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We come from a land down under

SongKhonGair

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
April - June 2024,
Toulouse - SdC
Well, I have participated in the forum a bit already, and have added ourselves to the 'April 2024 start' thread. I suppose I should formally introduce ourselves.

The brief version:

Neil and Nida from Australia, in our early 60s, starting our first Camino from Toulouse in April. Walking to SdC via Lourdes and SJPP. Caught the bug in SdC itself, then had an opportune encounter with an enthusiastic volunteer in Toulouse, who helped convince us to give it a go.

The long-winded version:

I am Neil, and my wife is Nida. My username - 'SongKhonGair', song Khon gair - means 'two old people' in Thai. Because we will turn 63 and 62 in 2024. Not as old as some here, I'm relieved to see, but still kinda old to be doing our first long distance hike.

In the spring of 2023 we enjoyed a meandering regular-tourist holiday from Lisbon to Paris, during which we visited Santiago de Compostela. Where we caught the Camino bug.

The bug started out as admiration for the pilgrims we encountered, and became a 'why not us?' hypothetical sort of discussion as we travelled - an idea to kick around on long train journeys. By the time we crossed Catalonia / the eastern Pyrenees by regional trains, from Barcelona to Toulouse, it had become a more serious 'why not us?' conversation.

Then during a visit to the Basilique Saint Sernin in Toulouse, we had a chat with a pilgrim-receiving volunteer. Whose enthusiasm was infectious! To summarise that wonderful encounter: We are not too old for a Camino, there are no "rules" on which route we take, and why not walk via Lourdes for that city's pilgrimage significance?

And so here we are - flights have been booked, packs/shoes/gear purchased, guidebooks acquired, Apps downloaded, caminodesantiago.me poured over, Gronze scrutinised, and spreadsheet given a decent workout. All that's left to do is walk the walk.

Slowly. We're in our 60s with little experience and 1100km / 690 miles ahead of us. We will start slowly and discover what is a reasonable daily distance for us. I'm allowing 25 days (including rest days) to cover the 330km to SJPP, which is just a bit over 13km per day. Setting a deadline only because we want to reserve beds at Orisson, and I'm guessing we will need to do that many weeks in advance.

Our intention is to follow the Chemin d'Arles from Toulouse to Maubourguet, where we will turn onto GR 101 for the 3 or 4 day diversion to Lourdes. From Lourdes we skirt the Pyrenees on the Chemin du Piémont Pyrénéen towards SJPP, probably cutting across to the Chemin du Puy where the two paths pass within ~10km of each other. This last diversion is to visit the fortified town of Navarrenx / enjoy an easier final few stages into SJPP.

I was sorely tempted to cross into Spain via the Somport pass, the scenery is said to be quite spectacular. We want to experience the "pilgrim scrum" of SJPP and the Napoleon pass though, it may be the only opportunity we have.

From SJPP we should have around 55 days to reach SdC. Which might well be enough time for two old people.

Buen Camino!
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
Welcome to the forum! Sounds like an excellent plan, and you've certainly allowed plenty of time. I've got no idea how long before you need to reserve at Orison, I'm sure somebody will be along soon to tell you. By then you'll have been on the trail for several weeks so may wish to walk slightly further.
As for the rest: by the forum standards you and I are not old. There are younger on here, but there are also a LOT that are older!
I did my first two short camino's this year, I'll turn 60 next year. I did a couple of months of training beforehand and had absolutely zero issues on my first Camino; injured myself prior to my second and hadn't fully recovered, but started off with a super slow ( not short, slow) day and was fine. Your plan to start slow is an excellent one, as many on here say, stop and enjoy the Roses.

Walk at your own pace even if that means one of you leaving the other behind, and waiting further down the line. It is disastrous to walk faster than you are comfortable with, equally it is incredibly frustrating to walk too slow. You may not think so now but after a couple of weeks on the trail you'll either be injured or ready to kill each other if you don't get that right. Talk through things like this now so you've established the 'ground rules' before you get there. Inc. issues like: what happens if one of you gets injured - does the other continue or not? If the uninjured person has even the slightest wish to do so, do it, because as you say you my never get the chance again. The other can always enjoy being a tourist and you can meet along the way. Or they can fly to Greece for their dreamed about holiday, and you meet in Santiago upon return.

The beauty of it is that you've got several months before you leave to train with your gear, ensure you have the right shoe sock combination, learn how to use your poles properly, and to figure out things like walking pace. You do not need to be superfit, even if you are just walking 10 kilometres a day twice a week and another couple of days just five you'll have set yourself up well for an easy Start.
 
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Hi and welcome. Also from Australia. Gympie Just north of Brisbane.
WOW! what a great adventure is ahead of you. I did my first Camino ( The CF) in 2015 at 52. And turned 60 last year and did the Portuguese ( from Porto) and the Ingles starting May 2nd this year.
I must say you have given yourself ample time to thoroughly enjoy your sojourn through France and Spain. I would love to walk the CF again. If only to walk over the Pyrenees again. My only tip is to book Orrison as soon as possible. It is an overnight stay that will truly kickstart your Camino experience.
I wish you all the best and safe travels.
Buen Camino
 
Sawasdee, and greetings also from Oz.

Indeed, as you say, older than some, younger than others ... my wife and I walked our first Camino in 2015 (from SJPdP to SdC)- I was 62 when I started and 63 when we ended, and only 3 weeks ago returned from nearly all of the Via de la Plata. I say "nearly all" because a couple of things got in the way, and we only walked 850 of the total 1,000 klm journey. That one started in Sevilla two days after my 71st birthday.

So in my view age isn't a thing. The younger folk might be happy to walk something in the region on 30 klms a day, whereas we tend to average around 20, but a nice steady plod along is kinda good. And you'll be amazed at how fit you are at the end.

Beyond that, I wouldn't presume to give advice. Much of the enjoyment of the walk in in the planning ...

Buen Camino ...
 
