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Camino Baztan

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
I have seen a couple of scattered posts on the Camino Baztan, and it has piqued my interest as I am in the beginning of my "camino 2012" planning stage. Like the Vasco Interior, this one goes mainly through the Basque country, which means it's going to be beautiful. The route I've got descriptions for starts in Bayonne and winds up in Pamplona.

It's described as a 6 day walk, but it's not much more than 100 km, so it should be easy to walk in fewer days.

The info I've found is in Spanish, but I'm willing to translate things if people are interested:

http://www.consorciobertiz.org/consorci ... tiago.html

Under each of the stages, there is a link to click to take you to a more detailed description of the path on the "rutasnavarra" website.

If others are interested, I'll ask Ivar to set up a new section for another camino leading into the Frances.
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
From YOUR CAMINO


From the north: Ruta del Baztan: ± 100 km Bayonne to Trinidad de Arre and Pamplona
It is possible to walk from Bayonne to the Camino Frances in five to six days, joining the route at Trinidad de Arre about 4.5 km from Pamplona. Although this is considered an ancient route, used by the Romans on the Camino Real, it is not a frequently used route and does not have much in the way of pilgrim accommodation until it reaches Trinidad de Arre. http://tinyurl.com/3nffmjy
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Hi, sam,
I haven't been able to open the link you sent -- anyone else have the same problem? I'll keep trying but if you have any suggestions, I'd appreciate them.

After looking at the elevations, it seems that this route offers a good alternative to those who want to start in France yet are daunted by the Pyrenees crossing so early in the walk. Based on the days detailed in the rutas Navarra website, the elevation gain is roughly as follows:
Day 1 -- flat
Day 2 -- 300 m
Day 3 -- 500 m
Day 4 -- 200 m
Day 5 -- 600 m
Day 6 -- 200 m

That makes it a lot more gentle than the 1300 m or so on the first day out of St. Jean. But of course it takes 5 or 6 days to walk from Bayonne to Pamplona rather than 3 or 4 from St. Jean. And as Sil notes, there aren't albergues, etc. But still ... it's kind of enticing, that part of the Pais Vasco is really beautiful.

Buen camino, Laurie
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Just got a PM explaining that you have to sign up to receive the guide via email and then you are asked to make a 2 E donation if you find it helpful. Much like the Confraternity system. I'll report back, thanks, Laurie
 

grayland

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Yes
peregrina2000 said:
Just got a PM explaining that you have to sign up to receive the guide via email and then you are asked to make a 2 E donation if you find it helpful. Much like the Confraternity system. I'll report back, thanks, Laurie
The http://www.caminoguide.net
is hosted and maintained by Gerald Kelly. The 2 euro is a donitivo if you find the guide helpful and not required to download. He uses the donation to keep the guides up to date. I have downloaded the Via de la Plata guide and am very happy with it as it is updated November 2011.
 

dazzamac

Active Member
I'm returning to the Camino again in 2012 and the Camino Baztan looks to be an interesting variation. I'm also considering the Voie de la Nive form Bayonne to St Jean Pied de Port. Given that both routes are less traveled, I'll admit that accommodation is a key concern.

Part of me is tempted by the idea of wild camping after talking to someone who brought and used a tent along the Camino Frances. I carried about 3kgs of photographic equipment with me last time and quite honestly I'm likely to do the same again, so either I invest in a trailer or find another way.
 

FatmaG

Active Member
I am back from the "Via de Baztan" - so here some information:

Beautiful, remote, lonely, very green and - on the beginning of April - rather rany.

As to my stages, I followed mostly the advice of DomiBy (MilleMerci pour ces bons conseils!)

Bayonne: I slept in the Maison diocésaine for 17€ (good breakfast included) - normally, they are closed on Sundays, but the Director himself came gratiously to let me in.
MAISON DIOCESAINE "ST  LEON"
10, Av. Jean DARRIGRAND
64100  -   BAYONNE
Tél : 05 59 58 47 47 (entre 16 et 20h)
<maisondio@numericable.fr>

Bayonne - Espelette (slightly off camino, just before Souraïde) :
Pilgrims' albergue (10€)
You have to contact the 'Office de tourisme'
Espelette is one of those charming basque villages, plenty of tourism, thus plenty of shopping possibilities
On the way: at least 2 possibilities to stop for a coffee, lunch etc.

Espelette - Urdax (in French) / Urdazubi (in Spanish) :
Pilgrims' albergue in ancient monastry (4€)
Some bars and at least one restaurant. One of the bars (next to the albergue) is a small shop as well.
Btw, in between : Ainhoa with bars, restaurants and shops, and in Dancharria at the old border plenty of awesome supermarkets.

Urdazubi - Ariskun :
Pension Etxeberria (20€)
Btw, there is an albergue in Amaiur, +- 5 km before reaching Ariskun
One bar in Amaiur - open when I passed
In Ariskun, I saw at least one bar, the pension being bar, restaurant and shop on the same time...

Ariskun - Berroeta :
Albergue in Berroeta (4€) - above the Fronton (don't forget ear plugs!)
Bring something to eat, no shopping possibility.
On your way: Elizondo, capital of the Baztan region. Plenty of everything.

