A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it

Advertisement

The big map o the Caminos de Santiago

A few thoughts from Moratinos

A

Anonymous

Guest
#1
Two days ago I arrived here in Moratinos - slightly ahead of schedule although Rebekah was kind of expecting me any time - and I was absolutely shattered. Tendons are now playing up slightly after 1700 kilometres and I also had run out of water on that horrible stretch between Carrión and Calzadilla earlier in the day, so I was dehydrated; and I went way over the distance I promised myself I would stick to that day.

I was even thinking of switching to the Camino del Norte when I arrived here, mainly because I was getting a bit weary of the big crowd heading down the Camino to get to Santiago in time for the feast on the 25th. But after two days rest here, watching people go by through Moratinos on the Camino, it has quietened down a bit (as far as I can tell) and I´m ready to start walking again tomorrow.

It was great to have two nights in a room on my own with no snorers, and it was also very pleasant to have good company to talk with during the day, plenty of good reading material to hand, and a good feed-up from my hosts!

I´m feeling a bit concerned for a Dutch pilgrim called Martin Broekers, who I met in France a couple of times on my walk down the Turonensis. His pony has run into real trouble and it looks like he will have to abandon. He is near Burgos apparently. If anyone sees him, please tell him to contact Rebekah, if he is within reach of Moratinos. She can put him up here and there is space for the pony. (I don´t think he is receiving the emails I sent him, and I may have the wrond email address.)

Well, I´m not switching to the Camino del Norte: I´m carrying on with Plan A tomorrow morning, and feeling a lot better about it. After ten weeks on the road I think I´ll have to be more aware that the fatigue is not only physical by mental, and I have to find new strategies to deal with the rough patches. This stretch between Sahagún and León will be a difficult one too, but I´m looking forward to Astorga and going uphill again into the mountains.

Anyone else from the Forum around at the moment on this stretch? Ultreia!

Gareth
 
#2
Gareth, they say that the 2nd third of the camino (the Frances) challenges you mentally. That would be the Meseta part, where you are now. So it must be true. A great sense of accomplishment you will feel and the gift comes as you enter the mountains after Leon.
Animo!
Lillian
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
#3
MermaidLilli said:
Gareth, they say that the 2nd third of the camino (the Frances) challenges you mentally.
Ah... that would account for the large Psychiatric Hospital that you see on the left as you come off the Meseta into León, just after crossing the footbridge over the motorway. This has indeed been a tough stretch. I´ve done it before and I knew what to expect, but after walking from England it is all quite different. I´m suffering from a generalised fatigue now which affects everything.

It is good at times: for example, this morning I started in the dark and when the sun came up it was marvellous looking at the light on the Picos de Europa in the north. There was also a marvellous moment when I had the sense of how high up the Meseta is, as you approack Mansilla de las Mulas. On the whole, though, I´ll be glad when I get to Astorga and start climbing away from all this flat land into the mountains.

Gareth
 

KiwiNomad06

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy-Santiago(2008) Cluny-Conques+prt CF(2012)
#5
Gareth Thomas said:
This has indeed been a tough stretch. I´m suffering from a generalised fatigue now which affects everything.
It is good at times: for example, this morning I started in the dark and when the sun came up it was marvellous looking at the light on the Picos de Europa in the north. There was also a marvellous moment when I had the sense of how high up the Meseta is, as you approack Mansilla de las Mulas. On the whole, though, I´ll be glad when I get to Astorga and start climbing away from all this flat land into the mountains.
Gareth
Gareth, I was tired too when I reached Moratinos, and Rebekah's hospitality was very welcome. And the sunrise as I left her place next morning was also so refreshing for the spirit. Then in Mansilla de los Mulas, I stayed in the municipal albergue, and the hospitalero there had tended such wonderful geraniums, with a profusion of pots all over the walls of the interior courtyard. The special atmosphere there was rejuvenating.
Leon was wonderful, but the walk on roads in and out of it was one of my least favourite parts of the whole Camino. But as I left Astorga and headed for the mountains, my spirits rose again. As I began climbing, only a few weeks ago, (June 23) there was a profusion of flowers along the path. At Rabanal the hospitality was enlivening. Then on the day I climbed to O'Cebreiro the weather was beautiful, and the views were stunning. With "only" 150km to go, it seemed like the end was imminent, and all my tiredness vanished as I enjoyed the greenery of Galicia, and thought about all the wonderful experiences I had enjoyed along the way.

With every best wish for the last kms of your Camino!
Margaret
Kiwinomad
 

OLDER threads on this topic




A few items available from the Camino Forum Store



Advertisement

Booking.com

Most read today

Most downloaded Resources

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store

Casa Ivar Newsletter

Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 11 1.4%
  • February

    Votes: 5 0.6%
  • March

    Votes: 35 4.4%
  • April

    Votes: 117 14.8%
  • May

    Votes: 192 24.3%
  • June

    Votes: 55 7.0%
  • July

    Votes: 15 1.9%
  • August

    Votes: 12 1.5%
  • September

    Votes: 236 29.9%
  • October

    Votes: 96 12.2%
  • November

    Votes: 11 1.4%
  • December

    Votes: 5 0.6%
Top