Wow what a beautiful story :) It shows how the Camino can grab hold of you and once she has she'll never let you go!

It sounds like a beautiful amazing adventure you have laid out before you, and I can't wait to hear how you get on. I love the route you are doing, and I think you have given yourself plenty of time to enjoy it, and I'm sure once you are going you will realise you are not as old as you think you are!

Orisson is a good idea to help split the day up, but as you say can be busy. You should get a better idea of when you might arrive there after you start your walking. Then of course there is also Borda just a few 100 yards further on which by all accounts sounds a nicer place from what I hear.
 
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Another Aussie here. What a wonderful adventure lies before you! Bon Chemin and Buen Camino. 🚶‍♂️
 
Welcome and what an ambitious adventure you have planned. It sounds wonderful. By the time you've got towards the end of your time in France you may well be deciding you really do want to do that Somport route and there's nothing stopping you! You'll probably have enough time to do that and then bus back to Saint Jean if you really wanted to and walk that too! The camino is your oyster!!
 
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Somport is a more solitary pilgrim experience, but quite a shock at Puente la Reina. At St Jean pdP you'll meet the shock sooner.
Haha, you make 'the shock' sound so enticing!

From what I have read, it will be a shock. Good or bad, time will tell. But we need to do the CF once in our lives, and then will probably switch to less populous paths if we come back again.

I could probably do 'solitary' for 1100km. Nida is far more sociable. Via SJPP was a bit of a compromise. :)
 
Welcome to the forum! Sounds like an excellent plan, and you've certainly allowed plenty of time. I've got no idea how long before you need to reserve at Orison, I'm sure somebody will be along soon to tell you. By then you'll have been on the trail for several weeks so may wish to walk slightly further.
As for the rest: by the forum standards you and I are not old. There are younger on here, but there are also a LOT that are older!
I did my first two short camino's this year, I'll turn 60 next year. I did a couple of months of training beforehand and had absolutely zero issues on my first Camino; injured myself prior to my second and hadn't fully recovered, but started off with a super slow ( not short, slow) day and was fine. Your plan to start slow is an excellent one, as many on here say, stop and enjoy the Roses.

Walk at your own pace even if that means one of you leaving the other behind, and waiting further down the line. It is disastrous to walk faster than you are comfortable with, equally it is incredibly frustrating to walk too slow. You may not think so now but after a couple of weeks on the trail you'll either be injured or ready to kill each other if you don't get that right. Talk through things like this now so you've established the 'ground rules' before you get there. Inc. issues like: what happens if one of you gets injured - does the other continue or not? If the uninjured person has even the slightest wish to do so, do it, because as you say you my never get the chance again. The other can always enjoy being a tourist and you can meet along the way. Or they can fly to Greece for their dreamed about holiday, and you meet in Santiago upon return.

The beauty of it is that you've got several months before you leave to train with your gear, ensure you have the right shoe sock combination, learn how to use your poles properly, and to figure out things like walking pace. You do not need to be superfit, even if you are just walking 10 kilometres a day twice a week and another couple of days just five you'll have set yourself up well for an easy Start.
Thank you Peter, some good advice there that I shall reread a few times.

'Ready to kill each other'! But you know us so well. :-D We haven't really discussed any of that re speed / injury (to one). Now that the gear and logistics are worked out, might well be time to start that chat.

Prep is an interesting one. We have a bit of land and work on it, so reasonably fit. Which is not the same as walking fit. Just did a summer of house / pet sitting in the UK, and the legs took a little while to come up to speed. Then we were walking 10km -15km per day, easy as that. (Those public paths in the UK - brilliant!) We shall do a few day hikes with our packs before we leave, and plan to start slow on the Camino. I think the pre-trip day hikes are important, just to encourage us to re-think what we are carrying!
 
Hi and welcome. Also from Australia. Gympie Just north of Brisbane.
WOW! what a great adventure is ahead of you. I did my first Camino ( The CF) in 2015 at 52. And turned 60 last year and did the Portuguese ( from Porto) and the Ingles starting May 2nd this year.
I must say you have given yourself ample time to thoroughly enjoy your sojourn through France and Spain. I would love to walk the CF again. If only to walk over the Pyrenees again. My only tip is to book Orrison as soon as possible. It is an overnight stay that will truly kickstart your Camino experience.
I wish you all the best and safe travels.
Buen Camino
Ah, sounds like a plan - we would like to walk to Fisterra this year, but don't want to put that pressure on ourselves to reach SdC with the required 7 - 10 days up our sleeves (including getting to Madrid for our flight). If it happens, it happens. I already have the Portuguese from Porto in the back of my mind for 2025, though, allowing time then to reach Fisterra / Muxia.

Add the Ingles as well, or go to Prague and drink more of that excellent local beer? We only have so many days we're allowed to be in the Schengen zone! 😁

Yeah, I'm a bit anxious re Orisson - that last week of April / first week of May will be heaving with Pilgrims, and there's the May Day holiday in there as well. Although we will have plenty of miles in our legs by then, I don't like the thought of walking all the way to Roncesvalles in one day. That is an area we do want to take slowly and properly appreciate as well. Time to commit to a date. And if we must slow down thru rural France due to that booking, forced to have leisurely breakfasts gazing at the Pyrenees, that won't be too hard to take. :)

I am originally from Qld btw - Mackay. Before it was a FIFO hub. Moved to Sydney for work ... over 35 years ago, and now we're retired up the coast past Newcastle (Port Stephens.) There are worse places to have ended up at!

I don't know if it's common for non-Australians, but I find myself somewhere like Porto or Prague and I'm like "is it real??". The first time I seen the Danube was an absolute buzz, had to dip a toe in it. So looking forward to wandering around the French countryside, can only imagine how amazing that will feel!

Cheers.
 
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@SongKhonGair
Welcome to the Forum. ยินดีต้อนรับสู่ฟอรั่ม
Well if you wrote that without the help of a translator, I am impressed! :) Nida has to remind me how to say 'fill it up please' every time we stop for fuel.