Berroeta - Olaguë :
Albergue Olaguë above youth meeting point (earplugs!) - 4€
I chose the alternative which goes down the valley before climbing again... (not the "oriental" one which seems to have few waymarking left).
At some point, the Venta de San Blaes where you can eat and drink and rest...
Lanz: one bar-restaurant. The very lovely owners proposed me to share their meal!
Olaguë: you can buy some basic things in a very small shop. The elderly lady opens kind of a window in the entrance of her house... Amazing.

Olaguë - Pamplona :
You come through plenty of villages but few offer a bar or a restaurant.
Therefore you should not miss the bar/restaurant in Sorauren...

To resume:
There are enough albergues to stop overnight, you should just know that none of them were heated. To get warm, to keep warm, to dry you wet hair, well : get inventive!
All - with exception of the last one - very clean and mostly well equipped.

To contact the hospitaleras of the Spanish albergues, you have to phone them (you might already do so the day upon your arrival - not to make a reservation but for them to know that a pilgrim is arriving. The lady responsible for the albergue in Olaguë told me quite severly that she might have been off to Pamplona for the Procession and that I might have stuck in pourring rain for hours. Thanks Santiaga, she was at home...)

If you want to join the Camino Frances to get to Santiago but you would like to have some lonely days or you prefer a less steeper way to cross the Pyrenees, the Baztan Way might be for you!



PS for detailled information about the albergues, have a look on the information sheet Catharina published on the board
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Thanks so much for the help Fatma,

So it sounds like there are two green, rural, Basque Caminos to join up with the Francés -- either the Vasco Interior that Annie and Joe just walked, or this Baztan route. How in the world will we choose?! Buen camino, Laurie
 

anniethenurse

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances.Vasco del Interior.Camino Finisterre& Muxia. Camino Portugues. Ruta del Ebro.
peregrina2000 said:
Thanks so much for the help Fatma,

So it sounds like there are two green, rural, Basque Caminos to join up with the Francés -- either the Vasco Interior that Annie and Joe just walked, or this Baztan route. How in the world will we choose?! Buen camino, Laurie
Hi Laurie!

Actually there is a third one also. Via de Bayona
http://www.mundicamino.com/rutas.cfm?id=59
Starts from Bayonne to Irun and continues (on the Vasco) untill Estavillo where it parts from Vasco and continues to Burgos. 12 etapas.

So why not Via Bayona/ Frances/ San Salvador/ Primitivo? 34 -36 etapas.
I got the new credentials for San Salvador!
buen camino
annie

Fatma, weldone again - a route less walked.
 

FatmaG

Active Member
Laurie, how to choose?
I guess we'll have to walk all of them...

Annie,
I saw your beautiful pictures - and, yes, I walked, to be correct, the Via de Baiona from Estavillo to Burgos. And from Hernani till Zegama an other alternative path through the mountains - called in my German guidebook the way of the transhumance. The Spanish - pardon the Basque Tourism office - calls this alternative the Camino de Saiatz.

All these beautiful caminos to come.....
 

Cliff175

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
April / May Camino Frances 2013
Portuguese Camino May of 2014
St. jean to pomplona, - Santander to Oviedo, SAN Salvador to Leon , to Santiago in 2015
2017 March -- VDLP Seville to Santiago
I am back from the "Via de Baztan" - so here some information:

Beautiful, remote, lonely, very green and - on the beginning of April - rather rany.

As to my stages, I followed mostly the advice of DomiBy (MilleMerci pour ces bons conseils!)

Bayonne: I slept in the Maison diocésaine for 17€ (good breakfast included) - normally, they are closed on Sundays, but the Director himself came gratiously to let me in.
MAISON DIOCESAINE "ST LEON"
10, Av. Jean DARRIGRAND
64100 - BAYONNE
Tél : 05 59 58 47 47 (entre 16 et 20h)
<maisondio@numericable.fr>

Bayonne - Espelette (slightly off camino, just before Souraïde) :
Pilgrims' albergue (10€)
You have to contact the 'Office de tourisme'
Espelette is one of those charming basque villages, plenty of tourism, thus plenty of shopping possibilities
On the way: at least 2 possibilities to stop for a coffee, lunch etc.

Espelette - Urdax (in French) / Urdazubi (in Spanish) :
Pilgrims' albergue in ancient monastry (4€)
Some bars and at least one restaurant. One of the bars (next to the albergue) is a small shop as well.
Btw, in between : Ainhoa with bars, restaurants and shops, and in Dancharria at the old border plenty of awesome supermarkets.

Urdazubi - Ariskun :
Pension Etxeberria (20€)
Btw, there is an albergue in Amaiur, +- 5 km before reaching Ariskun
One bar in Amaiur - open when I passed
In Ariskun, I saw at least one bar, the pension being bar, restaurant and shop on the same time...

Ariskun - Berroeta :
Albergue in Berroeta (4€) - above the Fronton (don't forget ear plugs!)
Bring something to eat, no shopping possibility.
On your way: Elizondo, capital of the Baztan region. Plenty of everything.

