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I Want To Do The Camino Slowly, In Short Stages, Is This Possible???

Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2018)
#1
I want to do the Camino a bit more slowly than most people do it, to walk shorter daily distances. Are there other stages on the journey where you can stop? It seems there are days when people walk upwards of 30km. I think that is too much for me. I am 55 years old and want to walk shorter distances and be a bit more relaxed about it. Do you think this is possible???
 

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#2
Anything is possible Dee. I am ten years older and distance is only what you prepare and train for. For most stages, I am told that the distance between albergues is about 4 km. From experience, this may start happening after Roncesvalles.

If you are prepared to sleep outside with a bivy and sleeping bag, stop when your body tells you to.

Looking at this, most people move along at about 5 km per hour. There is no rule requiring anyone to stick to that or only stop where there is a bar, mercado, albergue etc. Always take it at your own pace. It is not a race, though some would lead you to believe it. It is a pilgrimage, full of com=ntemplayion and hopefully, revelation.
 

Jun Meng

The Only Way I know
Camino(s) past & future
VLDP Spring, 2016
#3
I want to do the Camino a bit more slowly than most people do it, to walk shorter daily distances. Are there other stages on the journey where you can stop? It seems there are days when people walk upwards of 30km. I think that is too much for me. I am 55 years old and want to walk shorter distances and be a bit more relaxed about it. Do you think this is possible???
Don't walk via de La plata then.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés Sept. 2017
Camino Portugués Apr-May 2019
#4
Walk at your own pace and take your time. I don't understand why some people walk so far and so fast....There is too much to enjoy and too many wonderful people to meet. There are plenty of places to stop. Check out gronze.com; it lists the lodging at usual stages but also every town/village/city in between. Just click on a place that interests you.
I did my Camino last year when I turned 62. You will be fine. I saw many people younger than me who had problems with their knees, feet, back, etc. I believe that may have been due in part to the reasons I stated above.
Buen Camino.
 

C clearly

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
#5
most people move along at about 5 km per hour
Hmmm. I guess I'm not most people. When I walk briskly at home, on flat sidewalk, with no significant weight on my back, I walk about 5 km per hour. On the camino with backpack, on good surfaces, I average 4 km/h while walking. Then when I count in a few short breaks, etc, and bad surfaces, I find that 3 km/hour is what I can do over the day. So I'd say that 3 km/h is a better planning number.
I want to do the Camino a bit more slowly than most people do it
Many people take 6 weeks to walk the Camino Frances. You should get a guide book or look at the route online. You'll see that for most of the route, there are villages or towns every 5-10 km. The guide will indicate that most of them have pilgrim accommodation, at least from April to October. The longest stretch without accommodation is about 17 km after Carrion de los Condes. So, there is nothing to stop you from crossing Spain on the Camino Frances as slowly as you like, without having to sleep outside.
 

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Sailor

Donante Vitalicio
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Sin Fin
#6
I want to do the Camino a bit more slowly than most people do it, to walk shorter daily distances. Are there other stages on the journey where you can stop? It seems there are days when people walk upwards of 30km. I think that is too much for me. I am 55 years old and want to walk shorter distances and be a bit more relaxed about it. Do you think this is possible???
Plenty of short distances to walk, you do not have to walk the full stages listed on the Brierley guide, check the link for planning purposes. Ánimo! La luz de Dios alumbra su camino.

Link to your short stages planner: https://godesalco.com/plan/frances
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2018)
#7
Hmmm. I guess I'm not most people. When I walk briskly at home, on flat sidewalk, with no significant weight on my back, I walk about 5 km per hour. On the camino with backpack, on good surfaces, I average 4 km/h while walking. Then when I count in a few short breaks, etc, and bad surfaces, I find that 3 km/hour is what I can do over the day. So I'd say that 3 km/h is a better planning number.

