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Women's Hoka Boots

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Nana6

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
France ( 2020)
I am shopping and trying on boots to train in for the Camino. I like the feel of the new Hoka Sky Kaha? Does anyone have experience with these boots? I read on the forum that some were having problems with the Toa soles.
Thanks
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
I am shopping and trying on boots to train in for the Camino. I like the feel of the new Hoka Sky Kaha? Does anyone have experience with these boots? I read on the forum that some were having problems with the Toa soles.
Thanks
The Hokas will be fine. As to the question of individual issues with the Hokas, ALL shoes will have a small percentage of individuals that will have problems with their shoe. Part of it is random production issues, others have to do with the individual's wear patterns and feet and gait which are harder on shoes than the majority of the population.

As a whole, Hoka footwear throughout its model lineup, perform well and are not prone to manufacturing defects. The primary issue is making sure the shoe fits adequately and feels good on your feet.

As you go looking for shoes, here are some tips which I have posted before that may help you.

The most important theme for achieving a proper fit is: You do not choose a shoe based on measurements, you buy a shoe based on its Fit N Feel regardless of instrument measurements.
  1. When you go to the store, do so toward the end of the day.... you will have been up on your feet, so that will help with getting the correct fit. Additionally, you will need to wear the same backpack with the same gear you will be carrying... you want this additional weight on you as this will put the same downward pressure on the foot that you will be having while on Camino.
  2. Wear the exact same sock(s) you will be wearing while you are walking on the Camino. And if you have a special insole or orthotic, bring it with you.
  3. At the store, the measuring that will be done on your feet is only to get you in the ballpark for the correct shoe size.
  4. Start by standing up; never measure while sitting. You want the full weight of your body, with the pack on, to put the same pressure on your feet to spread them out as will happen while walking. That alone will increase the volume and size of your feet.
  5. Make sure those 'Camino' socks are on your feet; if you wear socks with liners while walking, do the same thing at the store.
  6. While standing, have someone near to you that you can use to steady yourself. With the measuring device on the ground, step onto the instrument and center all of your weight onto the foot being measured. Do the same for the other foot.
  7. Start with that size, but be aware that both the width and the length need to feel like there is adequate room for your feet. Ideally, like Goldilocks, everything will be just right. But, don't count on it. Be picky.
  8. If you have special insoles or orthotics, put them into any shoe you try on as they will take up space inside the shoe.
  9. When you find what you think will fit you well, you will need to see if your toes have enough clearance. Toes should not be able to be forced to the front of the shoe and touch the shoe. Not even a little. If they do, long walking and downhill grades on the trail or path or road will traumatize the bed of the nail, and that is when toenails can blacken and fall off.
  10. With your shoes tied securely, but not too tight, walk around the store with your pack on. Go up stairs and down stairs, scuff the shoes to the floor so that your feet are forced to do any movement they will do and see if your toes so much as butterfly kiss the front of the shoe. Kick the front of the shoe into a post or stair or wall or someone's shin.... does that make any of your toes touch the front of the shoe? That goes for all the little piggies.
  11. Next, pay attention to the width of the shoe. It shouldn't feel snug on the sides and there should be no rubbing or pressure points at all. They will not go away with "break in". They will create soreness, pain, and blistering. Even if it seems to be tolerable, it is like water torture; as your feet are continually exposed to those pressure points your feet will break down against them bit by bit, and bruising, blisters, and soreness will follow.
  12. You may need to go up a size to a size and a half in length, and go with a wider width to avoid those things I mentioned above. The notion that one avoids blisters by wearing snug footwear has been shown to do just the opposite.
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
One other thing I would mention as a consideration: The Kaha is a fairly aggressive boot.

Your avatar message mentions 'France 2020', so I am thinking that might mean you are planning to walk the Camino Frances. You did not mention the season of your planned walk or any special concerns that you have with your feet. I am mentioning this because there may be other, more comfortable footwear choices among the Hoka One One lineup which might be a better match.

I apologize for any presumption on my part if you have already considered all of your options and the Kaha is your best choice for your individual needs. :)
 

Nana6

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
France ( 2020)
The Hokas will be fine. As to the question of individual issues with the Hokas, ALL shoes will have a small percentage of individuals that will have problems with their shoe. Part of it is random production issues, others have to do with the individual's wear patterns and feet and gait which are harder on shoes than the majority of the population.