Yes, she is in charge of languages when we travel. 😁

Thank you for the welcome. :)

We live near Buriram when we're in Thailand. Weeding our few acres keeps us fit! We're going to do our pre-Camino hikes up around Chiang Mai, might be cool enough in the mountains. If the smoke doesn't ruin our lungs.
 
Sawasdee, and greetings also from Oz.

Indeed, as you say, older than some, younger than others ... my wife and I walked our first Camino in 2015 (from SJPdP to SdC)- I was 62 when I started and 63 when we ended, and only 3 weeks ago returned from nearly all of the Via de la Plata. I say "nearly all" because a couple of things got in the way, and we only walked 850 of the total 1,000 klm journey. That one started in Sevilla two days after my 71st birthday.

So in my view age isn't a thing. The younger folk might be happy to walk something in the region on 30 klms a day, whereas we tend to average around 20, but a nice steady plod along is kinda good. And you'll be amazed at how fit you are at the end.

Beyond that, I wouldn't presume to give advice. Much of the enjoyment of the walk in in the planning ...

Buen Camino ...
So many Australians so far from home! Outnumbered per capita only by the Kiwis it seems, but don't tell them that, it will only go to their heads. (Have a slice of pavlova guys, our gift to you! 😁 )

Your story is inspiring - still doing 850km Caminos at 71. Respect. I shall keep you in mind when I'm having a sook about "another bloody hill!", and I shall cut my whinging short.

I think 20km per day will be about where we settle, but not counting on that. We were regularly walking 12km or more per day walking other people's dogs twice a day, and on the Camino we shall have the entire day for plodding along. With packs on our backs...

Buen Camino to you as well. :)

Edit: have just found what I assume is your blog, going by the 'Author of ..." below your avatar. I shall read it with interest.
 
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Well if you wrote that without the help of a translator, I am impressed! :) Nida has to remind me how to say 'fill it up please' every time we stop for fuel.

Yes, she is in charge of languages when we travel. 😁

Thank you for the welcome. :)

We live near Buriram when we're in Thailand. Weeding our few acres keeps us fit! We're going to do our pre-Camino hikes up around Chiang Mai, might be cool enough in the mountains. If the smoke doesn't ruin our lungs.

I have to confess I did use google translate! I struggle with written Thai.
And my spoken Thai is fairly basic!
We are mainly in Sydney but have a 'home base' in Bangkok.

Tip when walking a Camino with a Thai wife.
Refuse to carry a Rice Cooker!
I did 'trial' a small one but it blew up whilst being tested. thank goodness. :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

In reality, Pat was worried about missing Rice, but she managed fine.
 
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Wow what a beautiful story :) It shows how the Camino can grab hold of you and once she has she'll never let you go!

It sounds like a beautiful amazing adventure you have laid out before you, and I can't wait to hear how you get on. I love the route you are doing, and I think you have given yourself plenty of time to enjoy it, and I'm sure once you are going you will realise you are not as old as you think you are!

Orisson is a good idea to help split the day up, but as you say can be busy. You should get a better idea of when you might arrive there after you start your walking. Then of course there is also Borda just a few 100 yards further on which by all accounts sounds a nicer place from what I hear.
Thank you, those are such encouraging words!

We have enjoyed our visits to France, and Toulouse is where we committed to making a Camino. Seems natural to start there, then. I am looking forward to the changing landscapes - from the flatter farmlands near Toulouse to the more rugged areas closer to the mountains. And we avoid walking across too many valleys, that would tax our legs.

The refuge at Orisson gets some strange Google reviews. And the Borda a little further on does seem a bit nicer too, that is where I am hoping to make a reservation.
 
@SongKhonGair ,
don't know if it's common for non-Australians, but I find myself somewhere like Porto or Prague and I'm like "is it real??". The first time I seen the Danube was an absolute buzz
I remember feeling much the same when I very first hit London 35 years ago. I walked the streets - literally - from Earls Court through Hyde Park, Green Park up around the palace big Ben etc etc. it was the stuff of news reports and stories and suddenly it was real. Then came Scotland, the ancestral home. Then Paris with the Louvre, the Eiffel Tower, Notre Dame - the list is almost endless. Switzerland, Ireland, Greece - the stuff of dreams - Canada and Norway, either of which I could live the rest of my life in , should New Zealand ever sink beneath the waves. And many, many more.
It's rare to feel that buzz nowadays but occasionally I do.
The Camino. @davejsy tip about Borda rather than Orison sounds like a good one. That's come up a few times.
Training -if you can get in 4 days back to back of 15km per day it will give you an excellent idea as to how things are. It will show you whether you have your backpacks fitted correctly; the correct shoe sock combo; and give you an indication as to any potential hotspots on your feet. Which means you can ensure you know how to deal with issues (should you have any.) Incidentally grab your hikers wool in Oz or the UK if you get the chance - it's much easier to find than elsewhere.
Although it sounds as though you may be back in Thailand, beautiful country. Many years since I have done more than an overnight, absolutely loved it when I was there. The hiking around Chiang Mai was superb, shame that it's becomes so polluted. If you can avoid the smog, a fantastic training ground.
 
Welcome and what an ambitious adventure you have planned. It sounds wonderful. By the time you've got towards the end of your time in France you may well be deciding you really do want to do that Somport route and there's nothing stopping you! You'll probably have enough time to do that and then bus back to Saint Jean if you really wanted to and walk that too! The camino is your oyster!!
Well looking at your signature, you are the expert! A Camino with 8 kids and Grandpa - Nida will only need to listen to my moaning, and that will be more than enough.

That's a good idea though. I have a conservative schedule mapped out, maybe our speed will be faster and there will be time for some backtracking or detouring. Or sitting at a beach shack consuming the local seafood! We shall let our legs decide. 😁
 
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Well, I have participated in the forum a bit already, and have added ourselves to the 'April 2024 start' thread. I suppose I should formally introduce ourselves.

