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Camino Ingles advice for a newbie

kevinhw

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Ingles (future, 2018)
#1
Hello, I am a potential first timer for the Camino - we've been thinking about it for ages. There are three of us - I'm a 38yo male in reasonably good shape, as is my wife (36yo). Her mother (60yo) would join us too. All of us walk to some degree, but nothing on this scale.

Our potential dates are flying from London to La Coruna on Wednesday 28 March. It's a very late flight so we'd need to stay somewhere that would let us arrive at 00.30-01.00 (if anyone knows anywhere to look - maybe near the airport in fact that would be awesome). Then we'd probably bus it to Ferrol on the Thursday afternoon, and potentially do the short walk to Neda that afternoon/evening. Then the planned walks are probably along the lines of what other folk have done.

Friday - Neda to Pontadeume
Saturday - Pontedeume to Betanzos
Sunday - Betanzos to Bruma
Monday - Bruma to Sigueiro
Tuesday - Sigueiro to Santiago (this is a shortish walk but as I understand you want to get to Santiago by midday?)

Does this sound a reasonable route? We expect the Saturday-Monday to be the toughest days and would factor in 6-7h days potentially. We probably wouldn't use albergues necessarily (well not dorms) but presumably these towns have options for pensions/B&Bs? Are these also towns where we could expect places to be open to eat in the evening - even if just supermarkets?

If anyone has any advice for anyone doing their first-time camino, we would appreciate it. We know it will be an adjustment and it's hugely different to anything we've done before. After a bit of rotten luck in the last year or so, we're hoping the challenge of a camino will usher in the start of some better times.

Thanks!
 

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davebugg

DustOff: "When I have your wounded."
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
#2
I would book the flight to London separate from the flight to La Coruna. Stay in London overnight and catch a flight to La Coruna in the morning.
 

kevinhw

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Ingles (future, 2018)
#3
I would book the flight to London separate from the flight to La Coruna. Stay in London overnight and catch a flight to La Coruna in the morning.
Hi Dave, we live in London and the only flight from Heathrow is 2030-2330. As far as I see it's the only direct flight from London to La Coruna. So that's why we'd look for the easiest option that evening - a hotel that would allow a very late check in!
 

martyseville

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
a/a
#4
Hi, I walked the Ingles last May. CORRECTION: did Ingles in April 16.

Did the walk in April 16. Not May 17. sorry.

-Ferrol Hotel Silva
-Neda(A'burg)>used hammock outside of A'burg
-Puntedume(Hotel Louis)>good food. Clean place. Heard A/burg was not the best there.
-Nimo(A/burg)>used hammock outside of A'burg. May be wrong, believe this is the town that has the good place to eat down the road. The owner is a artist. Walked from the A'burg to this place for breakfast. Then picked up the Camino in back of the restaurant. Lots of art work displayed in the restaurant.
-Betanzos(A'burg)>inside
-Presedo(A'burg)>inside Was only walker in the place
-Burma(A'burg)>
-Sigüeiro>(private apartment)
-Santiago>Hostal Alfonso

Slow walker. Enjoy seeing places and talking with people in the towns.

Loved it. Not a single day of rain. Then rained when I got to Santiago.

I will dig out my notes and provide you some information later. Sorry so vague now. Talking off top of head now.

Your break down of stages seems reasonable.

BUT, I would not plan on doing a afternoon stroll from Ferrol to Neda.
Start early morning out of Ferrol. Makes life easier.

Only challenge I had (and I am over 70) was the hill after "BAR JULIA"
Bar Julia is good pit stop. Before you head up that hill. Get water at the bar or at fountain down the street. Eat "pan cakes" at Bar Julia. Get stamp there too.

The other fun hill was when leaving Pontedeume

Most of the towns/cities along the way have cafes, bars, small stores.
The small stores will have what you need as a walker. Water, fruit, food, bread, beer, wine, sun screen, etc etc.
Larger cities have supermarkets.

As far as places to eat, Burma used to be the exception. For a long time there was no where to eat there. Food was ordered in. Now there is a place to eat down the street from the A'burg. Good food there. Was new place in May. So hope it is still open.

For now...

There are many hotels close to the train/bus stations in Coruna.

I got into Coruna very late. Stayed across from the train station in Hotel L I S T E (darn spell checker again) Not a 5-star place. But will do in a pinch. Good location.
I did not have a reservation. Just wanted to rest for a night.

In the center of Coruna there are many nice places to stay. I visited one of the hostels in the center. Nice place. Walking distance from train/bus station to center of Coruna. Walk from bus/train station to center is about 30 min. Depending on fast you walk. For me it was easy.

