Search over 55.000 Camino Questions

A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it


Advertisement
Rent a house in Santiago (1 month minimum)
300m from the cathedral and around the corner from the fresh food market in Santiago. Perfect place to tele commute from (1GB symmetrical connection).
Camino Jewellery
A selection of Camino Jewellery

Great Boots vs. Two Pairs of Walking Shoes

almhath

Member
Hi Y'all,

Ok. I sure want to let you all know how much I'm learning here, but let me share what I've been gravitating toward on the footwear for the Camino Frances, taking into account my personality and foot issues.

I've bought a great pair of waterproof Keen boots, and I've been walking in them. It's clear they're great. But I've noticed after only a couple miles, my feet are damp, and some hot spots need to be worked out. (My feet are hard to fit due to bunions and claw toes. I'm getting on in years a bit. :oops: )

I believe I could make them work. But I've been out walking with my husband, and I've found myself wishing I had on my New Balance 850s, which weigh about half of that... (They are not the model I'd recommend for a Camino, as they have little support.)

I've also heard it said that every pound you add to your feet may feel like 6 on your back, after a time....

Waterproof boots have been suggested to help keep water out, as it's such a pain if you have wet feet and miles to go, but also I've heard that wet waterproof boots won't dry as fast as mesh shoes. Maybe have damp boots for a couple days.

Sooooo......... I've been actually thinking of finding some (better models for the Camino) New Balance shoes, weighing about half what the boots weigh, and taking TWO pair with me for the camino.

One to wear, one to pack, and switch if one pair gets wet. And, a light mesh upper does suit my bunions/toes better.

I've been very seriously watching my pack weight, shaving ounces where ever I can, and my pack's only weighing about 7% of my body weight, less food and water. With 18 oz of shoes in it, it'll weigh a bit more, but it could make my trek more comfortable.

I respect the views I'm reading, and the experience of this group, so I thought I'd share that and ask what you think.

Thank you

Almha
 
Holy Year Credential
Get the HOLY YEAR Camino Credential (Passport) here.
2021 Camino Guides
Most all Camino authors have decided to use 2020 guides for 2021, with free PDF files with updates coming in the spring. Get yours today.

almhath

Member
Yes. That's my boot.

I'ts pretty good, but I do note my feet get damp in it from perspiration, and I would have to work out my bunion/toe problems.
 

grayland

Moderator
Staff member
Year of past OR future Camino
Yes
I would advise just taking your walking shoes/boots that you decide on and a pair of shoes for afternoon/night after walking. Many people take tevas or other sandals that they can also walk in...or just something like crocs to walk around town and the albergue. They are great to shower in. Two pair of walking shoes/boots would, in my opinion, be over the top.
 

almhath

Member
Hmmmm. I was wondering if I'd get that advice. I've also ordered some 1000 mile fusion socks, so I'll keep experimenting with the Keen boots.

Also, I'll get some Teva sandals. :)

Almha
 
Camino Socks
Browse the Camino Socks collection on the forum shop
Create your own ad
€1,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.

robertt

Active Member
My trick last time was to wear mids, kind of a boot, and a couple of sizes too large. Into them, I put some good insoles and always wore two layers of socks. (The waterproof membrane simply didn't work, but that's another matter.) This is the old Aussie way for hikers, but made so much easier because modern boots are seldom the heavy items they used to be. The best part is, the arrangement was so comfy that I wore the shoes after-hours, finding them more convenient than slip-ons. My attitude now is that if I'm aching to take off my footwear at the end of the day, I shouldn't be wearing it.

All highly personal, of course. And when wearing oversize shoes or boots, the heel must still be snug. Heel-lift and heel-slide can do lots of damage to legs, knees and backs. Anyway, from Pamplona to Compostela, then to Tui and back, then to Fisterra...no foot probs and no need to wear slip-ons!
 

jujuaway

Member
hi there Almhath, i use a very strong anti - persperant on my feet.It is made by Dove or Rexona and you can by it in Australia from the chemist shop. It is for people with really bad sweating problems, so it is perfect to reduce sweat on the feet. I would put it on in the evening before bed.
good luck with all your preparations, juju
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
grayland said:
I am not ever sure just what type of shoes people are talking about when they say "boots"

Here is the women's version of the shoe I wear now on the Camino: (Keen Targhee)
http://www.rei.com/product/772566/keen- ... erralID=NA

There are other great brands...but this is the basic type shoe I see most people wearing.
Useful link, thanks. Our boots look as though they are just a little deeper and they are waterproofed leather; Hi-Tec made in the UK.