The brief version:

Neil and Nida from Australia, in our early 60s, starting our first Camino from Toulouse in April. Walking to SdC via Lourdes and SJPP. Caught the bug in SdC itself, then had an opportune encounter with an enthusiastic volunteer in Toulouse, who helped convince us to give it a go.

The long-winded version:

I am Neil, and my wife is Nida. My username - 'SongKhonGair', song Khon gair - means 'two old people' in Thai. Because we will turn 63 and 62 in 2024. Not as old as some here, I'm relieved to see, but still kinda old to be doing our first long distance hike.

In the spring of 2023 we enjoyed a meandering regular-tourist holiday from Lisbon to Paris, during which we visited Santiago de Compostela. Where we caught the Camino bug.

The bug started out as admiration for the pilgrims we encountered, and became a 'why not us?' hypothetical sort of discussion as we travelled - an idea to kick around on long train journeys. By the time we crossed Catalonia / the eastern Pyrenees by regional trains, from Barcelona to Toulouse, it had become a more serious 'why not us?' conversation.

Then during a visit to the Basilique Saint Sernin in Toulouse, we had a chat with a pilgrim-receiving volunteer. Whose enthusiasm was infectious! To summarise that wonderful encounter: We are not too old for a Camino, there are no "rules" on which route we take, and why not walk via Lourdes for that city's pilgrimage significance?

And so here we are - flights have been booked, packs/shoes/gear purchased, guidebooks acquired, Apps downloaded, caminodesantiago.me poured over, Gronze scrutinised, and spreadsheet given a decent workout. All that's left to do is walk the walk.

Slowly. We're in our 60s with little experience and 1100km / 690 miles ahead of us. We will start slowly and discover what is a reasonable daily distance for us. I'm allowing 25 days (including rest days) to cover the 330km to SJPP, which is just a bit over 13km per day. Setting a deadline only because we want to reserve beds at Orisson, and I'm guessing we will need to do that many weeks in advance.

Our intention is to follow the Chemin d'Arles from Toulouse to Maubourguet, where we will turn onto GR 101 for the 3 or 4 day diversion to Lourdes. From Lourdes we skirt the Pyrenees on the Chemin du Piémont Pyrénéen towards SJPP, probably cutting across to the Chemin du Puy where the two paths pass within ~10km of each other. This last diversion is to visit the fortified town of Navarrenx / enjoy an easier final few stages into SJPP.

I was sorely tempted to cross into Spain via the Somport pass, the scenery is said to be quite spectacular. We want to experience the "pilgrim scrum" of SJPP and the Napoleon pass though, it may be the only opportunity we have.

From SJPP we should have around 55 days to reach SdC. Which might well be enough time for two old people.

Buen Camino!
Hi from NZ. We walked our first Camino in 2016 at age 72 all the way from SJPdP to SdC. We allowed 59 days with a day off each week and had absolutely no problems. We walked 1st Sept to end October. In 2024 at 79 we will start on the 10th April which is the first day of the opening of Orisson. I have already booked. After we finish in June I will have my 80th in Angers France with our friends from Argentina, we ther travel to Le Puy and walk to SJPdP. So at your young age you will have no problems. Buen Camino. See you on the way
 
Hi Neil, there's more of a tendency these days for forum members to offer moral support and encouragement rather than a reality check..
All the spreadsheet and screen research is fine, but you really need to get a much better idea of your capabilities. Unless there's some health issue you haven't mentioned, all your forecasts are absurdly conservative. Get out there and do some long walks. If a 10km walk feels OK, then double it in your calculations, as on the camino you have the whole day to complete the task, with a lunch break in the middle, and, you will get stronger and able to do much more as you proceed. One of the great exhilarations of the camino is finding out we can walk far further in a day - and successive days - than we ever imagined.
I also think the SJPdP route option and fixating on a booking date at Orisson are sub-optimal. You have the perfect and logical opportunity to take the Camino Aragones over Somport, which many multi-camino walkers here regard as a favourite. At the same time avoiding the hassle and contributing to the bed rush at the SJPdP-Pamplona pinch-point in high season.
If your practice does indeed show that you can walk at typical pilgrim speed then you'll be left with a lot of spare days. In which case you might want to look at adding the Portugues or the Ingles, as well as of course going on to Muxia and FInisterre. Or take a trip back to SJPdP if you are gripped by that particular FOMO..
 
Training -if you can get in 4 days back to back of 15km per day it will give you an excellent idea as to how things are. It will show you whether you have your backpacks fitted correctly; the correct shoe sock combo; and give you an indication as to any potential hotspots on your feet. Which means you can ensure you know how to deal with issues (should you have any.) Incidentally grab your hikers wool in Oz or the UK if you get the chance - it's much easier to find than elsewhere.
Thanks Peter, that sounds like good advice. We were planning multi-day anyway, somewhere you follow trails and stay in supplied tents apparently. Aimed at Thai people, so without the excessive price of the tours. You walk in with your gear - we shall book for three nights. And take our Camino gear.

Blisters! A great deal of research has gone into that topic. We have settled on Merino toe-sock liners and synthetic 'Mountain Designs' compression hiking socks, bought in Oz. And are taking Vaseline as backup. Another thing to test on the trekking practice run. We have a month in the UK pre-Camino, we can buy anything there that we decide is required. And Auch has a Decathlon, less than a week into our Camino.

A week in London up to and including Easter, then fly to Toulouse - we may match your early Earls Court to everywhere walking effort, a good warm up for us. We walk a lot when touristing anyway.

Do you use liner socks, by chance? I'm wondering now whether one pair is enough - I read the advice to change socks at lunchtime, and it occurred to me that sock liners are probably the most sweaty.

Cheers.
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
Thanks Peter, that sounds like good advice. We were planning multi-day anyway, somewhere you follow trails and stay in supplied tents apparently. Aimed at Thai people, so without the excessive price of the tours. You walk in with your gear - we shall book for three nights. And take our Camino gear.

