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Early stage Via Francigena planning query and the town of Robbio

Mr_Ross_Duncan

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Via Gebennensis (2018) Portuguese (2017)
Hi, we are planning our third Camino, this one will be the Via Francigena.
We intend to start in Aosta in September, some early stage planning has revealed a lack of accommodation in the stage finish town of Robbio.
If anyone has a suggestion we would be most grateful.
We will be staying the previous night in Vercelli, about 20klms from Robbio, the next town after Robbio is Mortara, about another 15klms, too far for us in one day.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF(2012)
Portugues, Muxia-Finist(2015)
St Olavs Way(2016)
88 Temples Japan(2017)
PWC & VF (2019)
Hi Ross,
I'm walking the full VF (London-Rome) starting next month (March). I too was hoping to 'break the stage' by staying near Robbio but couldn't find accommodation which suited me. As you correctly point out, Vercelli to Mortara is approx 34-35km. In the end, I've decided to do that stage in one hit with the option of a short hop by train to bring the walking distance down to something more comfortable/manageable. There are train stations at Palestro, Robbio & Nicorvo along the way. Frequency of services depends on where you hop on/off & what day of the week.
Otherwise, there is a B&B Ospitaliere ('La Torre Merlata'...see Booking.com for pics, etc) at Palestro which is before Robbio. Would make for a shorter day from Vercelli evened out by a longer day to Mortara.
Hope this helps. All the best with your planning! 👣🌏
 
Last edited:

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(x4), Fisterra/Muxía(x2), VdlP, Jerusalem, VF, Walsingham,
C inglés. 2019? Via Tolosana
Hi Ross,
I'm walking the full VF (London-Rome) starting next month (March). I too was hoping to 'break the stage' by staying near Robbio but could not find accommodation. As you correctly point out, Vercelli to Mortara is approx 34-35km. In the end, I've decided to do that stage in one hit with the option of a short hop by train to bring the walking distance down to something more comfortable/manageable. There are train stations at Palestro, Robbio & Nicorvo along the way. Frequency of services depends on where you hop on/off & what day of the week.
Otherwise, there is a B&B Ospitaliere ('La Torre Merlata'...see Booking.com) at Palestro which is before Robbio. Would make for a shorter day from Vercelli evened out by a longer day to Mortara.
Hope this helps. All the best with your planning! 👣🌏
I didn’t stay there but there is an ‘ostello comunale’ in Robbio.
Just a thought: if you plan to start from London, by the time you reach Robbio there’s a good chance you’ll be able to walk longer distances ;)
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF(2012)
Portugues, Muxia-Finist(2015)
St Olavs Way(2016)
88 Temples Japan(2017)
PWC & VF (2019)

Mr_Ross_Duncan

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Via Gebennensis (2018) Portuguese (2017)
Kaz,
Thanks for getting back, the train was my fall back option as well, I was kind of reluctant but with no other options it seems the only way, we might catch the train from Vercelli and hop out at Palestro then walk on to Mortara.
Have fun on the walk. :)
 

Mr_Ross_Duncan

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Via Gebennensis (2018) Portuguese (2017)

Stripey Socks

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances- 2013,Via de la Plata-2014, Portuguese - 2016, Via Francigena - Italy 2018
Hi Ross.
I stayed in Robbio in August last year at the community ostello. It was very basic but still doable. You do need to book as it is not manned all the time. From memory there were about 8 beds in one room and a couple of showers downstairs. I was on my own so it was really quiet and had a 'lost in translation' moment regarding the fact that all food options were closed at that time, so it was muesli for dinner again! Mortars is an easy walk from there..
I hope that helps. Enjoy your planning, Mel
 

timr

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Several and counting...
@Mr_Ross_Duncan @kazrobbo
The BnB Torre Merlata in Palestro is a stunning place, quite unique, and not to be missed!
Ambra is the host and she is hugely friendly. I would suggest contacting directly rather than using booking.com.
You could contact through FB https://www.facebook.com/ambra.castellani
When you reach Robbio, in the centre of the town there is a very attractive and sophisticated(!) wine bar, which is very friendly. Just opposite is a church which is no longer in use as a church, but is still maintained and well worth a visit if you are any way interested in old wall paintings.
 