We take Crocs for wearing indoors and a change of footwear when needed
 

Attachments

  • walking-boots.jpg
    walking-boots.jpg
    84.1 KB · Views: 5,026

lynnejohn

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances(2005), VDLP(2007), Madrid(2009), Ingles(2009), Sur (2011), VDLP(2011)-partial, VDLP(2014)
I've gone through two pairs of Keen Targhee mid-boots and they're the best I've every had. Super light and comfortable. Very comfortable width and accommodates my duck feet.

lynne
 
D

Deleted member 3000

Guest
I'll get some Teva sandals.
They weight twice what Crocs do. I have used both and prefer the Crocs. Teva would be a bit better for actual hiking if it comes to that. I would sit down a couple of days before I would hike in either!!! My brother has hiked in both...
 
Camino Jewellery
A selection of Camino Jewellery
John Brierley Camino Frances Guide
This guide is one of the ones that has been around for over 15 years. Updated yearly. Please read the reviews.

almhath

Member
Ok Guys!

Ok. I've been really working on this. Of course, I'm a a green-horn hiker; I've never done anything like the Camino Frances. But I'm dedicated, and I've done other endurance kinds of things. I believe I will go there the BEST prepared green-horn ever (?), and then the Camino will teach me what else I need to know, itself.

On the Boots: I have been wearing my Keens, and wishing I had something more like my shoes, because my feet were hot and sweating...and I had some hot spots—due, not to the boots, but to my bunions and claw toes (genetic, shape of foot, hard to fit). I do believe the Keens would be great.

But I went back to REI and talked with them some more—they are great—and I bought another pair of boots: some Merrells, that are goretex, but not leather upper. They're a synthetic mesh, that is more breathable, 1/4 lb lighter, but still a boot that gives me some ankle support.

I'm liking them, and I'll begin wearing them a lot to see how they compare.

Since I"m so green at hiking, I need this kind of experience to teach me what's going to work for me—learn here, hopefully before I get to Spain. I don't want to wish on the trail I'd made another decision.

You guys are great.

My pack is about 8% of my body weight, fully loaded. My boots seems to be a great compromise. I really like them. Both of them, actually. I'm exercising, practicing...This is all good for me.

Though I do still think I should bring a butler. Does anyone like to Buttle?

MERRY CHRISTMAS, everyone. Blessings to us all as we strive to live a better life and be better people.

Almha
 
Year of past OR future Camino
Francés (2004.SJPP-SdC-Finisterre)(1998-2012 completed in sections). Norte (2006.122km) Inglés (2009)
At last, a potential pilgrim who is giving themselves enough time to work out what their problems are likely to be and actively seeking to make sure they have the answer before it is too late.

Had we all learnt to this when we first set out....

I like Tevas as I walk in them as often as I can and wear boots when I must. You will quickly learn when you must wear boots and when it is safe to wear walking sandals. Do not be afraid to change your boots and sandals several times a day. You only have one goal, to arrive in Santiago blister free and not having had to take pain killers.

Wish you well with your trials and I am sure you will find a solution that works for you.

A blessed Christmas to you and yours.
 

dazzamac

Active Member
I'm aware that you've already bought your boots but I would offer this one piece of advice. I went with a lighter pair of boots for my first Camino (for much the same reasons as yourself), however I found that the soles offered less support and cushioning than was necessary on the rougher roads and stony trails. I ended up buying insoles to compensate.

Despite breaking in the boots before heading out, the lack of comparable walking surfaces at home meant that I wasn't aware of the problem until I started walking the Camino. That said, the boots were very comfortable and I continue to wear them now that I'm home. For my next Camino I'll be focusing on sturdier soles in perhaps a slightly heavier boot.
 