Blisters! A great deal of research has gone into that topic. We have settled on Merino toe-sock liners and synthetic 'Mountain Designs' compression hiking socks, bought in Oz. And are taking Vaseline as backup. Another thing to test on the trekking practice run. We have a month in the UK pre-Camino, we can buy anything there that we decide is required. And Auch has a Decathlon, less than a week into our Camino.

A week in London up to and including Easter, then fly to Toulouse - we may match your early Earls Court to everywhere walking effort, a good warm up for us. We walk a lot when touristing anyway.

Do you use liner socks, by chance? I'm wondering now whether one pair is enough - I read the advice to change socks at lunchtime, and it occurred to me that sock liners are probably the most sweaty.

Cheers.
I never wear liner socks (and don't get blisters anymore after my first Camino), but many people swear by them (especially the toe socks). I just wear a mid-weight cushioned merino sock (Icebreaker or Darn Tough brands) and I have good fitting shoes. I know what works for me, but you'll need to find what works best for you.
 
Hi Neil, there's more of a tendency these days for forum members to offer moral support and encouragement rather than a reality check..
All the spreadsheet and screen research is fine, but you really need to get a much better idea of your capabilities. Unless there's some health issue you haven't mentioned, all your forecasts are absurdly conservative. Get out there and do some long walks. If a 10km walk feels OK, then double it in your calculations, as on the camino you have the whole day to complete the task, with a lunch break in the middle, and, you will get stronger and able to do much more as you proceed. One of the great exhilarations of the camino is finding out we can walk far further in a day - and successive days - than we ever imagined.
I also think the SJPdP route option and fixating on a booking date at Orisson are sub-optimal. You have the perfect and logical opportunity to take the Camino Aragones over Somport, which many multi-camino walkers here regard as a favourite. At the same time avoiding the hassle and contributing to the bed rush at the SJPdP-Pamplona pinch-point in high season.
If your practice does indeed show that you can walk at typical pilgrim speed then you'll be left with a lot of spare days. In which case you might want to look at adding the Portugues or the Ingles, as well as of course going on to Muxia and FInisterre. Or take a trip back to SJPdP if you are gripped by that particular FOMO..
Thank you Tom. I value honest feedback!

We are starting slowly intentionally. With that many miles ahead of us we don't want to overdo it and spoil our Camino. By the time we reach SJPP our (walking days) average will be a little over 15km per day, if we stick to the "draft" schedule, and there are several short days dictated by accommodation options. We could shave three or four days between Toulouse and SJPP by cutting a rest day and doing some 24 / 25 km days. To what purpose though? We have plenty of time to reach SdC, we're not in a hurry. Haha, we're coming from almost exactly the opposite side of the planet. We have never set foot in a French village, and we are going to enjoy every minute in every village we pass thru. And the miles in between.

Even with such conservative plans though, we would still reach SdC with almost enough time to carry on to Fisterra / Muxia. My draft plan has us up to almost 17km per (walking) day by SdC, it doesn't need to be much higher than that to arrive with enough time to continue on. So yes, already pencilled in.

But point taken re length of days / gaining fitness. I mentioned earlier that we spent the northern summer house sitting in the UK. We'd check our mileage at the end of the day and often be surprised to find we had covered 15km. Mostly from walking a dog in the countryside twice per day. So yes, I'm expecting to cover more ground than my plan shows - it is not set in stone. And if we do arrive horribly early at SdC we can continue on to Fisterra / Muxia and laze around for a while. Or if we have had enough walking there's a narrow-gauge railway across the coast of northern Spain, goes nowhere in a hurry. We could make our way to San Sebastian. By train. Sampling the local seafood at every opportunity. :)

Interesting that you suggest the Aragones. If it was just me, I'd be there. It is a path I would very much enjoy, and I did try to talk Nida into it. We've had the conversation though, and SJPP wins. And seriously, we have been married for well over 30 years. I can see her preferring a scrum of pilgrims over another week or so just me and her. 😁 Going thru SJPP is not so much a fear of missing out, just a (maybe) once in a lifetime opportunity to be part of the excited throng of first-time pilgrims. "Contributing to the bed rush"? Yes we are. Those doing the CF multiple times may feel guilty about that, I don't know.
 
@SongKhonGair - I wanted to say that I LOVE your backstory and your approach very much - and your reply above. It seems you’ve considered well what will suit you as a couple and I see no reason for you to be dissuaded. And I get the impression you are open and well equipped to adapting as and when you want to or need to along the way. That will stand you in good stead as your camino unfolds.

I’ve walked all of the paths mentioned in your post. Yes it’s true that most people walk longer distances per day but … so what. You have the luxury of time and the desire and curiosity to savour your surroundings at a leisurely pace. I think your approach is an excellent one.

A couple of PSs
  • Like you, I’m a Queenslander by birth who later lived in Sydney, and then moved a little further north to live in a small coastal town.
  • Our home in Australia is at Pretty Beach on the Bouddi Peninsula, not far from you.
  • I know of some wonderful gîtes on the relevant sections of the Arles, Piemont and Le Puy Ways. Happy to give you the details via Private message if you like.
  • The Fève train across northern Spain is a great idea if you find yourself with time on your hands.
Best wishes. I wish you both Bon Chemin for your time in France and Buen Camino for your time in Spain. 😎
 
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Do you use liner socks, by chance? I'm wondering now whether one pair is enough - I read the advice to change socks at lunchtime, and it occurred to me that sock liners are probably the most sweaty.
Nope, my approach is the same as @J Willhaus .Darntuff socks are my go-to, I've tried several others and they just don't work for me. It got a little expensive there for a while but hey I'll get use out of the others during the winter.
What ever you do stick with what works for you. Don't try one thing during training and then swap when on the Camino unless you find it's not working. I made that mistake. After training for seven weeks without using Vaseline on day two of my camino I tried it. HUGE mistake. The first time in many years that I've had a blister. I didn't even feel it coming on, it was an incredible shock to take off my socks about 2 1/2 - three hours in to air my feet and find I had a (large!) blister. I very carefully cleaned off my feet, let them fully air, addressed the blister and put on new socks. Gave the Vaseline away and had no more issues.