As a whole, Hoka footwear throughout its model lineup, perform well and are not prone to manufacturing defects. The primary issue is making sure the shoe fits adequately and feels good on your feet.

As you go looking for shoes, here are some tips which I have posted before that may help you.

The most important theme for achieving a proper fit is: You do not choose a shoe based on measurements, you buy a shoe based on its Fit N Feel regardless of instrument measurements.
  1. When you go to the store, do so toward the end of the day.... you will have been up on your feet, so that will help with getting the correct fit. Additionally, you will need to wear the same backpack with the same gear you will be carrying... you want this additional weight on you as this will put the same downward pressure on the foot that you will be having while on Camino.
  2. Wear the exact same sock(s) you will be wearing while you are walking on the Camino. And if you have a special insole or orthotic, bring it with you.
  3. At the store, the measuring that will be done on your feet is only to get you in the ballpark for the correct shoe size.
  4. Start by standing up; never measure while sitting. You want the full weight of your body, with the pack on, to put the same pressure on your feet to spread them out as will happen while walking. That alone will increase the volume and size of your feet.
  5. Make sure those 'Camino' socks are on your feet; if you wear socks with liners while walking, do the same thing at the store.
  6. While standing, have someone near to you that you can use to steady yourself. With the measuring device on the ground, step onto the instrument and center all of your weight onto the foot being measured. Do the same for the other foot.
  7. Start with that size, but be aware that both the width and the length need to feel like there is adequate room for your feet. Ideally, like Goldilocks, everything will be just right. But, don't count on it. Be picky.
  8. If you have special insoles or orthotics, put them into any shoe you try on as they will take up space inside the shoe.
  9. When you find what you think will fit you well, you will need to see if your toes have enough clearance. Toes should not be able to be forced to the front of the shoe and touch the shoe. Not even a little. If they do, long walking and downhill grades on the trail or path or road will traumatize the bed of the nail, and that is when toenails can blacken and fall off.
  10. With your shoes tied securely, but not too tight, walk around the store with your pack on. Go up stairs and down stairs, scuff the shoes to the floor so that your feet are forced to do any movement they will do and see if your toes so much as butterfly kiss the front of the shoe. Kick the front of the shoe into a post or stair or wall or someone's shin.... does that make any of your toes touch the front of the shoe? That goes for all the little piggies.
  11. Next, pay attention to the width of the shoe. It shouldn't feel snug on the sides and there should be no rubbing or pressure points at all. They will not go away with "break in". They will create soreness, pain, and blistering. Even if it seems to be tolerable, it is like water torture; as your feet are continually exposed to those pressure points your feet will break down against them bit by bit, and bruising, blisters, and soreness will follow.
  12. You may need to go up a size to a size and a half in length, and go with a wider width to avoid those things I mentioned above. The notion that one avoids blisters by wearing snug footwear has been shown to do just the opposite.
Thank you Dave. Great information Appreciate it
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
Thank you Dave. Great information Appreciate it
You are welcome. I have done a lot of gear testing for various outdoor footwear manufacturers, and have looked at Hoka quite extensively, so if you have additional questions or concerns, please feel free to send me a Private Message (PM) using the Forum's service.

Additionally, there are a number of other great brands and footwear models. It sounds like you like Hoka, and they do make some great shoes. :)
 

Nana6

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
France ( 2020)
One other thing I would mention as a consideration: The Kaha is a fairly aggressive boot.

Your avatar message mentions 'France 2020', so I am thinking that might mean you are planning to walk the Camino Frances. You did not mention the season of your planned walk or any special concerns that you have with your feet. I am mentioning this because there may be other, more comfortable footwear choices among the Hoka One One lineup which might be a better match.

