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Using WikiLoc ?

2020 Camino Guides

Robo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2020)
Hi Everyone.

I have recently added wikiloc to my phone as I plan to start walking some of the more remote Caminos, starting with the VdlP.

Also started reading Gerald Kelly's guide book but would like to supplement the maps in that guide with GPS tracks of some kind.

Being one of those Pilgrims who can get caught up in the landscape and daydream a bit, I suspect I could wander off track quite easily :oops: And anyway, I like to have some kind of back up guide/map anyway, as I enjoy tracking my progress and estimating when I might arrive at way points etc. Keeps the mind active........ Bit like driving (rough speed and distance calculations in my head)

So my question is twofold really.

Part 1.

Is wikiloc really just an app to record your own tracks? Hopefuly not. When I look for via de la plata on the app I get about 60,000 trails! By filtering for hiking only, i get 15,000

So if I want to follow a 'good' track, how do you select one? Are they scored/graded? Or is it pot luck? I'd rather not follow the track of some 'num nut' who got lost all the time. :rolleyes:

Part 2.

Are there better apps to use, whereby you can down load a gps track that is recognised as being authentic/reliable/the right track?

Any pointers would be most useful.

I realise there have been a couple of posts on this topic but the answer seemed to be spending e120 on an app upgrade and I'm not sure that will still answer my question.......... Are there better options, just downloading files from somewhere to my phone?
 
Last edited:

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
Sorry, can't really answer because I usually follow my nose and keep myself before my butt when walking ;)

But I do check other GPS (Wikiloc) tracks from time to time on less walked Caminos. I just check them when in doubt because I don't want to be navigated (especially by voice) by them. And surely you'll see/feel if a "num nut" got lost several times ;)

Buen (GPS) Camino!
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
First, Robo, I think you will be fine walking the Vdlp without GPS. I have a GPS and this year brought along tracks for Almería to Mérida. I didn´t bring any for the walk beyond Mérida, which is where the Mozárabe joins the Vdlp (except for Alan Syke’s detour to visit the visigothic Santa Lucía de Trampal after Aljucén. And for that little detour, so worth the trouble, the GPS is essential). The Vdlp is extremely well marked, IMO.

But that’s not what you asked, so I will get back on track ;) — a pun! I use wikiloc exclusively and have never had a problem. I do a little searching to find what look to be the best tracks before I download them onto my computer — first, I delete all but “hiking” to get the bike tracks out of the way and then pull up a couple and compare. Usually all of the tracks essentially take the same route or with minor differences. To find tracks, I type a few key words, for example “Almería Alboloduy camino mozárabe” into the search function. Usually I find someone who has downloaded the entire camino and just go with that person. When I look at the tracks, I can see on my computer screen where people had to double back and can erase those mistakes. Then I transfer all to my GPS. It is time consuming, but it is part of my familiarization with the camino anyway. I also like to take alternatives for places where people have said there is a mountain alternative, etc. And those are easy to find by comparing what different people have recorded.

I do not walk with my head in my GPS. In fact, I do not walk with my GPS in my hand. I have it in a side pocket and only use it if I am at an intersection and don’t know which way to go, or if it has been at least 15 minutes or so without an arrow. That’s the deal I made with myself since like you I don’t want to walk staring at a screen. But it was a real life saver a couple of times on the Camino Castellano-Aragonés in particular.

I have debated putting something on my phone, but I know how to do two things with my Garmin Dakota GPS and I will continue with it till I have no alternative but to change technology. That is likely to be soon since I think Garmin has stopped making them. But I will probably get another GPS because people have warned that the GPS really eats up the phone battery. Since i am usually walking alone, and I do walk long stages, I prefer to not have to worry about my phone dying.

I hope this makes sense, but let me know if I’ve really confused you. Buen camino, Laurie
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
You don't have to worry about phone battery if you put your phone in airplane mode and have previously uploaded GPS maps. In this case your phone is just a GPS, not a phone anymore (except for 112). And if you use it only as a check-up at the intersections then a middle range (pricewise) phone battery should work for three days. For this what we are talking about of course ;)
 

J F Gregory

Portugal Central - October 2019
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (March-April,2016) finished, (October 2019) Portuguese Central Route.
I have never used GPS on a pilgrimage. I use maps picked up in tourist information offices.
 