Many people take 6 weeks to walk the Camino Frances. You should get a guide book or look at the route online. You'll see that for most of the route, there are villages or towns every 5-10 km. The guide will indicate that most of them have pilgrim accommodation, at least from April to October. The longest stretch without accommodation is about 17 km after Carrion de los Condes. So, there is nothing to stop you from crossing Spain on the Camino Frances as slowly as you like, without having to sleep outside.
Thank you, that is very reassuring.
 

Robo

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
Alone.
------------------------------
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
with my wife Pat.
------------------------------
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
together again :-)
#8
I'm with @C clearly . Over 2 Caminos so far my average speed is 3 kms per hour. Including breaks.
And I take breaks at least every 2 hours. I stop a lot to take photos and enjoy the views, go into churches etc.

I have found my comfortable distance to be up to 25 kms in a day. But I average 20 kms a day. I take shorter days if needed and take 2 or 3 full days off along the way.

So Yes, you can walk slower and you can walk shorter distances. As @C clearly mentions, the longest section between vilages is 17 kms. Mostly it is a lot less. Just take a look at the Gronze site. That will reassure you. ;)

https://www.gronze.com/camino-frances

P.S. I am staggered by the speeds and daily distances some members here talk about ;);)
They must spend every day at the gym or be half mountain goat :eek::eek:
But they tend to be the minority once you get 'out there'.

I know I walk slowly, but most pilgrims I met only walked a little faster than I do. So maybe averaging up to 4 kph including breaks......

On one day, I averaged 5 kph including breaks. It was a shorter day, only 15 kms, and I felt a bit down and just wanted a good 'work out'. It felt like a Military 'speed march' at times, of which I have done plenty......
 
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Robo

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
Alone.
------------------------------
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
with my wife Pat.
------------------------------
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
together again :-)
#9
I want to do the Camino a bit more slowly than most people do it, to walk shorter daily distances. Are there other stages on the journey where you can stop? It seems there are days when people walk upwards of 30km. I think that is too much for me. I am 55 years old and want to walk shorter distances and be a bit more relaxed about it. Do you think this is possible???
By the way. I did my fist CF at age 57/58 and took 40 days.
This year at age 60/61 (I enjoy my Birthday on Camino) we'll take about 50 days.
It's not a race ;);)
 

RJM

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times, but soon again I hope....
#10
Yes, very much possible to walk all the way from Saint Jean to Santiago doing around 10 km a day. As said get one of the guidebooks that details all the towns and accommodations.
There is only one stretch I remember on the Frances where you would have to walk a longer distance. Carrion de los Condes to Los Templarios.
 

Sailor

Donante Vitalicio
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Sin Fin
#11
True, after Carrion de los Condes the next albergue is in Calzadilla de la Cueza, about 17 kilometers away. But, there is bus transportation from Carrion de los Condes all the way to Leon, stops in Calzadilla de la Cueza and at Terradillos de los Templarios, so, you have some options. Animo! La luz de Dios alumbra su camino.
 

Bala

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (SJPdP-Burgos, 2015)
Camino Frances (Burgos-Sarria, 2018)
Sarria-Santiago (fall 2018)
#12
Welcome to the forum, Dee. I'm another 3-4 kph walker. As others say, yes, definitely, on the Camino Francés the infastructure is well in place to do short distances on a pretty regular basis. You can take as long as you like. And go as slow as you like.

As for myself, I'm walking the Francés in stages, going back for round 2 in April. I originally planned for 32 days from Burgos to Santiago, about 500 kilometers. But based on my training walks at home, and my experience first time out, I've downscaled to making Sarria (~380km) my target finish. So about 10-12 kilometers per day.

I did the so-called Brierley stages from SJPP to Burgos 2 years ago, covering about 200 kilometers over 12 days. Those distances were not a pleasant experience for me. In fact, they were decidedly unpleasant! So I see no need to try to repeat them. And with so many wonderful places to see and stop along the way, why would I want to?

