015 Villafranca to Santiago
2016 St Jean to Los Arcos
2018 24-Sept Leon to Finnisterre
#21
I’ve had tears fixed via ortho on both knees. Recovery took me about 1 month. Used to do crazy thing like Ironman. I think you are walking too much and too fast. It takes 48 hours to recover fully, meaning your body gets stronger and not continually depleted. Especially if you have a knee issue! Steroids are temporary and usually have less value each time, plus might contribute to further actual damage. Tread carefully, my friend, you will want those knees for a long time!
 

jennysa

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Camino Aragones 2012, 2017, Via Francigena 2016 & 17,
#23
I had similar problems and could hardly walk Fortunately I had a wonderful Orthopedic surgeon . I had an arthroscope and had that wonderful Gel injected into my knee. I walked 8kms 2 days after that and 2 weeks later I did a 210 km hiking trail. 2 months later I walked from Lourdes to Pamplona and then went on to walk the Primitivo. I have never looked back. I was meticulous about doing exercises. Look at YouTube - lots of Pre and post op exercises. The gel that is injected into your knee lasts for about a year and then has to be repeated but it is worth it as it cushions the joint. I have never had a cortisone injection
 
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago to Finisterre to Muxia 2013
Camino Frances May 2015
Camino Frances July 2017
#24
Hi Tom,

A positive story for you- I broke my leg badly as a teenager while skiing and was made aware shortly afterwards that I was likely to have knee issues in the future. Ironically it was when I was at my lightest, and annoyingly most active in many years that my knee gave me serious trouble at the age of 41. As well as the torn meniscus it was found that I had severely worn cartilage on my femur and tibia due to badly set bones. So in the November of 2014 I went for surgery to trim the meniscus and microfracture (this apparently encourages new cartiage growth) the bone ends. The operation started at noon and I was walking out on crutches by 6. I was off the crutches within a week and cycling again by January, then starting my first full Camino in May with no ill effects.

Obviously situations and outcomes vary but things went very well for me. Hope it works out for you too.

Rob.
 

TaraWalks

Peregrina without a skateboard
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2016 & 2018, planning for Le Puy 2019/2020ish and for some shorter Caminos stacked
#25
A year ago I was diagnosed with a torn lateral meniscus on my left leg. At that time I received a cortisone shot and have been having no issues up until a couple weeks ago. I’ve been averaging over six miles walking a day. Apple Health tells me I’ve walked about 1300 miles so far this year. When training I walk a fifteen minute mile. In the past two weeks I’ve started experiencing pain again in the left knee. I’ve made an appointment with my knee doc to have a recheck. I’m expecting I’ll get another cortisone shot at that time and hope that that will suffice. Surgery is always an option and may be necessary at some point. I’ve been hoping to put it off. I have slowed my walking pace and lightened my training schedule for the time being.

Here are my questions, for those of you that did have your meniscus repaired, what was the result and how long was your recovery? I am walking my second Camino Frances this coming Feb and Mar. Where I’m leaning right now is to get the cortisone shot and see if the knee settles down. Honestly, up until a couple weeks ago it’s been good as gold.
Hi Tom, apologies if this has already been said. I'm not sure how old you are and how much you want to have surgery but I'm just going to float the Physio perspective.

Admittedly my treatment population is jail inmates but I see a lot of meniscal tears so just a thought:

If you're not bone on bone and you're still pondering the surgery, the current evidence suggests that the long term outcomes for just Physio vs meniscal repair and Physio are the same. (One just doesn't have the risk of post op complications and the rehab post).

Bear in mind that every surgeon's rehab protocol will be different and no amount of excessive Physio will speed up your rehab. You have to follow the protocol to the letter for best results. In saying that, you need to "prehab" your knees (and the muscle groups up and down the kinetic chain) before surgery anyway for best results, so you don't just want to walk into surgery unprepared.

Whilst you're prehabbing, you may find that your knee feels stronger, you have better proprioception and control of the knee and you pain may decrease as a result. My advice is to try this as it's the lowest risk option with the highest gain, you can weigh up the surgery options. You have to be committed though (but I don't doubt that you are ;).

Cortisone is a lovely quick fix but doesn't last and you're only allowed a certain number of shots in a certain space of time. Also there is no guarantee that your next CSI will be as effective as the first.

In the mean time RICE post all training hikes. Take your NSAIDS and do your Physio as directed (no more and no less), wear supportive foot wear, use poles for tricky descents to avoid twisting your knee and see how you feel.

My prison inmates frequently try the Physio option and are generally much happier for it. (Besides, having any kind of surgery inside is not pretty).

