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Finesterra? No Thank You Please

Santiago Photo Book

scruffy1

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Holy Year from Pamplona 2010, SJPP 2011, Lisbon 2012, Le Puy 2013, Vezelay (partial watch this space!) 2014; 2015 Toulouse-Puenta la Reina (Arles)
Looking through some old photo albums, revealing my age, and came across some yellowing phots from Fisterra/Finesterra, 15 years ago. Back then it was a long lovely walk out there to a modernish bustling port, the walk out to the Cabo was lonely but inspiring, and very cheap. My last visit revealed a different place, much more crowded, too much bustle and not in the port, no room in the inn so we took an unpleasant room from an abuela who had a sign in her window, and practiced our German in the bars and restaurants. The walk out to the lighthouse was as crowded as the path leading out of Sarria. No longer my cup of tea. There are other options Muxia being one of them. A better option might be a walk towards Portugal to Padrón, not far for those itinerary-conscious time-restricted and today much more inspiring - for starters the Iglesia de Santiago de Padrón. The church reveals the “Pedron” the large and ancient stone which claims the honor of that to which the boat carrying the body of Saint James was moored when he returned to Spain. In order to see it an attending priest may have to be…ah…persuaded to open the hatch inside the church, that which is in the courtyard is a copy. Padrón also offers the home and museum of Rosalía de Castro Galicia’s finest poet – see “Rosalía de Castro Selected Poems” Shearman Books. The Collegiate Church of Santa Maria la Mayor of Iria Flavia and its porch. Did I mention pimentos padrón? Yes from here.
 

andywild

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
april '2018'
I must admit that last few km to the lighthouse felt very 'Disney' ... I was questioning whether it was worth the effort. I found myself a rock, whipped out my bottle of wine to share with the people sat around me.. and then the sunset...
It all made sense then.
 

Lindsay53

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances April / May 19
A pilgrim I met on the meseta told me that Muxia was a far more attractive finish to the Camino than Finisterra. On reaching the fork in the road I decided to heed his advice. I'm glad I did. Relatively uncrowded, nice town, amazing views. Only two buses per day to Santiago, but this may help to keep the crowds down!
 

hel&scott

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2004 St Jean - Santiago, 2008 &18 Seville - Finesterre, 2010 Ferrol - Lisbon, 2012 from Cartehenga.
Having been to all 3 of the places you mention I admit each has there charms. We arrived in Padron during a market day and the churros we brought were some of the best I've eaten and helped us march on thru.
Muxia was windy and rocky, it's windswept beauty was enhanced by a Pohutukawa hedge and while not in flower when I was there I could imagine it's blood red blooms being offset agains the blue of the sky and the darker tones of the ocean. The town pretty much extends to the ocean edge and I was amazed at the work that has gone into creating stone fenced terraces over the years just so the locals can grow a few cabbages and turnips, says a lot about the dogged determination of the inhabitants.
And yes, Finisterre has changed, I was very disappointed to see the ground at the cape literally covered by cigarette butts. The town itself is larger and has a life of its own outside of the Camino as it hosts a lot of summer visitors making the most of the nearby beaches. The developments infront of the lighthouse do obscure what as a lonley and dramatic end of the road, but as @andywild points out once you find your favourite rock to hunker down on away from the crowds and with a bottle of the local red to watch the sun break through the clouds, or the sunset, you can reconnect with what makes this place so special.
 

Pelegrin

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo June 2013
SJPP - Logroño June 2014
Ingles July2016
Market days in Padron are every Sunday morning. There are three big tents for pulpo, grilled meat and pimentos. Better drink wine because beer is not usually cold.
 