So figure what works for you, and then be prepared to adjust for slower or faster once you start walking! All the best, and happy planning.
 

trecile

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Aug-Sept(2016) SJPDP-Finisterre, July-Aug(2017) SJPDP-Muxia-Finisterre, July-Aug(2018) El Norte
#13
I met a guy last year who planned to take it really slow, and had his stages planned for a 60 day Camino. He ended up doing it faster - in about 45 days, because he was ending up with too much downtime in tiny villages with nothing much to do
 

GettingThere

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Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Roncesvalles-SdC Apr-Jun 2015
Roncesvalles-Sarria Sep-Oct 2017
#14
I walked most of the Camino Frances in 2015 and 2017 with my mother - she was almost 82 on the second walk. Our first walk we averaged around 12-15km per day, the second we were slower at around 10-15km. We had no difficulty finding accommodation at those distances. The occasional stretch that was too far or tough for her we took a taxi or bus. I cannot imagine ever being able (or wishing) to walk 30km a day! The people I came across on the Camino who were really suffering or injured were invariably those who had tried to walk too far (for them), too fast or were carrying too heavy a pack. You just work out what works for you, according to how much time you have, your own fitness level and what you want from this walk.

Buen (slow!) Camino
 

Seabird

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF April/May (2016), starting in St. Palais, France
#16
I spent 49 days to walk the CF, including the extra two days to walk into SJPdP. I planned on an average of about 17 km a day, with five extra days built in. I needed every one of them to rest and enjoy the journey. next time I want to plan on about 55 days. So take the time you need!
 

L. J.

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2018
#17
I want to do the Camino a bit more slowly than most people do it, to walk shorter daily distances. Are there other stages on the journey where you can stop? It seems there are days when people walk upwards of 30km. I think that is too much for me. I am 55 years old and want to walk shorter distances and be a bit more relaxed about it. Do you think this is possible???
I want to walk slower also. All these responses kind of scare me! Most people talk about walking 3 miles an hour. I walk closer to 2 miles an hour. I'm not sure how well I'm going to do when my husband and I go this Fall. He's already been once and walks much faster than I do.
 

GettingThere

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Roncesvalles-SdC Apr-Jun 2015
Roncesvalles-Sarria Sep-Oct 2017
#18
I want to walk slower also. All these responses kind of scare me! Most people talk about walking 3 miles an hour. I walk closer to 2 miles an hour. I'm not sure how well I'm going to do when my husband and I go this Fall. He's already been once and walks much faster than I do.
If you have another look at the posts above you'll find they are talking about kilometers (km) not miles. It makes quite a difference! Don't worry - you'll be fine.

A faster companion is quite common too - it's important not to try to match his pace as that's how injuries can happen. Let him stride on ahead and then agree to meet up at the next stop, or he could just wait for you every so often.
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata.
#19
@L.J. welcome to the forum - and don't worry about your fast walking husband. Mine also walks much faster than me. I let him go ahead so we both walk at our own pace. The the nice thing about the Camino is that it is a linear path, so when I arrive at the next village, there he is, at the first coffee shop, waiting for me.
 

Robo

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
Alone.
------------------------------
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
with my wife Pat.
------------------------------
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
together again :-)
#20
I want to walk slower also. All these responses kind of scare me! Most people talk about walking 3 miles an hour. I walk closer to 2 miles an hour. I'm not sure how well I'm going to do when my husband and I go this Fall. He's already been once and walks much faster than I do.
Don't be scared.

My 3 kph = 1.86 mph ;);)

My wife walks even slower than me. We don't actually walk 'together'.
I'll stop to take photos and maybe she will keep going.
Or I'll want to go fast up a hill to get it 'done' and she'll take her time.

We generally keep each other in sight though.
And we each carry a phone.........

And worst case scenario, one of us will just wait for the other to catch up.
 
