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Luggage Transfer Correos

Casa Morais (Fornos, after Coimbra)

2020 Camino Guides

AJGuillaume

Pélerin du monde
Camino(s) past & future
Via Gebennensis (2018)
Via Podiensis (2018)
Voie Nive Bidassoa (2018)
Camino Del Norte (2018)
We're trying to break the stage between Coimbra and Sernadelo (https://www.gronze.com/etapa/coimbra/sernadelo) into two shorter stages.
Gronze shows a casa rural at Fornos, the Casa Morais. The website link takes you to a site that has nothing to do with the casa rural, and Booking.com does not list it anymore. It still shows on Google maps.
Is Casa Morais closed?
Thank you!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) Portugues(2013)
San Salvador (2017) Ingles (2019)
+351 967 636 029 is the phone number I saw when I looked it up just now. Traveloka website showed the house, with images and some information, linked to turismo Coimbra. The number may be your best guide, and if you have skype or equivalent, a call would not be exorbitant at all no matter where you live. Hope this is a help.
 

AJGuillaume

Pélerin du monde
Camino(s) past & future
Via Gebennensis (2018)
Via Podiensis (2018)
Voie Nive Bidassoa (2018)
Camino Del Norte (2018)
+351 967 636 029 is the phone number I saw when I looked it up just now. Traveloka website showed the house, with images and some information, linked to turismo Coimbra. The number may be your best guide, and if you have skype or equivalent, a call would not be exorbitant at all no matter where you live. Hope this is a help.
I tried that, it goes to a voice mail, without a personalised greeting message.
The number is a mobile number, so I would have hoped that someone would answer.
I even tried calling their landline +351 239 431 061. After a few rings, it goes to a fax tone.
I have also looked for reviews on tripadvisor, and the last review was in January 2018.
I was just looking for confirmation that the place is now closed.
 

Terry Callery

Chi Walker
Camino(s) past & future
"Portuguese Camino - In Search of the Infinite Moment" Amazon/Kindle books authored
"Slow Camino"
You could always just take a taxi to cut the distance and spend the extra day gained in Coimbra!
This is from the journal I kept when I did the Portuguese route in February of 2018 and stayed in Coimbra an extra night.

For over a hundred years (from 1145 – 1255) Coimbra was the capital of Portugal, but today it is Coimbra University (founded in 1290) for which the city is best known. I had a hard time figuring out why there were so many tourists here, particularly since it was winter. There is no truly great cathedral in Coimbra like in Lisbon or Porto and there were no “world-class” museums. However, when I looked at my map of the city in my guide book, it became apparent why this city attracts so many visitors. It is the compact size of Coimbra with a nice collection of medieval churches, cloisters, small museums and the University all grouped around the city center and located either directly on or just off the Camino. Together with lots of shops and countless restaurants and cafés everywhere, all clustered among enchanting historic architecture and narrow pedestrian streets, the old part of the city is ideal for strolling leisurely about. In fact the old part of Coimbra was declared a “World Heritage Site” in 2013.
I left Hotel Oslo in the late afternoon planning to have my “leisurely stroll” around the old city and hoping to discover a memorable restaurant for diner. Not far from the Arco de Almedina which was the main gate of the medieval walled defenses of the Old City, I came upon a group of Coimbra University music students all dressed in black, some wearing black capes, playing music in the streets. It was Coimbra fado music which is rooted in the medieval lyrical “trovadorismo”. The twelfth century troubadours sang songs of poetry that had the stylized subject matter of love, of friend, of scorn and of curse. Trovadorismo is considered to be the very first literary movement in Portugal. Coimbra fado is played and sung by men (unlike the fado music in Lisbon where both men and women do the vocals). There were nine students all in their early 20’s in the very professional sounding group I had stopped to appreciate. There was one accordion player and one big stand-up bassist. A small guitar known as “guitar de Coimbra” was being played alongside two larger classical guitars and there were also two small mandolins or an instrument that looked like one. I leaned against the wall of a building on the opposite side of the street and it was not long before my feet began to shuffle, as if detached from the rest of me, to the upbeat song that the “fado students” were strumming out. I started dancing. I was doing my “Southside shuffle”, dancing in the streets of Coimbra and soon I found my exhaustion from yet another day of walking vaporized by the music. There were two tall guys in the troupe of musicians who picked up their tambourines for the next song and they started dancing to the rhythm of the churning upbeat song. The dancing duo were jumping up in the air and slapping their tambourines against the soles of their feet and the appreciative crowd which had gotten bigger started to throw Euros into the empty guitar case used for collecting “tips”.
What a change for me, after walking for weeks in silent meditation, to be dancing joyfully among a crowd of strangers. For the next half hour I was total absorbed in the present moment and having the time of my life. There were a multitude of other street performers “busking in the streets of Coimbra including mimes and puppeteers and actors dressed in medieval costumes. The largest group I saw was the “fado students” and the smallest was the one-man act (that is if you don’t count the monkey with the tip jar) of an organ-grinder. It was a perpetual festival here in the streets of Coimbra and I was feeling very much a part of it.
 