D

Deleted member 3000

Guest
This is the fate of many second pairs of footwear:As an alternative, you might be able to use the abandoned boots as a source of your second pair, if you need to ... :D
 

Attachments

  • P5110142.JPG
    P5110142.JPG
    4.3 KB · Views: 4,686
Hola amigo,
Dont let anyone give you any fancy talk about feet and footwear,and what to buy. The best bet is to have a good pair of sturdy boots ( I wear 'Brashar') and a pair of sandals for around town. Here's the reson; The first two weeks into the trip three people's shoes bit the dust and they had to buy new boots en route, can you imagine the pain and blisters. Make shure your feet are in good condition and your boots broken in before you start, because your feet are going to hurt like hell anyway, at least for the first two weeks, then it gets better after that. So, take it easy at first, find some good streching exersize's, morning and night, yes, my legs and feet where sore, but I did'nt get a single blister the whole trip. Buen camino, and may the gods be with you.
 
Rent a house in Santiago (1 month minimum)
300m from the cathedral and around the corner from the fresh food market in Santiago. Perfect place to tele commute from (1GB symmetrical connection).
2021 Camino Guides
Most all Camino authors have decided to use 2020 guides for 2021, with free PDF files with updates coming in the spring. Get yours today.

almhath

Member
Hello Big Hairy Scottsman. I've read a couple of your posts, and you're reminding me of Joost in "The Way," if that's okay for me to say. It's a very positive impression. Love yarr sense o' humorr.

I do have a great pair of both boots and shoes, now. Very good. I never even knew how bad my feet were before, until I came here and started learning. Now I've chunked those Keds--donated them all--and I'm wearing Merrells and NB and even one pair of Keens. I'll be wearing them all as I settle into something. We'll see how it works.

Also, I've weighed the shoes that I'm finding myself preferring--the Merrells--and compared them in weight to the boots I"m preferring--the Merrells--and there are only two ounzes difference between them. So I'm finding myself drawn to these two, and we'll see how it works out.

My other great shoes: I'll wear them,and my feet are soooooooooo much better for it.

I used to get sore feet at the end of a day.......... What was I thinking? Well, I WASN'T thinking. Can you believe it? I was going through life giving myself feet trouble, and I didn't even know it. Like: You don't know how much noise there is, until it gets turned off and you can hear the quiet. I am soooooooooo much better already for being here, and I haven't even left yet for the Camino.

I know I'm not an experienced trekker--usually not more than five miles a day. I know I'm not in the best shape--better than the average office-worker, but worse than the average carpenter. But I have some great other endurance experience, and I have a boat load of determination.

I am sooo grateful for all you guys' great input, and I"m gathering some great stuff. Learning about the trip, the mind-set........ I have pacer poles great shoes/boots, socks/liners, feet care stuff, great sleeping bag, permethrin to treat it......... AND, my pack only weighs about 8% of my body weight fully loaded. (I'm also going through my days wearing my great shoes or boots, and also wearing 5lb weights on my ankles to help me tone.)

I'm guessing I'll take either the Merrell shoes or boots (very similar, really--essentially same sole, top construction--though the boots have about 1 more inch up the ankle, hence the 2 oz.), and for the 2nd pair, I'll likely take my Teva sandals. I also bought some Crocks flip-flops, which I like better in some ways, but the post 'tween my toes is just not comfortable to walk in farther than the shower.

............and I loved the Way all five times I've seen it. Hubby and I have enjoyed it. I haven't walked it, yet, butI got a good sense of it, I felt, watching.

And I did look at their boots, too. :)

Almha
 

koby

Member
Yesterday I bought a pair of (returnable) Keen Targhee II Mid boots. They were so comfortable when I wore them at home for awhile. Today I worn them all day except when I was out and at the end of the afternoon wore them to find two hot spots: one on my bunion and one on the top of my big toe on the same foot.

I took a size 8-1/2 while my shoe size is 8 wide (to accommodate orthotics, bunions and toe problem). I think I may need a 9 for the hot spots but not for the size. I can put my finger down the back of my shoe. I note another post above with the same problem: it's the feet and not the shoes, and another post advising about the heel not slipping.