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Rick of Rick and Peg

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2015
#21
Our guide book had the route divided into 33 stages but it took us 48 days of walking to complete the Camino Frances (with an additional 10 days of touring, resting and recovery.) We averaged 16 km (10 miles) per walking day with our shortest day being not quite 6 km and we had a few long days of about 22 km. We were in our mid 60s. I can only remember us passing one person who was walking in all that time.
 

Iriebabel

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Start Walk SJPDP 1 April 2018
#22
Bad knees and 50 year old injured bones so I planned for 45 days, this can be more or less. I am prepared to change my reservations if I want to take additional time. Who knows I may even finish early it will be all up to how I feel day to day.
I have been to Spain several times but never in the north so I plan to explore as much as I can, take photos and bask in the glow of the camino, lovely cafe con leches and lovely Spain and it’s people.

I understand that some people are competitive or have limited time to walk but I cannot understand a reason for not taking time to take it all in. All in all to each his own but I don’t want it to be a blur in my memory.

3 weeks to go and getting excited
 

M. Oliver

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016
#23
They call the Camino "the way" but as a wise couple from San Francisco said to me during my 2016 hike, it should be called "your way". You should walk the Camino at whatever pace is comfortable for you. It took me about four weeks, from June to early-July. I rested longer when I wanted/needed to and walked a little more when I felt like I could. I arrived in Santiago with no blisters anywhere! Be sure to outfit your feet with comfortable hiking boots that you have broken in well before you leave for the Camino.
 

J F Gregory

Preparing for the Norte
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
March-April,2016 finished
October- November 2018 to walk the Del Norte.
#24
I know a couple who only has 2 weeks holiday per year. The completed their Camino in 3 years. It is individual.
 

Bodi

New Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP to Najera Sept. 2017; Sarria to SdC Sept. 2018
#25
I walked part of the Camino in 2017 at age 59. Unfortunately, I pulled a muscle in my back early on, so I could only walk at most 10km per day. It was easy to find accommodation every night. I actually sent a bag ahead every morning using the wonderful transport services. Eventually, I was able to increase my distance to around 15 - 18 km per day. I made lots of stops every day and visited churches and other sights along the way. Just do the Camino at your own pace!
 

jmcarp

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2013
Camino del Norte a Chimayó (USA), 2015
Camino Portugues, 2017
#26
My wife and I (both in our early 70's) average approximately 20 km (12.4 mi) per day, averaging about 3 km/hr when taking into account rest stops, varying terrain, etc. If you're going to do the Camino Francés, see https://www.caminoguidebook.com/plan/fast-and-slow-itineraries and scroll down the page to "'Slow' Camino Frances: 40 Days". While we did not follow this itinerary exactly, it served as a good starting point for planning.
 

Joziane

Lifes` moments, memories & aspirations....
Camino(s) past & future
(2017) Cam.Frances May 17-July2
#27
The beauty of the Camino is there are no rules while walking. You do whatever you wish at your pace. No one will judge. It is your journey....enjoy it.
 
#28
Try not to get too caught up on the stages - those are just the authors of the guidebooks' way of breaking up the journey. There's nothing magical about those stages. Some people follow the stages religiously, but you don't have to. Especially on the Camino Frances, there are tons of options between stages. Some of the less popular Caminos will have fewer options though. I have the Bierley Guide, and he gives lots of information about places between his stages. Other guides are similar. Just look through the maps and see the options.

I averaged 4km/h the whole Camino - there are plenty of "slower" walkers. Don't worry. It won't seem like it when you are walking because you'll see people passing you - what you don't see are all the people ahead and behind that are walking along at your same pace.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2018)
#29
I want to walk slower also. All these responses kind of scare me! Most people talk about walking 3 miles an hour. I walk closer to 2 miles an hour. I'm not sure how well I'm going to do when my husband and I go this Fall. He's already been once and walks much faster than I do.
Then I would have a serious talk with your husband, and make it be known to him you are going to walk slowly. I am also a slow walker, and have had unpleasant walking experiences with folk who see it as some sort of race. Now, I stand my ground. I trust you will stand yours!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Spring of 2018.
#31
I'll be starting in May and the only person's speed I'm worried about is mine. I spent three months in Belize last year and the motto on Caye Caulker is "go slow like the turtle." I haven't been in a hurry since!
 