I apologize for any presumption on my part if you have already considered all of your options and the Kaha is your best choice for your individual needs. :)
No need to apologize. I had hoped to go this September but looks like May or June next year.
I do have an ankle issue and REI suggested I wear boots. I am trying to get in shape by walking on trails in my neighborhood which are paved or asphalt I am planning on going to state parks soon to do different terrain
I have been disappointed that I am still walking 20 minutes per mile The more miles I push seem to get slower so training with strength training also
 

Nana6

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
France ( 2020)
You are welcome. I have done a lot of gear testing for various outdoor footwear manufacturers, and have looked at Hoka quite extensively, so if you have additional questions or concerns, please feel free to send me a Private Message (PM) using the Forum's service.

Additionally, there are a number of other great brands and footwear models. It sounds like you like Hoka, and they do make some great shoes. :)
I have not decided on a boot. Right now, I just wear Brooks Ghost 11 for walking and an Asics trail shoe . The Hokas are very comfortable. I also tried Oboz but they seem heavier. The Lowa brand seems great but way more than I need(I think)
I have time but trying to 1) get in good shape2) Gather my equipment as I can
3) Try to be as informed as possible

My heartfelt thanks for your kindness
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
No need to apologize. I had hoped to go this September but looks like May or June next year.
I do have an ankle issue and REI suggested I wear boots. I am trying to get in shape by walking on trails in my neighborhood which are paved or asphalt I am planning on going to state parks soon to do different terrain
I have been disappointed that I am still walking 20 minutes per mile The more miles I push seem to get slower so training with strength training also
About ankle issues, I will repost something I wrote on the subject below. There is a lot of incorrect information about ankles and boots and what they can and cannot do, so a high topped boot may or may not be a good answer for your concerns.
-----------------------------------------------------------
-----------------------------------------------------------
From an earlier post:

Individually held preferences are something which cannot and should not be debated. Folks have a right to make choices based on whatever criteria they believe is important to them. To that end, I want to say that whatever your reason for wanting boots, flip-flops, bare feet, sandals, trail runners, etc. do not feel that you must change your decisions based on what 'everyone else' does. Be comfortable with your choice.

It is not my intention to offend anyone, as I believe that there are times and situations where boots are a reasonable choice to make when hiking, backpacking, or walking. I own and use a pair of Lowa Camino boots in certain cold weather seasons and weather conditions in the mountains when backpacking.

That being said, if one is looking for and asking for factual information in order to make decisions between choosing boots or trail runners (and running shoes) to wear for Camino, ankle support is not a reason to choose boots.

First, there are defined and diagnosed medical issues where an ankle needs to be supported. However, the only sure ankle support for medically indicated need are ankle braces which can fit inside of the shoe.

Despite anecdotal evidence and subjective opinion to the contrary, research has repeatedly shown that boots do not provide the level of stiffness and the shear rigidity needed to keep ankles free from injury.

The ankle is best protected with exercise and use, where the ankle is allowed to use uneven surfaces, exercise, and balancing on one foot in order to build strength and endurance and lessen susceptibility to injurious fatigue.

Boots can, in fact, exacerbate the risk of injury.

A foot in a boot is sitting higher off the ground than when in a shoe because the outer and midsoles are much thicker and built up. Additionally, the outer sole of boots are trimmed closer to shell of the boot, meaning that the outer sole has a fairly narrow profile. Both of these factors have been shown to have a higher risk of the footwear 'rolling' when stepping on an unstable surface or piece of debris like loose rocks or uneven surfaces.

As the boot begins to roll, the boot carries the foot with it, the higher material of the boot above the ankle exerts more force against the foot to make it roll with the boot. That material is not stiff enough to keep from flexing, which means that your ankle is going to start bending as the roll of the boot continues. And because the foot is higher off the ground inside the boot, the ankle can be forced into a more significant bending.

Another factor about boots that helps lead to injury is their weight. The heavier the weight that the foot and lower legs need to lift, the more stress and fatigue the ankles and supporting structures are exposed to. Such weakens the ability of the ankle structures to maintain resiliency.

Trail shoes and trail runners, on the other hand, do the opposite when confronted with the same type of uneven surface or debris. The outer and midsoles are much closer to the ground. They are also wider than the shoe making for a contact point with the ground that is more stable. Their much lighter weight keeps ankle structures from fatiguing.