Berroeta - Olaguë :
Albergue Olaguë above youth meeting point (earplugs!) - 4€
I chose the alternative which goes down the valley before climbing again... (not the "oriental" one which seems to have few waymarking left).
At some point, the Venta de San Blaes where you can eat and drink and rest...
Lanz: one bar-restaurant. The very lovely owners proposed me to share their meal!
Olaguë: you can buy some basic things in a very small shop. The elderly lady opens kind of a window in the entrance of her house... Amazing.

Olaguë - Pamplona :
You come through plenty of villages but few offer a bar or a restaurant.
Therefore you should not miss the bar/restaurant in Sorauren...

To resume:
There are enough albergues to stop overnight, you should just know that none of them were heated. To get warm, to keep warm, to dry you wet hair, well : get inventive!
All - with exception of the last one - very clean and mostly well equipped.

To contact the hospitaleras of the Spanish albergues, you have to phone them (you might already do so the day upon your arrival - not to make a reservation but for them to know that a pilgrim is arriving. The lady responsible for the albergue in Olaguë told me quite severly that she might have been off to Pamplona for the Procession and that I might have stuck in pourring rain for hours. Thanks Santiaga, she was at home...)

If you want to join the Camino Frances to get to Santiago but you would like to have some lonely days or you prefer a less steeper way to cross the Pyrenees, the Baztan Way might be for you!



PS for detailled information about the albergues, have a look on the information sheet Catharina published on the board

Thank You for this information. Sounds wonderful. I plan to walk the Camino Baztan this September. I only speak english, thinking I should make a card on how to make reservations ? Do you think my language limitation will be a game breaker ?
 

Kiwi-family

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Past: (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2018)-Frances, Baztan, San Salvador, Primitivo, Fisterra,VdlP, Madrid
No - with a bit of mime you'll be fine. Reservations are not needed.
 

LVDWD

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2015
I am back from the "Via de Baztan" - so here some information:

Beautiful, remote, lonely, very green and - on the beginning of April - rather rany.

As to my stages, I followed mostly the advice of DomiBy (MilleMerci pour ces bons conseils!)

Bayonne: I slept in the Maison diocésaine for 17€ (good breakfast included) - normally, they are closed on Sundays, but the Director himself came gratiously to let me in.
MAISON DIOCESAINE "ST LEON"
10, Av. Jean DARRIGRAND
64100 - BAYONNE
Tél : 05 59 58 47 47 (entre 16 et 20h)
<maisondio@numericable.fr>

Bayonne - Espelette (slightly off camino, just before Souraïde) :
Pilgrims' albergue (10€)
You have to contact the 'Office de tourisme'
Espelette is one of those charming basque villages, plenty of tourism, thus plenty of shopping possibilities
On the way: at least 2 possibilities to stop for a coffee, lunch etc.

Espelette - Urdax (in French) / Urdazubi (in Spanish) :
Pilgrims' albergue in ancient monastry (4€)
Some bars and at least one restaurant. One of the bars (next to the albergue) is a small shop as well.
Btw, in between : Ainhoa with bars, restaurants and shops, and in Dancharria at the old border plenty of awesome supermarkets.

Urdazubi - Ariskun :
Pension Etxeberria (20€)
Btw, there is an albergue in Amaiur, +- 5 km before reaching Ariskun
One bar in Amaiur - open when I passed
In Ariskun, I saw at least one bar, the pension being bar, restaurant and shop on the same time...

Ariskun - Berroeta :
Albergue in Berroeta (4€) - above the Fronton (don't forget ear plugs!)
Bring something to eat, no shopping possibility.
On your way: Elizondo, capital of the Baztan region. Plenty of everything.

Berroeta - Olaguë :
Albergue Olaguë above youth meeting point (earplugs!) - 4€
I chose the alternative which goes down the valley before climbing again... (not the "oriental" one which seems to have few waymarking left).
At some point, the Venta de San Blaes where you can eat and drink and rest...
Lanz: one bar-restaurant. The very lovely owners proposed me to share their meal!
Olaguë: you can buy some basic things in a very small shop. The elderly lady opens kind of a window in the entrance of her house... Amazing.

Olaguë - Pamplona :
You come through plenty of villages but few offer a bar or a restaurant.
Therefore you should not miss the bar/restaurant in Sorauren...

To resume:
There are enough albergues to stop overnight, you should just know that none of them were heated. To get warm, to keep warm, to dry you wet hair, well : get inventive!
All - with exception of the last one - very clean and mostly well equipped.

To contact the hospitaleras of the Spanish albergues, you have to phone them (you might already do so the day upon your arrival - not to make a reservation but for them to know that a pilgrim is arriving. The lady responsible for the albergue in Olaguë told me quite severly that she might have been off to Pamplona for the Procession and that I might have stuck in pourring rain for hours. Thanks Santiaga, she was at home...)

If you want to join the Camino Frances to get to Santiago but you would like to have some lonely days or you prefer a less steeper way to cross the Pyrenees, the Baztan Way might be for you!



PS for detailled information about the albergues, have a look on the information sheet Catharina published on the board
Do you think you could MTn bike this route?
 

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