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Trailrunners

Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances April 2020
How many miles do you normally get from a pair of trailrunners before you need to replace them? I've been wearing a pair on my treadmill since September, while carrying a backpack, and all of a sudden I'm having foot pain. I'm wondering if it is my shoes that need to be replaced.
 

zenofmatthew

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
The dimensions of
length and breadth are now unplanned,
depth and time are cast.
In my long distance running days, 500 miles was my "check engine," feet feeling worse was an immediate replace. I also used to alternate pairs, trying not to use the same pairs twice in a row where possible. For reference, I was doing 60-70 miles per week. Your mileage may vary.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
How many miles do you normally get from a pair of trailrunners before you need to replace them? I've been wearing a pair on my treadmill since September, while carrying a backpack, and all of a sudden I'm having foot pain. I'm wondering if it is my shoes that need to be replaced.
It is possible - though it would not be my first thought as a primary candidate - that your foot pain is related to wear from use on a treadmill. Treadmill walking does not exactly reproduce the true stresses and wear issues as free walking. Where I might expect to have usable wear in a trail shoe for 400 to 500 miles while backpacking in the wild, I would expect that on a treadmill, they would easily last two to three times as long.

If shoes are an issue, a big clue would be evidence showing deformities from motion control issues: pronation or supination.

Keep in mind that there are numerous causes for foot pain, regardless of type of shoes, newness, cushioning, etc.

Depending on the describable symptoms of your pain, its onset (sudden or gradual), you may need to further explore the issue with a Podiatric specialist.
 

Vacajoe

Traded in my work boots for hiking ones
Camino(s) past & future
2019 Biarritz-Pamplona-Lourdes
2018 Aragon/Frances/Finis
2018 Operation Sabre
2018 Marin Ramble
My first sign of my shoes reaching the end of their lifespan is foot pain, but certainly your pain could be a result of numerous other issues. I get about 700-800 walking miles on my Altra Timps, less if it involves bad weather or a heavy pack.
 

Chris Gi

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Did April through June 2018 from Pamplona to Santiago.
2020 May or end of September - NO!
2021 ?
How many miles do you normally get from a pair of trailrunners before you need to replace them? I've been wearing a pair on my treadmill since September, while carrying a backpack, and all of a sudden I'm having foot pain. I'm wondering if it is my shoes that need to be replaced.
500 is about as good as it gets for basic trail runners. On the other hand my husband’s heavy leather Merrell boots will outlive him.
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(2012) Le Puy/CF (2015) Portugues (2017) Norte (2018) CF (2019)
It is possible - though it would not be my first thought as a primary candidate - that your foot pain is related to wear from use on a treadmill. Treadmill walking does not exactly reproduce the true stresses and wear issues as free walking. Where I might expect to have usable wear in a trail shoe for 400 to 500 miles while backpacking in the wild, I would expect that on a treadmill, they would easily last two to three times as long.

If shoes are an issue, a big clue would be evidence showing deformities from motion control issues: pronation or supination.

Keep in mind that there are numerous causes for foot pain, regardless of type of shoes, newness, cushioning, etc.

Depending on the describable symptoms of your pain, its onset (sudden or gradual), you may need to further explore the issue with a Podiatric specialist.
quick question my friend. Just came back a few weeks agofrom the Camino. I will be writing about it soon. I had no problem with my Brooks Cascadias. Second Camino with them. The inner insole is pretty shot. So I need to replace them. I have walked about 1650K with this pair. Had no foot problems or blisters. I love them. Do I need a new pair? Will be walking again in October on the CP. You are my foot guru.
 
Camino(s) past & future
(2015) Frances
(2018) Portuguese
(2019) VdP Seville to Salamanca
(2020) VdP Salamanca to Santiago
I buy a new pair, wear them, and throw them away after a Camino (300-400 miles). If you wait until you get foot pain, you've waited too long. I'm probably throwing money away by ditching them too early, but the alternative is to make a mistake and pay for it with pain.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances April 2020
I'm wearing Brooks Cascadia. They are coming upon 300 miles really quickly. I am going to try a new pair and see if it helps. Thanks for all the feedback everyone.😊❤😊
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
quick question my friend. Just came back a few weeks agofrom the Camino. I will be writing about it soon. I had no problem with my Brooks Cascadias. Second Camino with them. The inner insole is pretty shot. So I need to replace them. I have walked about 1650K with this pair. Had no foot problems or blisters. I love them. Do I need a new pair? Will be walking again in October on the CP. You are my foot guru.
When I thru-hiked the Pacific Crest Trail, I had to ship boxes of food and supplies to locations along the entire 2650 mile length. Sometimes it would take two days to leave the trail, walk to a trailhead, hitch a ride to the town where the post office was holding the package, and then return.