Bus station in Coruna is about a 10 min walk from the train station.

Bus to Ferrol: Two different buses to Ferrol. Slow and fast one. There is the slow route bus. Which stops in every town along the way. And there is the direct one. Catch the direct one from Coruna to Ferrol.

Train to Ferrol: runs few times a day to Ferrol. It is a little commuter type of a train. Toss up if bus or train would be better.

Bus station in Ferrol is almost across the street from the train station in Ferrol.
Not bad.

In Ferrol, get your camino passport at Hotel Silva or TI office in Ferrol. Or possibly at the Cathedral in Ferrol

Pilgrim's office in Ferrol: (possible)
http://www.ferrol360.es/la-nueva-of...e-inaugura-la-proxima-semana-en-ferrol-vello/


Ferrol: Hotel Silva is nice, clean place to stay in Ferrol. Since I stayed in Ferrol two days, I did the walk from the port of Ferrol to the circle. Then the next day I walked from hotel Silva down to the circle (traffic circle that you must walk by on your Ingles camino in Ferrol) and picked up the camino again from there.

There is nice laundry mat down the street from Hotel Silva.

N e da: The A'burg in N e da (sorry darn auto correct) is nice. Small place. Walk across pedi bridge and you will be at it. This will make sense when you get there. Has washer and dryers.

The A'burg in Pontedeume is bad news. I stayed in Hotel Louis. Will give more information later. Good food there. There is another small hotel across from Hotel Louis. Where many of the walkers stayed at.

Hill is fun when walking out of Pontedeume. Long. Not bad. But you will know you did it.

Lots of places to stay in Betanzos. A'burg there is not bad. Has washer and dryers. Be looking for where you cross over the RR tracks when walking out of Betanzos! Few walkers missed it and had to back track.

A' burg in Bruma is very small. Place to eat now down the street. I may be wrong, but think the A'burg is the only place to stay in Bruma. Hotel is few kms from Bruma. and is off the Camino a few kms.

I stayed in private place in Sigüeiro (in private apartment). Was darn good. I found out about it from a Spanish man in Ferrol. Clean and nice. Has private room and dorm type rooms x 2. Washer and dryer. Use of kitchen, etc. Owner is WONDERFUL.

Santiago de Compostela I stayed in wonderful Hostel Alfonso. Love it. Well worth the price. Only has a few rooms. Can find it on line. Must make reservation. Wonderful view of Cathedral from rooms on the back side of the building. Owners are super great!

(((I stopped at one more place. Stayed in A'burg. I will have to look at my notes and tell you later.)))
 
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martyseville

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
a/a
#5
If you have a reservation in Coruna you should have no problems as a late arrival.
Just tell the hotel you are staying at you will arrive late. Just let the hotel know.

Since arriving late, taxis are inexpensive in Coruna. Coruna is not that big of a city.
 

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kevinhw

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Ingles (future, 2018)
#6
Thank you martyseville! That is all very useful information so far, and definitely something we'll keep in mind. That's interesting about the Ferrol-Pontedeume part being one walk - I have seen it done as two shorter walks to ease you in, but it makes sense to get a sense of your bearings in Ferrol for an afternoon, and not arriving and having to leave straight away.

How far is the Ferrol-Pontedeume leg? Google Maps has it around 18km but of course that may not be the camino walk. That said, it's not any further than any of the other legs of the walk, right?

Getting all these little bits of info will really help us - knowing where to stay, eat, etc. This is very new to us and it's great to hear what other walkers have experienced.

Thanks!
 

Purky

The Dutch guy
Camino(s) past & future
Breathe properly.
Stay curious.
And walk a camino.
#7
First of all, get the Johnnie Walker guide. It will show you the way to SdC and provide you with all the information (accommodation, background info, height profiles) you need. I'm assuming this guide has the newest info on the redirection between Presedo and Bruma (click here for more on that).

A first stop in Neda isn't a bad idea IMO, if time permits. An easy 13 km, just to get started and find your bearings, instead of a 29 km stretch to Pontedeume. Your stages could then look like this:

Ferrol - Neda (13km)
Neda - Pontedeume (16km)
Pontedeume - Betanzos (20km)
Betanzos – Hospital de Bruma (29km)
Hospital de Bruma – Sigüeiro (24km)
Sigüeiro – Santiago de Compostela (16km)

Buen camino!
 