Doogman

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
?
I have found MAPS.ME works very well. It is a free app, and once you have downloaded the maps you need to your phone, it works offline. It was a lifesaver when I was on the Via Francigena in northern France, where I found the marking/signage difficult to follow.

Below are a couple of websites that have GPS tracks that are compatible with MAPS.ME. I cannot vouch for how up to date these are, or how accurate they are, but it's a start:

http://centrodedescargas.cnig.es/CentroDescargas/loadCamSan.do

https://www.santiago.nl/downloads#spanje

Best of luck!
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Hi, Robo,
Just a quick follow up.

I went to wikiloc.com and searched for Hiking -- Sevilla Guillena via de la plata. The most relevant and highly ranked trails come up first and a quick comparison of a few of them helps you see the options.

For instance, on the first stage from Sevilla, I know you can choose to go through Camas or not. Here is one of each:

https://www.wikiloc.com/hiking-trails/sevilla-a-guillena-via-de-la-plata-nuevo-10965116

https://www.wikiloc.com/hiking-trails/sevilla-guillena-via-de-la-plata-etapa-1-24269020

I always go stage by stage, because my GPS will only take a maximum of "500 points" and a track of the whole vdlp with 500 points would be very unhelpful.
 

sunshines

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
camino de portuguese (2018)
camino Frances (portion) (2019)
camino primitivo/Frances (2019)
I hike short hikes in Tenerife as I live here and I use OsmAnd over wikiloc although I download the wiki and translate it to OsmAnd... Os has much more detail like an OS map and it has saved me getting lost numerous times .. best bet though is to take J F Gregory with you :):):)
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
But take care - the CI has already changed significantly since this was uploaded in March this year.

sample route changes.JPG

WARNING: Roads are shifted, houses burn, are abandoned or rebuilt; a round world distorts a flat map; man’s memory is fallible; expect not exactness. (Rubric from colonial era map of New England)
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2014), Camino Mozarabe, (3-days then aborted (2016), Via de la Plata/Sanabres (2018)
Robo:

An Aussie hiking companion on the VDLP last Spring suggested an app similar to MAPS.ME, called "Windy Maps". Functions in identical manner, off-line, "airplane" mode, etc. I never got lost, and always knew where I was in relation to the "trail". You'll really like the VDLP regardless of where you start.