Harington

una abuelita inglésa
Camino(s) past & future
Vézelay/Francés 2011, Primitivo 2012, VdlP 2013, Via Domitia 2014, Inglés 2015, Francigena 2016
Hi, we are planning our third Camino, this one will be the Via Francigena.
We intend to start in Aosta in September, some early stage planning has revealed a lack of accommodation in the stage finish town of Robbio.
If anyone has a suggestion we would be most grateful.
We will be staying the previous night in Vercelli, about 20klms from Robbio, the next town after Robbio is Mortara, about another 15klms, too far for us in one day.
This may be out of date, but the details I have are the Oratorio parrochiale, Piazza Libertà 2, email: nicorvofrancigena@libero.it.
 

Mr_Ross_Duncan

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Via Gebennensis (2018) Portuguese (2017)
@Mr_Ross_Duncan @kazrobbo
The BnB Torre Merlata in Palestro is a stunning place, quite unique, and not to be missed!
Ambra is the host and she is hugely friendly. I would suggest contacting directly rather than using booking.com.
You could contact through FB https://www.facebook.com/ambra.castellani
When you reach Robbio, in the centre of the town there is a very attractive and sophisticated(!) wine bar, which is very friendly. Just opposite is a church which is no longer in use as a church, but is still maintained and well worth a visit if you are any way interested in old wall paintings.
Thanks Tim, great information, that wine bar sounds like the perfect stop for a pick me up. Cheers
 

Mr_Ross_Duncan

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Via Gebennensis (2018) Portuguese (2017)
Hi Ross.
I stayed in Robbio in August last year at the community ostello. It was very basic but still doable. You do need to book as it is not manned all the time. From memory there were about 8 beds in one room and a couple of showers downstairs. I was on my own so it was really quiet and had a 'lost in translation' moment regarding the fact that all food options were closed at that time, so it was muesli for dinner again! Mortars is an easy walk from there..
I hope that helps. Enjoy your planning, Mel
Thanks for all that information, it's very helpful, the muesli bit made me laugh out loud, good stuff.
 

JennyH94

Pilgrim in progress
Camino(s) past & future
The Frances from Pamplona and part VF, first-aid helper and hospitalera
Hi Ross -

Friend Sally and I stayed at the parrochiale albergue in Robbio in September 2017. As Stripey Socks posted, the albergue is very basic - it's definitely one where you need your sleeping bag. However, it had a reasonably well-equipped kitchen and the shower was hot.

It's located behind the town hall and you make a donation to stay there. We were grateful to be able to stay there and, like many other parrochiale albergues on the VF, we were the only ones staying that night.

We took the opportunity of the availability of the kitchen to have our evening meal at the albergue rather than go out. There's a good supermarket about 10 minutes walk from the albergue.

Here's a photo of the small dorm we stayed in:

52344

I hope this helps -

Cheers from Oz -
Jenny
 

Mr_Ross_Duncan

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Via Gebennensis (2018) Portuguese (2017)
Hi Ross -

Friend Sally and I stayed at the parrochiale albergue in Robbio in September 2017. As Stripey Socks posted, the albergue is very basic - it's definitely one where you need your sleeping bag. However, it had a reasonably well-equipped kitchen and the shower was hot.

It's located behind the town hall and you make a donation to stay there. We were grateful to be able to stay there and, like many other parrochiale albergues on the VF, we were the only ones staying that night.

We took the opportunity of the availability of the kitchen to have our evening meal at the albergue rather than go out. There's a good supermarket about 10 minutes walk from the albergue.