tpmchugh

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013)
Camino Frances (2015)
#32
I want to do the Camino a bit more slowly than most people do it, to walk shorter daily distances. Are there other stages on the journey where you can stop? It seems there are days when people walk upwards of 30km. I think that is too much for me. I am 55 years old and want to walk shorter distances and be a bit more relaxed about it. Do you think this is possible???
Very very possible. I like to take it a bit slower and my maximum in any one day was 23 km. Remember one day walking into Lorca after about 8.5 km. I got chatting to the young Korean girl who was joint owner with her Spanish husband and on the spur of the moment, I decided to stay. Walked from San Anton to San Nicholas albergue and once again, it seemed a good idea to stop short. On the reverse, stopped in Virgen del Camino and on the spur of the moment again, I decided to walk on towards Villadangas. Just a pity you are not starting with me in April. We could 'saunter along' like two old tortoises and enjoy the sights sounds and smells at our leisure :)
 
#33
Then I would have a serious talk with your husband, and make it be known to him you are going to walk slowly. I am also a slow walker, and have had unpleasant walking experiences with folk who see it as some sort of race.
Absolutely. People can injure themselves trying to keep up with a fast walker. At the very least, it's no fun trying to walk faster than you are comfortable walking and doing so interrupts your natural flow and prevents the brain from the free-form thinking that creates Camino magic.

I know people who walk the Camino together but have different paces - the ones who do it most successfully will walk together sometimes, letting the slower person set the pace, and walk seperately other times, meeting up along the way or at an agreed upon point at the end of the day. It can help to each have a phone so you can at least text each other to coordinate.
 

Nate Bissonette

Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria to Santiago May 2018
#34
Mark McCarthy recently posted an excellent resource on a different thread. Search "Sarria to Santiago in Very Short Stages." I'm hoping to walk it in May.
 
Camino(s) past & future
I plan to leave South Africa on 15 September and return on 14 October 2018.
#35
I am enjoying the comments here! I am doing my first Camino in September and I have 30 days! I will be close to 78 and now during my training I average 17kms. I am not concerned. One step at a time!
By the way. I did my fist CF at age 57/58 and took 40 days.
This year at age 60/61 (I enjoy my Birthday on Camino) we'll take about 50 days.
It's not a race ;);)
 

John H.

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF - April/May 2017
CP - Sept./2017
C? - Soon, I hope!
#36
I want to do the Camino a bit more slowly than most people do it, to walk shorter daily distances. Are there other stages on the journey where you can stop? . . . Do you think this is possible???
Absolutely possible and possibly very fun. Last year I walked the CF in 26 days (avg. 31 kms per day). On my last night I met a lovely couple from Holland that were taking a lot more time. They had taken 61 days (avg. 13 kms per day) and seemed to be having just as much fun as I did. Each of us enjoyed the community of people we met along the way, regardless of the pace. Everyone walks their own Camino.

I recall there is only 1 day where the distance between towns is 17 kms, starting from Carrion de los Condes. The walk is very flat and follows a road much of the way. If that is too much for you, take a taxi for the first 5 kms. Perhaps the first day from St Jean PdP is a long one but you can break that in tow, walk the valley route or just start in Roncesvalles or Pamplona like many people do.

Don't spend too much time thinking about it and certainly do not worry. Just go if this interests you. Have a great trip!
 