Buen Camino,

Greg
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
But I will probably get another GPS because people have warned that the GPS really eats up the phone battery.
Maybe the GPS function on the phone works for some people, but for me it was a bust, because I couldn't get the maps or GPS on the phone to work in without a connection to the internet, even though I had installed all the necessary maps and apps and thought I had sussed it out ahead of time. But I had had an active data package when I did that, and not on the Camino.
AND...all that eats up memory, so if you have a not too expensive phone, you may find that you max out once you install both.
There is nothing like the feeling of being in the middle of no-where without a functioning map, and no clear idea which way to go - the result can be getting lost. Fortunately, on the VDLP you would be unlikely to be in that situation.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
Maybe the GPS function on the phone works for some people, but for me it was a bust, because I couldn't get the maps or GPS on the phone to work in without a connection to the internet, even though I had installed all the necessary maps and apps and thought I had sussed it out ahead of time. But I had had an active data package when I did that, and not on the Camino.
AND...all that eats up memory, so if you have a not too expensive phone, you may find that you max out once you install both.
There is nothing like the feeling of being in the middle of no-where without a functioning map, and no clear idea which way to go - the result can be getting lost. Fortunately, on the VDLP you would be unlikely to be in that situation.
Vira, just buy a bit bigger SD card for a few € and extend your phone memory :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Del Estrecho, Ruta Fray Leopoldo,
Vía Serrana, Camino Francés
Robo, I'm glad you are giving Wikiloc a try. We have used it extensively on three 90-day trips to Spain, and like it for the following reasons:
  1. It was developed by a group of Spanish outdoor enthusiasts and thus has extensive coverage for trails in Spain. Often local walkers will add photos or journal entries that alert us to interesting historical, cultural, or geographic points along the way. For lesser known caminos like the Vía Serrana or the Ruta Fray Leopoldo, this additional information also lets us judge whether a stage has any particular difficulties. The details on Wikiloc gave us the confidence to tackle stages of the Via Serrano north and south of El Colmenar last year, for example.
  2. It works offline without access to cell or wifi if you have downloaded the tracks and basemap beforehand.
  3. It now uses the Spanish IGN maps for the basemaps. This is a new feature that was just added a few weeks ago when Google began charging websites for the use of its (formerly free) maps. IGN maps provide a wealth of local information not available from non-Spanish basemaps. To see the IGN map on a Wikiloc page on your computer, click on the word "map" at the top center-right of the satellite view that comes up on any Wikiloc individual track page. On your phone, the default map for any track is now the IGN map.
  4. You can upload any track you have from another source (such as an official camino track) to Wikiloc and see it displayed on the IGN map as you follow it. This upload can be shared or kept private.
To add to Laurie's useful tips above, here are some things I do to find appropriate trails:
  1. I search on my computer (easier on the big screen rather than on the phone) using either words (the way Laurie described above) or using the map feature. To find the map search, scroll down a bit on the home page, and then click on the icon of a world map that appears on the right. As you zoom in (and in and in), more and more track symbols will appear. (The symbol appears on the map at the point where the track begins.) You can refine your search by clicking on "filters" on the left. In addition to choosing the symbol for walking trails, you can weed out a lot of tracks by narrowing down the distance range that you are looking for.
  2. Once I am at the appropriate zoom level, I click on the "eye" symbol in the left hand panel to see the track on the map. I may have more than one track open at once to compare them and see variations.
  3. I open the pages for the tracks I want to see more details on. Do they have photos, or a write-up, or flags for points of interest? Often, there will be something on this page that will let you see whether this is a track you trust. Maybe it was made by an official camino association, a local walking club, or an outdoor association.
  4. I click on the heart symbol (left-hand corner above the map) to make a list of "favorites" that I want to download to my phone.
  5. I next switch to my phone, open the wikiloc app, and click on "profile" (bottom right) and then on "favorites" (middle of page). This gives me a list of the trails I just selected on my computer.