Now here is the thing researchers found as most significant: A foot in a shoe that is kept a bit loose can compensate, to a large degree, when the shoe starts to roll off of an uneven surface. As the shoe rolls, the shoe tends to slip around the foot. In other words, the shoe moves around the foot for the most part, so the ankle won't immediately bend out of place with the shoe. This allows the wearer of the shoe to have enough time to react to the rolling and twisting shoe to keep the ankle from injurious strain.

Yes, there are people who get ankle injuries in trail shoes and trail runners. But those injuries are less frequent and less severe, on an average, than with a foot encased in an above the ankle hiking boot.

As I stated above, there will be any number of folks that, with no predisposing medical conditions, will state anecdotal evidence along the lines that they, or a friend, or other family members, et al, were saved by above the ankle boots. Subjective opinion is like that. :) But objective evidence begs to differ on the best way of protecting ankles from injury.
 

Nana6

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
France ( 2020)
One other thing I would mention as a consideration: The Kaha is a fairly aggressive boot.

Your avatar message mentions 'France 2020', so I am thinking that might mean you are planning to walk the Camino Frances. You did not mention the season of your planned walk or any special concerns that you have with your feet. I am mentioning this because there may be other, more comfortable footwear choices among the Hoka One One lineup which might be a better match.

I apologize for any presumption on my part if you have already considered all of your options and the Kaha is your best choice for your individual needs. :)
Any help is appreciated. I live in Houston, Texas. Most hiking around here is flat or slightly rolling. No one wears boots unless going to Rocky areas or have bad ankles. It is hot here.
Not sure about socks. Everyone has differing opinions Right now I am wearing feetures with my running shoes But I haven't hit hiking over 6 miles yet. I have gone up one size. Should the socks have room from the sides of the shoes/boots?
 

Nana6

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
France ( 2020)
About ankle issues, I will repost something I wrote on the subject below. There is a lot of incorrect information about ankles and boots and what they can and cannot do, so a high topped boot may or may not be a good answer for your concerns.
-----------------------------------------------------------
-----------------------------------------------------------
From an earlier post:

Individually held preferences are something which cannot and should not be debated. Folks have a right to make choices based on whatever criteria they believe is important to them. To that end, I want to say that whatever your reason for wanting boots, flip-flops, bare feet, sandals, trail runners, etc. do not feel that you must change your decisions based on what 'everyone else' does. Be comfortable with your choice.

It is not my intention to offend anyone, as I believe that there are times and situations where boots are a reasonable choice to make when hiking, backpacking, or walking. I own and use a pair of Lowa Camino boots in certain cold weather seasons and weather conditions in the mountains when backpacking.

That being said, if one is looking for and asking for factual information in order to make decisions between choosing boots or trail runners (and running shoes) to wear for Camino, ankle support is not a reason to choose boots.

First, there are defined and diagnosed medical issues where an ankle needs to be supported. However, the only sure ankle support for medically indicated need are ankle braces which can fit inside of the shoe.

Despite anecdotal evidence and subjective opinion to the contrary, research has repeatedly shown that boots do not provide the level of stiffness and the shear rigidity needed to keep ankles free from injury.

The ankle is best protected with exercise and use, where the ankle is allowed to use uneven surfaces, exercise, and balancing on one foot in order to build strength and endurance and lessen susceptibility to injurious fatigue.

Boots can, in fact, exacerbate the risk of injury.

A foot in a boot is sitting higher off the ground than when in a shoe because the outer and midsoles are much thicker and built up. Additionally, the outer sole of boots are trimmed closer to shell of the boot, meaning that the outer sole has a fairly narrow profile. Both of these factors have been shown to have a higher risk of the footwear 'rolling' when stepping on an unstable surface or piece of debris like loose rocks or uneven surfaces.

As the boot begins to roll, the boot carries the foot with it, the higher material of the boot above the ankle exerts more force against the foot to make it roll with the boot. That material is not stiff enough to keep from flexing, which means that your ankle is going to start bending as the roll of the boot continues. And because the foot is higher off the ground inside the boot, the ankle can be forced into a more significant bending.

Another factor about boots that helps lead to injury is their weight. The heavier the weight that the foot and lower legs need to lift, the more stress and fatigue the ankles and supporting structures are exposed to. Such weakens the ability of the ankle structures to maintain resiliency.