#37
A good guide for slower walks on Camino Frances is
“Lightfoot Guide to Slackpacking the Camino Frances”
Book by Sylvia Nilsen
She provides three different paced walks with suggested alburgies and small hotels, pensions. Buen Camino
 

zrexer

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2014, 15 & 16 Camino Frances
2017 Camino Portuguese
2018 Camino Primitivo (Sept.)
#38
I know a couple who only has 2 weeks holiday per year. The completed their Camino in 3 years. It is individual.
We did the same thing. In 2014 my wife and I were still both working and neither of us were able to take all of our holidays in one stretch, so we broke the Camino Iinto three parts.
When we went in 2014 we had no idea at that point we would ever return, so wanting to get to Santiago in our first year we started at Ponferrada and walked for 9 days.
Upon returning home we both realized that we had loved the experience so much we wished to return. So in 2015 we walked from Burgos to Ponferrada.
And in 2016 we started in St.Jean and walked to Burgos. We then jumped on a bus to Sarria and walked the last 5 days again into Santiago, but with different overnight spots to make it fresh.
If we wanted to do it all in one stretch we would still be home thinking about it. I have retired, but my wife is still working so 5 weeks in a row is still an issue for us.

Regarding your walking pace you will probably find after abut 10 days you will be capable of longer days with the conditioning you pick up. But never walk faster than you feel comfortable at as this inevitably leads to injuries.
 

movinmaggie

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015) Scotland GGW (2017) Primitivo (2018) if all vital signs working
#39
I walked most of the Camino Frances in 2015 and 2017 with my mother - she was almost 82 on the second walk. Our first walk we averaged around 12-15km per day, the second we were slower at around 10-15km. We had no difficulty finding accommodation at those distances. The occasional stretch that was too far or tough for her we took a taxi or bus. I cannot imagine ever being able (or wishing) to walk 30km a day! The people I came across on the Camino who were really suffering or injured were invariably those who had tried to walk too far (for them), too fast or were carrying too heavy a pack. You just work out what works for you, according to how much time you have, your own fitness level and what you want from this walk.

Buen (slow!) Camino
I too walked the CF in 2015 for my 80th birthday. I passed 2o an 30 yr olds who had to quit due to knee splints and infected blisters. In both cases, they were racing to get to the next Albergue for a bed.....
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (Oct 2017)
#40
I would just recommend that you book your lodging (one day) ahead if you know you want to limit your kilometers - especially if the next distance between towns is further additional kms than you want/are able to walk that day. My longest day was one where the albergue I planned to stay in was closed (I would have known this if I had booked!) and I had to keep going, to the chagrin of my miserable feet.
 

Albertagirl

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Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Ch. d'Arles: Oloron Ste Marie to Aragones; Frances (2016); V.d.l.P.; Sanabres (2017)
#41

Thornley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances [08 ]Portuguese [09 ]Le Puy[10] Norte[ 11] Madrid [12] Figeac - Pamplona [13] Mont Saint Michel - Bordeaux / St Palais - Pamplona [14] Moissac -Burgos [15] , Norte to Oviedo and then Primitivo [16]
Le Puy to Moissac and Dax to Santo Domingo
#42
I want to do the Camino a bit more slowly than most people do it, to walk shorter daily distances. Are there other stages on the journey where you can stop? It seems there are days when people walk upwards of 30km. I think that is too much for me. I am 55 years old and want to walk shorter distances and be a bit more relaxed about it. Do you think this is possible???
On our second Camino we deliberately took 45 days , it was magical.
 

VNwalking

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2014, 2015)
St Olav/Francés (2016)
Baztanés/Francés (2017)
Ingles (July 2018)
#43
Of course. Stages are not set in stone. Go as far as you comfortably can each day and it adds up - on the Frances accommodation is spaced at roughly 5km intervals.
It looks like this (by the Aussie genius Leunig~)
Leunig.PNG
 

Oravasaari

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP to Fistera (2015), Leon to Fistera (2016), CF, Salvadore, Primitivo (2017), CF run/walk 2018
#44
I met a guy last year who planned to take it really slow, and had his stages planned for a 60 day Camino. He ended up doing it faster - in about 45 days, because he was ending up with too much downtime in tiny villages with nothing much to do
Did my first 3 caminos super fast at 30km plus average per day and originally planned to try the Via de la Plata this year. But I now plan to do a 20 km per day max Camino Frances (again) Instead, from Pamplona or Logrono because I need to maintain my half marathon training whilst on the walk! 20km max days gives lots options on the CF! I'll walk 15-20 km then go for a training run (5/8/10/12 km) around destination village or even back down the camino route, out and back.