  6. I click on the name of the first trail to open it on my phone, scroll down to the bottom of the page, and slide the button over by the words "Save Trail". The slider will now show green, indicating that the trail is downloaded to the phone for offline use.
  7. I use the back arrow at the upper left to go back to my favorites list and repeat step 6 for all the trails I want to save on my phone for offline use.
  8. I make sure I have the appropriate background map downloaded for offline use. This page tells how to do it.
We used the Wikiloc app every day this spring with our phones in airplane mode and never ran out of battery. The IGN background map (which we previously had to get from another app; see the planning page on our journal below) gave us lots of enjoyable information about our surroundings (Spanish names of fountains, cortijos, cortefuegos, etc.) If you decide to use it, I hope it adds as much pleasure to your walk.
 
Last edited:

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
Robo, I'm glad you are giving Wikiloc a try. We have used it extensively on three 90-day trips to Spain, and like it for the following reasons:
  1. It was developed by a group of Spanish outdoor enthusiasts and thus has extensive coverage for trails in Spain. Often local walkers will add photos or journal entries that alert us to interesting historical, cultural, or geographic points along the way. For lesser known caminos like the Vía Serrana or the Ruta Fray Leopoldo, this additional information also lets us judge whether a stage has any particular difficulties. The details on Wikiloc gave us the confidence to tackle stages of the Via Serrano north and south of El Colmenar last year, for example.
  2. It works offline without access to cell or wifi if you have downloaded the tracks and basemap beforehand.
  3. It now uses the Spanish IGN maps for the basemap. This is a new feature that was just added a few weeks ago when Google began charging websites for the use of its (formerly free) maps. IGN maps provide a wealth of local information not available from non-Spanish basemaps. To see the IGN map on a Wikiloc page on your computer, click on the word "map" at the top center-right of the satellite view that comes up on any Wikiloc individual track page. On your phone, the default map for any track is now the IGN map.
To add to Laurie's useful tips above, here are some things I do to find appropriate trails:
  1. I search on my computer (easier on the big screen rather than on the phone) using either words (the way Laurie described above) or using the map feature. To find the map search, scroll down a bit on the home page, and then click on the icon of a world map that appears on the right. As you zoom in (and in and in), more and more track symbols will appear. (The symbol appears on the map at the point where the track begins.) You can refine your search by clicking on "filters" on the left. In addition to choosing the symbol for walking trails, you can weed out a lot of tracks by narrowing down the distance range that you are looking for.
  2. Once I am at the appropriate zoom level, I click on the "eye" symbol in the left hand panel to see the track on the map. I may have more than one track open at once to compare them and see variations.
  3. I open the pages for the tracks I want to see more details on. Do they have photos, or a write-up, or flags for points of interest? Often, there will be something on this page that will let you see whether this is a track you trust. Maybe it was made by an official camino association, a local walking club, or an outdoor association.
  4. I click on the heart symbol (left-hand corner above the map) to make a list of "favorites" that I want to download to my phone.
  5. I next switch to my phone, open the wikiloc app, and click on "profile" (bottom right) and then on "favorites" (middle of page). This gives me a list of the trails I just selected on my computer.
  6. I click on the name of the first trail to open it on my phone, scroll down to the bottom of the page, and slide the button over by the words "Save Trail". The slider will now show green, indicating that the trail is downloaded to the phone for offline use.
  7. I use the back arrow at the upper left to go back to my favorites list and repeat step 6 for all the trails I want to save on my phone for offline use.
  8. I make sure I have the appropriate background map downloaded for offline use. This page tells how to do it.
We used the Wikiloc app every day this spring with our phones in airplane mode and never ran out of battery. The IGN background map (which we previously had to get from another app; see the planning page on our journal below) gave us lots of enjoyable information about our surroundings (Spanish names of fountains, cortijos, cortefuegos, etc.) If you decide to use it, I hope it adds as much pleasure to your walk.
Viewranger does a very similar job. You can publish your own trails - some people compose volumes on long walks with photos, trails, advice etc for a nominal fee - or use it to store your own trails which you can keep private. I do this to save clogging up my Garmin (much better than Basecamp) or Google Earth.
Based on Open Street Maps.
 