#9
If you are walking over Semana Santa you may need to book accommodation if staying in hostels because it can get quite busy at this time.
Ryanair also fly from London Stansted direct to Santiago and then there is a bus to Ferrol.
The route has also changed on the last day but it is waymarked very well.
I love the Ingles.
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
#10
I would look at booking 2 nights O Meson Novo in Meson do Vento and using their service to break the Betanzos to Bruma stage. They pick up and return at approx the half way point. Alternative is the albergue at Presedo with a similar effect. Starting at Ferrol to Neda/Naron is a good plan. Hotel Kensington in Naron is a good place to stay just before the river crossing to the Neda albergue.
 

martyseville

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
a/a
#11
The new guide is needed because of the new routes.
Bar Julia for instance is not on the Camino anymore.
Oh no, Bar Julia is no longer on the route from Ferrol to Santiago?

Then that wonderful hill after Bar Julia is no longer enjoyed by walkers?

Reading what you posted about Bar Julia, I went back and looked up date walked and places stopped. I am a slow, enjoying the walk, person:

Did the walk in April 16. Not May 17. sorry.

-Ferrol Hotel Silva
-Neda(A'burg)>used hammock outside of A'burg
-Puntedume(Hotel Louis)>good food. Clean place. Heard A/burg was not the best there.
-Nimo(A/burg)>used hammock outside of A'burg
-Betanzos(A'burg)>inside
-Presedo(A'burg)>inside Was only walker in the place
-Burma(A'burg)>
-Sigüeiro>(private apartment)
-Santiago>Hostal Alfonso
 
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Davey Boyd

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Seven Compostelas in Three years and counting......
#13
The new guide is needed because of the new routes.
Bar Julia for instance is not on the Camino anymore.
Just out of interest when did this change? Bar Julia was on route when I walked last June.

I remember it well as we chatted to the girl who was running the bar alone. She was eight (yes 8) years old! Her dad was out the back and grandmother upstairs, though the bar was packed with locals who were 'looking after her'. She was doing her homework on the bar, and she had to stand on tiptoes to pour a beer! When we tried to buy a second beer she stood with her hands on her hips and told us very sternly "You want another beer you pay me first"! Us and the locals burst out laughing.

Buen Camino Kevin, you are going to love it. Sorry for hijacking your thread!

Davey
 

natefaith

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria-Santiago (2009)
León-Ponferrada (2014)
Camino Inglés (2017)
#15
Welcome to the Forum, @kevinhw !

I would also recommend that you take it easy in Ferrol for a night and then get started the next morning. And that if you have time, to break up the stages even more than in your original plan so you can enjoy the towns:

- Ferrol to Neda
- Neda to Cabañas or Pontedeume
- Cabañas/ Pontedeume to Miño
- Miño to Betanzos
- Betanzos to somewhere near Presedo, with pick up to O Meson Novo as @Tia Valeria mentioned above
- Back to somewhere near Presedo, to O Meson Novo (Meson do Vento)
- Meson do Vento to Sigueiro
- Sigueiro to Santiago

This is an 8-day itinerary, though, which you may not have time for...in that case you could do Cabañas/ Pontedeume to Betanzos in one day, or Betanzos to Meson do Vento. I wouldn't try Ferrol to Pontedeume (about 30km on the Camino - Google Maps probably showed you something different) your first day...it's nice to have a shorter day in the beginning so you can warm up your walking muscles and really enjoy the first day without pushing too hard. But that's just me. :)

Also...going from Cabañas all the way to Betanzos just about trashed me back in July! Even though it was only 22km it was a hard, steep journey and took forever. You all may be made of harder stuff! :) But with Miño being a beach town I wish I'd stopped there for the night.

For the most part grocery stores are open until 9pm or 10pm, and many restaurants are open for dinner starting at 8pm or 9pm, so finding food won't be a problem. And there are several hotels/ private places in each village but as others have said you'll be walking over Semana Santa so you'll want to reserve your rooms soon.

Whatever you decide enjoy all the planning and Buen Camino!
 

PeteB

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
"Ingles 2013"
#16
Hello, I am a potential first timer for the Camino - we've been thinking about it for ages. There are three of us - I'm a 38yo male in reasonably good shape, as is my wife (36yo). Her mother (60yo) would join us too. All of us walk to some degree, but nothing on this scale.

Our potential dates are flying from London to La Coruna on Wednesday 28 March. It's a very late flight so we'd need to stay somewhere that would let us arrive at 00.30-01.00 (if anyone knows anywhere to look - maybe near the airport in fact that would be awesome). Then we'd probably bus it to Ferrol on the Thursday afternoon, and potentially do the short walk to Neda that afternoon/evening. Then the planned walks are probably along the lines of what other folk have done.