Here's a photo of the small dorm we stayed in:

View attachment 52344

I hope this helps -

Cheers from Oz -
Jenny
Hi Jenny, thanks for all that information, it does indeed look basic, but still fine. We're looking forward to our upcoming Camino. Thanks again, we appreciate the time it takes to respond.
Cheers
Ross
 

Chrisp

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: 2014
EPW: 2015
Portuguese Camino: 2016
TMB: 2016
Rota Vicentina: 2017
VF: 2018
Hi Ross, My husband and I walked the VF from Canterbury to Rome last year and I remember this long stretch. If I remember correctly, Robbio is not the most attractive town. It is worth pushing on to Mortara. I know it sounds such a long way but it is easy walking compared to the Aosta Valley. Good luck 👣👣👣

Hi, we are planning our third Camino, this one will be the Via Francigena.
We intend to start in Aosta in September, some early stage planning has revealed a lack of accommodation in the stage finish town of Robbio.
If anyone has a suggestion we would be most grateful.
We will be staying the previous night in Vercelli, about 20klms from Robbio, the next town after Robbio is Mortara, about another 15klms, too far for us in one day.
 

athiker93

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sept-Oct 2013
Hi Ross,
I'm walking the full VF (London-Rome) starting next month (March). I too was hoping to 'break the stage' by staying near Robbio but couldn't find accommodation which suited me. As you correctly point out, Vercelli to Mortara is approx 34-35km. In the end, I've decided to do that stage in one hit with the option of a short hop by train to bring the walking distance down to something more comfortable/manageable. There are train stations at Palestro, Robbio & Nicorvo along the way. Frequency of services depends on where you hop on/off & what day of the week.
Otherwise, there is a B&B Ospitaliere ('La Torre Merlata'...see Booking.com) at Palestro which is before Robbio. Would make for a shorter day from Vercelli evened out by a longer day to Mortara.
Hope this helps. All the best with your planning! 👣🌏
Very nice - are you starting at St. Pauls in London? That is where i started in 2016 when i thru hiked the entire VF. Good Luck - its an amazing journey. Please feel free to contact me with any questions. I hope to see your posts on here throughout your journey!
 

athiker93

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sept-Oct 2013
Are you using Lightfoots guide to plan your trip? That is the best and more accurate. I did 24k out of Vercelli into Nicorvo and stayed at the Casa Parrocchiale in town.
 

caminka

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
see signature
Hi, we are planning our third Camino, this one will be the Via Francigena.
We intend to start in Aosta in September, some early stage planning has revealed a lack of accommodation in the stage finish town of Robbio.
If anyone has a suggestion we would be most grateful.
We will be staying the previous night in Vercelli, about 20klms from Robbio, the next town after Robbio is Mortara, about another 15klms, too far for us in one day.
Good point, however, we'll be just warming up, 25klm is enough for me. Thanks for the link, that's going to be very helpful.
you may want to take a look at my pilgrim-specific and pilgrim-friendly accommodation list for the italian portion of the VF on the forum: https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/resources/accommodation-list-for-the-italian-part-of-via-francigena.672/. the official VF site (https://www.viefrancigene.org/en/piedi/) curiously does not list all pilgrim accommodation (no ostello in robbio, for example).
 

caminka

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
see signature
Sorry to contradict but it does. I posted the link above.
only in this pdf then? (with only very basic info.) I couldn't find it amongst the links in the stages section, nor is there an icon for it if you activate the accommodation icons on the maps.
 

Harington

una abuelita inglésa
Camino(s) past & future
Vézelay/Francés 2011, Primitivo 2012, VdlP 2013, Via Domitia 2014, Inglés 2015, Francigena 2016
Are you using Lightfoots guide to plan your trip? That is the best and more accurate. I did 24k out of Vercelli into Nicorvo and stayed at the Casa Parrocchiale in town.
Unfortunately LightFoot is now rather out of date with both the route and certainly with accommodation links.
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(x4), Fisterra/Muxía(x2), VdlP, Jerusalem, VF, Walsingham,
C inglés. 2019? Via Tolosana
only in this pdf then? (with only very basic info.) I couldn't find it amongst the links in the stages section, nor is there an icon for it if you activate the accommodation icons on the maps.
It’s a simple municipal ostello, gives you the phone number and address. 5 beds.
You have to ask in the bar ‘tre archi’ for access.
 