Hence the value of training.
If you've done enough slightly longer training sessions you may feel what many call a 'hot spot', or an area that is getting more friction than it should. That's the precursor to a blister. I then pack that area thoroughly with hikers wool, which provides both lubricant and additional padding and stays in place because the wool binds with your socks. You can remove it and replace it in the next socks, you don't have to throw it away at the end of each day. After the first week it's very rare that I require it. Anytime I pause for more than a couple of minutes I take off my shoes take the inserts out and let things air. A proper 15 to 20 minute break and the socks come off too.
I change my socks at least once during the day. The first pair gets aired out whilst safety pinned ( not pegged, far too easy to lose them) to my backpack, then reused once dry.
The dirtiest pair gets hand washed at the end of the day, the other pair becomes the first one for the morning. Repeat.
I'm with @Pelerina, I love your approach. But @peregrino_tom is absolutely correct, you may very well find that after a couple of weeks on the trail your distance is very modest! I was just moderately fit on my first Camino and found that after 2-3 hours doing chores and resting up, having something to eat etc, I had more than enough energy to explore town. Like you something I absolutely love. Some places were so small that I've done it in half an hour others took three or four - in other words 10- 15 kilometers. Strolling around with no backpack on, different shoes - it's incredible how much mileage you can do!
Many of us find ourselves astonished to find that after just a couple of weeks we are routinely covering five to ten kilometers more per day.
Not surprising when you think about it. Our bodies are made to walk.... and walking sets the spirit free.
 
I have to confess I did use google translate! I struggle with written Thai.
And my spoken Thai is fairly basic!
We are mainly in Sydney but have a 'home base' in Bangkok.

Tip when walking a Camino with a Thai wife.
Refuse to carry a Rice Cooker!
I did 'trial' a small one but it blew up whilst being tested. thank goodness. :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

In reality, Pat was worried about missing Rice, but she managed fine.
Oh, I think we have watched some of your YouTube videos - we had a good laugh over the idea of taking a rice cooker. 😅😂🤣

You don't need to be psychic to see a lot of paella in my (Spanish) future!
 
@SongKhonGair - I wanted to say that I LOVE your backstory and your approach very much - and your reply above. It seems you’ve considered well what will suit you as a couple and I see no reason for you to be dissuaded. And I get the impression you are open and well equipped to adapting as and when you want to or need to along the way. That will stand you in good stead as your camino unfolds.

I’ve walked all of the paths mentioned in your post. Yes it’s true that most people walk longer distances per day but … so what. You have the luxury of time and the desire and curiosity to savour your surroundings at a leisurely pace. I think your approach is an excellent one.

A couple of PSs
  • Like you, I’m a Queenslander by birth who later lived in Sydney, and then moved a little further north to live in a small coastal town.
  • Our home in Australia is at Pretty Beach on the Bouddi Peninsula, not far from you.
  • I know of some wonderful gîtes on the relevant sections of the Arles, Piemont and Le Puy Ways. Happy to give you the details via Private message if you like.
  • The Fève train across northern Spain is a great idea if you find yourself with time on your hands.
Best wishes. I wish you both Bon Chemin for your time in France and Buen Camino for your time in Spain. 😎
Thank you @Pelerina, those are meaningful words coming from a veteran such as yourself.

Hmmm, 'Kumano Kodo Buddhist Pilgrimage Trail' in your signature. I shall read up on that, Nida is of course Buddhist and I spent a short time as an ordained Buddhist monk (a Thai cultural tradition, and I (as a foreigner) was in the right place at the right time).

There's a Dwight D. Eisenhower quote that keeps repeating itself as I plan this Camino - 'In preparing for battle I have always found that plans are useless, but planning is indispensable.' Not too many battles on the path I hope, but I do expect my spreadsheet to go out the window as we adapt to the reality, yet the knowledge I have gained remain relevant. Which is fine, a Camino is surely about resilience and mental strength as much as it is about the physical side. We will indeed adapt.

Pretty Beach huh? Lovely part of the world. That train line from Gosford to Woy Woy / Brooklyn / Cowan is a treat, the tourism people should make a bigger deal about it.

And yes, I would very much appreciate your gîte recommendations, yes please! Thank you so much.

Cheers.
 
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Welcome to the forum! Wow it sounds like you have it all planned out (maybe I need to get my A into G with some more research!) as going in April too from SJPDP to SdC. I can confirm the Orrison is available now for bookings in April, so best get in ASAP. I have booked but I have also heard mixed reviews. I don't have first hand experience of this place however.
 
Hi from NZ. We walked our first Camino in 2016 at age 72 all the way from SJPdP to SdC. We allowed 59 days with a day off each week and had absolutely no problems. We walked 1st Sept to end October. In 2024 at 79 we will start on the 10th April which is the first day of the opening of Orisson. I have already booked. After we finish in June I will have my 80th in Angers France with our friends from Argentina, we ther travel to Le Puy and walk to SJPdP. So at your young age you will have no problems. Buen Camino. See you on the way
I read your 2024 plans somewhere, in the 'April starts' thread perhaps? Amazing! And inspiring. I assume the order of SJPdP - SdC, then Le Puy - SJPdP is about temperatures, or crowds, or flights, or public / school holidays. Irrelevant anyway - I do look forward to following your story though.

We may catch you up towards the end of the CF - we should finish by mid June, with plenty of days off as well. I'll be known as the weird guy saying "Kiwis?" to any older people we encounter. 😁
 
I am originally from Qld btw - Mackay. Before it was a FIFO hub. Moved to Sydney for work ... over 35 years ago, and now we're retired up the coast past Newcastle (Port Stephens.) There are worse places to have ended up at!