All of that meant that I needed to plan for replacement shoes before they 'blew out' of their useful life. No shopping along the way where I could easily depend on getting the shoes I wanted. I decided the best course was to plan on a shoe replacement - whether needed or not - between 500 and 600 miles.

So I bought 5 pairs of identical shoes to ship with my other supplies in some of the boxes for pickup. Sometimes the replacements were needed, sometimes I could have gone farther along the PCT with what I already was wearing.

So if you can, get the Cascadia version that you like, and replace the old ones. (good shoe, btw). I will typically allow no more than 800 miles, even when not backpacking, due to my unique needs. But, I will use the old ones that I replaced as around-the-house chore and wear shoes.

A lot of times, the midsole cushioning has broken down before 900 miles of wear. Trail and street running shoes are designed to do that. The impact cushioning seems more effective with the type of materials in 'cushioning' that create a sacrificial deterioration.

In fact, the uppers and even the outersole can look pretty good even with that much mileage when the midsole components are not doing the same job of absorbing impacts.

A good, third party insole can help extend the life of the shoe by taking up the role of help to absorb impacts, but that is only a temporary solution at best. Even then, a lot depends on whether the other components of the shoe are still functional - - the motion control and stability stuff. If the shoe shows that is is rolling to the inside or outside (pronation or supination), then it can be damaging to the ankle and foot.

Sorry for being so wordy, but I hope that gives you some ideas. Send me a PM if you think I can be of further help, or I'm happy to post answers on the thread, too. :)
 

linkster

Nunca dejes de creer!
Camino(s) past & future
CF (17) Sarria - Portomarín
CF (17) SJPdP - SdC
CF (18) SJPdP - Fisterra
CP (19) Porto - Muxia
I have worn Hoka Bondi, and Altra Olympus. I only get about 350 miles out of them. Usage on the trail and at home on the pavement seem to be about the same for me. I wear insoles, but the cushioning breaks down in the shoes. I can feel the difference when I put a new pair on. I have bounced a spare pair along the CF using the correos general delivery (lista de correos).:D :cool:
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances April 2020
I have worn Hoka Bondi, and Altra Olympus. I only get about 350 miles out of them. Usage on the trail and at home on the pavement seem to be about the same for me. I wear insoles, but the cushioning breaks down in the shoes. I can feel the difference when I put a new pair on. I have bounced a spare pair along the CF using the correos general delivery (lista de correos).:D :cool:
When I have run/walked marathons I think I only get around 300 miles from my Brooks Ghost shoes. I don't know why I thought I would get more from trailrunners. I'm kind of shocked other people can get 2 to 3 times as much use from theirs.
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(2012) Le Puy/CF (2015) Portugues (2017) Norte (2018) CF (2019)
When I thru-hiked the Pacific Crest Trail, I had to ship boxes of food and supplies to locations along the entire 2650 mile length. Sometimes it would take two days to leave the trail, walk to a trailhead, hitch a ride to the town where the post office was holding the package, and then return.

All of that meant that I needed to plan for replacement shoes before they 'blew out' of their useful life. No shopping along the way where I could easily depend on getting the shoes I wanted. I decided the best course was to plan on a shoe replacement - whether needed or not - between 500 and 600 miles.

So I bought 5 pairs of identical shoes to ship with my other supplies in some of the boxes for pickup. Sometimes the replacements were needed, sometimes I could have gone farther along the PCT with what I already was wearing.

So if you can, get the Cascadia version that you like, and replace the old ones. (good shoe, btw). I will typically allow no more than 800 miles, even when not backpacking, due to my unique needs. But, I will use the old ones that I replaced as around-the-house chore and wear shoes.

A lot of times, the midsole cushioning has broken down before 900 miles of wear. Trail and street running shoes are designed to do that. The impact cushioning seems more effective with the type of materials in 'cushioning' that create a sacrificial deterioration.

In fact, the uppers and even the outersole can look pretty good even with that much mileage when the midsole components are not doing the same job of absorbing impacts.