Tim Greig

Pilgrim
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2016
Via Podiensis 2017
Via Francigena 2018
I walked the VF last summer and didn't plan anything. Accommodation was mostly plentiful (subject to local festivals and feast days) and I generally found it better not to use Booking.com which is not comprehensive and is often very poor value. There's often accommodation to be found in local churches etc and I was never stranded. The VF guidebook in English published by Terre di Mezzo (but it only covers the Italian section) is invaluable and lists the hostel in Robbio www.comune.robbio.pv.it open all year. It's worth looking at the Confraternity of Pilgrims to Rome website https://pilgrimstorome.org.uk/ for lots of accommodation options and other info. As Chrisp says (above) walking is easy in the Po Valley, I slept in Vercelli, left before dawn and covered the 19km to Robbio in time for breakfast. Then onto Mortara where there is plenty of accommodation. I stayed in a hotel above a Chinese restaurant which was cheap and air conditioned. I'm happy to help anyone with the VF and you can see my blog at www.timgreig.co.uk
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF(2012)
Portugues, Muxia-Finist(2015)
St Olavs Way(2016)
88 Temples Japan(2017)
PWC & VF (2019)
Very nice - are you starting at St. Pauls in London? That is where i started in 2016 when i thru hiked the entire VF. Good Luck - its an amazing journey. Please feel free to contact me with any questions. I hope to see your posts on here throughout your journey!
Thanks for the offer to answer PWC & VF queries Athiker93...always good to have those who have 'been there, done that' just keyboard taps away! I'm starting at Southwark Cathedral. As you began in London too, how many days total did it take you to reach Rome? I'm subject to Schengen visa restrictions & am only able to incl the PWC as England is not part of the Schengen agreement. 👣🌏
 

Chrisp

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: 2014
EPW: 2015
Portuguese Camino: 2016
TMB: 2016
Rota Vicentina: 2017
VF: 2018
Thanks for the offer to answer PWC & VF queries Athiker93...always good to have those who have 'been there, done that' just keyboard taps away! I'm starting at Southwark Cathedral. As you began in London too, how many days total did it take you to reach Rome? I'm subject to Schengen visa restrictions & am only able to incl the PWC as England is not part of the Schengen agreement. 👣🌏
Hi Tassie Kaz, I assume you’re an Aussie (and Kaz has nothing to do with Kazakhstan) because I think I can help you. You will find that Australia has a seperate agreement with Italy and you can stay in Italy for 90 over and above the Schengen Visa restrictions. If you can’t find via Google let me know and I’ll send you the link. You will need to leave Europe from Italy though and not take a train back to London for instance. We had no trouble whatsoever when we left and we took 4-months to walk to Rome!
 

timr

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Several and counting...
Hi Tassie Kaz, I assume you’re an Aussie (and Kaz has nothing to do with Kazakhstan) because I think I can help you. You will find that Australia has a seperate agreement with Italy and you can stay in Italy for 90 over and above the Schengen Visa restrictions. If you can’t find via Google let me know and I’ll send you the link. You will need to leave Europe from Italy though and not take a train back to London for instance. We had no trouble whatsoever when we left and we took 4-months to walk to Rome!
That's really interesting and useful for those it affects, in a good way. Happily I'm immune from the problem, (even after Brexit, as I have an Irish passport as well) but I always feel sorry for those who are affected.
One thing which seems really difficult is getting straightforward, simple and incontrovertible facts about the regulations. If Brexit leaves a lot of people high and dry, there will be a need for clear advice for people from UK. But all discussions I've seen (but not this one 😉) stress that there is little unanimity in how the rules are applied.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF(2012)
Portugues, Muxia-Finist(2015)
St Olavs Way(2016)
88 Temples Japan(2017)
PWC & VF (2019)
Hi Tassie Kaz, I assume you’re an Aussie (and Kaz has nothing to do with Kazakhstan) because I think I can help you. You will find that Australia has a seperate agreement with Italy and you can stay in Italy for 90 over and above the Schengen Visa restrictions. If you can’t find via Google let me know and I’ll send you the link. You will need to leave Europe from Italy though and not take a train back to London for instance. We had no trouble whatsoever when we left and we took 4-months to walk to Rome!
You're right Chrisp, I'm an Aussie & not from Kazakhstan...although it is on my 'To Visit' list! 😇
I do know of the agreement which is separate to the Schengen for some countries. I believe France is on the list too.
I didn't really look into it because in this case, commitments at home just happened to fit the Schengen requirements anyway & I decided to work within the standard system rather try to get around it. Also I heard the application process is difficult & messy; but apparently not for you! which is great to know for the future.
How did you find the process? Did you have to sign over your first born 😁 or was it relatively painless?
I note you said if you have the Schengen exemption 'you must leave Europe from Italy'. I guess that would rule out journeying anywhere afterwards, like Croatia for example, which although non-Schengen is still part of Europe.
I'll have to high-tail it from Rome/Italy before my visa expires & Croatia was my only non-Schengen option.