Trail shoes and trail runners, on the other hand, do the opposite when confronted with the same type of uneven surface or debris. The outer and midsoles are much closer to the ground. They are also wider than the shoe making for a contact point with the ground that is more stable. Their much lighter weight keeps ankle structures from fatiguing.

Now here is the thing researchers found as most significant: A foot in a shoe that is kept a bit loose can compensate, to a large degree, when the shoe starts to roll off of an uneven surface. As the shoe rolls, the shoe tends to slip around the foot. In other words, the shoe moves around the foot for the most part, so the ankle won't immediately bend out of place with the shoe. This allows the wearer of the shoe to have enough time to react to the rolling and twisting shoe to keep the ankle from injurious strain.

Yes, there are people who get ankle injuries in trail shoes and trail runners. But those injuries are less frequent and less severe, on an average, than with a foot encased in an above the ankle hiking boot.

As I stated above, there will be any number of folks that, with no predisposing medical conditions, will state anecdotal evidence along the lines that they, or a friend, or other family members, et al, were saved by above the ankle boots. Subjective opinion is like that. :) But objective evidence begs to differ on the best way of protecting ankles from injury.
I did not know that. I am doing ankle and knee exercises. Among many other exercises ( lol)
I read a book on how to do the Camino and it scared me for a few days. So training everyday. This is a dream of mine and very important to me
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
I did not know that. I am doing ankle and knee exercises. Among many other exercises ( lol)
I read a book on how to do the Camino and it scared me for a few days. So training everyday. This is a dream of mine and very important to me
As I mentioned, whatever footwear is chosen is an individual decision. But the reasons and facts related to one's individual need's in footwear, may open up the possibilities for something more ideal :).
 

Stefystar

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances from sarria 2015
Via Francigena Aquapendente to Rome 2016
Camino Portuguese from TuI 2016
One other thing I would mention as a consideration: The Kaha is a fairly aggressive boot.

Your avatar message mentions 'France 2020', so I am thinking that might mean you are planning to walk the Camino Frances. You did not mention the season of your planned walk or any special concerns that you have with your feet. I am mentioning this because there may be other, more comfortable footwear choices among the Hoka One One lineup which might be a better match.

I apologize for any presumption on my part if you have already considered all of your options and the Kaha is your best choice for your individual needs. :)
Hi,
What are you referring to as aggressive?
Sorry for my ignorance, I am also looking for a walking trainer boots. Pls can you let me know?
Thank you,😊
 
Camino(s) past & future
French Route (Sept-Oct 2015)
I walk the Camino Portuguese from Lisbon in Hoka One. Supper comfortable shoes, but before I reach Porto, there was hardly any sole left and they have separated from the shoes. I had to walk the last day to Porto in my Crocs flip-flop. I found some glue and glued the sole back and kept walking until I found a pair of Saucony Peregrine that is in my size. I shipped the Hoka to Santiago and carried it back to the US and returned to REI. I did ask the salesperson if the shoes would last me 500 miles and the person said yes. I did about 30 miles of testing in the shoes before my Camino. Most of my training was done in my hiking boots at home. I love the Hoka, but I love my Saucony Peregrine even more. It is not as cushiony as the Hoka, but it is grippy in the rain, which was perfect. I doubt if the Hoka with the worn out sole would make it to Santiago. I have put many more miles on my Saucony since, and they can probably last another Camino.
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
I walk the Camino Portuguese from Lisbon in Hoka One. Supper comfortable shoes, but before I reach Porto, there was hardly any sole left and they have separated from the shoes. I had to walk the last day to Porto in my Crocs flip-flop. I found some glue and glued the sole back and kept walking until I found a pair of Saucony Peregrine that is in my size. I shipped the Hoka to Santiago and carried it back to the US and returned to REI. I did ask the salesperson if the shoes would last me 500 miles and the person said yes. I did about 30 miles of testing in the shoes before my Camino. Most of my training was done in my hiking boots at home. I love the Hoka, but I love my Saucony Peregrine even more. It is not as cushiony as the Hoka, but it is grippy in the rain, which was perfect. I doubt if the Hoka with the worn out sole would make it to Santiago. I have put many more miles on my Saucony since, and they can probably last another Camino.
You perfectly illustrate how individual experiences with shoes can vary widely from person to person. :)

I've used Hoka Bondi on two Caminos, and Hoka One One Speedgoat on my Colorado Trail thru-hike. Both of the Hoka are still used today for training. REI was generally correct in their estimation of useful life for both running or hiking, but I prefer to use a mileage 'range' to detail that type of information.