A good, third party insole can help extend the life of the shoe by taking up the role of help to absorb impacts, but that is only a temporary solution at best. Even then, a lot depends on whether the other components of the shoe are still functional - - the motion control and stability stuff. If the shoe shows that is is rolling to the inside or outside (pronation or supination), then it can be damaging to the ankle and foot.

Sorry for being so wordy, but I hope that gives you some ideas. Send me a PM if you think I can be of further help, or I'm happy to post answers on the thread, too. :)
I like that you are wordy because it adds alot of texture and understanding to what you are teaching me. Thanks alot. I will definitely heed your advice.
Thanks so much my friend.
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(2012) Le Puy/CF (2015) Portugues (2017) Norte (2018) CF (2019)
I'm wearing Brooks Cascadia. They are coming upon 300 miles really quickly. I am going to try a new pair and see if it helps. Thanks for all the feedback everyone.😊❤😊
I read davebugg's advice and I will be buying a new pair of Cascadias. I have now walked 5 caminos in 4 different incarnations of Cascadias and they have served me so well!
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(2012) Le Puy/CF (2015) Portugues (2017) Norte (2018) CF (2019)
When I have run/walked marathons I think I only get around 300 miles from my Brooks Ghost shoes. I don't know why I thought I would get more from trailrunners. I'm kind of shocked other people can get 2 to 3 times as much use from theirs.
Maybe the shock is that I got away with 1600K worth of one pair of Casacadias without blisters or foot pain. Maybe I am really lucky. I am sure not an elegant walker. Don't think I would ever be confused with Gene Kelly or Fred Astaire.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
When I have run/walked marathons I think I only get around 300 miles from my Brooks Ghost shoes. I don't know why I thought I would get more from trailrunners. I'm kind of shocked other people can get 2 to 3 times as much use from theirs.
Among the many factors which influence how long a specific shoe will last is a person's weight, gait, motion control issues, running and walking terrain. . . these are just a few things that will determine longevity. How much mileage one person comfortably gets out of a pair of shoes will not necessarily apply to another.

Seeing how someone walks and looking at a shoe in person makes it easier to give advice on what to advise, but hopefully the Forum is providing a place for you to start.

For those who have persistent problems with feet during active outdoors sports stuff, I advise finding a Podiatrist who specializes in athletes and sports. They have more insight, training, and skills at looking at the problems backpackers, runners and walkers persistently have with feet and ankles. If you are not at the point where you feel the need to consult with one, it never hurts to look for one in your area so that you know who to contact if the need ever arrives :)
 

brambles

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Inca (2018)
Camino Frances (June/July 2019)
Camino Portugues (June/July 2020)
I am always surprised about recommendations for Brooks Cascadias. The collar/ opening of my daughter's started to open up and disintegrate by day 5 on the CF.
 

brambles

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Inca (2018)
Camino Frances (June/July 2019)
Camino Portugues (June/July 2020)
Also my Altra Timps felt like slippers by week three on the CF. I felt every stone. I will never buy a shoe without a rock plate again.
 

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016), VDLP (2017), Mozarabe (2018), Vasco/Bayona (2019)
Also my Altra Timps felt like slippers by week three on the CF. I felt every stone. I will never buy a shoe without a rock plate again.
I love the comfort of my Brooks Ghost, but am now looking for a sturdier replacement trail runner - by week two of my last walk, I had to concentrate on placing every step, to avoid bruising my feet.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
For those who like the shoe they are using - - but need more protection to the sole of your foot from all of the pokey stuff that will impact the sole of your foot: partially buried rocks with the pointed ends exposed, chunky gravels, sticks, etc. - - you can make your own 'rock plate' or shield. Combined with a more cushioned insole, it can make a world of difference.

Making your own rock plate; though not as elegant a solution, does seem to work fairly well for most who have done so. :) If you find it works, it is a cheaper solution than replacing a still good shoe.

Use the insoles of your shoe to trace a pattern on a sturdy, but flexible piece of plastic type of material. Some use gallon milk jugs, others have used the type of very thin and flexible cutting 'boards'. Others have found material from places like Amazon.

After cutting out the material, attach double sided tape to the rock plate and place on the interior bottom of the shoe, under the insole.

The shoe still remains flexible and comfortable. It can add a bit of torsional stiffness, (less twisting), but should not interfere with the overall 'feel' of the shoe itself.
 

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