Friday - Neda to Pontadeume
Saturday - Pontedeume to Betanzos
Sunday - Betanzos to Bruma
Monday - Bruma to Sigueiro
Tuesday - Sigueiro to Santiago (this is a shortish walk but as I understand you want to get to Santiago by midday?)

Does this sound a reasonable route? We expect the Saturday-Monday to be the toughest days and would factor in 6-7h days potentially. We probably wouldn't use albergues necessarily (well not dorms) but presumably these towns have options for pensions/B&Bs? Are these also towns where we could expect places to be open to eat in the evening - even if just supermarkets?

If anyone has any advice for anyone doing their first-time camino, we would appreciate it. We know it will be an adjustment and it's hugely different to anything we've done before. After a bit of rotten luck in the last year or so, we're hoping the challenge of a camino will usher in the start of some better times.

Thanks!
Hi,

My wife and I did the Ingles in 2013 with two friends, three of us in our fifties and one just turned 70. We flew EasyJet from Gatwick to SdC and then picked up a taxi from the airport to Ferrol - all in all an easy journey. The taxi took an hour, the walk back four and half days!

A must is to buy the Johnnie Walker guide but rest assured the route is well signposted - we never got off the route.

Your proposed itinerary is good, we did day one from Ferroll to Ponteduma and on day four walked just beyond Siguero so day five was only a half day into SdC by 11am.

We bought bottled water at all stopping locations and also sandwiches from cafes/hotels/grocery stores.

I have a full sheet of information on our route, hotels, mileages, etc, if you can give me your email address I'll send it to you with pleasure.

Pete
 
Last edited by a moderator:

PeteB

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
"Ingles 2013"
#17
Hi, my wife and I did the Ingles in 2013 with two friends. We are 5.and one friend was

Hi,

My wife and I did the Ingles in 2013 with two friends, three of us in our fifties and one just turned 70. We flew EasyJet from Gatwick to SdC and then picked up a taxi from the airport to Ferrol - all in all an easy journey. The taxi took an hour, the walk back four and half days!

A must is to buy the Johnnie Walker guide but rest assured the route is well signposted - we never got off the route.

Your proposed itinerary is good, we did day one from Ferroll to Ponteduma and on day four walked just beyond Siguero so day five was only a half day into SdC by 11am.

We bought bottled water at all stopping locations and also sandwiches from cafes/hotels/grocery stores.

I have a full sheet of information on our route, hotels, mileages, etc, if you can give me your email address I'll send it to you with pleasure.

Pete
PS. Treat yourself to a stay in the SdC Parador -it is well worth it and located right in the square with the cathedral.
 

natefaith

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria-Santiago (2009)
León-Ponferrada (2014)
Camino Inglés (2017)
#20
Can one still walk the old route with Bar Julia and the "hill". ??
You really liked that hill!! :)

I recall that @Purky and I were walking the Inglés in July during the same week though we never ran into one another. And the authorities were in the very middle of taking out the stone markers and replacing them with temporary wooden signs as they completed the re-routing away from Bar Julia and the hill. The hill was hard but I'm glad I got to walk it, on one of its very last days as part of the "official" Camino.
 

kevinhw

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Ingles (future, 2018)
#21
Thanks all. Wow I did not expect this thread to pick up so quickly! Hopefully we can all get the time off over Easter so we can book the flights and sort the accommodation out. There's been some really useful advice here, thank you! I think the next thing is to definitely get the Johnnie Walker guide!
 

martyseville

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
a/a
#22
Thanks all. Wow I did not expect this thread to pick up so quickly! Hopefully we can all get the time off over Easter so we can book the flights and sort the accommodation out. There's been some really useful advice here, thank you! I think the next thing is to definitely get the Johnnie Walker guide!
I walked the Ingles without a guide or map.
Only thing I had was a small piece of paper from the TI office in Ferrol. It showed the stages, distance between them and that was about it.

The Ingles was (is) well marked. Lots of nice people in all of the towns.

I biked and later walked the Frances. In comparison, I liked the Ingles much better than the Frances. Was nice pace. But I am a very slow walker. Nicer people in the towns.