Cheers.
I say. What a strange coincidence. I moved to Qld from Sydney 35 years ago. We may have past each other in our journey`s.
 
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Welcome to the forum! Wow it sounds like you have it all planned out (maybe I need to get my A into G with some more research!) as going in April too from SJPDP to SdC. I can confirm the Orrison is available now for bookings in April, so best get in ASAP. I have booked but I have also heard mixed reviews. I don't have first hand experience of this place however.
We stayed here in September 2016 on our first camino at age 72 and they gave us their double room, so we had a great night sleep 4 our first night
 
I can confirm the Orrison is available now for bookings in April, so best get in ASAP. I have booked but I have also heard mixed reviews. I don't have first hand experience of this place however.
I think it depends on what you're looking for. Orisson has an amazing atmosphere and buzz from all of the pilgrims setting off on their big adventures. I found it a very commercially run operation which is of course their right. I arrived late lunchtime and it was packed with tourists and I guess locals eating out in the sun, and it took a long time to be able to check in get to room etc - but I wasn't in any rush.
The food that was been served at lunchtime was 5 star compared to what was served for the pilgrims meal in the evening which was very average, but perfectly edible. Breakfast was very basic, and memorable only for the fact your cereal bowl was expected to double up as your coffee bowl/mug! You have the option of pre-ordering a sandwich for the next day to take with you - I would avoid this and save your money - it was basically made with what seemed like long-life baguettes, which I guess is fine if you need to give your chewing muscles a vigorous workout. Disappointing they couldn't use fresh bread given we were after all still in the land of the baguette and what they were charging.
Accommodation wise I was in a dorm with 5 others, and it was one of the rooms above the bar overlooking the valley, which from what I can gather were the best ones. Others were less lucky, including those in the newer part under the terrace which apparently has very flimsy/cheap bunk beds, or the rooms at the back of the building which were quite dark and stuffy - based on other's opinions.

So I think for atmosphere and location it's a 10/10, for everything else its decidedly average at best. If I was going again on my own, then it would definitely be Borda to try next, which does sound much nicer in many ways. If I was going with someone who I wanted to have the amazing first night experience like I did, then I would still happily return to Orisson. But I would skip the sandwich this time 🤣

Irrespective of any of the above, if you're lucky with the weather the walk over the Pyrenees under a rising sun the next day will likely stay with you forever.
 
I think it depends on what you're looking for. Orisson has an amazing atmosphere and buzz from all of the pilgrims setting off on their big adventures. I found it a very commercially run operation which is of course their right. I arrived late lunchtime and it was packed with tourists and I guess locals eating out in the sun, and it took a long time to be able to check in get to room etc - but I wasn't in any rush.
The food that was been served at lunchtime was 5 star compared to what was served for the pilgrims meal in the evening which was very average, but perfectly edible. Breakfast was very basic, and memorable only for the fact your cereal bowl was expected to double up as your coffee bowl/mug! You have the option of pre-ordering a sandwich for the next day to take with you - I would avoid this and save your money - it was basically made with what seemed like long-life baguettes, which I guess is fine if you need to give your chewing muscles a vigorous workout. Disappointing they couldn't use fresh bread given we were after all still in the land of the baguette and what they were charging.
Accommodation wise I was in a dorm with 5 others, and it was one of the rooms above the bar overlooking the valley, which from what I can gather were the best ones. Others were less lucky, including those in the newer part under the terrace which apparently has very flimsy/cheap bunk beds, or the rooms at the back of the building which were quite dark and stuffy - based on other's opinions.

So I think for atmosphere and location it's a 10/10, for everything else its decidedly average at best. If I was going again on my own, then it would definitely be Borda to try next, which does sound much nicer in many ways. If I was going with someone who I wanted to have the amazing first night experience like I did, then I would still happily return to Orisson. But I would skip the sandwich this time 🤣

Irrespective of any of the above, if you're lucky with the weather the walk over the Pyrenees under a rising sun the next day will likely stay with you forever.
Thanks @davejsy. Your comments pretty much match the comments I've read online. Borda is not available for booking yet.... so I'm going to try and get a booking there when it comes up, instead.
 
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Haha, you make 'the shock' sound so enticing!

From what I have read, it will be a shock. Good or bad, time will tell. But we need to do the CF once in our lives, and then will probably switch to less populous paths if we come back again.

I could probably do 'solitary' for 1100km. Nida is far more sociable. Via SJPP was a bit of a compromise. :)
It’s a mild shock in comparison to the one coming later after Sarria!
 
Welcome to the forum! Wow it sounds like you have it all planned out (maybe I need to get my A into G with some more research!) as going in April too from SJPDP to SdC. I can confirm the Orrison is available now for bookings in April, so best get in ASAP. I have booked but I have also heard mixed reviews. I don't have first hand experience of this place however.
Thank you Sarah.

Borda haven't opened their bookings yet. Getting nervous...

I don't think you need to worry about planning much past Pamplona? I only did a rough plan for our entire Camino just to know we can comfortably make it with time to spare before our flight home. I can use that to compare with our actual distance covered too.

They say to book as far as Pamplona, so I'll do that (especially as it will be May Day week for us). After that we shall play it by ear. I'd like to try not booking each day and just walk until we have had enough - 5km or 25km. The whole "bed race" thing is a bit of a worry though. We will mostly stay away from the "official" stage ends, see how we go.
 