I'd love to know what you end up doing.
Cheers,
T
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: September 24 - October 31 (2015); February/March (2019)
#27
Ps. Try to stay away from asphalt and concrete
I have slowed my pace of late. As far as walking surfaces, unfortunately the trails around my neighborhood are all blacktop. I can drive out a bit to gravel trails, but it seems a shame to have to drive someplace to walk.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: September 24 - October 31 (2015); February/March (2019)
#28
I thought I’d post an update here. I got another cortisone shot yesterday. I took it easy yesterday and will do the same today since it’s going to really hot today. It’s supposed to cool some by Monday, so I’ll start walking again then. I talked with the physician’s assistant about the gel and when it is time for surgery. He said that the gel could be another step after cortisone quits working. I got almost a year of relief from the last cortisone shot, so we are sticking with that for now. He said results from the gel are a bit hit or miss. As for surgery, as I thought, that is the last option and is generally not undertaken unless you’re having locking or buckling of the knee. I’m having neither of those. The knee does feel better already, so I’m hopeful I can get back to my old pace and distance. Thanks for all the feedback.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: September 24 - October 31 (2015); February/March (2019)
#29
Good news! I’m ten days out from my cortisone shot, and my left knee is as good as new. I walked 5-1/4 miles (~9 km) today at a brisk pace and had absolutely zero knee pain. I kept expecting it to show up, but it never did. The knee has been great the rest of the day. I think what I’ll do is get another cortisone shot a few weeks before I leave on my Camino, just as an insurance policy.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2020)
#31
Just some more thoughts to add to the Knee debate. Of course these only relate to my case, and we are all different. But it's useful to share experiences I think.

I finally got in to see a specialist today. Scans showed torn meniscus and grade 3 arthritis.

It seems by policy thus far of walking very overweight (extra 15-20 kg above ideal weight) and 'training on the Camino' during the first week, probably contributed to all of this.

So if I'm going to walk another Camino, three things have to happen according to the Doc.

  1. Lose at least 10 kgs. I'll try 15. to get from 96 to 80 ish kg. I've put on weight since returning from Camino :(
  2. Exercise for 20 minutes 5 times a week on a static bike, to build up leg and knee muscles. This will protect the knee.
  3. Optional. Have PRP treatment. Plasma injections into the knees to speed up recovery. 3 injections spaced over a month. ($1,000 all up)
As we all know, a meniscus tear cannot be repaired, and it does not regenerate. I asked about surgery. Seems this is only done these days if the tear keeps 'catching' and causing pain. Basically they cut away the section that is torn. This means the joint will wear faster!

So no promises it seems. There is a risk that part way through the Camino it could all flare up again. But a change of lifestyle, focused on losing weight and regular exercise seems to be the plan. Rather than rushing to get fit at the last minute.......

We live and learn.......

So for those who walk very overweight, like I have been doing, it could quite possibly cause irreparable damage.
 

lissie45

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning to walk Frances 2019
#32
Robo I’ve dropped 12 kg in the last 18 months and the difference in my arthritic knees is amazing. I still need to drop another 10kg before a cami is next year. Look at Pilates too - is really good for strengthening all your muscles and completes low impact
 
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
#33
Less carried weight, whether on your frame or in your mochila is the bottom line. This is a case of "less is more."

One can either lose weight, always preferred, or carry less weight while on Camino. Your knees and other joints do not know or care where the added weight comes from. Reducing the amount of weight you carry on those knees, hips, ankles, etc, it the key thing here.

I think we could call the concept; "total, all-in ready to walk" or just "Camino-weight..." It means you, dressed and completely kitted out and with your loaded rucksack on a scale... The value is relative to each pilgrim, but is or can be used to gauge whether YOU are too heavy, or weather YOUR RUCKSACK is relatively too heavy...

Or at least I think so...o_O
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: September 24 - October 31 (2015); February/March (2019)
#35
Just some more thoughts to add to the Knee debate. Of course these only relate to my case, and we are all different. But it's useful to share experiences I think.

I finally got in to see a specialist today. Scans showed torn meniscus and grade 3 arthritis.

It seems by policy thus far of walking very overweight (extra 15-20 kg above ideal weight) and 'training on the Camino' during the first week, probably contributed to all of this.

So if I'm going to walk another Camino, three things have to happen according to the Doc.

  1. Lose at least 10 kgs. I'll try 15. to get from 96 to 80 ish kg. I've put on weight since returning from Camino :(
  2. Exercise for 20 minutes 5 times a week on a static bike, to build up leg and knee muscles. This will protect the knee.
  3. Optional. Have PRP treatment. Plasma injections into the knees to speed up recovery. 3 injections spaced over a month. ($1,000 all up)
As we all know, a meniscus tear cannot be repaired, and it does not regenerate. I asked about surgery. Seems this is only done these days if the tear keeps 'catching' and causing pain. Basically they cut away the section that is torn. This means the joint will wear faster!

So no promises it seems. There is a risk that part way through the Camino it could all flare up again. But a change of lifestyle, focused on losing weight and regular exercise seems to be the plan. Rather than rushing to get fit at the last minute.......

We live and learn.......

So for those who walk very overweight, like I have been doing, it could quite possibly cause irreparable damage.
I lost about 15kg before my first Camino. 13 of that is still off. I lost 5 more on my Camino. That 5 hasn’t stayed off. I’m planning to lose 5kg more before walking in Feb. Losing the weight is critical for me to be able to walk with comfort.
 

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