AJGuillaume

Pélerin du monde
Camino(s) past & future
Via Gebennensis (2018)
Via Podiensis (2018)
Voie Nive Bidassoa (2018)
Camino Del Norte (2018)
You could always just take a taxi to cut the distance and spend the extra day gained in Coimbra!
This is from the journal I kept when I did the Portuguese route in February of 2018 and stayed in Coimbra an extra night.

For over a hundred years (from 1145 – 1255) Coimbra was the capital of Portugal, but today it is Coimbra University (founded in 1290) for which the city is best known. I had a hard time figuring out why there were so many tourists here, particularly since it was winter. There is no truly great cathedral in Coimbra like in Lisbon or Porto and there were no “world-class” museums. However, when I looked at my map of the city in my guide book, it became apparent why this city attracts so many visitors. It is the compact size of Coimbra with a nice collection of medieval churches, cloisters, small museums and the University all grouped around the city center and located either directly on or just off the Camino. Together with lots of shops and countless restaurants and cafés everywhere, all clustered among enchanting historic architecture and narrow pedestrian streets, the old part of the city is ideal for strolling leisurely about. In fact the old part of Coimbra was declared a “World Heritage Site” in 2013.
I left Hotel Oslo in the late afternoon planning to have my “leisurely stroll” around the old city and hoping to discover a memorable restaurant for diner. Not far from the Arco de Almedina which was the main gate of the medieval walled defenses of the Old City, I came upon a group of Coimbra University music students all dressed in black, some wearing black capes, playing music in the streets. It was Coimbra fado music which is rooted in the medieval lyrical “trovadorismo”. The twelfth century troubadours sang songs of poetry that had the stylized subject matter of love, of friend, of scorn and of curse. Trovadorismo is considered to be the very first literary movement in Portugal. Coimbra fado is played and sung by men (unlike the fado music in Lisbon where both men and women do the vocals). There were nine students all in their early 20’s in the very professional sounding group I had stopped to appreciate. There was one accordion player and one big stand-up bassist. A small guitar known as “guitar de Coimbra” was being played alongside two larger classical guitars and there were also two small mandolins or an instrument that looked like one. I leaned against the wall of a building on the opposite side of the street and it was not long before my feet began to shuffle, as if detached from the rest of me, to the upbeat song that the “fado students” were strumming out. I started dancing. I was doing my “Southside shuffle”, dancing in the streets of Coimbra and soon I found my exhaustion from yet another day of walking vaporized by the music. There were two tall guys in the troupe of musicians who picked up their tambourines for the next song and they started dancing to the rhythm of the churning upbeat song. The dancing duo were jumping up in the air and slapping their tambourines against the soles of their feet and the appreciative crowd which had gotten bigger started to throw Euros into the empty guitar case used for collecting “tips”.
What a change for me, after walking for weeks in silent meditation, to be dancing joyfully among a crowd of strangers. For the next half hour I was total absorbed in the present moment and having the time of my life. There were a multitude of other street performers “busking in the streets of Coimbra including mimes and puppeteers and actors dressed in medieval costumes. The largest group I saw was the “fado students” and the smallest was the one-man act (that is if you don’t count the monkey with the tip jar) of an organ-grinder. It was a perpetual festival here in the streets of Coimbra and I was feeling very much a part of it.
Thank you very much for sharing your journal, @Terry Callery .
We had already planned to stay an extra day in Coimbra. I had seen groups of these young men in a previous trip to Portugal. They are similar to tunas universitarias in Spain, and like yours, my feet wouldn't stay still :)
We have found that there is a train from Coimbra to Vilela-Fornos, which costs less than 2€, and which takes 11 minutes. That will reduce our walk from Coimbra to Mealhada by about 8km.
After reading your journal, we're going to stay a second day in Coimbra.
Muito obrigado!
 

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