Thanks for sharing this info on the Forum as I don't think it's a widely known option.
👣🌏
 
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Carel5

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016 Mozarabe: Almeria - Merida
2018 Francigena: GSB - Massa
(2019) Francigena: Massa - Roma
There is a small ostello in Robbio, run by the municipality. I stayed there with four other pilgrims in September 2018. You must call them in advance, and then someone of the town hall will give you the key and show you the facilities. It is indeed basic but doable. Some walk Vercelli - Mortara (32 km) in one day, but I was happy about two shorter stages after the long stage towards Vercelli.
 

JennyH94

Pilgrim in progress
Camino(s) past & future
The Frances from Pamplona and part VF, first-aid helper and hospitalera
I walked the VF last summer and didn't plan anything. Accommodation was mostly plentiful (subject to local festivals and feast days) and I generally found it better not to use Booking.com which is not comprehensive and is often very poor value. There's often accommodation to be found in local churches etc and I was never stranded. The VF guidebook in English published by Terre di Mezzo (but it only covers the Italian section) is invaluable and lists the hostel in Robbio www.comune.robbio.pv.it open all year. It's worth looking at the Confraternity of Pilgrims to Rome website https://pilgrimstorome.org.uk/ for lots of accommodation options and other info. As Chrisp says (above) walking is easy in the Po Valley, I slept in Vercelli, left before dawn and covered the 19km to Robbio in time for breakfast. Then onto Mortara where there is plenty of accommodation. I stayed in a hotel above a Chinese restaurant which was cheap and air conditioned. I'm happy to help anyone with the VF and you can see my blog at www.timgreig.co.uk
Hi Tim - my friend Sally and I stayed at that same hotel in September 2017 and it was very good value and the Chinese meal that night was delicious. Lovely owners there - helpful and friendly. It's great to share a good recommendation, isn't it.
I look forward to checking out your blog - it will bring back some lovely memories of Sally's and my time on the VF.
Cheers from Oz -
Jenny
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF(2012)
Portugues, Muxia-Finist(2015)
St Olavs Way(2016)
88 Temples Japan(2017)
PWC & VF (2019)
I walked the VF last summer and didn't plan anything. Accommodation was mostly plentiful (subject to local festivals and feast days) and I generally found it better not to use Booking.com which is not comprehensive and is often very poor value. There's often accommodation to be found in local churches etc and I was never stranded. The VF guidebook in English published by Terre di Mezzo (but it only covers the Italian section) is invaluable and lists the hostel in Robbio www.comune.robbio.pv.it open all year. It's worth looking at the Confraternity of Pilgrims to Rome website https://pilgrimstorome.org.uk/ for lots of accommodation options and other info. As Chrisp says (above) walking is easy in the Po Valley, I slept in Vercelli, left before dawn and covered the 19km to Robbio in time for breakfast. Then onto Mortara where there is plenty of accommodation. I stayed in a hotel above a Chinese restaurant which was cheap and air conditioned. I'm happy to help anyone with the VF and you can see my blog at www.timgreig.co.uk
Accommodation platforms such as Booking.com, Wotif, Hotels.com, etc do have their advantages. It's true they aren't comprehensive as properties have to enlist but they are a good starting point. From there you can shop around (incl going direct) for options & pricing.
The biggest plus is they remove the issue of the language barrier; your booking is confirmed instantly & any communication with the property is translated through the platforms. Not everyone is confident enough with their foreign language abilities to tackle, for example, phoning ahead. Also many people want a certain style of accom or aren't comfortable 'winging it' & booking can ease anxiety. As a solo female walker, having compared & chosen where I stay helps provide safety & security. For me, I'm happy to pay a few extra € £ ¥ $ for less hassle factor...whether that be language or having to find somewhere to stay (& then maybe having little or no choice) on arrival. Accommodation booking platforms are not the 'be all & end all' but they do have their place...they've got me out of many a pickle!
Oh, by the way...would the Mortara accom you (& Jenny) mentioned be the Primavera della Bottala by any chance? I hope it is...that one is on my radar so good to know its a winner! And it's not on Booking.com.. 🤭 😄
👣🌏
 