I think the Frances is so crowded now.
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
#23
I think so. The road up probably won't vanish, but you'll have to do it without waymarking. Just follow the old guide...
The one difficult place without waymarking might be where the track in the woods turns uphill just before that last really steep few metres.
I too am sad that the route no longer goes this way and glad that Casa Julia was open for a drink when we walked last time.
 

kevinhw

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Ingles (future, 2018)
#24
From checking the Brierley book and the different stages of the Ingles, I wanted to know about the Betanzos to Bruma stage. The last 5km goes from about 150m above sea level to 460m. When you walk this last 5km, how drastic a change is this? Is it going to be really tough? Can newbies hack it if they take it slow and steady? This seems to be the only severe change in steepness.
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
#25
Many people split the stage, either at the Presedo albergue or by using the O Meson Novo pick up and drop back service. I think this is now only for pilgrims staying both nights with them.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Inglés (from Ferrol June 2014)
Camino Portuguese (from Tui May 2015)
#26
When you walk this last 5km, how drastic a change is this? Is it going to be really tough? Can newbies hack it if they take it slow and steady? This seems to be the only severe change in steepness.
There are a couple of other steep hills (leaving Pontedeume and Betanzos), but both are much shorter.

For the portion heading towards Bruma, I'm what you would call a "slow stroller" and found the steepest part to be about 1 hr 10 min of slow uphill walking (from Bar Julia to Vizono). This was the old route (the one that went by Bar Julia), so the new route may be a little easier. Faster, more in-shape walkers report doing this in something like 45 minutes. I did it first thing in the morning, which I think is a great strategy for newbies. Above, @Tia Valeria and @natefaith both talk about using a Meson Novo's complimentary shuttle service - and I concur! Or look at breaking up the stage by staying in Presedo if you are more into albergues.

Whatever you choose, it is doable! Buen Camino!!
 

Elle Bieling

Elle Bieling, PilgrimageTraveler
Camino(s) past & future
Inglés (2014, 2018), Finisterre (2014, 2018) Primitivo (2015), Portuguese (2017, 2018)
#27
Hi there. I walked in Sept of "15 so the third day to Bruma, I understand is much easier now with the rerouting. I was 58 and did your five stages easily in 5 days. If you want to read my adventure here it is Camino Ingles. Buen Camino!
 

martyseville

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
a/a
#28
mmm with the rerouting Casa Julia (most called it Bar Julia) must be losing money now.
The "pan cakes" that were home made on the revolving grill were so good.

Was great pit stop before "that" hill. Which everyone knew was coming after Casa Julia.
 

kevinhw

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Ingles (future, 2018)
#29
Hi there. I walked in Sept of "15 so the third day to Bruma, I understand is much easier now with the rerouting. I was 58 and did your five stages easily in 5 days. If you want to read my adventure here it is Camino Ingles. Buen Camino!
Thanks Elle, I think I've read your blog already when I was first thinking about the Camino. Really enjoyed it :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (Part: 2013&2014), Portugues (Part2015), Finisterre (2016), Ingles (2017) & Sanabres (2018)
#30
Hello, I am a potential first timer for the Camino - we've been thinking about it for ages. There are three of us - I'm a 38yo male in reasonably good shape, as is my wife (36yo). Her mother (60yo) would join us too. All of us walk to some degree, but nothing on this scale.

Our potential dates are flying from London to La Coruna on Wednesday 28 March. It's a very late flight so we'd need to stay somewhere that would let us arrive at 00.30-01.00 (if anyone knows anywhere to look - maybe near the airport in fact that would be awesome). Then we'd probably bus it to Ferrol on the Thursday afternoon, and potentially do the short walk to Neda that afternoon/evening. Then the planned walks are probably along the lines of what other folk have done.

Friday - Neda to Pontadeume
Saturday - Pontedeume to Betanzos
Sunday - Betanzos to Bruma
Monday - Bruma to Sigueiro
Tuesday - Sigueiro to Santiago (this is a shortish walk but as I understand you want to get to Santiago by midday?)

Does this sound a reasonable route? We expect the Saturday-Monday to be the toughest days and would factor in 6-7h days potentially. We probably wouldn't use albergues necessarily (well not dorms) but presumably these towns have options for pensions/B&Bs? Are these also towns where we could expect places to be open to eat in the evening - even if just supermarkets?

If anyone has any advice for anyone doing their first-time camino, we would appreciate it. We know it will be an adjustment and it's hugely different to anything we've done before. After a bit of rotten luck in the last year or so, we're hoping the challenge of a camino will usher in the start of some better times.

Thanks!
PS. Treat yourself to a stay in the SdC Parador -it is well worth it and located right in the square with the cathedral.
I agree with the tip about the Parador in El Ferrol - we (me wife and father) stayed there in late April lat year & can recommend - right on the Camino route and they do a special rate for Peregrinos - we had the same o/night stops you're suggesting - the hill out of Pontedueme and the one couple of days later after Casa Julia are the toughest bits otherwise a really lovely route.
Re your Credencials - Nota Bene the Tourist Info office beside the Port DOESN'T supply these and you need to get from the Concatedral de San Xiao (mornings and early evenings) - OR get by post from Ivar!
Buen Camino
 
Camino(s) past & future
Ingles 2017
#31
I did the Ingles in October 2017. Beautiful scenery, empty trails and available accomodations. There was a good amount of soft trail/mud. This will be the same for you in March/April.