Jeep500

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015) this year Portugal (2017)
Hello!
I did two Camino and I always used Wikiloc site to plan the distance between cities. I also used GPS MotionX ,it's an application that you could download trails into it and the best of it will provide you the maps so you can see where you are located. Sometimes it help me out to find short cuts under bad wheater.
What you need to do is to type the city that you will begin into Wikiloc often you will find few pilgrims who downloaded the track in Wikiloc. You will notice the kilometers are never the same between them. The reasons are they didn't started or finished from the same places. When the distance recorded are much more or less look at the date it was downloaded over the years they may have modified the Camino . I noticed from the Puy they changed the Camino in certain areas.
When you find the trails that you would like to use download them into your Pc then transfer them into GPS MotionX via e-mail. You are set to go ,on the Camino each day I upload the track that I will walk .
Never get lost plus I had a device that I could used to plan my day on the Camino.
Bon Chemin!
 

Jeep500

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015) this year Portugal (2017)
Hello,
I cannot answer this question ,I never used this aps and it's for Android phone only.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Aragon/Frances 08, Arles 10, Le Puy 12, Geneva 14, VdlP 15, Norte/Primitivo 15, VF 17, Levante 18,
Robo, I'm glad you are giving Wikiloc a try. We have used it extensively on three 90-day trips to Spain, and like it for the following reasons:
  1. It was developed by a group of Spanish outdoor enthusiasts and thus has extensive coverage for trails in Spain. Often local walkers will add photos or journal entries that alert us to interesting historical, cultural, or geographic points along the way. For lesser known caminos like the Vía Serrana or the Ruta Fray Leopoldo, this additional information also lets us judge whether a stage has any particular difficulties. The details on Wikiloc gave us the confidence to tackle stages of the Via Serrano north and south of El Colmenar last year, for example.
  2. It works offline without access to cell or wifi if you have downloaded the tracks and basemap beforehand.
  3. It now uses the Spanish IGN maps for the basemaps. This is a new feature that was just added a few weeks ago when Google began charging websites for the use of its (formerly free) maps. IGN maps provide a wealth of local information not available from non-Spanish basemaps. To see the IGN map on a Wikiloc page on your computer, click on the word "map" at the top center-right of the satellite view that comes up on any Wikiloc individual track page. On your phone, the default map for any track is now the IGN map.
  4. You can upload any track you have from another source (such as an official camino track) to Wikiloc and see it displayed on the IGN map as you follow it. This upload can be shared or kept private.
To add to Laurie's useful tips above, here are some things I do to find appropriate trails:
  1. I search on my computer (easier on the big screen rather than on the phone) using either words (the way Laurie described above) or using the map feature. To find the map search, scroll down a bit on the home page, and then click on the icon of a world map that appears on the right. As you zoom in (and in and in), more and more track symbols will appear. (The symbol appears on the map at the point where the track begins.) You can refine your search by clicking on "filters" on the left. In addition to choosing the symbol for walking trails, you can weed out a lot of tracks by narrowing down the distance range that you are looking for.
  2. Once I am at the appropriate zoom level, I click on the "eye" symbol in the left hand panel to see the track on the map. I may have more than one track open at once to compare them and see variations.
  3. I open the pages for the tracks I want to see more details on. Do they have photos, or a write-up, or flags for points of interest? Often, there will be something on this page that will let you see whether this is a track you trust. Maybe it was made by an official camino association, a local walking club, or an outdoor association.
  4. I click on the heart symbol (left-hand corner above the map) to make a list of "favorites" that I want to download to my phone.
  5. I next switch to my phone, open the wikiloc app, and click on "profile" (bottom right) and then on "favorites" (middle of page). This gives me a list of the trails I just selected on my computer.
  6. I click on the name of the first trail to open it on my phone, scroll down to the bottom of the page, and slide the button over by the words "Save Trail". The slider will now show green, indicating that the trail is downloaded to the phone for offline use.
  7. I use the back arrow at the upper left to go back to my favorites list and repeat step 6 for all the trails I want to save on my phone for offline use.
  8. I make sure I have the appropriate background map downloaded for offline use. This page tells how to do it.
We used the Wikiloc app every day this spring with our phones in airplane mode and never ran out of battery. The IGN background map (which we previously had to get from another app; see the planning page on our journal below) gave us lots of enjoyable information about our surroundings (Spanish names of fountains, cortijos, cortefuegos, etc.) If you decide to use it, I hope it adds as much pleasure to your walk.
This is helpful and clear. But I am still confused.
I have used the Wikiloc app for Cami Sant Jaume and Aragones, and enjoy having a good map with a yellow line showing the route done by someone else who has done the stage I am about to walk. But I have never been able to figure out how to get a blue circle, representing me, on the map. What am I doing wrong? Do I need to buy the wikiloc premium again (which I have tried in the past with no success)? Do I need to transfer the wikiloc map to some other app? Help. I'm about to the start the Camino Mozarabe from Almeria, using the Variant via Trujillo to , then Via de la Plata, then the Torres - and while I usually have a knack for finding yellow arrows, I have been lost enough times on various caminos to want a map with a yellow route and a blue dot showing where I am relative to the yellow line. And I am not good at technology - so despite having read extensively on this forum, I don't understand how to add me, the blue dot, to a wikiloc map. Can someone explain how to use wikiloc to show where I am relative to the map?
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
This is helpful and clear. But I am still confused.
I have used the Wikiloc app for Cami Sant Jaume and Aragones, and enjoy having a good map with a yellow line showing the route done by someone else who has done the stage I am about to walk. But I have never been able to figure out how to get a blue circle, representing me, on the map. What am I doing wrong? Do I need to buy the wikiloc premium again (which I have tried in the past with no success)? Do I need to transfer the wikiloc map to some other app? Help. I'm about to the start the Camino Mozarabe from Almeria, using the Variant via Trujillo to , then Via de la Plata, then the Torres - and while I usually have a knack for finding yellow arrows, I have been lost enough times on various caminos to want a map with a yellow route and a blue dot showing where I am relative to the yellow line. And I am not good at technology - so despite having read extensively on this forum, I don't understand how to add me, the blue dot, to a wikiloc map. Can someone explain how to use wikiloc to show where I am relative to the map?
I have used wikiloc for years on my Garmin Dakota GPS when I walk untraveled routes. I don’t know how it works on a phone, but as I walk, the GPS shows me as a moving black line, so I can tell if I am close to the track, which is a different color and obviously stable. I keep telling myself I should move over to the phone and wikiloc, but I am kind of a tech-phobe and this works like a charm, so I haven’t yet taken the plunge. This may not help you, and I’m sure there are others with more precise answers, but I have gotten so much help about wikiloc here that I always try to contribute something to these threads. Buen camino, have a WONDERFUL Mozárabe! Buen camino, Laurie
 