scruffy1

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Holy Year from Pamplona 2010, SJPP 2011, Lisbon 2012, Le Puy 2013, Vezelay (partial watch this space!) 2014; 2015 Toulouse-Puenta la Reina (Arles)
A pilgrim I met on the meseta told me that Muxia was a far more attractive finish to the Camino than Finisterra. On reaching the fork in the road I decided to heed his advice. I'm glad I did. Relatively uncrowded, nice town, amazing views. Only two buses per day to Santiago, but this may help to keep the crowds down!
About three kilometers out from Muxia may be found the Church of San Julian de Moraime, a 12th century JEWEL of a church usually closed, locked, appearing abandoned. I was "lucky" others perhaps not so much since on my approach the bell was ringing and thinking I might be late for the mass hurried on and into the church...to find a funeral in process. I was graciously received despite my appearance-5 weeks on the Camino does not enhance your haberdashery nor your tonsorial virtues The church is amazing, exterior and interior, and when all the mourners left I was left alone to my own devices and to enjoy the special atmosphere there. A flustered acolyte later returned to the church when they realized it was left open and after politely answering my questions in Spanglish politely showed me the door. Worth a visit even for only the exterior. 1564421390317.png
 

Bala

Veteran member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: SJPdP-Burgos, (2015); Burgos-Sarria (2018); Sarria-Santiago (2018).
Frances (2020)
I "splurged" ($40 USD/nt) on a 2-night waterfront room in Muxia and took the afternoon bus out of Santiago. The next morning I got up at my regular pilgrim time and walked out to the church and lighthouse. I basically had the whole area to myself. Unbelievably beautiful and peaceful.

Later I walked to San Julian, which Scruffy mentions above. Another truly lovely walk. I was not as lucky as Scruffy as the church was closed. But I could peak through the window and appreciate the ancient interior, clearly still in active use. I don't think I saw more than 2 or 3 pilgrims the whole way out and back. But a herd of heavily-bearded goats trotted over to check me out.

Late in the afternoon I wandered back out to the church to watch dusk fall and then went to mass. The church was filled with hanging models of various fishing boats. What an unexpected and charming surprise (although I suspect maybe the story behind some of those boats may be more tragic than charming). Then an excellent fish dinner with two other pilgrims at a quiet seaside restaurant.

The following morning another woman and I took a private taxi tour of the coast. After being in Muxia, I was pretty taken aback by Finesterre. Kind of like being at the New Jersey shore. Those of you from the U.S. mid-Atlantic know exactly what I mean. Everyone else, well, you get the picture.

Our taxi guy, native Gallegan, drove straight through town (explaining he refuses to go there anymore), and out to the lighthouse. In spite of the still-heavy numbers of people, it was possible to soak up a bit of solitude, enjoy the beauty, and think how it must have been just a few years ago.

Sadly, all good things come to an end. There was a large resort already under construction on the edge of Muxia. And I fear it won't be long before this lovely little village becomes another tourist town, filled with ice cream shops, souvenir stands, trendy restaurants, and commercial hotels.

Next time, should I be so lucky, Pedron. Meanwhile, very special memories of Muxia.
 

malingerer

Active Member
I "splurged" ($40 USD/nt) on a 2-night waterfront room in Muxia and took the afternoon bus out of Santiago. The next morning I got up at my regular pilgrim time and walked out to the church and lighthouse. I basically had the whole area to myself. Unbelievably beautiful and peaceful.

Later I walked to San Julian, which Scruffy mentions above. Another truly lovely walk. I was not as lucky as Scruffy as the church was closed. But I could peak through the window and appreciate the ancient interior, clearly still in active use. I don't think I saw more than 2 or 3 pilgrims the whole way out and back. But a herd of heavily-bearded goats trotted over to check me out.

Late in the afternoon I wandered back out to the church to watch dusk fall and then went to mass. The church was filled with hanging models of various fishing boats. What an unexpected and charming surprise (although I suspect maybe the story behind some of those boats may be more tragic than charming). Then an excellent fish dinner with two other pilgrims at a quiet seaside restaurant.

The following morning another woman and I took a private taxi tour of the coast. After being in Muxia, I was pretty taken aback by Finesterre. Kind of like being at the New Jersey shore. Those of you from the U.S. mid-Atlantic know exactly what I mean. Everyone else, well, you get the picture.