Make sure your prep hikes include banging your toes and heels in your walking shoes, and testing how your ankles and knees handle abrupt slips and slides. The guides can prepare you for long gradual uphills. They are not nearly as bad as getting your toes hammered going down hills.

It is all worth it in the end. Safe travels.
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
#32
To avoid feet slipping forward and hammering toes downhill it is helpful to stop and tighten bootlaces before steeper descents. Easier done with boots than shoes maybe. It worked for us :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (14), Fin.-Muxia (14), Portuguese (15), Le Puy (17), English (17), Via de la Plata (18)
#33
I suggest picking up some trekking poles. I walked this camino last October, and the route was steeper than I anticipated. The poles are really helpful at propelling upwards, and saving the knees on the descent.

I agree with "Martyseville" and stay at Hotel Silva in Ferrol. Good price, clean, and comfortable.

I was glad to do the first part of the way through Ferrol to the big traffic circle on my arrival day.

Finding the arrows through Ferrol was a bit confusing, but I was relaxed because there was no time pressure. The next morning, I walked from Hotel Silva to the traffic circle to hop back on the camino and cruise onto Pontedeume.
 

SoyGalego

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte/Primitivo/Fisterra 17
Ingles/Muxia/Fisterra 18.
#34
l completed my Camino Ingles from the 21st to 24th Feb 18. l travelled to Santiago de Compostela airport, then took the bus from the airport to the bus station, then caught a bus to Ferrol. It arrived late that evening but enabled me to start the Camino the following day. Travelling to A Coruna would have made it impossible for me, as it seems for you, to get to Ferrol unless I took a taxi.

l was alone while walking and shared the Municipal Albergues on two stages with an Italian chap, meet no one else. l was luck with the weather although cold in the mornings it had been dry, which made me carry wet gear for nothing!!

My stages were, Ferrol to Pontedeume, Pontedeume to Betanzos, Betanzos to Bruma and Bruma to Santiago. I originally planned to do the Ingles in a comfortable 5 days but my fellow pilgrim snored like a "champion" and decided to do it 4 days instead.

I enjoyed Betanzos a large town and also my stay in Bruma. In Bruma there isn't much there and you need to plan for food etc. If you arrive on a Monday the only restaurant/bar is closed for a rest day then. My advise is don't plan to arrive on a Monday, I enjoyed my time with the ladies of this bar and had a good chat. A lot of people go there to use the WiFi but the Albergue does have it if you want it. It's from the Xunta of Galicia and once registered it's valid for a period of time. If you miss the bar there are vans with goodies, one with bread and one with bits and bobs at various times. The hospitalio at Bruma will give you all the details on timings etc.

The new route does miss out Bar Julia and sends you via the main road. You'll come across another bar on the main road, handy to get that important stamp, but lacking in atmosphere from what I read about Bar Julia.

For me the hardest stages was from Betanzos to Bruma and had to stop for 10-15mins to replen with sustenance. I don't eat breakfast and don't stop much and I think my sugars on this occasion had been low. Nothing difficult about it just circumstances.

That's my experiences and hope it helps.

Buen Camino Peregrino.
 
Camino(s) past & future
May 2019 (Camino Ingles)
#35
Hello, I am a potential first timer for the Camino - we've been thinking about it for ages. There are three of us - I'm a 38yo male in reasonably good shape, as is my wife (36yo). Her mother (60yo) would join us too. All of us walk to some degree, but nothing on this scale.

Our potential dates are flying from London to La Coruna on Wednesday 28 March. It's a very late flight so we'd need to stay somewhere that would let us arrive at 00.30-01.00 (if anyone knows anywhere to look - maybe near the airport in fact that would be awesome). Then we'd probably bus it to Ferrol on the Thursday afternoon, and potentially do the short walk to Neda that afternoon/evening. Then the planned walks are probably along the lines of what other folk have done.

Friday - Neda to Pontadeume
Saturday - Pontedeume to Betanzos
Sunday - Betanzos to Bruma
Monday - Bruma to Sigueiro
Tuesday - Sigueiro to Santiago (this is a shortish walk but as I understand you want to get to Santiago by midday?)

Does this sound a reasonable route? We expect the Saturday-Monday to be the toughest days and would factor in 6-7h days potentially. We probably wouldn't use albergues necessarily (well not dorms) but presumably these towns have options for pensions/B&Bs? Are these also towns where we could expect places to be open to eat in the evening - even if just supermarkets?