Camino(s) past & future
Aragon/Frances 08, Arles 10, Le Puy 12, Geneva 14, VdlP 15, Norte/Primitivo 15, VF 17, Levante 18,
This is helpful and clear. But I am still confused.
I have used the Wikiloc app for Cami Sant Jaume and Aragones, and enjoy having a good map with a yellow line showing the route done by someone else who has done the stage I am about to walk. But I have never been able to figure out how to get a blue circle, representing me, on the map. What am I doing wrong? Do I need to buy the wikiloc premium again (which I have tried in the past with no success)? Do I need to transfer the wikiloc map to some other app? Help. I'm about to the start the Camino Mozarabe from Almeria, using the Variant via Trujillo to , then Via de la Plata, then the Torres - and while I usually have a knack for finding yellow arrows, I have been lost enough times on various caminos to want a map with a yellow route and a blue dot showing where I am relative to the yellow line. And I am not good at technology - so despite having read extensively on this forum, I don't understand how to add me, the blue dot, to a wikiloc map. Can someone explain how to use wikiloc to show where I am relative to the map?
And just to clarify, I am using the Wikiloc app on my Iphone.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2015
I have Wikiloc Premium, just updated the app today by chance and I run it on an Android. I tested it out tonight on a nearby trail. Getting your position is easy but not intuitive.

Here is what I did. I opened up a file manager and found the gpx file of the trail. I picked Wikiloc as the app to open the file with. Wikiloc started and showed the trail in the upper part of the screen. Here is the non intuitive part; click the "record trail" item on the bottom. Your position should be shown as a blue dot with a blue triangle/arrow. You should now be able to click the "start following" item and start following the trail.

The trail was already recorded so "start recording" doesn't seem to make sense but when you are following the trail you are recording your speed, time and distance traveled so if you think that way "start recording" makes some sense.

I don't think you need Premium to get the dot.
 

C clearly

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016), VDLP (2017), Mozarabe (2018), Vasco/Bayona (2019)
I don't use Wikiloc on my phone, so likely can't help. However, something that might seem obvious - do you have "Location" turned on, on your phone?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Aragon/Frances 08, Arles 10, Le Puy 12, Geneva 14, VdlP 15, Norte/Primitivo 15, VF 17, Levante 18,
Yes. My location is turned on. And I can see my blue dot on google maps, so I know my phone has a functional blue dot.

Rick - I’m quite sure I have tried the Recording button, but then I am recording my trail and the yellow trail is no longer visible. But I haven’t opened up the file manager (and don’t Know what that is) to find the gpx file of the trail. Maybe that is my problem. I am just using my wikilocs app on my iPhone, clicking on my saved “favorite” trail, am wanting a blue dot to appear showing me where I am.

Laurie - you were such an inspiration to me when I walked the levante, the cami sant Jaume and the Catalan. But a blue dot would have been very reassuring climbing out of the San Esteve d’en Bas valley towards L’Esqirrol! Connie
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Yes. My location is turned on. And I can see my blue dot on google maps, so I know my phone has a functional blue dot.

Rick - I’m quite sure I have tried the Recording button, but then I am recording my trail and the yellow trail is no longer visible. But I haven’t opened up the file manager (and don’t Know what that is) to find the gpx file of the trail. Maybe that is my problem. I am just using my wikilocs app on my iPhone, clicking on my saved “favorite” trail, am wanting a blue dot to appear showing me where I am.

Laurie - you were such an inspiration to me when I walked the levante, the cami sant Jaume and the Catalan. But a blue dot would have been very reassuring climbing out of the San Esteve d’en Bas valley towards L’Esqirrol! Connie
With or without a blue dot, that one was awesome walk!

But I now remember that I did do one walk on the Invierno this past summer (following @VNwalking’s little loop to a gorgeous view from the Torre Vilariño) with wikiloc tracks on my phone. I don’t remember if there was a pulsating blue dot or some other feature, but it was very clear to me where I was. Are you saying that when you used my Catalán Camino GPS tracks, you never knew where you were? Gosh, wish I could help.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Aragon/Frances 08, Arles 10, Le Puy 12, Geneva 14, VdlP 15, Norte/Primitivo 15, VF 17, Levante 18,
With or without a blue dot, that one was awesome walk!
I couldn’t agree more. And I actually never got lost without my blue dot. But if it had been cold and rainy, then a blue dot would have been super reassuring.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Del Estrecho, Ruta Fray Leopoldo,
Vía Serrana, Camino Francés
@Sitkapilgrim , I’m sitting in the Madrid airport waiting for the bus to Pamplona, so I can’t try out a trail right now, but here’s what I do on my iPhone in order to see both the other person’s track and my blue dot at the same time. From within the Wikiloc app, I open the track I want to follow that someone else made, and I slide over the “save trail” button so that it is downloaded for offline use. Then when I am physically on the trail, I click “follow trail”. Wikiloc takes me automatically into recording the trail as I follow it, and my blue dot appears. The other person’s line is green; mine is orange. I have Wikiloc premium and do not need to use anything except the Wikiloc app itself to follow the trail. The app gives me a sound signal if I veer off the track.