In any case, neither of the problems you experienced are typical for Hoka's in general, or any trail/running shoe and are what would be typical of a failure during production of the shoe. This type of failure has been seen in all brands of these types of shoes, but thankfully, they are not very common.

Sole separations are the most common reported problem for these shoes, and it is linked most often to either failure of the machinery to properly apply and spread the outersole glues, or a failure of the glues to properly cure. The blame is speed of manufacture and contaminants in the ingredient base of the glues used.

This happened to me when testing shoes for New Balance. I had premature failure of a pair of their Leadville's. When looked at, their QA folks were able to see that a specific production run of that shoe had a higher than normal incidence and tracked down the problem to the wrong type of adhesive being loaded for that specific production run.
 

Nana6

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
France ( 2020)
I walk the Camino Portuguese from Lisbon in Hoka One. Supper comfortable shoes, but before I reach Porto, there was hardly any sole left and they have separated from the shoes. I had to walk the last day to Porto in my Crocs flip-flop. I found some glue and glued the sole back and kept walking until I found a pair of Saucony Peregrine that is in my size. I shipped the Hoka to Santiago and carried it back to the US and returned to REI. I did ask the salesperson if the shoes would last me 500 miles and the person said yes. I did about 30 miles of testing in the shoes before my Camino. Most of my training was done in my hiking boots at home. I love the Hoka, but I love my Saucony Peregrine even more. It is not as cushiony as the Hoka, but it is grippy in the rain, which was perfect. I doubt if the Hoka with the worn out sole would make it to Santiago. I have put many more miles on my Saucony since, and they can probably last another Camino.
Thanks
 

bbates225

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
June/July (2017) Camino Frances (couldn't finish)
June/July (2020) Camino Frances (will try again)
And if you have THIS, you will be fine. The fact that you are doing research already shows you are on the right track to start your camino :)
I hope you find a pair of shoes that suits you well, be them boots or normal sneakers (I prefer the latter, but to each their own) :)
Do normal sneakers actually make it for 500 miles? I ask because they are so comfortable. On my Camino in 2017 I saw a guy set out from St Jean in a brand new sparkly white pair. I encountered him along the way and they always looked just as new and just as white through rain and mud. Since I couldn't finish beyond Astorga I never saw him again so I don't know if he and they made it or not. Since my feet were my problem - bursitis, not blisters, I have been trying out - and returning to REI - several different types of boots/shoes. So far nothing has felt right. I've also been researching feet issues and find I have issues I never knew I had. Davebugg offered advise way back when and been reading his comments here. I understand to each his/her own, but sneakers are so comfy, hence my question. Just bought a pair of Merrill Moab 2 vegan (since I am). Haven't tried yet. Anybody out there familiar with these?
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking.
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
I wore an older model of Hokas on the Le Puy route and absolutely loved them. They were like walking on marshmellows and they gripped awesomly on large smooth wet rocks.
My son has worn Hokas on the full John Muir Trail and the Colorado Trail and never had issues with his feet.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances: (2016), Del Norte: (2018), Finisterre: (2018)
Olvidado/San Salvador/Primativo: (2019)
I am shopping and trying on boots to train in for the Camino. I like the feel of the new Hoka Sky Kaha? Does anyone have experience with these boots? I read on the forum that some were having problems with the Toa soles.
Thanks
I haven't been able to find that model yet, but I walked a few weeks of the Camino Olvidado this spring in the Hoka Speedgoats and loved them. I destroy the liner in the heel counter very quickly, but I tend to do that in all shoes.
 

Nana6

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
France ( 2020)
I haven't been able to find that model yet, but I walked a few weeks of the Camino Olvidado this spring in the Hoka Speedgoats and loved them. I destroy the liner in the heel counter very quickly, but I tend to do that in all shoes.
I love the speedgoats. How did the feel walking on cobblestones?
 