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Tim Greig

Pilgrim
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2016
Via Podiensis 2017
Via Francigena 2018
I agree with you and I use Booking too. It's good to know you have accommodation secured after a long day's walk and there are many advantages that you mention. Booking and others are now under investigation for their hard sell methods and hopefully they will improve. On the VF we gradually stopped using Booking.com because accommodation was typically empty during the summer so there was no need to use them. Often a hotel would try to charge more upon arrival than the advertised rate in Booking.com so we'd have to point this out to them and they soon agreed to price match. I guess the hard sell grated on me! Anyway the good news is you are booked into the same hotel in Mortara. It's not the Ritz but it's clean and comfortable, the food is good and there's not much else in town!
Primavera Della Bottala
Corso Giuseppe Garibaldi, 1, 27036 Mortara PV, Italy
Tel +39 0384 92800
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF(2012)
Portugues, Muxia-Finist(2015)
St Olavs Way(2016)
88 Temples Japan(2017)
PWC & VF (2019)
Good tip about platform booked hotels trying to charge more than quoted...forewarned is forearmed! I haven't encountered that situation yet but I have been asked by some properties to say I cancelled or shortened my stay so they don't have to pay the booking site fees....
Thanks for the info that the Mortara accom is the one I pre-selected...I'll make sure it's top of my (short) list when the time is nearer.
👣🌏
 

Chrisp

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: 2014
EPW: 2015
Portuguese Camino: 2016
TMB: 2016
Rota Vicentina: 2017
VF: 2018
You're right Chrisp, I'm an Aussie & not from Kazakhstan...although it is on my 'To Visit' list! 😇
I do know of the agreement which is separate to the Schengen for some countries. I believe France is on the list too.
I didn't really look into it because in this case, commitments at home just happened to fit the Schengen requirements anyway & I decided to work within the standard system rather try to get around it. Also I heard the application process is difficult & messy; but apparently not for you! which is great to know for the future.
How did you find the process? Did you have to sign over your first born 😁 or was it relatively painless?
I note you said if you have the Schengen exemption 'you must leave Europe from Italy'. I guess that would rule out journeying anywhere afterwards, like Croatia for example, which although non-Schengen is still part of Europe.
I'll have to high-tail it from Rome/Italy before my visa expires & Croatia was my only non-Schengen option.