I think it depends on what you're looking for. Orisson has an amazing atmosphere and buzz from all of the pilgrims setting off on their big adventures. I found it a very commercially run operation which is of course their right. I arrived late lunchtime and it was packed with tourists and I guess locals eating out in the sun, and it took a long time to be able to check in get to room etc - but I wasn't in any rush.
The food that was been served at lunchtime was 5 star compared to what was served for the pilgrims meal in the evening which was very average, but perfectly edible. Breakfast was very basic, and memorable only for the fact your cereal bowl was expected to double up as your coffee bowl/mug! You have the option of pre-ordering a sandwich for the next day to take with you - I would avoid this and save your money - it was basically made with what seemed like long-life baguettes, which I guess is fine if you need to give your chewing muscles a vigorous workout. Disappointing they couldn't use fresh bread given we were after all still in the land of the baguette and what they were charging.
Accommodation wise I was in a dorm with 5 others, and it was one of the rooms above the bar overlooking the valley, which from what I can gather were the best ones. Others were less lucky, including those in the newer part under the terrace which apparently has very flimsy/cheap bunk beds, or the rooms at the back of the building which were quite dark and stuffy - based on other's opinions.

So I think for atmosphere and location it's a 10/10, for everything else its decidedly average at best. If I was going again on my own, then it would definitely be Borda to try next, which does sound much nicer in many ways. If I was going with someone who I wanted to have the amazing first night experience like I did, then I would still happily return to Orisson. But I would skip the sandwich this time 🤣

Irrespective of any of the above, if you're lucky with the weather the walk over the Pyrenees under a rising sun the next day will likely stay with you forever.

Thanks @davejsy. Your comments pretty much match the comments I've read online. Borda is not available for booking yet.... so I'm going to try and get a booking there when it comes up, instead.
When we stayed in 2016 we were offered a range of food for lunch to take the next day and that was egg sandwiches, the food trailer was open up near the summit and also had a good range of food. Asked at the pilgrim office when u get your passport if they are there and open. As to the accomadation and food for dinner it was as good as and better than some of the accomadation further on in the Camino but buzz and excitement was the best by far. Let's not get to critical the grass is always better on the other side of the fence, and it all depends what country you come from as to how you judge another. Buen Camino
 
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When we stayed in 2016 we were offered a range of food for lunch to take the next day and that was egg sandwiches, the food trailer was open up near the summit and also had a good range of food. Asked at the pilgrim office when u get your passport if they are there and open. As to the accomadation and food for dinner it was as good as and better than some of the accomadation further on in the Camino but buzz and excitement was the best by far. Let's not get to critical the grass is always better on the other side of the fence, and it all depends what country you come from as to how you judge another. Buen Camino
I wouldn't say critical - more factual. The food trailer is nothing to do with Orrison refuge. I would have to disagree that the standard is just as good as further on, I found most places to be much better and half the price of Orisson. I was there September 23 so maybe things have changed in the preceding 7 years since you were there. Not sure what country I come from has to do with this. . .
 
Thank you Sarah.

Borda haven't opened their bookings yet. Getting nervous...

I don't think you need to worry about planning much past Pamplona? I only did a rough plan for our entire Camino just to know we can comfortably make it with time to spare before our flight home. I can use that to compare with our actual distance covered too.

They say to book as far as Pamplona, so I'll do that (especially as it will be May Day week for us). After that we shall play it by ear. I'd like to try not booking each day and just walk until we have had enough - 5km or 25km. The whole "bed race" thing is a bit of a worry though. We will mostly stay away from the "official" stage ends, see how we go.
I am very similar to you. Keen to avoid any sorts of "bed races" and bottlenecks. I've managed to get accom at Borda now (yay!). One reason for this is to over-skip Roncesvalles. For some reason it doesn't appeal. I'll maybe attend their service later in the evening, but stay down the road a bit. Thanks for the reminder about May Day. I forget about that! I will have to work out roughly where I might be. I've allowed 38 days for walking, but swallowed up one of those days by allowing an extra night's accom before I start any walking. This is to allow a buffer for missed connections/strikes/jetlag etc. I want to get to SJPDP relaxed and allow for the unforeseen.
 
Hi from NZ. We walked our first Camino in 2016 at age 72 all the way from SJPdP to SdC. We allowed 59 days with a day off each week and had absolutely no problems. We walked 1st Sept to end October. In 2024 at 79 we will start on the 10th April which is the first day of the opening of Orisson. I have already booked. After we finish in June I will have my 80th in Angers France with our friends from Argentina, we ther travel to Le Puy and walk to SJPdP. So at your young age you will have no problems. Buen Camino. See you on the way
Hi Ken and Liz, Im also from Nz and did my first camino in 2017, in April/May. This year I am considering starting in mid sept and finishing in Oct. Was most things still open in late Oct? How was the choices of accomodation at this time? Thanks!
 
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Hi Rachel, we had know problems with accommodation in September / October.
We did book ahead as Liz had a hip problem but that is all fixed with a new one.
For this Comino I am using Gronze web site and it is great, give you all the stages and towns and accommodation, costs and a story to go with the hike and the elevation.
All the best for your Camino.
Regards Ken. We are from Levin where abouts are you?
 
Hi Rachel, we had know problems with accommodation in September / October.
We did book ahead as Liz had a hip problem but that is all fixed with a new one.
For this Comino I am using Gronze web site and it is great, give you all the stages and towns and accommodation, costs and a story to go with the hike and the elevation.
All the best for your Camino.
Regards Ken. We are from Levin where abouts are you?
Im in Waikanae! Small world huh! :)
 
Hi Rachel, we had know problems with accommodation in September / October.
We did book ahead as Liz had a hip problem but that is all fixed with a new one.
For this Comino I am using Gronze web site and it is great, give you all the stages and towns and accommodation, costs and a story to go with the hike and the elevation.
All the best for your Camino.
Regards Ken. We are from Levin where abouts are you?
Sorry! I forgot to say thanks for the reply and info. I will check out Gronze again and see what info they have on this time of year for walking. The Camino calls again and so I must go! It's such a wonderful experience isn't it...nothing like walking in NZ. Best wishes to you both for your upcoming trek, how exciting!
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
Hi Rachel, yes very small world.
We are using the foot hills behind Levin for our training.
Its called Heights road just before Shannon on the right, we walk 10k. 4k straight up then a k of flat then all the way back down hill so getting good push up and descending work out.
Done just over 200k now and still 5 weeks to go.
Catch up one day Buen Camino
 

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