Does one (or more) sizes larger than one's regular shoes sound reasonable? I seemed to have read somewhere that these boots are sized small. As it is, I feel as if my boots are almost as big as I am.

This is an individual situation I know, but does anyone have any suggestions?
 

k-fun

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Francés (2011), Camino Portugués (2013), Camino St. Jaume (2013)
I recommend you go by the feel of the shoe and not the size. I bought men's shoes because they are wider than women's shoes and wore them around for months. I bought them 1/2 size larger and carried thick, medium and light socks to accommodate the extra space and potential growth. Even so, about the 3-4th week on the Camino, my feet had grown so much in length and in width that my toes felt squished even with the lightest sock. I was starting to get blisters and my toes were crammed enough to cause an ingrown toe nail problem. I ended up walking the last part of the trip in hiking sandals.

I saw a lot of people with painful feet. I wish you well in your search for the ideal shoe.
 

Abbeydore

Veteran Member
k-fun said:
I recommend you go by the feel of the shoe and not the size. I bought men's shoes because they are wider than women's shoes and wore them around for months. I bought them 1/2 size larger and carried thick, medium and light socks to accommodate the extra space and potential growth. Even so, about the 3-4th week on the Camino, my feet had grown so much in length and in width that my toes felt squished even with the lightest sock. I was starting to get blisters and my toes were crammed enough to cause an ingrown toe nail problem. I ended up walking the last part of the trip in hiking sandals.

I saw a lot of people with painful feet. I wish you well in your search for the ideal shoe.

This why I think leather is better than fabric, because they might grow a little, more foregiving.
 

backpack45scb

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2001 CF, 04-6 LP, 07 Port, 08-10 Arles, 11 Mozá,12-13 Gen-LP. 00-10 PCT, 15 Norte, 16 Primi
An additional suggestion to koby and almha. Whatever footwear you have, be very alert to how your feet feel. If something doesn't feel quite right, stop immediately and deal with it. In our case, we always have stretchy breathable tape on hand. One roll is two inches wide, the other maybe 3/4 inches. If a toe is tender use the smaller size to wrap around the toe. For bunions, use the large size and wrap it entirely around your foot. It usually stretches to fit, but if a spot might bunch up, use the scissors on your tiny swiss army knife to cut a wedge out of the tape to improve the fit. Sometimes it takes several layers.

If a woman, don't be hesitant to try a men's size for better fit, particularly if you have bunions. For the initial looseness of fit, carry several thickness of socks and start with something like a thick hiker and a liner. In a few weeks you may go to a light hiker and liner, or just a liner. One advantage of trail runners over boots is that they are more flexible and usually can be laced snugly to prevent heel slipping.

Miscellaneous hints. If you get runners, do not get Gortex. You want your feet to dry quickly when wet. Initially stop every couple of hours and take your shoes and socks off. If you lie down and elevate your feet they will feel even better.

koby said:
Yesterday I bought a pair of (returnable) Keen Targhee II Mid boots. They were so comfortable when I wore them at home for awhile. Today I worn them all day except when I was out and at the end of the afternoon wore them to find two hot spots: one on my bunion and one on the top of my big toe on the same foot.

........
 
Camino Maps
A collection of Camino Maps from the Camino Forum Store
Rent a house in Santiago (1 month minimum)
300m from the cathedral and around the corner from the fresh food market in Santiago. Perfect place to tele commute from (1GB symmetrical connection).

Bozzie

Continuing to walk my camino daily. Blessings!
Year of past OR future Camino
2012/2016
Hi,
Check out this website for tying your boots differently:
http://www.backpacker.com/skills-how-to ... position=5

Hi...
I've been told that sometimes tying your laces in another way will help relieve hots spots.
My boots are one half size bigger than I usually wear, but I agree that it the best fit for your feet is whatever feels best to you. Are you wearing sock liners and a good wool/synthetic sock?

Please check out the above website...you'll be surprised how it helps!