Our taxi guy, native Gallegan, drove straight through town (explaining he refuses to go there anymore), and out to the lighthouse. In spite of the still-heavy numbers of people, it was possible to soak up a bit of solitude, enjoy the beauty, and think how it must have been just a few years ago.

Sadly, all good things come to an end. There was a large resort already under construction on the edge of Muxia. And I fear it won't be long before this lovely little village becomes another tourist town, filled with ice cream shops, souvenir stands, trendy restaurants, and commercial hotels.

Next time, should I be so lucky, Pedron. Meanwhile, very special memories of Muxia.

For me it will always be Finisterre. It is best in a boat out in the bay watching the sunset under a Celtic, ethereal, magical sky. The wind whispers, the water cradles and for a little while, I am Celt and at home. I know the time will come when I must face forever in to the West and not return, but that which is at Finisterre will guide me.

Walk soft,

stay safe

and as ever

Vaya

con Dios.

The Malingerer
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
There was a large resort already under construction on the edge of Muxia. And I fear it won't be long before this lovely little village becomes another tourist town, filled with ice cream shops, souvenir stands, trendy restaurants, and commercial hotels.
And that's not your average large resort, it is a parador de turismo. 27 million euros, 6 years under construction. Looks like it will open any day now. I share your pessimism about the future of Muxia.

 

Bala

Veteran member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: SJPdP-Burgos, (2015); Burgos-Sarria (2018); Sarria-Santiago (2018).
Frances (2020)
For me it will always be Finisterre. It is best in a boat out in the bay watching the sunset under a Celtic, ethereal, magical sky. The wind whispers, the water cradles and for a little while, I am Celt and at home. I know the time will come when I must face forever in to the West and not return, but that which is at Finisterre will guide me.

Walk soft,

stay safe

and as ever

Vaya

con Dios.

The Malingerer
That's the way to experience it. 🌅
 

Davey Boyd

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Again, soon as possible!
I must be in the minority (I usually am), but I prefer Fisterra. In fact every time I have walked to Muxia (four times) I wished I stayed elsewhere. I find Muxia really unfriendly, the opposite of Fisterra. Plus due to the family run Cabo de Villa albergue in Fisterra it is like walking home, wonderful place, wonderful family. (First time there I met a pilgrim who stayed 5 months).

I don't walk to Santiago, I walk to Cabo de Villa!

Plus, Fisterra has 'The Family' (bar/hippy commune/albergue/nut house), and some of the local (not touristy) fishermans bars are extremely friendly too!

Davey
 

Raggy

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Mozarabe Almeria (2017)
Cherhill to Canterbury - Pilgrims' Way (2018)
Via Francigena (2019)
You know what this thread tells me? Not everybody likes the same things. Who would have thought that?
So true. Some people would rather finish in a tranquil spot and others enjoy a livelier atmosphere. What we have in common, though, is that we attach some importance to the end point. We may say that the Camino is not about reaching a particular place, that it's about the journey not the destination. But it turns out that many of us do have a preference about how we bring the Camino to a close ... and where.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Lourdes/Burgos/SdeC 77; Frances 12,15,17; Finisterre 17; Lourdes/Aragones 18; Meseta 19.
I went dutifully to the Fisterra lighthouse in 2012 and 2015.... But in 2017 I got this sense that my lighthouse walks were over. Then, at lunch on the Fisterra waterfront, I was handed an advertiser for a sunset cruise to see the lighthouse from the sea side. Couldn't resist. Did it, enjoyed it, can recommend it to those who've done the burn-something thing....

 
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trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
I went dutifully to the Fisterra lighthouse in 2012 and 2015.... But in 2017 I got this sense that my lighthouse walks were over. Then, at lunch on the Fisterra waterfront, I was handed an advertiser for a sunset cruise to see the lighthouse from the sea side. Couldn't resist. Did it, enjoyed it, can recommend it for those who've done the burn-something thing....

I took the sunset cruise last year. I enjoyed seeing the sunset from the boat, and it was a good deal at 12€ with wine and snacks included!
 