If anyone has any advice for anyone doing their first-time camino, we would appreciate it. We know it will be an adjustment and it's hugely different to anything we've done before. After a bit of rotten luck in the last year or so, we're hoping the challenge of a camino will usher in the start of some better times.

Thanks!
looking forward to following your journey on the Camino Ingles. I'm planning to do this in May of next year (2019)
 
Camino(s) past & future
March/April 2018
#36
Have you considered a flight to Santiago? That’s where I landed, and the bus to Ferrol was maybe 90 minutes.
 

SoyGalego

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte/Primitivo/Fisterra 17
Ingles/Muxia/Fisterra 18.
#37
That's how I travelled to Ferrol. During the winter the bus is every hour and Ruth's timings are about right. When I got to the bus station from the airport I just missed the bus to Ferrol and had to wait the hour. It's not a problem the station has Wi-Fi and a cafeteria. Trains are also available to Ferrol and the difference in price is negligible. But I prefer the bus as it gives you more views on route and also you'll see some of the areas you'll be waking too as well.

Enjoy the Camino Ingles it's a nice short route with history and I enjoyed it.

Buen Camino.
 

peb

Member
Camino(s) past & future
C. Ingles March 2018
#38
Wrote a more detailed piece on another thread having just completed the Camino Ingles.

Camino Ingles is a good walk, as you can do the whole path, instead of part of a longer Camino if you only have limited time. This held a larger attraction for me. In addition, the first two or three days by the coast are a lovely walk. There are not many people on the Ingles, so, if you like that kind of thing, it makes for a more adventurous pilgrimage, rather than on the Frances, where you may encounter what may look as a procession from Sarria in the last 100 km.

I did the following stages over 5 days. If I had my time again, I would have done a six day walk.

Ferrol to Pontedeume (took 10 hours). If I had my time again, I would have broken this up into 2 stages - Ferrol to Nada, staying at Neda overnight, and then the next day Neda to Pontedeume. My legs suffered from such a long first stage, and, in addition, there was little time to stop to admire the estuary views.

Pontedeume to Betanzos - took 7 hours.

Betanzos to Buscas (8km past Hospital de Bruma) - took me 9 hours. There is no longer the real steep climb up to Hospital de Bruma. The new route takes you gradually uphill and then the finish is a walk along the road past an electricity substation where you join up with the route from La Coruna much earlier. This section should therefore hold less fear than in the guidebooks, although the climb out of Betanzos first thing is quite steep, but then it is first thing.

Buscas to Siguiero - took me 6 hours

Siguiero to Santiago - took me 3 hours.


Getting there, I found flying to La Coruna, via Madrid much cheaper than flying to Santiago, provided that you are willing to kill some time at Madrid Airport. This also avoided the very late Vueling flight from London to La Coruna. I spent the good part of a day looking round La Coruna, which is worth it, and then took the train from La Coruna to Ferrol. You can catch the train from Santiago to Ferrol, but apart from 1 direct train per day, you need to change at La Coruna and the train station is out of town, meaning you cannot do much. Therefore, if you fly into Santiago, a bus to Ferrol may be more convenient.

I stayed at Hotel el Suixo in Ferrol which I would do again. If you need a credencial, they have these in a glass cabinet where they sell Camino souvenirs just past reception and I believe they would sell one to non-guests, and will stamp the first stamp for you.

I picked up a good map of Ferrol from the tourist office for free and this had a good marked arrow route of where the Ingles ran through the town.

Apart from in 3 places which I have highlighted elsewhere, the Ingles is well marked. As I noted, for those that only have a week or so, it is a good option to take. For those with longer than a week, consider combining the Ingles with the extension out to Finisterre and Muxia.
 

mitomano

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
ingles (future)
#39
Hi, I walked the Ingles last May. CORRECTION: did Ingles in April 16.

Did the walk in April 16. Not May 17. sorry.

-Ferrol Hotel Silva
-Neda(A'burg)>used hammock outside of A'burg
-Puntedume(Hotel Louis)>good food. Clean place. Heard A/burg was not the best there.
-Nimo(A/burg)>used hammock outside of A'burg. May be wrong, believe this is the town that has the good place to eat down the road. The owner is a artist. Walked from the A'burg to this place for breakfast. Then picked up the Camino in back of the restaurant. Lots of art work displayed in the restaurant.
-Betanzos(A'burg)>inside
-Presedo(A'burg)>inside Was only walker in the place
-Burma(A'burg)>
-Sigüeiro>(private apartment)
-Santiago>Hostal Alfonso

Slow walker. Enjoy seeing places and talking with people in the towns.