Good luck with the boots. Make sure you're comfortable as you don't want to walk while hurting!
Dee Anne
"Bozzie"

I took a size 8-1/2 while my shoe size is 8 wide (to accommodate orthotics, bunions and toe problem). I think I may need a 9 for the hot spots but not for the size. I can put my finger down the back of my shoe. I note another post above with the same problem: it's the feet and not the shoes, and another post advising about the heel not slipping.

Does one (or more) sizes larger than one's regular shoes sound reasonable? I seemed to have read somewhere that these boots are sized small. As it is, I feel as if my boots are almost as big as I am.

This is an individual situation I know, but does anyone have any suggestions?[/quote]
 
M

Maya2

Guest
I use a sturdier pair of high top boots (to protect my ankles)--but only one pair. And carry a favourite pair of light sandals for showering and for use around town after a day of walking.

This seems overwhelming from where you are, but things will fall into place for you. Taking the first step is the most difficult. The journey is fabulous!
 

Finisterre

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Sarria 2001,
Porto 2006,
Valenca 2008,
Finisterre 2010,
SJdPP 2012,
Tui 2014.

No plans to return, yet.
I just misread the thread title as Great Boobs ....
I had to click on it.
 

koby

Member
Good suggestions especially trying men's size and tying laces a different way. I am walking only the Sarria to Santiago portion (about 110kms) so maybe i could be considering other makes as well. But I'm not familiar with boots so suggestions about makes and/or specific boots that have worked well for those who need orthotics and have problems with bunions and hot spots on top of toes would be appreciated.

After another day of wearing the new boots I know they definitely are not right for me as the hot spots were there again and this is only from walking in the house. I will definitely go with what feels good/right rather than size.

Thank you.
 

backpack45scb

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2001 CF, 04-6 LP, 07 Port, 08-10 Arles, 11 Mozá,12-13 Gen-LP. 00-10 PCT, 15 Norte, 16 Primi
Koby, my recommendations are trail runners - I wear Asics Gel Nimbus, Susan wears Brooks Cascadias. For the few times when I need boots, I have a pair of Lowa Renegade GTX. However, different manufacturers and even different models have different lasts and the shape of the last is what controls the fit. Try till you find something comfortable.
 
Camino Socks
Browse the Camino Socks collection on the forum shop
Learn how to Get "Camino Ready " 2nd Edition. In English, Spanish, German and Korean

rubyslippers

Ruby Slippers
Year of past OR future Camino
April-May (2008) September (2012)
Tia Valeria said:
grayland said:
I am not ever sure just what type of shoes people are talking about when they say "boots"

Here is the women's version of the shoe I wear now on the Camino: (Keen Targhee)
http://www.rei.com/product/772566/keen- ... erralID=NA

There are other great brands...but this is the basic type shoe I see most people wearing.
Useful link, thanks. Our boots look as though they are just a little deeper and they are waterproofed leather; Hi-Tec made in the UK.



We take Crocs for wearing indoors and a change of footwear when needed

What they said! :)

I have the Hi Tech and would never try it in trail shoes. nothing less that what is shown in this photo. when you are carrying weight on your back it will make hamburger out of your feet. They MUST be water proof. the Hi Tech boots are beautiful!
 

Rupe

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino France Aug - Sept 2016
Portugal May 2018
I would advise just taking your walking shoes/boots that you decide on and a pair of shoes for afternoon/night after walking. Many people take tevas or other sandals that they can also walk in...or just something like crocs to walk around town and the albergue. They are great to shower in. Two pair of walking shoes/boots would, in my opinion, be over the top.
I wonder how many St. James had?
 

Did not find what you were looking for? Search here

Popular Resources

“All” Albergues on the Camino Frances in one pdf ivar
  • Featured
“All” Albergues on the Camino Frances in one pdf
4.95 star(s) 100 ratings
Downloads
15,076
Updated
A selection of favorite albergues on the Camino Francés Ton van Tilburg
Favorite Albergues along the Camino Frances
4.83 star(s) 35 ratings
Downloads
7,726
Updated
Profile maps of all 34 stages of the Camino Frances ivar
Profile maps of all 34 stages of the Camino Frances
4.88 star(s) 24 ratings
Downloads
7,569
Updated

Similar threads

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Updates on YouTube

Camino Conversations

Most downloaded Resources

Top