Felicia V

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portuguese 2017
Returning 2018
Looking through some old photo albums, revealing my age, and came across some yellowing phots from Fisterra/Finesterra, 15 years ago. Back then it was a long lovely walk out there to a modernish bustling port, the walk out to the Cabo was lonely but inspiring, and very cheap. My last visit revealed a different place, much more crowded, too much bustle and not in the port, no room in the inn so we took an unpleasant room from an abuela who had a sign in her window, and practiced our German in the bars and restaurants. The walk out to the lighthouse was as crowded as the path leading out of Sarria. No longer my cup of tea. There are other options Muxia being one of them. A better option might be a walk towards Portugal to Padrón, not far for those itinerary-conscious time-restricted and today much more inspiring - for starters the Iglesia de Santiago de Padrón. The church reveals the “Pedron” the large and ancient stone which claims the honor of that to which the boat carrying the body of Saint James was moored when he returned to Spain. In order to see it an attending priest may have to be…ah…persuaded to open the hatch inside the church, that which is in the courtyard is a copy. Padrón also offers the home and museum of Rosalía de Castro Galicia’s finest poet – see “Rosalía de Castro Selected Poems” Shearman Books. The Collegiate Church of Santa Maria la Mayor of Iria Flavia and its porch. Did I mention pimentos padrón? Yes from here.
Padron was one of, if not THE most favorite places for me on my road from Porto. Actually, it felt more like my personal SdC.
I feel I could return there over and over
 

John H.

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF - 2017
CP Central - 2017
CP Coastal - 2018
CF - [hopefully again someday]
Bala: "... I was pretty taken aback by Finesterre. Kind of like being at the New Jersey shore..."

😄 Yup. This was also my thought, but glad I saw it. My private room at a local hotel was so classy it even had wallpaper in the shower - yup, wallpaper in the shower.

I am glad I also walked another 30 kms to Muxia to finish my 1st Camino.
 

Mycroft

Member
Looking through some old photo albums, revealing my age, and came across some yellowing phots from Fisterra/Finesterra, 15 years ago. Back then it was a long lovely walk out there to a modernish bustling port, the walk out to the Cabo was lonely but inspiring, and very cheap. My last visit revealed a different place, much more crowded, too much bustle and not in the port, no room in the inn so we took an unpleasant room from an abuela who had a sign in her window, and practiced our German in the bars and restaurants. The walk out to the lighthouse was as crowded as the path leading out of Sarria. No longer my cup of tea. There are other options Muxia being one of them. A better option might be a walk towards Portugal to Padrón, not far for those itinerary-conscious time-restricted and today much more inspiring - for starters the Iglesia de Santiago de Padrón. The church reveals the “Pedron” the large and ancient stone which claims the honor of that to which the boat carrying the body of Saint James was moored when he returned to Spain. In order to see it an attending priest may have to be…ah…persuaded to open the hatch inside the church, that which is in the courtyard is a copy. Padrón also offers the home and museum of Rosalía de Castro Galicia’s finest poet – see “Rosalía de Castro Selected Poems” Shearman Books. The Collegiate Church of Santa Maria la Mayor of Iria Flavia and its porch. Did I mention pimentos padrón? Yes from here.
By "persuading" the attending priest to open the hatch do you mean bribe him? How is it done?
 

Stivandrer

Perambulating & Curious. Rep stravaiging offender
Camino(s) past & future
I´ve got Camino plans until 2042,
- or till I fall flat on my face, whichever comes first !!
Was lucky to get to F´sterra on a morning with few people about and only a lonely couple of bonfires burning lnylon tee shirts and rubber shoes !!
My little seance with myself, the sun and the roar of the ocean was shared after a while with a German Lutheran pastor whom I met just days before in Seminario Menor on his bicycle and shared an impromptu supper w bread and water inst of wine and I sang to him a Kyrie from Ukraine that he did not know - the rest was silence.

And the beauty of it forever tatooed on my retinae....

Like many things, I do not nescessarily need to go there again, I have had my fill and am content...
this time around, I will head for Muxia instead, for sure..