Loved it. Not a single day of rain. Then rained when I got to Santiago.

I will dig out my notes and provide you some information later. Sorry so vague now. Talking off top of head now.

Your break down of stages seems reasonable.

BUT, I would not plan on doing a afternoon stroll from Ferrol to Neda.
Start early morning out of Ferrol. Makes life easier.

Only challenge I had (and I am over 70) was the hill after "BAR JULIA"
Bar Julia is good pit stop. Before you head up that hill. Get water at the bar or at fountain down the street. Eat "pan cakes" at Bar Julia. Get stamp there too.

The other fun hill was when leaving Pontedeume

Most of the towns/cities along the way have cafes, bars, small stores.
The small stores will have what you need as a walker. Water, fruit, food, bread, beer, wine, sun screen, etc etc.
Larger cities have supermarkets.

As far as places to eat, Burma used to be the exception. For a long time there was no where to eat there. Food was ordered in. Now there is a place to eat down the street from the A'burg. Good food there. Was new place in May. So hope it is still open.

For now...

There are many hotels close to the train/bus stations in Coruna.

I got into Coruna very late. Stayed across from the train station in Hotel L I S T E (darn spell checker again) Not a 5-star place. But will do in a pinch. Good location.
I did not have a reservation. Just wanted to rest for a night.

In the center of Coruna there are many nice places to stay. I visited one of the hostels in the center. Nice place. Walking distance from train/bus station to center of Coruna. Walk from bus/train station to center is about 30 min. Depending on fast you walk. For me it was easy.

Bus station in Coruna is about a 10 min walk from the train station.

Bus to Ferrol: Two different buses to Ferrol. Slow and fast one. There is the slow route bus. Which stops in every town along the way. And there is the direct one. Catch the direct one from Coruna to Ferrol.

Train to Ferrol: runs few times a day to Ferrol. It is a little commuter type of a train. Toss up if bus or train would be better.

Bus station in Ferrol is almost across the street from the train station in Ferrol.
Not bad.

In Ferrol, get your camino passport at Hotel Silva or TI office in Ferrol. Or possibly at the Cathedral in Ferrol

Pilgrim's office in Ferrol: (possible)
http://www.ferrol360.es/la-nueva-of...e-inaugura-la-proxima-semana-en-ferrol-vello/


Ferrol: Hotel Silva is nice, clean place to stay in Ferrol. Since I stayed in Ferrol two days, I did the walk from the port of Ferrol to the circle. Then the next day I walked from hotel Silva down to the circle (traffic circle that you must walk by on your Ingles camino in Ferrol) and picked up the camino again from there.

There is nice laundry mat down the street from Hotel Silva.

N e da: The A'burg in N e da (sorry darn auto correct) is nice. Small place. Walk across pedi bridge and you will be at it. This will make sense when you get there. Has washer and dryers.

The A'burg in Pontedeume is bad news. I stayed in Hotel Louis. Will give more information later. Good food there. There is another small hotel across from Hotel Louis. Where many of the walkers stayed at.

Hill is fun when walking out of Pontedeume. Long. Not bad. But you will know you did it.

Lots of places to stay in Betanzos. A'burg there is not bad. Has washer and dryers. Be looking for where you cross over the RR tracks when walking out of Betanzos! Few walkers missed it and had to back track.

A' burg in Bruma is very small. Place to eat now down the street. I may be wrong, but think the A'burg is the only place to stay in Bruma. Hotel is few kms from Bruma. and is off the Camino a few kms.

I stayed in private place in Sigüeiro (in private apartment). Was darn good. I found out about it from a Spanish man in Ferrol. Clean and nice. Has private room and dorm type rooms x 2. Washer and dryer. Use of kitchen, etc. Owner is WONDERFUL.

Santiago de Compostela I stayed in wonderful Hostel Alfonso. Love it. Well worth the price. Only has a few rooms. Can find it on line. Must make reservation. Wonderful view of Cathedral from rooms on the back side of the building. Owners are super great!

(((I stopped at one more place. Stayed in A'burg. I will have to look at my notes and tell you later.)))
Hi, is it possible to sleep in a hammock outside the albergues in Bruma and Sigueiro? Thanks.
 

peb

Member
Camino(s) past & future
C. Ingles March 2018
#40
The albergues in Sigueiro were in the city, so not much chance of fixing up a hammock.

Hospital de Bruma does have a garden, but the alberge keeper I came across was so fierce, you would be braver than I to ask to fix up a hammock there.
 

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