Nana6

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
France ( 2020)
I wore an older model of Hokas on the Le Puy route and absolutely loved them. They were like walking on marshmellows and they gripped awesomly on large smooth wet rocks.
My son has worn Hokas on the full John Muir Trail and the Colorado Trail and never had issues with his feet.
Hoka boots or Hoka trail shoes?
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
Do normal sneakers actually make it for 500 miles? I ask because they are so comfortable. On my Camino in 2017 I saw a guy set out from St Jean in a brand new sparkly white pair. I encountered him along the way and they always looked just as new and just as white through rain and mud. Since I couldn't finish beyond Astorga I never saw him again so I don't know if he and they made it or not. Since my feet were my problem - bursitis, not blisters, I have been trying out - and returning to REI - several different types of boots/shoes. So far nothing has felt right. I've also been researching feet issues and find I have issues I never knew I had. Davebugg offered advise way back when and been reading his comments here. I understand to each his/her own, but sneakers are so comfy, hence my question. Just bought a pair of Merrill Moab 2 vegan (since I am). Haven't tried yet. Anybody out there familiar with these?
It depends on what you mean by 'sneakers'. To me, sneakers brings up childhood memories of Keds or PF Flyers :).

Anyway, this is my perspective on that whole issue:

1. Street running shoes will not last as long as trail runners - which will not last as long as trail shoes - which will not last as long as trail boots - which will not last as long as hiking boots - which will not last as long as mountaineering boots.

2. Longevity is not my primary concern for footwear when I am doing any type of distance walking. My primary concerns are comfort, stability, performance ( including traction) combined with the lightest weight possible.

3. I used 5 pairs of trail runners during a thru hike of the 2600+ miles of the Pacific Crest Trail. Those trail runners were chosen because they would allow my feet to function and hold up well for that 5+ months of continuous backpacking. I didn't care that I averaged only 400 to 500 miles per pair, what mattered was how well they kept my feet comfortable and able to perform.

I will note that most of the time I was swapping out shoes prior to the end of their useful life. Such are the downsides when one has to plan for resupplies at prearranged package shipping points, sometimes many miles off of the trail.

4. I have a pair of trail running shoes that has lasted now for over 700 miles. I started using them after I arrived in Leon from SJPdP and are still using them for my daily training hikes and day hikes.

5. My experience with a shoe's longevity will be different for other folks. Much of that has to do with different gaits, different motion control issues, those who are heavier or lighter, the type of use the shoes are put through, and even some lesser thought of things like using higher heat of a hair dryer to dry out shoes.

6. Footwear needs are individualistic. There are those who need a stiffer platform - like boots - in order to stave off foot injuries like plantars fasciitis; while others need a running shoe for the same exact reasons but are affected by those injuries in a different bio-mechanical manner.

Anyway, hope that is a bit helpful.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking.
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
May I ask, which one?
Did you have any issues with them on cobblestones?
They were Hoka One Ones, but they have newer models now. I had no problems on cobbles!
 

Anamya

Keeping it simple
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015)
Portugues (2017)
Lebaniego (2019)
Do normal sneakers actually make it for 500 miles? I ask because they are so comfortable.
My Mizunos lasted 200km on the Frances + 200km on the portugues plus hundreds of kms in training before that. They finally died in a Tough Mudder race the following year. I always choose comfort for the camino, if my feet are happy, everything feels better :)
I was not talking about the bare, non cushioned stuff like keds, by sneakers I meant more cushioned runners like asics, mizuno, etc etc.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking.
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
I've walked 5 longer, various Caminos and have worn Asics, Sauconys, and Hokas and had success with all of them!
 

Lizhk

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francis (2017) StJPdP to Burgos (2018) Porto interior (2018), Porto Coastal (May 2019)
I have used Hoka One One trail shoes and loved the soles, so soft. The only problem I had was when it poured rain and my feet and shoes got wet. While it was easy to change to dry socks, the shoes were still wet and I got blisters. This year I bought Hoka Speedgoat gortex trail shoes. While my feet were warmer, it was easy to change socks once a day and stay dry. No blisters! This pair still look new after 450k.
 

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