Sure, the art is to dodge the crowds, and sometimes you almost fail, like when I arrived to Cruz de Ferro and delivered my stone for a friend in solemnity, just in time before a crowd of three turist buses swarmed the place full...
 
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andralynn

Member
Camino(s) past & future
I am leaving for Barcelona May 20th, 2019 and will begin my Camino in San Sebastian May 27th, 2019
A pilgrim I met on the meseta told me that Muxia was a far more attractive finish to the Camino than Finisterra. On reaching the fork in the road I decided to heed his advice. I'm glad I did. Relatively uncrowded, nice town, amazing views. Only two buses per day to Santiago, but this may help to keep the crowds down!
I stayed a night and Day in Finisterra and enjoyed every minute. The people are warm and friendly and the village beautiful. Don’t sell it short too quickly.
 

NYSE

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Santiago & Camino Finisterre/Muxia April 2019
Looking through some old photo albums, revealing my age, and came across some yellowing phots from Fisterra/Finesterra, 15 years ago. Back then it was a long lovely walk out there to a modernish bustling port, the walk out to the Cabo was lonely but inspiring, and very cheap. My last visit revealed a different place, much more crowded, too much bustle and not in the port, no room in the inn so we took an unpleasant room from an abuela who had a sign in her window, and practiced our German in the bars and restaurants. The walk out to the lighthouse was as crowded as the path leading out of Sarria. No longer my cup of tea. There are other options Muxia being one of them. A better option might be a walk towards Portugal to Padrón, not far for those itinerary-conscious time-restricted and today much more inspiring - for starters the Iglesia de Santiago de Padrón. The church reveals the “Pedron” the large and ancient stone which claims the honor of that to which the boat carrying the body of Saint James was moored when he returned to Spain. In order to see it an attending priest may have to be…ah…persuaded to open the hatch inside the church, that which is in the courtyard is a copy. Padrón also offers the home and museum of Rosalía de Castro Galicia’s finest poet – see “Rosalía de Castro Selected Poems” Shearman Books. The Collegiate Church of Santa Maria la Mayor of Iria Flavia and its porch. Did I mention pimentos padrón? Yes from
 

NYSE

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Santiago & Camino Finisterre/Muxia April 2019
I don't know. After walking from Santiago to Finesterre, I headed up to Muxia where I finished my Camino. I found both towns interesting, with Finesterre being more crowded. Staying two days in Finesterre, I walked to the lighthouse three times. I enjoyed the walks and found I could be by myself, or with another pilgrim. It all seemed to be exactly what I wanted when I wanted. On the Camino it's so easy to be in one's own world, by one's self, or intertwined with others. Everywhere in the world today it seems to be busier; it's just the time we live in. I know, for myself, i'd do it all over, and over, and over again. I'm one if the fortunate ones, I walked the Camino exactly the way i planned.
 

Derrybiketours

A journey of 500 miles begins with one step!
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP-SANT-FIN (09/2018)
PORTO-SANT (11/2018)
Caminho Da Fe (01/2019)
SJPdP- Meseta (28/09/2019)
Finisterre, the end of the earth was an interesting end to my first Camino. When I arrived at the beach before reaching the town I was exhausted. As far as I and my staff Paddy were concerned it was time to hangup my boot's. I removed my boot's attached them to Paddy and walked the last 1km barefoot. Towards the end of the beach I was rewarded with my Camino shell. I asked another pilgrim traveling in the opposite direction if they could capture the moment in a photograph. The memory in my camera phone was full and battery was depleted. The backup GoPro also had a depleted battery. I had no choice but too delete some of my previous pics to free up some memory. I wasn't going to miss capturing this magic moment. I spent the next 9 days living in a room in a private flat overlooking the bay. I was prepared to settle longer but after a eventful Saturday night in town what I found out made me depart at short notice but not before I walked out to Faro, looked across the vast ocean and visualised myself crossing the Atlantic, I'm glad I did and I captured it on my GoPro. I returned to Santiago and continued to Madrid, Toledo, Porto walked to Santiago then to Brazil and walked the Camino da Fe. Finisterre was the beginning of my journey but I will never return. In October I will finish my walk in Muxia and wonder were I will end up. Fisterra is a must, at least once. 🤠
 