I think purchasing premium would simplify the process for you. Let me know if I can help. I’ll be in Pamplona this afternoon and can try out a trail if you tell me what step is not working for you. Are you in Spain now?
Elaine
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2015
I followed @islandwalker's way of searching the wikiloc database to find the trail and then saving the file for offline use (instead of my previous method of opening a previously saved file). Wikiloc worked fine using her instructions. The app shows the location marker.
 

Magwood

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
See signature line for links to daily posts to blogs from many caminos
I'm about to the start the Camino Mozarabe from Almeria, using the Variant via Trujillo to , then Via de la Plata, then the Torres -
I walked this route last year and recorded on wikiloc every stage. After the Torres I jumped on a bus from Ponte de Lima to Viana de Castelo and walked to Santiago via the Coastal and Espiritual routes.

I know others won't agree with me but I only use wikiloc for recording and I use maps.me to refer to the route if I need to when walking. Maps.me has a simple interface and I find it very easy to follow and to make any diversions that I wish. My first port of call for tracks to download is the camino association website for each particular route. Tracks are mostly available. And then I use a simple online app to convert the tracks to kml format if necessary.

You can find the tracks (gps & kml) for the Torres here
and for the Variante por Trujillo here

On the Trujillo variant I missed the two stages before Trujillo due to lack of accommodation facilities. I am happy to bunk down in the most dire of albergues, but there seemed to be no facilities other than a roof and toilet on one or two stages which was just too much (little) to cope with as we didn't have sleeping mats. I took this variant because I had already walked the Mozárabe from Málaga and wanted to ring some changes. The highlights were Trujillo itself, the walk through Monfragüe natural park and Plasencia. I would be interested to know if there were slightly more comfortable options for accommodation now. Have you discovered the facebook group run by Jose Antonio Ortega Ruiz? He is very generous with his information and would be very pleased to hear from you.

If you are interested to read about my camino along these routes I blogged every day here with a lot of hopefully useful information.

I'm not sure if any of this information is helpful to you but it is not often I hear of anyone walking via Trujillo and the Torres so I wanted to share, and would be very pleased to help in any way I can.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2015
Rick - I’m quite sure I have tried the Recording button, but then I am recording my trail and the yellow trail is no longer visible.
I've run into a consistency problem. My first instructions to you were wrong because sometimes my opening the app from the file manager had a green button "follow trail" under the small map showing the trail and sometimes a red button "remove trail from map". I've since noticed that if I click the red button I then get the green button.

I will have to experiment some day to see if I can find the source of inconsistency between whether I get the red or green button first.

From some trials this morning I learned a few things that I want to pass on. First, I was not on the trail (it was a loop trail). I was about 5 minutes away from the closest spot on the loop and 10 minutes away from the start/end. I clicked the green "follow trail" button and that enlarged the map and showed me my position on it with a blue dot and small attached blue arrow head. The map was nearly full screen with another green button prompt "start following". I ignored the button for a while but played with zooming the map in and out until I saw both my position and the trail. I started walking to the closest point on the trail. On the screen I could see the blue dot and arrowhead getting closer to the marked trail but there was no line showing the path I had walked. I then clicked the green "start following" button and from that time on the app stated showing the path I was taking to get to the trail.

When I got to the trail the phone buzzed and the dot and arrowhead changed into a large arrowhead. I followed the trail for a bit and the app noticed that I was going in the opposite direction from what was recorded and it popped up a red notification that I was going the "wrong" way and asked if I wanted to have it track me going in the reverse direction. I said yes. I followed the trail until it turned. I didn't and went straight. After a bit I got another notification that I was leaving the trail. I dismissed the notice and kept walking. After a bit more I got another notification that I left the trail and the big arrowhead turned once again into a dot and small arrowhead. I dismissed that message too and kept walking. The app continued with drawing my actual path from the moment I clicked the "start following" button until I clicked the red square and then the "finish" button. After that I scrolled down to the trashcan to indicate that I didn't want to save the path either to my phone or to Wikiloc.

Good luck.
 

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