Thanks for sharing this info on the Forum as I don't think it's a widely known option.
👣🌏
Hi Tassie Kaz, Yes you must put Kazakhstan in your to ‘go to’ list. We lived there for 4-years and it would be way too unreal if you were an Aussie living in Kazakhstan too!!! Anyway, re visas for Italy, as Australians we don’t need to do anything whatsoever - go to Smart Traveller or Google Australian Bi-lateral Visa agreements and you will find that there are arrangements for Australia s to stay up to 90-days extra over and above the Schengen 90-days, ie you can stay for 180-days. France is not included but I’m sure you can travel to Croatia from Italy and leave from there, or any other non-Schengen country! Good luck and enjoy the Via Francigena at whatever pace you want to walk. Buen Camino, Chris 😊👣👣
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF(2012)
Portugues, Muxia-Finist(2015)
St Olavs Way(2016)
88 Temples Japan(2017)
PWC & VF (2019)
Hi Tassie Kaz, Yes you must put Kazakhstan in your to ‘go to’ list. We lived there for 4-years and it would be way too unreal if you were an Aussie living in Kazakhstan too!!! Anyway, re visas for Italy, as Australians we don’t need to do anything whatsoever - go to Smart Traveller or Google Australian Bi-lateral Visa agreements and you will find that there are arrangements for Australia s to stay up to 90-days extra over and above the Schengen 90-days, ie you can stay for 180-days. France is not included but I’m sure you can travel to Croatia from Italy and leave from there, or any other non-Schengen country! Good luck and enjoy the Via Francigena at whatever pace you want to walk. Buen Camino, Chris 😊👣👣
Wow...brilliant info Chris...thank you! It won't change anything this trip but certainly opens up options for future forays. I'm sure I found info on a similar arrangement for France but maybe I'm mistaken. When time permits, I'll investigate & if I find anything, I'll post the info on the forum.
Hugely impressed you lived in Kazakhstan... what an amazing experience that would have been. I'm fascinated by the whole region & all the Silk Road countries.
Yes, 'Kaz' is a result of that very Orstralyan trait of nicknames/shortening names. Of course we do love dropping letters & adding 'ie' to the end of everything so in full I could say 'I'm Kazzie..an Aussie from Tassie!' 😖 cringe.. 😄 Ah well...play the cards when it suits...
Thanks for your VF wishes...two weeks to go! 😯
I see you've done the Tour du Mont Blanc too; it's just breathtaking...the scenery & the relentless climbing!
Best wishes for your plans, Karen
 

athiker93

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sept-Oct 2013
Thanks for the offer to answer PWC & VF queries Athiker93...always good to have those who have 'been there, done that' just keyboard taps away! I'm starting at Southwark Cathedral. As you began in London too, how many days total did it take you to reach Rome? I'm subject to Schengen visa restrictions & am only able to incl the PWC as England is not part of the Schengen agreement. 👣🌏
It took me 4 days to reach Canterbury, then another day to reach Dover. The UK is not in the Schengen area, so it doesnt count against the days on the Continent. I did the hike in 110 days...and did it without a Schengen visa extension. As long as you exit via Italy, Spain or Portugal (Southern Europe)...they really do not mind. If you are English and combined with Brexit...they may reconsider. I went to 3 Italian Consulates, plus 2 Consular offices and NO ONE could give me a straight answer on proper paperwork since there really is not a visa for what we do. An Italian Consular at the Miami Consulate (above a Ferrari dealership to boot!), told me for a $5 thousand dollar donation he could make it go away.
 

VNwalking

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As long as you exit via Italy, Spain or Portugal (Southern Europe)...they really do not mind.
Uh-huh. Maybe, maybe not. If you have the misfortune of being in the queue that ends up at the one grumpy immigration officer, you'll get a big fat illegal overstay stamp in your passport and that'll be your last camino in a very long time. Why risk it?
for a $5 thousand dollar donation he could make it go away.
:eek:
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF(2012)
Portugues, Muxia-Finist(2015)
St Olavs Way(2016)
88 Temples Japan(2017)
PWC & VF (2019)
It took me 4 days to reach Canterbury, then another day to reach Dover. The UK is not in the Schengen area, so it doesnt count against the days on the Continent. I did the hike in 110 days...and did it without a Schengen visa extension. As long as you exit via Italy, Spain or Portugal (Southern Europe)...they really do not mind. If you are English and combined with Brexit...they may reconsider. I went to 3 Italian Consulates, plus 2 Consular offices and NO ONE could give me a straight answer on proper paperwork since there really is not a visa for what we do. An Italian Consular at the Miami Consulate (above a Ferrari dealership to boot!), told me for a $5 thousand dollar donation he could make it go away.
Thanks for the info @athiker93 ...I think you may have got lucky overstaying, I'd have been sweating on it. Easier for me to just work within the Schengen rather than risk it. I've got too many walks I want to do to be blacklisted...plus the $5000 'donation' pays for the next trip anyway! 😏
 

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