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ranthr

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C Frances 2005, 2007
Le Puy en Velay -SdC 2009
Via de la Plata 2011
gr 653 from Oloron to Puente la Reina 2012
Gr65 from le Puy to Figeac 2013
Irun to Santander 2013
Porto to SdC 2014
Astorga to SdC 2015
I have been to Finisterre a couple of times recently since my first visit in 2005, and I regretted it both times.
I hope never again.
I loved Muxia, and I do not hope the new parador will change it a lot. I guess the touristbusoperators will do
a lot more to that.
 

Thornley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances x 2 , Norte x 2 , Le Puy x 3 , Portuguese x 2,
Mont St Michel , Primitivo .
Parador in Muxia to Lires to Finisterre to SDC will become the most favoured 100km [ If you want or need a compostela ] for peace and beauty by a country mile.
 

Llew

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances & Finisterre 2012, Norte, Ingles,Finisterre & Muxia 2015, Australian (2016), Portuguese 2018
For me it will always be Finisterre. It is best in a boat out in the bay watching the sunset under a Celtic, ethereal, magical sky. The wind whispers, the water cradles and for a little while, I am Celt and at home. I know the time will come when I must face forever in to the West and not return, but that which is at Finisterre will guide me.

Walk soft,

stay safe

and as ever

Vaya

con Dios.

The Malingerer
Totally agree. Finisterre for me has something magical about it. I found Muxia did not have the same friendliness.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francis SJPP April 2016,
August 2017, May 2018
Camino Portuguese
2019, May Porto, Sept Lisbo
In 2018 I was lucky enough to walk SJPdP to SC, Muxia -Finisterre, Walking every step of the way. So after the visit to the lighthouse I hitched a ride in a van to the bottom of town...I don't know whether it was the driver's speed but I had to close my eyes the whole way down. Terrifying...I'm glad I went to quiet Muxia first then to Lires and Finesterre... very moving to be enjoying lunch there with Simon and Ariel that I had met in SJPdP on my first night 6 weeks and 2 days later. Wonderful memories.
Love
 
Camino(s) past & future
this will be my first. Norte September 2018.
I must be in the minority (I usually am), but I prefer Fisterra. In fact every time I have walked to Muxia (four times) I wished I stayed elsewhere. I find Muxia really unfriendly, the opposite of Fisterra. Plus due to the family run Cabo de Villa albergue in Fisterra it is like walking home, wonderful place, wonderful family. (First time there I met a pilgrim who stayed 5 months).

I don't walk to Santiago, I walk to Cabo de Villa!

Plus, Fisterra has 'The Family' (bar/hippy commune/albergue/nut house), and some of the local (not touristy) fishermans bars are extremely friendly too!

Davey
World Family is a great place! ❤
 

Lindsay53

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances April / May 19
I stayed a night and Day in Finisterra and enjoyed every minute. The people are warm and friendly and the village beautiful. Don’t sell it short too quickly.

I hope to walk the Portuguese next year, I will check out Finisterra then. :)
 

Hansel

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances and Fisterre (2018,08) ,Camino Primitivo, and Fisterre,(2019,04)
You know what this thread tells me? Not everybody likes the same things. Who would have thought that? 😂😂😂
You can please some of the people some of the time, but you can't please all of the people all of the time !
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
I walked to Muxia and then Fisterra last November. I found Muxia a more attractive and atmospheric place. But walking back into town from the lighthouse at Fisterra I happened to turn round and catch sight of this cloud formation which struck me as looking remarkably like a scallop shell. A beautiful but transient sight.

clouds.jpg
 

Delphinoula

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino PdC 2018 Finisterre Muxía 2018
C Franconia 2019
Camino desde Algeciras Sevillia (2019)
I walked middle of April 2018.
 

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