There's a good planning tool on godesalco.com (planificator) that allows you to select stopping points, calculates stage distance and shows how many accommodation options there are at each village/town. Someone else mentioned above that the max distance without sny stopping points is 17km just after Carrion de Los Condes. On most other sections you will be spoiled for choice and can pretty much call it a day whenever you've had enough.

Enjoy your planning!
 

anacheka

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
April 20-June 8 2017
#45
I agree with everyone who has pointed out that walking the Camino at your own pace is very possible. I would like to add to the conversation a couple of things that I learned when I did the Camino last year at a slower pace than most. When you walk shorter distances you often arrive in town before the albergues are open (they tend to open between 12-2). That's not a problem -- it just leaves you with some time to fill. Also, while there are many wonderful people to meet & walk with, my experience was that everyone we met ultimately passed us. This was humbling and a lesson in letting go of ego. Walking more slowly is luxurious -- no rush, ability to really enjoy each place, long siesta every afternoon, & we often got first choice of the beds and albergues (I only once had a top bunk).
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Ch. d'Arles: Oloron Ste Marie to Aragones; Frances (2016); V.d.l.P.; Sanabres (2017)
#46
I would like to share my personal experience on my first camino. I planned it to be a leisurely walk, comfortable distances each day and a day off each week. But my body wanted to move faster after the first few days and I never took a weekly day off. Result: there I am in Santiago with almost two weeks left before my flight home. I stayed in Santiago for six days, although I really only wanted three, then bused to Muxia and Finesterre for three unplanned days in each. This did not work for me. I was restless to go home, and staying in tourist accommodation instead of albergues quickly got expensive. Now I realize that I could have asked for a bed in the dorm at private albergues, but I was tired of sleeping in a dorm.
On reflection, this was not bad planning, simply allowing extra time since I did not know initially how long I would need to walk and my return air ticket was not flexible. For later caminos, I have estimated 20 km a day, with very little time off (50 days walking and one day off on the VdlP, plus a few days in Santiago at the end). This works for me. The moral of this story: walk your own pace. If you live in Europe and have a flexible schedule, it might be desirable not to book a return ticket, at least for your first camino, when you are learning what works for you. Assuming that the more time you have on camino, the better, is not always ideal.
 

Thornley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances [08 ]Portuguese [09 ]Le Puy[10] Norte[ 11] Madrid [12] Figeac - Pamplona [13] Mont Saint Michel - Bordeaux / St Palais - Pamplona [14] Moissac -Burgos [15] , Norte to Oviedo and then Primitivo [16]
Le Puy to Moissac and Dax to Santo Domingo
#47
Walking more slowly is luxurious -- no rush, ability to really enjoy each place, long siesta every afternoon, & we often got first choice of the beds
Sums it all up , well said
 

hecate105

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2009 Portuguese 2009 Estellas, 2014 Aurelia, 2016 St Davids, 2017 Via Augusta/V dl P
#48
Always go at your own pace...I usually cycle, but so slowly that I get a family of camino walkers for maybe a week at a time.. It makes them feel SO good when they get to the albergue before me...:rolleyes:;)
 

kirkie

Pilgrim
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
#49
I too walked the CF in 2015 for my 80th birthday. I passed 2o an 30 yr olds who had to quit due to knee splints and infected blisters. In both cases, they were racing to get to the next Albergue for a bed.....
Way to go! I am not sure where that phrase came from, but just want to say it to you, Maggie! Well done!
 

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